T h e arabs f r o m t h e e a r L i e s t t I m e s t o t h e p r e s e n t


CH. TV- E A R L Y  I N T E R N A T I O N A L  R E L A T I O N S


Download 7.19 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet6/119
Sana15.03.2020
Hajmi7.19 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   119

CH. TV-

E A R L Y  I N T E R N A T I O N A L  R E L A T I O N S 

33 


antecedent  o f the  S u e z  C a n a l ,  w a s reopened  b y the  c a l i p h s and 

used until the discover)' (1497) of  t h e  r o u t e to  I n d i a  r o u n d  t h e 

Cape of Good  H o p e . 

T h e  E g y p t i a n interest in  S i n a i arose because of its  c o p p e r and stniit.c 

turquoise mines  l o c a t e d  i n  W a d i  M a g h a r a h  i n the  s o u t h e m  p a r t  " " P P " 

of the peninsula near the  m o d e r n  t o w n of  a l - T u r .  E v e n in pre-

dynastic days the  n o m a d s of  S i n a i  w e r e  e x p o r t i n g their  v a l u e d 

products to Egypt. Pharaohs of the Fkst Dynasty operated the 

mines of tlie peninsula, but the period of  g r e a t  e x p l o i t a t i o n 

started with Snefru (ca. 2720  B . C . ) of the  T h i r d  D y n a s t y .  T h e 

From G. Elhot iwi/A, Annmt Ecrpl""' Onpi- aj Ctmlnohon" 

(.Hctprrb- Hrci) 

A N C I E N T  E G Y P T I A N  R E P R E S E N T A T I O N S  O F  A R A B I A N S 

(Co. 2000 B.C. and 1500 B.C. respectively) 

great  t o a d connecting  E g y p t  w i t h  S y r i a - P a l e s t i n e and  t h e n c e 

reaching to the rest of the Fertile  C r e s c e n t and  A s i a  M i n o r — 

that first international  h i g h w a y used by  m a n — s e n t a  b r a n c h 



south-east to these copper and turquoise  m i n e s of  S f n a i . In a 

royal tomb of tlie First  D y n a s t y at  A b y d o s , Petrie found in



 19CX) 

on a piece of  i v o r y a portrait of a  t y p i c a l  A r m c n o i d  S e m i t e 

labelled  " A s i a t i c " , %vith a  l o n g pointed beard and  s h a v e n  u p p e r 

lip, presumably a  S o u t h  A r a b i a n . An earlier relief  b e l o n g i n g to 

- the same dynasty shows an emaciated  B e d o u m chief in a loin-

\ cloth crouching in submission before his  E g y p t i a n captor,  w h o 

is about to brain the  B e d o u i n  w i t h his  m a c e .  T h e s e are the 

earliest representations  o f  A r a b i a n s  e x t a n t .  T h e  w o r d for 

' Bedouin  ( E g . 'amu,  n o m i d ,  A s i a t i c ) figures prominently in the 

early  E g y p t i a n annals and in  s o m e cases refers to  n o m a d s aroxmd 

Egypt and outside of  A r a b i a proper. 


34 

T H E  P R E - l S L A M l C  A G E 

P A R T I 

Frank-

incense 

South  A r a b i a was brought nearer to  E g y p t when the latter 

established commercial relationships with  P u n t and Nubia, 

Herodotus * speaks of Sesostris, probably Senusert I (1980-1935





B.C.) of Dynasty  X I I , as conquering the nations on the Arabian 

Gulf, presumably the African side of the  R e d  S e a .  T h e Eight-

eenth Dynasty maintained a fleet in the  R e d Sea, but as early 

as the Fifth  D y n a s t y we find Sahure (2553-2541  B . C . ) conduct-

ing the first maritime expedi-

tion by  w a y of that sea to 

an  i n c e n s e - p r o d u c i n g land, 

evidently Somaliland on the 

African shore. 

T h e chief attraction for the 

Egyi>tians in  S o u t h  A r a b i a lay 

in tlie frankincense, which they 

prized highly for temple use 

and mummification and in 

which that part of  A r a b i a was 

particularly rich.  W h e n Nubia 

was subjugated and Punt 

(modern Somaliland) brought 

within the commercial sphere 

of the  E g y p t i a n empire many 

expeditions were conducted to 

those places to procure "myrrh, 

fragrant gums, resin and aro-

matic  w o o d s " .  S u c h an  e x -

pedition to  P u n t  w a s under-

taken by Hatshepsut (ca. 1500 



B . C . ) , the first famous  w o m a n in history.  T h e emissaries of her 

successor,  I h u t m o s e  I I I , the Napoleon of ancient  E g y p t , 

brought (1479  B . c ) from the same land the usual cargo of 

"ivory, ebony, panther-skins and  s l a v e s " . As these were also tlie 

products of  a l - Y a m a n in south-western  A r a b i a it is not unlikely 

that the Egyptians used the term  " P u n t " for the land on both 

sides of  B a b  a l - M a n d a b Gold  m a y also have come from  A r a b i a . 

T h e incense trade with South  A r a b i a went through  W a d i al-

H a m m a m a t ,  m a k i n g that central route the most important link 

with South  A r a b i a . 



»

 Bk.

 11,


 ch.

 102. 

^ '''ft'' 



from -i T Olm Irj ^ Huiiry cf Pahsitne 

IN ^ Syria (Char es ^ nhncr t 5fKx) 

S F M I  R K H F T ,  T H i :  S I X T H KIVC, 

0 1  T H I  r i R S r  D Y V \ b T \ 

> \ U T I N G  T i l L  C H i r i  O f 

THF  N O M A U S 

J^rmi Bfrlram Thoma!. "Arabia Felix" {Charlis Siriintr'j Sms) 

A  F R A N K I N C E N S E  T R E E  A N D A  M A H R I  C O L L E C T O R 

36  T H E PRE-ISLAMIC  A G E PAETi 

y a d r a m a w t , ' - which in ancient times included the coasUands 

M a h r a h and  a l - S h i h r /  w a s the celebrated land of frankincense. 

?;afar, formerly a town and now a district on the coast, was its 

chief centre.  T h e  m o d e m name is Dhufar and it is under the 

nominal rale of the sultan  o f ' U m a n .  T h i s  ? a f a r , the commercial 

centre of the frankincense country and situated as Jt is on the 

iouthern coast, should not be confused with the inland Zafar in 

a l - Y a m a n ,  w h i c h  w a s the Himyarite capital."  T h e frankincense 

Quban, whence "olibanum") tree still flourishes in  y a d r a m a w t 

and other parts of South  A r a b i a . As of old,  Z a f a r is still the 

chief centre of its trade. 

T h e ancient  E g y p t i a n s were not the only people  w h o had a 

commercial interest in  A r a b i a .  T h e i r foremost rivals for the 

trade in spices and minerals were the people of Babylonia. 



2. Reia-

 Eastern  A r a b i a bordered  o n Mesopotamia.  T h e early inhabit-



the'su'-'"' ^"^^ °^  ^ ' ^ ^ region, the Sumerians and  A k k a d i a n s , had already 

menans

  b y the fourth millennium before  o u r era become familiar with 



loi^^^'^

 their neighbours  o f the Westland  ( A m u r r u ) and were able to 

communicate  w i t h them both by land and water. 

T h e source of supply of the Sumerian copper, the earliest metal 

discovered and used in industry,  w a s probably in  ' U m a n . 

On a diorite statue of  N a r a m - S i n {ca.  2 1 7 1 B  C ) , a grandson 

and successor of  S a r g o n (the first great name in Semitic history), 

we read that he conquered  M a g a n and defeated its lord.Manium,* 

G u d e a {ca.

  2 0 0 0 B . C . ) ,

 the Sumerian patesi of  L a g a s h , tells us of his 

expedition to procure stone and wood for his temple from  M a g a n 

and  M e l u k h k h a .  T h e s e two Sumerian place-names,  M a g a n and 

M e l u k h k h a , evidently were first applied to certain regions in east 

and central  A r a b i a  b u t were later, in the  A s s y r i a n period, shifted 

to more distant localities in the Sinaitic peninsula and eastern 

Africa.  " M a g a n " is not etymologically identifiable with Arabic 

" M a ' a n , " name of an oasis in northern  a l - y i j a z (now in Trans-

jordan), possibly an ancient  M i n a e a n colony on the caravan route. 

In these cuneiform inscriptions we  h a v e the first recorded refer-

ence in history to a place in  A r a b i a and to an  A r a b i a n people. 



* Ha^annSwcth of Gen.  1 0 ; 26 

* In Its later and modem use tlie name al-Shiljr has been apphed to the whole 

franlanccnse coast,  m j u d m g Mahrah and ZafSr, 

» CI Yaqut, BuUin, vol. m, pp 576 7 

* Cf r Thurcau-Dangin, Lts inscnphem de Sumer tt d'Akkad (Pans, 1905), 

PP 2381239. 

CH.vr  E A R L Y  I N T E R N A T I O N A L  R E L A T I O N S 37 

'  T h e  " S e a l a n d "  o f the cuneiform inscriptions  w a s ,  a c c o r d i n g 

to a recent theory, located in  A r a b i a  p r o p e r  a n d  i n c l u d e d the 

western shore  o f  t h e Persian  G u l f  a s far  a s  t h e isle  o f  a l - B a h r a y n 

(andentDilmun)  a n d possibly  a l - N u f i i d  a s  f a r w e s t  a s  a l - ' A q a b a h . 

Nabopolassar  w a s  k i n g  o f  t h e  S e a l a n d before  h e  b e c a m e  k i n g  o f 

Babylon. 

T h e  f i r s t unmistakable reference  t o the  A r a b i a n s  a s  s u c h  o c c u r s 3  A S -

I n  a n inscription  o f  t h e  A s s y r i a n  S h a l m a n e s e r  I I I ,  w h o  l e d  a n ^ ^ ^ ^ 

expedition against the  A r a m a e a n  k i n g of  D a m a s c u s  a n d his Uon 

'allies  A h a b and  J u n d u b ,  a n  A r a b i a n  s h e i k h .  T h e  e n c o u n t e r 

took place  i n 853  B . C .  a t  Q a r q a r , north  o f  I J a m a h .  T h e s e are 

the words of  S h a l m a n e s e r : 

JCarkar, his royal city, I destroyed, I devastated, I burned with fire. 



,

 1,200

 chariots,

 r,20o

 cavalry,



 20,000

 soldiers  o f Hadad-ezer,  o f  A r a m 

(? Damascus);.., 1,000 camels of Gindibu', the Arabian.* 

-It seems very appropriate that the  n a m e  o f  t h e  f i r s t  A r a b i a n  i n 

recorded history should be associated  w i t h  t h e  c a m e l . 

Anxious  t o ensure  t h e safety  o f  t h e  t r a d e  h i g h w a y s  p a s s i n g 

through the far-flung  A s s y r i a n  e m p i r e  a n d  c o n v e r g i n g on  t h e 

Mediterranean,  T i g l a t h - P i l e s e r  I I I  ( 7 4 5 - 7 2 7  B . C . ) ,  f o u n d e r  o f 

the second  A s s y r i a n empire, conducted a series of  c a m p a i g n s 

against  S y r i a  a n d its environs.  I n the third  y e a r  o f his  r e i g n  h e 

exacted tribute from  Z a b i b i , the  q u e e n  o f  " A r i b i "  l a n d .  I n  t h e 

ninth year  h e conquered another  q u e e n  o f  A r i b i ,  S a m s i  ( S h a m s 

o r Shamslyah)  b y  n a m e .  H i s  a n n a l s  r e c o r d  t h a t  i n 728  B . C . 

tlie  M a s ' a i tribe, the city of  T e m a i  ( T a y m a * )  a n d  t h e  S a b ' a i 

(Sabaeans) sent  h i m tribute  o f  g o l d ,  c a m e l s  a n d  s p i c e s .  T h e s e 

tribes evidently lived in the  S i n a i peninsula  a n d the desert to  t h e 

nortli-east.*  T h u s  w a s  T i g l a t h - P i l e s e r  I I I the  f i r s t  t o fasten the 

yoke on  A r a b i a n necks 

Sargon  I I (722-705  B . C . ) , the  c o n q u e r o r  o f  C a r c h e m i s h  a n d 

Samaria, reports  t h a t m the seventh  y e a r of his  r e i g n he  s u b -

jugated  a m o n g others the tribes  o f  T a m u d  ( T h a r a u d  o f  t h e 

Koran) and  I b a d i d ,  " w h o inhabit  t h e desert,  w h o  k n o w neither 

high nor low  o f i i u a l " , struck  t h e m  d o w n and deported the 

- remnant  t o  S a m a r i a . '  A t the  s a m e  t i m e  h e  r e c e i v e d from  S a m s i , 



* LudenVill, vol. i, §  6 l l . 

* pjtlef Nidsoi, Handbueh der altaroh'iehen AlUriumtka- it, vol. J, £>te altan-

tmhc KuUur (Copdihagqn, 1927!, p. 65. 

* Lucktnbni, f ol. ii, § 17. 

3 8  T H E  P R E - I S L A M I C  A G E  P A R T I 

queen of  A r a b i a , It'amara (Yatha'-amar),the Sabaean chief, and 

from other kings of  E g y p t and the desert  " g o l d , products of the 

mountain, precious stones, ivory, seed of the maple (?), all kinds 

of herbs, horses, and camels, as their tribute",'  T h i s It'amara of 

S a b a '  w a s evidently one of the  Y a t h a ' - a m a r s who bear the royal 

title mukamb in tlie South  A r a b i c inscriptions. Likewise his 

successor Kariba-il of  S a b a ' , from  w h o m Sennacherib claims to 

h a v e received tribute, must have been the south-western Arabian 

identified with Kariba-il of the inscriptions.^! If so, the "tribute" 

claimed by the Assyrians could not have been but freewill 

presents offered by these South  A r a b i a n rulers to the Assyrian 

k i n g s as equals and probably as allies in the common struggle 

against the wild nomads of North  A r a b i a . 

A b o u t 688  B . C . Sennacherib reduced  " A d u m u , the fortress of 

A r a b i a " and carried  a w a y to Nineveh the local gods and the 

queen herself, who was also the priestess.  A d u m u is the oasis 

in North  A r a b i a that figured later in the Islamic conquests under 

the name  D u m a t al-Jandal.  T h e queen,  T e l k h u n u (Te'elkhunu) 

by name, had allied herself with the rebellious Babylonians 

against the  A s s y r i a n suzerainty, and was assisted by Hazael, 

the chief of the Qedar (Assyrian Kidri) tribe, whose headquarters 

were in  P a l m y r e n a . 

Esarhaddon about 676 suppressed a rebellion headed by 

U a i t e ' , the son and successor of  y a z a e l , who,  " t o save his life, 

forsook his  c a m p , and, fleeing alone, escaped to distant (parts)".* 

Evidently the Bedouins proved a thorn in the side of the Assyrian 

empire and were incited to revolt by both  E g y p t and Babylonia. 

On his famous march (670) to the conquest of  E g y p t , the terrible 

A s s y r i a n was so unnerved by his fearful privations in the North 

A r a b i a n desert that he  s a w "two-headed serpents" and otlier 

frightful reptiles that"flapped their  w i n g s " . * Isaiah  ( 3 0 : 6 ) , in his 

" b u r d e n " of the beasts of the south, mentions "the viper and 

fiery flying serpent".  H e r o d o t u s ' assures us that "vipers are 

found in all parts of the world; but the winged serpents are 

nowhere seen except in  A r a b i a , where they are al! congregated 

together". 

In his ninth campaign, directed against the  A r a b i a n tribes, 



* Luckenbill, vol. ii, § 18. ' Nielsen, ffcmdhucft, vol. i, pp. 75  « y . 

' Luckenbill, vol. ii, § 946. * Cf. ibid. vol. ii, § 558. 

» Bk.  I l l , cb. 109. 

C H . ' i v ' "  S j A R L Y " I N T E R N A T I O N A L  R E L A T I O N S 39 

A s h u r b a n i p a l ( 6 6 8 ^ 2 6  B . c . ) c a p t u r e d  U a i t e '  a n d  h i s  a r m i e s  a f t e r 

a  s e v e r e  s t r u g g l e . 

M a n y  r e f e r e n c e s  a r e  m a d e  i n  t h e  A s s y r i a n  a n n a l s  t o  A r a b i a n 

chiefs  " k i s s i n g  t h e  f e e t "  o f  t h e  k i n g s  o f  N m e v e h  a n d  o f f e r i n g 

t h e m  a m o n g  o t h e r  p r e s e n t s  g o l d ,  p r e c i o u s  s t o n e s ,  e y e b r o w  d y e s 

( k o h l ,  a n t i m o n y ) ,  f r a n k i n c e n s e ,  c a m e l s  a n d  d o n k e y s .  I n  f a c t 

w e  r e a d  o f  n o  l e s s  t h a n  n i n e  d i f f e r e n t  c a m p a i g n s  u n d e r t a k e n 

b y  S a r g o n II,  S e i m a c h e r i b ,  E s a r h a d d o n  a n d  A s h u r b a n i p a l  t o 

'  c h a s t i s e  t h e  u n c o n q u e r a b l e  B e d o u i n s  w h o  w e r e  f o r  e v e r  h a r a s s i n g 

t h e  A s s y r i a n  p r o v i n c e s  i n  S y r i a ,  i n t e r f e r i n g  w i t h  t h e  c a r a v a n 

r o u t e s  a n d  r e c e i v i n g  a i d  a n d  c o m f o r t  f r o m  E g y p t  a n d  B a b y -

l o n i a ,  b o t h  h o s t i l e  t o  A s s y r i a .  T h e  " U r b i "  m e n t i o n e d  i n  t h e s e 

c a m p a i g n s  m u s t  h a v e  b e e n  m a i n l y  B e d o u i n s ,  a n d  t h e i r  l a n d , 

" A r i b i " ,  m u s t  h a v e  b e e n  t h e  S y r o - M e s o p o t a m i a n  d e s e r t ,  t h e 

S i n a i t i c  p e n i n s u l a  a n d  N o r t h  A r a b i a .  I n  S i n a i  t h e  M i d i a n i t e s  o f 

'  t h e  O l d  T e s t a m e n t  a n d  n o t  t h e  N a b a t a e a n s  w e r e  t h o s e  b r o u g h t 

u n d e r  A s s y r i a n  c o n t r o l .  T h e  S a b a e a n s  p r o p e r  i n  s o u t h - w e s t e r n 

A r a b i a  w e r e  n e v e r  s u b j u g a t e d  b y  N i n e v e h .  T h e  A s s y r i a n s , 

t h o u g h  r i g h t l y  c a l l e d  t h e  R o m a n s  o f  t h e  a n c i e n t  w o r l d ,  c o u l d 

n o t  h a v e  b r o u g h t  u n d e r  e v e n  n o m i n a l  r u l e  m o r e  t h a n  t h e  o a s e s 

a n d a few  t r i b e s  i n  N o r t h  A r a b i a . 

A m o n g  t h e  s e t t l e m e n t s  o f  t h e  n o r t h  a t  t h i s  p e r i o d  T a y m a "  4 . Neo-

,  ( T e m a  a n d  T e - m a - a  o f  t h e  A s s y r o - B a b y l o n i a n  r e c o r d s )  w o n l^^'^Jnd" 

special  d i s t i n c t i o n  a s  t h e  p r o v i n c i a l  r e s i d e n c e  o f  N a b o n i d u s Persian  r e 

(S56-539


  B . C . ) ,

  t h e  l a s t  k i n g  o f  t h e  C h a l d a e a n s .  T h e  C h a l d a e a n s ^^y^'^. 

_ h a d fallen  h e i r  t o  t h e  A s s > T i a n  e m p i r e ,  w h i c h  i n c l u d e d ,  s i n c e  t h e 

d a y s of  T i g l a t l i - P i l e s e r  I I I

  ( 7 4 5 - 7 2 7

  B . C . ) ,

  S y r i a  a n d



 a

  p o r t i o n 

o f  N o r t h  A r a b i a .  I n  t h e  t l i i r d  y e a r  o f  h i s  r e i g n  N a b o n i d u s ,  i n  t h e 

words  o f a  c u n e i f o r m  i n s c r i p t i o n ,  " s l e w  t h e  p r i n c e  o f  T e m a "  a n d 

"established  h i m s e l f  i n  t h a t  o a s i s . * 

? ' , T h c  m o s t  s i g n i f i c a n t  r e f e r e n c e  i n  c u n e i f o r m  l i t e r a t u r e  t o  t h i s 

A r a b i a n  o a s i s  o c c u r s  i n a  c l i r o n i c l e  r e l a t i n g  t o  t h e  fa l l  o f  B a b y l o n 

(539 B.C.)  i n t o  t h e  h a n d s  o f  t h e  P e r s i a n s .  T h e  c h r o n i c l e  s t a t e s 

' t h a t  N a b o n i d u s  w a s  i n  " a l  T e m a "  i n  t h e  s e v e n t h ,  n i n t h ,  t e n t h 

. . a n d  e l e v e n t h  y e a r s  o f  h i s  r e i g n ,  w h i l e  h i s  s o n  ( i . e .  B e l s h a z z a r ) 

a n d  t h e  s o l d i e r s  w e r e  i n  B a b y l o n i a . 

, 525  C a m b y s e s ,  t h e  s o n  a n d  s u c c e s s o r  o f  t h e  f o u n d e r  o f  t h e 

- P e r e i a n  e m p i r e ,  p a s s e d  t h r o u g h  n o r t h e r n  A r a b i a  a n d  m a d e  a n 

a l l i a n c e  w i t h  i t s  p e o p l e  w h i l e  o n  h i s  w a y  t o  t h e  c o n q u e s t  o f 



,i ,* ^ R.'P. Dougherty, Naionidus and Btlshaszar (New Haven, 1929), pp. 106-7. 

4 0  T H E  P R E - I S L A M I C  A G E PARTI 

E g y p t .  S p e a k i n g  o f  D a r i u s ,  H e r o d o t u s '  r e m a r k s :  " T l i e A r a b i a n s 

w e r e  n e v e r  r e d u c e d  t o  t h e  s u b j e c t i o n  o f  P e r s i a " . 

T h e  T a y m a '  s t o n e ,  b o u g h t  b y  H u b e r (1883)  a n d  n o w  d e p o s i t e d 

i n  t h e  L o u v r e ,  b e a r s  o n e  o f  t h e  m o s t  v a l u a b l e  S e m i t i c  i n s c r i p -

t i o n s  e v e r  f o u n d .  I t s  d a t e  g o e s  b a c k  t o  t h e fifth  c e n t u r y  B . C . 

W r i t t e n  i n  A r a m a i c ,  i t  r e c o r d s  h o w a  n e w  d e i t y ,  S a l m  o f  H a j a m , 

w a s  i n t r o d u c e d  i n t o  T a y m a *  b y a  c e r t a i n  p r i e s t  w h o  f u r t h e r  p r o -

v i d e d  a n  e n d o w m e n t for  t h e  n e w  t e m p l e  a n d  e s t a b l i s h e d a  h e r e d i -

t a r y  p r i e s t h o o d . *  T h e  n e w  d e i t y  i s  r e p r e s e n t e d  i n  t h e  A s s y r i a n 

f a s h i o n  a n d  b e l o w  h i m  s t a n d s  h i s  p r i e s t  w h o  e r e c t e d  t h e stela. 

s . Con-  T h e  J e w s  w e r e  g e o g r a p h i c a l l y  n e x t - d o o r  n e i g h b o u r s  o f  t h e 

A r a b i a n s  a n d  r a c i a l l y  t h e i r  n e a r e s t  o f  k i n .  E c h o e s  o f  t h e desert 

Hebrews  o r i g i n  o f  t h e  H e b r e w s  a b o u n d  i n  t h e  O l d  T e s t a m e n t . *  H e b r e w  a n d 

A r a b i c ,  a s  w e  h a v e  l e a r n e d  b e f o r e ,  a r e  c o g n a t e  S e m i t i c  t o n g u e s . 

S o m e  o f  t h e  H e b r e w  O l d  T e s t a m e n t  n a m e s  a r e  A r a b i c ,  e . g . those 

o f  a l m o s t all  o f  E s a u ' s  s o n s  ( G e n . 36:  1 0 - 1 4 ; t  C h .  i : 35-7). A 

S o u t h  A r a b i a n  w o u l d  h a v e b u t little difficulty  i n  u n d e r s t a n d i n g  t h e 

f i r s t  v e r s e  o f  H e b r e w  G e n e s i s . *  T h e  r u d i m e n t s  o f  t h e  H e b r e w  r e -

l i g i o n ,  m o d e r n  r e s e a r c h  s h o w s ,  p o i n t  t o a  b e g i n n i n g  i n  t h e desert. 

O n  t h e i r  w a y  t o  P a l e s t i n e  f r o m  E g y p t  a b o u t 1225  B . C .  t h e 

H e b r e w  ( R a c h e l )  t r i b e s  s o j o u r n e d  a b o u t  f o r t y  y e a r s  i n  S i n a i  a n d 

t h e  N u f u d .  I n  M i d i a n ,  t h e  s o u t h e m  p a r t  o f  S i n a i  a n d  t h e land 

e a s t  o f it,  t h e  d i v i n e  c o v e n a n t  w a s  m a d e .  M o s e s  m a r r i e d  a n 

A r a b i a n  w o m a n ,  t h e  d a u g h t e r  o f a  M i d i a n i t e  p r i e s t , ' ' a wor-

s h i p p e r  o f  J e h o v a h  w h o  i n s t r a c t e d  M o s e s  i n  t h e  n e w  c u l t .  Y a h u 

( Y a h w e h ,  J e h o v a h )  w a s  a p p a r e n t l y a  M i d i a n i t e  o r  N o r t h 

A r a b i a n  t r i b a l  d e i t y .  H e  w a s a  d e s e r t  g o d ,  s i m p l e  a n d  a u s t e r e . 

H i s  a b o d e  w a s a  t e n t  a n d  h i s  r i t u a l  w a s  b y  n o  m e a n s  e l a b o r a t e . 

H i s  w o r s h i p  c o n s i s t e d  i n  d e s e r t feasts  a n d sacrifices  a n d  b u r n t 

offerings  f r o m  a m o n g  t h e  h e r d s . '  T h e  H e b r e w s  e n t e r e d  P a l e s d n e 

a s  n o m a d s ;  t h e  h e r i t a g e  o f  t h e i r  t r i b a l life  f r o m  d e s e r t  a n c e s t o r s 

c o n t i n u e d  t o  b e well  m a r k e d  l o n g after  t h e y  h a d  s e t t l e d  a m o n g , 

a n d  b e c o m e civilized  b y ,  t h e  n a t i v e  C a n a a n i t e s . 

T h e  H e b r e w  k i n g d o m  i n its  h e y d a y  i n c l u d e d  t h e  S i n a i t i c 




Download 7.19 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   119




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling