T h e arabs f r o m t h e e a r L i e s t t I m e s t o t h e p r e s e n t


Download 7.19 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet4/119
Sana15.03.2020
Hajmi7.19 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   119

V year, but in summer-time the region is  v o i d of the breath of life. 

> Before Bertram  T h o m a s ' no  E u r o p e a n  e v e r ventured to cross 



' rt'^ 1'  ^ ' • ^ w Acrfsi tit £m?tj> Quarter if AraMa  ( N e w V ork, 1932). 

A R A B I A 

Land surface features 

EnElrah Miles 

o 50 too

 300 

Cultivated land, and 

available for cultivation 

A P 

1

 C A 

7  ' ^ " ^ 

KBKry V

«a

=r

 tU

.tt» 

CH n , >  T H E  A R A B I A N  P E N I N S U L A '

 i? 

al-Rab' al-KJia!i,  " n o  m a n ' s  l a n d "  o f  A r a b i a .  A r a b i a n  A m e r i c a n 

Oil  C o m p a n y .marked its 2^0,000  s q u a r e miles on its  m a p s . 

Thomas crossed it in fifty-eight  d a y s from  t h e  A r a b i a n  S e a to 

* the Persian Gulf, encountered  t h e  p h e n o m e n o n of  s i n g i n g  s a n d s 

and discovered a  " l a k e of salt  w a t e r " , in reality an  a r m of the 

Pcrsian'-Gulf in the south of  Q a t a r .  U n t i l then  o u r  k n o w l e d g e 

o f the dreaded and mysterious  w a s t e  o f  S o u t h  A r a b i a  w a s  n o 

more than that of the tenth-century  g e o g r a p h e r s . 

3.  A l - l ^ a r r a h , a surface of  c o r r u g a t e d and fissured  l a v a s 

overlying sandstone.  V o l c a n i c tracts  o f this  t y p e  a b o u n d  i n  t h e 

western and central regions of the  p e n i n s u l a  a n d  e x t e n d  n o r t h 

as far as eastern  H a w r a n .  Y a q u t ' lists no less  t h a n thirty  s u c h 

Harrahs.  T h e last  v o l c a n i c eruption reported  b y  a n  A r a b  h i s -

torian took place in  A . D . 1256. 

Within tWs  r i n g of desert and steppe lies an elevated core, 

Najd, the  W a h h a b i l a n d .  I n  N a j d  t h e limestone  h a s  l o n g  b e e n 

generally exposed; here and there  a r e  o c c a s i o n a l strips of  s a n d . 

M t . Shammar consists  o f granite and basalt  r o c k . 

A r a b i a is one of the driest and hottest of countries.  T h o u g h Cl 

sandwiched between seas on the east and  w e s t , those bodies  o f " " 

water are too narrow to  b r e a k the  c l i m a t i c continuity of  t h e 

Africo-ASian rainless continental masses.  T h e  o c e a n  o n  t h e  s o u t h , 

to' be sure, does  b r i n g rains,  b u t the  s i m o o m (samutn)  w h i c h 

seasonally lashes the land leaves  v e r y little  m o i s t u r e for  t h e  i n -

terior.  T h e  b r a c i n g  a n d delightful east  w i n d (al-sabd)  h a s  a l w a y s 

provided a favourite  t h e m e for  A r a b i a n poets. 

In al-Ij[ijaz,  t h e birthplace of Islam, seasons of  d r o u g h t  e x t e n d -

ing possibly over a period of tliree or  m o r e  y e a r s  a r e  n o t  u n -

known. Rainstorms of short duration and  e x t r a o r d i n a r y  v i o l e n c e 

may strike  M a k k a h and  a l - M a d i n a h  a n d  o c c a s i o n a l l y threaten 

to overthrow the  K a ' b a h ;  a l - B a l a d h u r i * devotes a  w h o l e  c h a p t e r 

to the floods (stiyiil)  o f  M a k k a h .  S u b s e q u e n t  t o these rains tlie 

hardj^ pastoral flora of the desert  m a k e s its  a p p e a r a n c e . In north-

ern al-I.Iijaz the isolated oases, the largest  c o v e r i n g an area of 

some ten square miles, are  t h e  o n l y  s u p p o r t of settled life.  F i v e -

sixths of the population of  a l - y i j a z is  n o m a d i c .  C e r t a i n oases, 

such as  F a d a k (now al-Ha*it),  w h i c h figured in early  I s l a m ,  a r e 

' 1


 ^"'•'^f' ctBumn, cd F WOstenfeld (Lcipsig, 1866-73), '"dex 

al-BuldSn, cd dc Goeje (Leyden, t866), pp. 53-5; tr, Philip K Hitti. 

Vn^ns ef Ike hhmc State (Ne«- York, igt6. reprint Beirut, 1966), pp. S2-4. 

1 8  T H E  P R E - I S L A M I C  A G E  P A R T 1 

today of no significance.  M o s t of these fertile tracts were culti-

vated at the time of the Prophet by Jews.  T h e mean annual 

temperature in the IJijaz lowland is nearer 90° than 80° F.  A l -

M a d l n a h , with a mean temperature of little over 70° F., is more 

healthful than its sister to the south,  M a k k a h . 

Only in  a l - Y a m a n and  ' A s i r are there sufficient periodic rains 

to warrant a systematic cultivation of the soil. Perennial vegeta-

tion is here found in favoured valleys to a distance of about two 

hundred miles from the coast.  S a n ' a ' , the  m o d e m capital of al-

Y a m a n , is over 7000 feet above the sea and therefore one of the 

healthiest and most beautiful towns of the peninsula. Other 

fertile but not continuous tracts are found on the coast.  T h e 

surface of tJadramawt is marked by deeply sunk valleys where 

water is abundant in the subsoil.  ' U m a n , the easternmost pro-

vince, receives a fair supply of rain. Especially hot  a n d humid are 

Juddah (Jedda),  a l - l j u d a y d a h (Hodeida) and  M a s q a t (Muscat). 

A r a b i a cannot boast a single river of significance which flows 

perennially and reaches the sea. None of its streams are navi-

g a b l e . In place of a system of rivers it has a network of %vadis 

which carry  a w a y such floods as occur. These wadis serve 

another purpose: they determine the routes for the caravans and 

the pilgrimages. Since the rise of Islam the pilgrimages have 

formed the principal link between  A r a b i a and the outer world. 

T h e chief land routes are from Mesopotamia, by  w a y of Buray-

dah in Najd, follo\ving the  W a d i al-Rummah, and from Syria, 

passing through  W a d i al-Sirhan and skirting the  R e d  S e a coast. 

T h e intrapeninsular routes are either coastal, fringing nearly 

the whole peninsula, or transpeninsular, running from south-

west to north-east through the central oases and avoiding the 

stretch beUveen, namely, the  V a c a n t Quarter. ^ 

T h e tenth-century geographer al-Istakhri^ speaks of only one 

place in al-^Jijaz, the mountain near al-Ta'if, where water freezes. 

A l - H a m d a n i * refers to frozen water in  S a n ' a ' . To these places 

Glaser^ adds  M t . IJadur  a l - S h a y k h , in  a l - Y a m a n , where snow 

tails almost every winter. Frost is more widespread. 



H

  T h e dryness of the atmosphere and the salinity of the soil 



Masdhk aUMamShk, cd. At Goeje (Leyden, 1870), p. 19, U. 12-13. 

- Al-IklU, Bk. VIII, ed. Nabih A. Fans (Princeton, 1940), p. 7; see also Nazih 

M, al-'A?m, Si^hh fi BtlSd al-'Arab aUSa'idah (Cairo, 1937?), pt.  I , p. n8. 

' In  A . Petcrmann, Mtttnlungtn mts/ustui Perthu geograpkischer Ansialt, 

«ol. 32 (Gotha, 1886), p. 43. 

C H . n ^<

 '

  T H E  A R A B I A N  P E N I N S U L A 19 

militate against the  p o s s i b i h t y o f  a n y  l u x u r i a n t  g r o \ v t h .  A l - I l i j a z 

i s  r i c h  i n dates.  W h e a t  g r o w s  i n  a l - Y a m a n  a n d  c e r t a i n oases. 

Barley is cultivated for horees.  M i l l e t (dJnirah)  g r o w s in certain 

regions, and rice  i n  ' U m a n and  a l - y a s a .  O n the  h i g h l a n d s parallel 

to the southem coast,  a n d  p a r t i c u l a r l y in  M a h r a h , the  f r a n k i n -

cense tree,  w h i c h figured  p r o m i n e n t l y in the  e a r l y  c o m m e r c i a l life 

of South  A r a b i a , still flourishes. A characteristic  p r o d u c t of  ' A s i r 

i s gum-arabic.  T h e coiice plant, for  w h i c h  a l - Y a m a n  i s  n o w 

famous,  w a s introduced into  S o u t h  A r a b i a  i n the fourteenth  c e n -

tury  f i - o m  A b y s s i n i a .  T h e earliest reference  t o this  " w i n e  o f  I s l a m " 

is in the writings of the sixteenth  c e n t u r y . '  T h e earliest  k n o w n 

mention of coffee by a  E u r o p e a n  w r i t e r  w a s in  1 5 8 5 . 

O f the trees  o f the desert several species  o f  a c a c i a ,  i n c l u d i n g 



 (tamarisk) and ghada,  w h i c h  g i v e s  e x c e l l e n t  c h a r c o a l ,  a r e 

found.  A n o t h e r species, talk, yields  g u m - a r a b i c .  T h e desert also 

produces samh, the  g r a i n s of  w h i c h  g i v e a flour used for  p o r r i d g e , 

and the eagerly  s o u g h t truffle  a n d  s e n n a (al-sana). 

A m o n g the domestic plants  t h e  g r a p e - v i n e ,  i n t r o d u c e d  f r o m 

Syria after the fourth  C h r i s t i a n century, is  w e l l represented in 



al-Ta'if, and yields  t h e alcoholic  b e v e r a g e styled nabtdh al-

zabih.  T h e  w i n e {khamr),  h o w e v e r ,  s u n g by the  A r a b i c poets, 

was the brand  i m p o r t e d firom  y a w r S n and  t h e  L e b a n o n .  T h e 

olive tree, native in  S y r i a , is  u n k n o w n in al-I^Iijaz.  O t h e r  p r o -

ducts of the  A r a b i a n oases  a r e  p o m e g r a n a t e s ,  a p p l e s , apricots, 

almonds, oranges, lemons,  s u g a r - c a n e ,  w a t e r - m e l o n s and  b a n a n a s . 

T h e  N a b a t a e a n s and  J e w s  w e r e  p r o b a b l y  t h e ones responsible 

for the introduction of such fruit trees from  t h e north. 

A m o n g tlie  A r a b i a n flora  t h e  d a t e - p a l m tree is  q u e e n .  I t  b e a r s The date 

the most  c o m m o n  a n d esteemed fruit:  t h e fruit {tamr) parP**™ 

excellence.  T o g e t h e r  w i t h  m i l k  i t  p r o v i d e s  t h e  c h i e f  i t e m  o n tlie 

menu of the  B e d o u i n , and,  e x c e p t for  c a m e l flesh, is his  o n l y solid 

food  * T t s fermented  b e v e r a g e is  t h e  m u c h - s o u g h t nabtdk. Its 

crushed stones furnish the  c a k e s  w h i c h  a r e  t h e  e v e r y d a y  m e a l 

o f the camel.  T o possess  " t h e  t w o  b l a c k  o n e s " (fli-aswaddn), 

i.e. -sv^ter and dates, is the  d r e a m of  e v e r y  B e d o u i n .  T h e  P r o p h e t 

is reported to  h a v e enjoined, "  H o n o u r  y o u r atmt,  t h e  p a l m , 

•which  w a s  m a d e  o f the  s a m e  c l a y  a s  A d a m " . *  A r a b authors list 



' ' See al-Jazin m  d e Sacy, ChmtomBihu: craie, 2nd ed. (Pans, 1826). vol i, 

J Coasuit ibn Quiaybah, 'Utiin al AkhiSr (Cairo, 1930), vol lu, pp 209-13 

Ai-Suyati, ffusn eS-MtihS^areh (Cairo, 1321), vol n, p 255 

20  T H E  P R E - I S L A M I C  A G E  P A R T I 

a hundred varieties of dates in and around al-Madinah. 

Even this queen of  A r a b i a n trees must have been introduced 

from the north, from Mesopotamia, where the palm tree was 

the chief object which attracted early man thither.  T h e Arabic 

vocabulary in Najd and al-Hijaz relating to agriculture, e.g. ba'l 

(watered by rain only),^ akkar (ploughman), etc., indicates bor-

rowing from the northern Semites, particularly the Aramaeans. 



Fauna  T h e animal kingdom is represented  b y panthers (sing, namif), 

leopards (sing, fahd), hyenas, wolves, foxes and lizards (especi-

ally al-dabb).  T h e lion, frequently cited by the ancient poets of 

the peninsula, is now extinct. Monkeys are found in  a l - Y a m a n . 

A m o n g the birds of prey eagles Qucfdb'), bustards {Itubdra, 

houbara), falcons, hawks and owls  m a y be counted. Crows are 

abundant.  T h e most common birds are the hoopoe (hudkud), 

lark, nightingale, pigeon and a species of partridge celebrated 

in  A r a b i c literature under the name al-qata? 

Of domestic animals the principal ones are the camel, the ass, 

the ordinary watch-dog, the greyhound {saluqi), the cat, the 

sheep and the goat.  T h e mule is said to have been introduced 

from  E g y p t after the Hijrah by  M u h a m m a d . 

T h e desert yields locusts, which the Bedouin relishes, especially 

w h e n roasted with salt. Locust plagues are reputed to appear 

every seventh year. Of reptiles the Nufud boasts, by all accounts, 

the horned viper. Lawrence^ speaks with horror of his experience 

with the snakes in  W a d i al-Sirhan. 



The Renowned as it has become in  M o s l e m literature, the horse 

^ ^ l a n nevertheless a late importation into ancient  A r a b i a .  T h i s 

animal, for which Najd is famous, was not known to the early 

Semites. Domesticated in early antiquity somewhere east of the 

Caspian  S e a by nomadic Indo-European herdsmen, it  w a s later 

imported on a large scale by the Kassites and Hittites and 

through them made its  w a y , two millenniums before Christ, into 

Western  A s i a .  F r o m Syria it was introduced before the beginning 

of our era into  A r a b i a , where it had the best opportunity to 

keep its blood pure and free from admixture.  T h e Hyksos passed 

the horse on from Syria into  E g y p t and the  L y d i a n s from Asia 

Minor into Greece, where it was immortalized by Phidias on the 

* See below, p. 97. 

* See R. Memcrtxhagcn, Tht Birds of Aroh'o (Edmbmgb, 1954% 

* T. E. Lawrence, Sezen Ptllars ef Wisdom (New York, 1936), pp, aGg-yo. 


CLIR.tr '  ' T H E  A R A B I A N  P E N I N S U L A it 

Parthenon.,  I n the  E g y p t i a n ,  A s s y r o - B a b y l o n i a n  a n d  e a r l y 

Persian records  t h e  A r a b i a n  a p p e a r s as a  c a m e l e e r ,  n o t as a 

cavalier.  T h e  c a m e l ,  r a t h e r  t h a n  t h e horse,  f i g u r e d  i n  t h e tributes 

exacted  b y the  A s s y r i a n  c o n q u e r o r s from the  " U r b i " . ^  I n 

Xerxes' army, intent  u p o n the  c o n q u e s t  o f  G r e e c e , the  A r a b s 

rode camels.'  S t r a b o , '  p r e s u m a b l y on the authority of his friend 

Aelius Gallus, the  R o m a n  g e n e r a l  w h o  i n v a d e d  A r a b i a  a s late 

as 24  B . C . , denies the existence of the horse in the  p e n i n s u l a . 

Renowned for its  p h y s i c a l  b e a u t y ,  e n d u r a n c e ,  i n t e l l i g e n c e 

and touching devotion to its master,  t h e  A r a b i a n  t h o r o u g h b r e d 

{kuhaylan) is the  e x e m p l a r from  w h i c h all  W e s t e r n  i d e a s  a b o u t 

the good-breeding of horseflesh  h a v e been  d e r i v e d . In the  e i g h t h 

century the  A r a b s introduced  i t into  E u r o p e  t h r o u g h  S p a i n , 

where it left permanent traces in its  B a r b a r y  a n d  A n d a l u s i a n 

descendants.*  D u r i n g the  C r u s a d e s  t h e  E n g l i s h horse  r e c e i v e d 

fresh strains of blood  t h r o u g h  c o n t a c t  w i t h  t h e  A r a b . 

I n  A r a b i a the horse  i s  a n animal  o f  l u x u r y  w h o s e  f e e d i n g  a n d 

care constitutes a  p r o b l e m to the  m a n of  t h e desert. Its possession 

is a presumption of  w e a l t h . Its chief  v a l u e lies in  p r o v i d i n g the 

speed necessary for the success of a  B e d o u i n  r a i d (ghazw). It is 

also used for sports: in tournament (j'artd),  c o u r s i n g  a n d  h u n t i n g . 

I n  a n  A r a b  c a m p today  i n case  o f  s h o r t a g e  o f  w a t e r the children 

might cry for a drink,  b u t  t h e master,  u n m o v e d ,  w o u l d  p o u r 

the last drop into a pail to  s e t before the horse. 

If the horse is  t h e  m o s t  n o b l e of  t h e conquests of  m a n ,  t h e The 

camel is certainly from the  n o m a d ' s  p o i n t of  v i e w the  m o s t 

useful.  W i t h o u t it the desert could not be  c o n c e i v e d of as a 

habitable place.  T h e camel is the  n o m a d ' s nourisher, his vehicle 

o f transportation  a n d his  m e d i u m  o f  e x c h a n g e .  T h e  d o w r y  o f 

the bride, the price  o f blood, the profit  o f mayst'r  ( g a m b l i n g ) , 

the wealth of a  s h e i k h , are all  c o m p u t e d in terms of  c a m e l s . 

tt is the Bedouin's constant  c o m p a n i o n , his alier ego, his foster 

parent. He drinks its  m i l k instead of  w a t e r  ( w h i c h he spares for 

, the cattle); he feasts on its flesh; he covers himself  w i t h its  s k i n ; 

he makes his tent of its hair. Its  d u n g he uses as fuel,  a n d its 

Urine as a hair tonic  a n d medicine. To  h i m the  c a m e l is  m o r e 

than "the ship of the desert"; it is  t h e special gift of  A U a h (cf. 



* Below, pp. 39,  4 , . 

* Heroaottts, Hutari', Bk VII, ch. 86. § 8 

' 1 Browa, TAc Harst of tki Dttcrl  ( N e w York, 1929),  p p . 123 tes-



3 2  T H E PRE-ISLAMIC  A G E  P / R T I 

K o r a n  l 6 : 5-8). To quote a striking phrase of Sprenger,^ the 

Bedouin is "the parasite of the  c a m e l " .  T h e Bedouins of our day 

take delight in referring to themselves as ahl al-ba'ir, the people 

of the camel.  M u s i F states that there is hardly a member of the 

R u w a l a h tribe who has not on some occasion drunk water from 

a camel's paunch. In time of emergency either an old camel is 

killed or a stick is thrust down its throat to  m a k e it vomit water. 

If the camel has been watered within a day or two, the liquid 

is tolerably drinkable.  T h e part which the camel has played in 

the economy of  A r a b i a n life is indicated by the fact that the 

A r a b i c  l a n g u a g e is said to include some one thousand names 

for the camel in its numerous breeds and stages of growth, a 

number rivalled only by the number of synonyms used for the 

sword.  T h e  A r a b i a n camel can go for about twenty-five days 

in winter and about five days in summer without water.  T h e 

camel was a factor in facilitating the early Moslem conquests 

by assuring its masters more mobility than, and consequent 

advantage over, the settled peoples.  T h e Caliph  ' U m a r is quoted 

as having said:  " T h e  A r a b prospers only where the camel 

prospers".  T h e peninsula remains the chief camel-breeding centre 

in the world.  T h e horses of Najd, the donkeys of  a l - ^ a s a and 

the dromedaries of  ' U m a n are world famous. In the past the 

pearl fisheries of  ' U m a n and the Persian  G u l f region, the salt 

mines of certain areas and the camel industry were the main 

sources of income. But since the beginning of the exploitation of 

the oil-fields in 1933, the extensive activities connected with the 

oil industry have become by far the greatest source.  T h e oil-fields 

of al-Hasa are classed  a m o n g the richest in the world. 

From north-western  A r a b i a the camel, like the horse 

originally an  A m e r i c a n animal, was introduced into Palestine 

and Syria on the occasion of the invasion of the Midianites 

in the eleventh century  B . C . (Judges 6 : 5, cf Gen. 24 : 64), the 

first record of the widespread use of this animal.' It was intro-

duced into  E g y p t with the Assyrian conquest in the seventh cen-

tury  B . C . , and into northern Africa with the Mbslem invasion 

in the seventh century after Christ. 

' InZcilschrt/l dtr dcutsehtn morgenlandischtn Geselhcfiafl,^v{'i&^i),p -^61,1.13. 

• Tie JSfonners and Customs of the Hwala Bedouins (Ncn York, 192S), f). 368 

Cf. Bertram Thomas m The Near East and India, Nov. 1, 1928, p 51S 

» Cf. Carleton S. Coon, Caravan: the Story ef the Middle East (New York, 

1951), p. 61. 


CHAPTER in 

BEDOUIN LIFE 

DRRESPONDING  t o the twofold  n a t u r e  o f  t h e land,  t h e  i n h a b i t - The 

Its of  A r a b i a fall  i n t o  t w o  m a i n  g r o u p s :  n o m a d i c  B e d o u i n s 

i d settled folk.  T h e line  o f  d e m a r c a t i o n  b e t w e e n  t h e  w a n d e r i n g 

id the sedentary elements in  t h e  p o p u l a t i o n is  n o t  a l w a y s 

lai^ly  d r a w n .  T h e r e  a r e  s t a g e s  o f  s e m i - n o m a d i s m  a n d  o f 

Liasi-urbanity.  C e r t a i n townsfolk  w h o  w e r e  a t  o n e  t i m e  B e d o u i n 



ill betray their  n o m a d i c origin,  w h i l e other  B e d o u i n s  a r e  t o w n s -

cople in the  m a k i n g .  T h e blood of the settled  p o p u l a t i o n is 

lUs constantly refreshed by a  n o m a d i c strain. 

T h e  B e d o u i n  i s  n o gyp.sy  r o a m i n g ahnlessly for  t h e  s a k e  o f 

naming.  H e represents the best  a d a p t a t i o n  o f  h u m a n life  t o 

eSert conditions.  W h e r e v e r  v e r d a n t  l a n d is  f o u n d , there he  g o e s 

eeldng pasture.  N o m a d i s m is as  m u c h a scientific  m o d e of  l i v i n g 

1 the  N u f u d as industrialism is in  D e t r o i t or  M a n c h e s t e r . 

Action and reaction  b e t w e e n  t h e  t o w n s f o l k  a n d tlie desert 

oik are motivated by the  u r g e n t dictates of self-interest  a n d self-

»reservation.  T h e  n o m a d insists on  e x t r a c t i n g from his  m o r e 

avourably situated neighboin-  s u c h resources  a s  h e  h i m s e l f 

acks,  a n d that either by violence—^raids—or by peaceful  m e t h o d > 

- e x c h a n g e .  H e  i s land-pirate  o r  b r o k e r ,  o r both  a t  o n c e .  T h e 

iesert, where the^  B e d o u i n  p l a y s  t h e  p a r t of the pu-ate, shares 

:ertdin common characteristics Avith the  s e a . 

^  T h e nomad, as a  t y p e , is  t o d a y  w h a t he  w a s  y e s t e r d a y  a n d 

what he will be  t o m o r r o w .  H i s culture pattern  h a s  a l w a y s been 



Download 7.19 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   119




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling