The Future of Public Employee Retirement Systems


Download 2.79 Kb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet1/32
Sana26.09.2020
Hajmi2.79 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   32

The Future of Public Employee
Retirement Systems

The Future of Public
Employee Retirement
Systems
EDITED BY
Olivia S. Mitchell and Gary Anderson
1

3
Great Clarendon Street, Oxford ox
2
6dp
Oxford University Press is a department of the University of Oxford.
It furthers the University’s objective of excellence in research, scholarship,
and education by publishing worldwide in
Oxford New York
Auckland Cape Town Dar es Salaam Hong Kong Karachi
Kuala Lumpur Madrid Melbourne Mexico City Nairobi
New Delhi Shanghai Taipei Toronto
With offices in
Argentina Austria Brazil Chile Czech Republic France Greece
Guatemala Hungary Italy Japan Poland Portugal Singapore
South Korea Switzerland Thailand Turkey Ukraine Vietnam
Oxford is a registered trade mark of Oxford University Press
in the UK and in certain other countries
Published in the United States
by Oxford University Press Inc., New York
© Pension Research Council, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, 2009
The moral rights of the authors have been asserted
Database right Oxford University Press (maker)
First published 2009
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced,
stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means,
without the prior permission in writing of Oxford University Press,
or as expressly permitted by law, or under terms agreed with the appropriate
reprographics rights organization. Enquiries concerning reproduction
outside the scope of the above should be sent to the Rights Department,
Oxford University Press, at the address above
You must not circulate this book in any other binding or cover
and you must impose the same condition on any acquirer
British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data
Data available
Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication Data
Data available
Typeset by SPI Publisher Services, Pondicherry, India
Printed in Great Britain
on acid-free paper by
MPG Books Group, Bodmin and King’s Lynn
ISBN 978–0–19–957334–9
1 3 5 7 9 10 8 6 4 2

Contents
List of Figures
vii
List of Tables
ix
Preface
xii
Notes on Contributors
xiv
Abbreviations
xx
1. The Future of Public Employee Retirement Systems
1
Olivia S. Mitchell
Part I. Costs and Benefits of Public Employee
Retirement Systems
2. Estimating State and Local Government Pension and Retiree
Health Care Liabilities
19
Stephen T. McElhaney
3. The Case for Marking Public Plan Liabilities to Market
29
Jeremy Gold and Gordon Latter
4. Between Scylla and Charybdis: Improving the Cost Effectiveness
of Public Pension Retirement Plans
58
M. Barton Waring
5. Public Pensions and State and Local Budgets: Can Contribution
Rate Cyclicality Be Better Managed?
75
Parry Young
6. Benefit Cost Comparisons Between State and Local
Governments and Private Industry Employers
85
Ken McDonnell
7. Administrative Costs of State Defined Benefit and Defined
Contribution Systems
97
Edwin C. Hustead
8. Thinking about Funding Federal Retirement Plans
105
Toni Hustead

vi Contents
Part II. Implementing Public Retirement
System Reform
9. Reforming the German Civil Servant Pension Plan
115
Raimond Maurer, Olivia S. Mitchell, and Ralph Rogalla
10. The Outlook for Canada’s Public Sector Employee Pensions
143
Silvana Pozzebon
11. Unifying Pension Schemes in Japan: Toward a Single Scheme for
Both Civil Servants and Private Employees
164
Junichi Sakamoto
12. Redefining Traditional Plans: Variations and Developments in
Public Employee Retirement Plan Design
187
Keith Brainard
13. Defined Contribution Pension Plans in the Public Sector:
A Benchmark Analysis
206
Roderick B. Crane, Michael Heller, and Paul J. Yakoboski
Part III. The Political Economy of
Public Pensions
14. The Evolution of Public Sector Pension Plans in the
United States
239
Robert L. Clark, Lee A. Craig, and Neveen Ahmed
15. Pension Fund Activism: The Double-Edged Sword
271
Brad M. Barber
16. The New Intersection on the Road to Retirement: Public
Pensions, Economics, Perceptions, Politics, and Interest Groups
294
Beth Almeida, Kelly Kenneally, and David Madland
Index
327

List of Figures
3-1
Comparison of Entry Age Normal (EAN) liabilities to
Accrued Benefit Obligation (ABO) liabilities. Assumed
salary scale: 0 percent
38
3-2
Comparison of Entry Age Normal (EAN) liabilities to
Accrued Benefit Obligation (ABO) liabilities. Assumed
salary scale: 5 percent
42
3-3
Nominal interest rates: actuarial versus market
44
3-4
Real interest rates: actuarial versus market
46
3-5
Treasury interest rates, real and break-even inflation rates
(as of 3/31/2008)
46
5-1
Employer contributions as percent of state and local
government payroll
77
5-2
Estimated impact of recommended method as if
implemented 10 years ago
80
9-1
Age distribution of active civil servants in 2004
119
9-2
Range of pension costs under alternative asset allocations
130
9-3
Time paths of supplementary public pension
contributions and cost savings under optimal asset
allocation strategy.
Panel A. Probabilities of supplementary contributions and
contribution holidays over time.
Panel B. Magnitudes (in billions of 2004 euros) of
expected supplementary contributions and cost saving
due to contribution holidays
133
10-1
Percentage of paid workers covered by a Registered
Pension Plan (RPP), total and by sector, Canada: 1981–2006
146
10-2
Percentage of registered pension plan members in
defined benefit and defined contribution plans by sector,
Canada: 1974–2007 (at January 1)
148
10-3
Asset allocation of trusteed public sector pension funds,
Canada: 1992–2006 (percentage of total assets at market value) 155
10-4
Asset allocation of trusteed private sector pension funds,
Canada: 1992–2006 (percentage of total assets at market value) 156
11-1
Japan’s current social security pension schemes
165

viii List of Figures
11-2
Financing basic pension benefits in Japan
173
11-3
Merging the Mutual Aid Associations (MAAs) for Japan
Railway Company (JR), Salt and Tobacco Monopoly
Enterprise (JT), and Nippon Telegraph and
Telecommunications Enterprise (NTT) employees with
the Employees’ Pension Insurance (EPI) scheme
176
14-1
Mean income replacement rates, state pension plans, by
years of service, 1982 and 2006
248
14-2
Mean income replacement rates of state pension plans, by
social security coverage, 1982
249
14-3
Mean income replacement rates of state pension plans, by
social security coverage, 2006
249
15-1
Relation between agency costs, monitoring expenditures,
and portfolio value.
Panel A. Agency costs and monitoring expenditures.
Panel B. Shareholder expenditures on monitoring and
portfolio value
275
15-2
Cumulative market-adjusted returns for CalPERS focus list
firms, 1992 to 2007
283
15-3
Cumulative gains from CalPERS shareholder activism for
different horizons
287
16-1
Effect of various factors on the probability of introducing
a defined contribution plan
305

List of Tables
3-1
Summary of data from four public pension plans’
Comprehensive Annual Financial Reports (CAFRs: $mm
for aggregate financial values)
37
3-2
Factors used to convert Entry Age Normal (EAN)
Accrued Actuarial Liabilities (AAL) to Accumulated
Benefit Obligation (ABO). Assumed salary scale: 0 percent
39
3-3
Factors used to convert Entry Age Normal (EAN)
liabilities to Accumulated Benefit Obligation (ABO)
liabilities. Assumed salary scale: 5 percent
40
3-4
Converting Entry Age Normal (EAN) liabilities to
Accumulated Benefit Obligation (ABO) liabilities:
various salary assumptions
43
3-5
First adjustment: converting the Actuarial Accrued
Liability (AAL) to Accumulated Benefit Obligation (ABO)
43
3-6
Second adjustment: converting the Accumulated Benefit
Obligation (ABO) to a Market Value Liability (MVL)
45
3-7
Comparison of funded status: Actuarial vs. Market
47
5-1
Employer contributions as a percent of state and local
government payroll
77
6-1
Employer costs for employee compensation and
percentage of full-time employees participating in
employee benefit programs: state and local
governments: 1998 and 2007
86
6-2
Employer costs for employee compensation and
percentage of full-time employees participating in
employee benefit programs: private industry
88
6-3
Employment and total compensation costs, by industry
group and union membership, state and local
governments and private sector: 2007
91
6-4
Employment and total compensation costs in state and
local governments and private sector by occupation
group, ages 16 and older
93
7-1
Annual administrative expenses for state retirement
plans as a percentage of contributions and assets
99

x List of Tables
7-2
Administrative expenses of Federal plans
101
9-1
Projected benefit liabilities and contribution rates:
deterministic model
122
9-2
Simulated parameters for stochastic asset case
128
9-3
Risk of alternative asset allocation patterns assuming
fixed contribution rate
129
9-4
Optimal asset allocation patterns for alternative
parameterizations
135
9-A1
Estimated quarterly VAR parameters
138
10-1
Overview of public and private sector Registered
Pension Plans (RPPs), Canada, 2007 (at January 1)
145
10-2
General characteristics of public and private sector
registered pension plans, Canada 2007, at January 1
(percent of members)
148
10-3
Design features of public and private sector Defined
Benefit Registered Pension Plans, Canada 2007, at
January 1 (percent of members)
150
10-4
Contributions to public and private sector Registered
Pension Plans, Canada 2007, at January 1
151
11-1
Contribution programs for each scheme for employees
179
12-1
Earnings and dividend credit rates applied to accounts
in the Nebraska Public Employee Retirement System
cash balance plan, 2003–2007
189
12-2
Comparison of inflation-adjusted benefit with and
without the Minnesota Teachers’ Retirement Association
deferred annuity benefit
198
12-3
Earnings credit applied to individual accounts in the
Oregon Public Employee Retirement System, 2004–2007
200
12-4
Defined benefit plans with mandatory defined
contribution components sponsored by state governments
201
13-1
Retirement income targets
209
13-2
Retirement income replacement projections under a
defined contribution plan
211
13-3
Best practice recommendations for core defined
contribution plan design in the public sector
212
13-4
Projected income replacement rates at retirement for
selected public core DC plans
218

List of Tables xi
13-A1
Comparison of best practice benchmarks to major
public sector core DC plans
223
14-1
Descriptive statistics, means, and standard deviations of
independent variables
252
14-2
Multivariate models of replacement ratios for state and
local employees, with 20 years of service, 1982 and 2006
253
14-3
Explanation of the percentage change in replacement
ratios for state employees with 20 years of service,
between 1982 and 2006
255
14-A1
Benefit formulas and retirement ages for state employee
pension plans, by state, 1982 and 2006
257
14-A2
Plan contributions and vesting requirements
263
15-1
Announcement day market-adjusted returns and
valuation impact for CalPERS focus list firms by year,
1992 to 2007
281
15-2
Daily abnormal returns (Alpha) to value-weighted
portfolios of CalPERS focus list firms at different
holding periods, 1992 to 2007
285
16-1
Empirical determinants of the public’s self-reported
preferences for plan type and plan features
303

Preface
Many millions of pension plan participants all over the world have recently
awakened to the sad fact that financial market collapse can—virtually
overnight—erode a lifetime of saving for old age. The shock is made
worse by the fact the global age wave is also cresting, with rising numbers
of elderly and declining working-age populations to support them. This
volume focuses on the retirement systems provided to public sector employ-
ees, paying careful attention to their costs, their benefits, and their future
in light of these current financial and demographic challenges.
There is no question but that those covered by public pensions are
often the subject of ‘pension envy’: that is, their benefits might seem more
generous and their contributions lower than those offered by the private
sector. Yet this volume points out that such judgments are often inaccurate,
since civil servants hold jobs for with few counterparts in private industry,
such as firefighters, police, judges, and teachers. Often these are riskier,
dirtier, and demand more loyalty and discretion than would be required of
a more mobile labor force in the private sector. In any event, there remains
ample room for comparative and analytic judgment. Accordingly, one focus
of this book is on financial aspects of these schemes, addressing the cost and
valuation debate. Another is the political economy of how public pension
asset pools are perceived and managed, an increasingly important topic in
times of global financial turmoil. And finally we undertake an international
comparison of public retirement system reform, exploring ways that public
pensions can be strengthened in the United States, Japan, Canada, and
Germany. We are thus happy to represent the vigorous debate currently
underway by academics, financial experts, regulators, and plan sponsors,
all seeking to define a new future for public retirement systems.
Previous research studies directed at the Pension Research Council and
the Boettner Center of the Wharton School of the University of Penn-
sylvania have focused on public and private pensions as well as retire-
ment adequacy in the United States and around the world. As with all of
our research volumes, we owe much to our fine contributors, coeditors,
and conference participants. In this instance, Gary Anderson served as a
wonderful co-organizer and we owe him many thanks. The Senior Part-
ners and Institutional Members of the Pension Research Council are also
very much appreciated for their intellectual and financial support. The
Wharton School provided conference facilities and funding, permitting
the initial research findings to be reported. Additional financial sustenance

Preface xiii
was received from the Pension Research Council, the Boettner Center for
Pensions and Retirement Research, and the Ralph H. Blanchard Memor-
ial Endowment at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.
The manuscript was expertly prepared and carefully edited by Andrew
Gallagher and Matt Rosen, with assistance from Hilary Farrell.
On behalf of these institutions and individuals, we thank all of our fine
collaborators and supporters for their help and intellectual guidance in
these times of financial turmoil.
Olivia S. Mitchell
Pension Research Council
Boettner Center for Pensions and Retirement Research
The Wharton School
The Pension Research Council
The Pension Research Council of the Wharton School at the University
of Pennsylvania is an organization committed to generating debate on key
policy issues affecting pensions and other employee benefits. The Council
sponsors interdisciplinary research on the entire range of private and social
retirement security and related benefit plans in the United States and
around the world. It seeks to broaden understanding of these complex
arrangements through basic research into their economic, social, legal,
actuarial, and financial foundations. Members of the Advisory Board of
the Council, appointed by the Dean of the Wharton School, are leaders
in the employee benefits field, and they recognize the essential role of
social security and other public sector income maintenance programs while
sharing a desire to strengthen private sector approaches to economic secu-
rity. More information about the Pension Research Council is available on
the Internet at http://www.pensionresearchcouncil.org or send email to
prc@wharton.upenn.edu.

Notes on Contributors
Neveen Ahmed
is a doctoral candidate in Economics at North Carolina
State University studying US financial markets and public pensions. She
received her MA in economics from North Carolina State University and
her BSc in Economics from Cairo University.
Beth Almeida
is the Executive Director of the National Institute on Retire-
ment Security, a not-for-profit organization that conducts research and
education programs on US pensions. She has worked previously with the
International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers and led
research initiatives at the University of Bonn’s Center for European Integra-
tion Studies; the European Institute for Business Administration; and the
Center for Industrial Competitiveness at the University of Massachusetts-
Lowell. She received her bachelor’s degree in International Business from
Lehigh University and her master’s degree in economics from the Univer-
sity of Massachusetts-Amherst.
Gary Anderson
is a consultant on public pension issues; previously he
served as Executive Director of the Texas Municipal Retirement system
which covers municipal employees and retirees for many Texas cities. He is
also an Advisory Board member of Wharton’s Pension Research Council,
and has served with the National Association of State Retirement Adminis-
trators and the Government Finance Officers Association. He received his
BA in Political Science from Texas A&M University, and his MA in Public
Management from the University of Houston-Clear Lake City.
Brad M. Barber
is a Professor of Finance at the Graduate School of Man-
agement, UC Davis. His recent research focuses on pension fund activism,
analyst recommendations, and investor psychology. At UC Davis, he teaches
courses in investment analysis and corporate financial policy. He received
his Ph.D. in Finance and his MBA from the University of Chicago, and his
BS in Economics from the University of Illinois.
Keith Brainard
is the research director for the National Association of State
Retirement Administrators. His work focuses on governmental pension
plans and defined benefit pensions; he also maintains the Public Fund
Survey, an online compendium of public pension data. Mr. Brainard pre-
viously served as manager of budget and planning for the Arizona State
Retirement System, and he provided fiscal research and analysis for the

Notes on Contributors xv
Texas and Arizona legislatures. He received his MA from the LBJ School of
Public Affairs at the University of Texas-Austin.
Robert L. Clark
is Professor of Economics and Professor of Management,
Innovation, and Entrepreneurship at North Carolina State University. His
research examines retirement decisions, the choice between defined ben-
efit and defined contribution plans, the impact of pension conversions
to defined contribution and cash balance plans, the role of information
and communications on 401(k) contributions, government regulation of
pensions, the development of public sector retirement plans, and Social
Security. He also studies economic responses to population aging in devel-
oped countries and international retirement plans, especially Japan. He
serves on Wharton’s Pension Research Council Advisory Board and is a
Governor of the Foundation for International Studies on Social Security.
Professor Clark earned his BA from Millsaps College and his MA and Ph.D.
from Duke University.
Lee A. Craig
is Alumni Distinguished Professor of Economics at North
Carolina State University. His research focuses on long-run changes in US
agricultural productivity growth, the evolution and integration of agricul-
tural commodity markets, the gold standard and the history of business
cycles, and the history of public sector pensions and pension finance. He
has been affiliated with the National Bureau of Economic Research; a
trustee of the Economic History Association and the Cliometric Society;
a fellow of the Center for Demographic Studies at Duke University; a fellow
of the Seminar für Wirtschaftsgeschichte, Universität München, Germany;
and a member of the North Carolina Academy of Outstanding Teachers.
Professor Craig received his BS and MA from Ball State University and his
MA and Ph.D. from Indiana University.

Download 2.79 Kb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   32




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling