The ukrainian review


Download 11.13 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet1/32
Sana27.12.2019
Hajmi11.13 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   32
78784

T
he
U
krainian
R
eview
A  quarterly journal devoted to the study of Ukraine
Spring,  1991

THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
A  Quarterly  Journal  devoted  to  the  study  of  Ukraine
E D IT O R IA L   B O A R D
Slava  Stetsko 
Editor
Prof.  Nicholas  L.  Fr.-Chirovsky 
Assistant Editor
Prof.  Lev  Shankovsky 
Assistant  Editor 
Prof.  Volodymyr  Zarycky 
Assistant Editor
Roman  Zwarycz 
Associate  Editor
Borys  Potapenko 
Associate  Editor
Dr.  Oleh  S.  Romanyshyn 
Associate  Editor
Stephen  Oleskiw 
Associate  Editor
Price:  £5.00  or  $10.00  a  single  copy, 
Annual  Subscription:  £20.00  or  $40.00
Editorial  correspondence  should  be  sent  to:
The  Editors,
“The  Ukrainian  Review”,
200  Liverpool  Road,
London,  N1  ILF.
Subscriptions  should  be  sent  to:
“The  Ukrainian  Review”  (Administration), 
d o   Association  of Ukrainians  in  Great  Britain,  Ltd., 
49  Linden  Gardens,
London,  W2  4HG.
Overseas  representatives:
USA:  Organization  for  the  Defense  of Four  Freedoms 
for  Ukraine,  Inc.,
136  Second  Avenue,  New  York,  N.Y.  10003.
Canada:  Ucrainica  Research  Institute,
83-85  Christie  Street,  Toronto,Ont.  M6G  3B1.
Printed in  Great Britain  by  the  Ukrainian  Publishers  Limited 
200  Liverpool Road,  London,  N1  ILF.  Tel.:  071-607-626617

T
h e
 U
k r a in ia n
 R
ev iew
Vol. XXXIX, No.  1 
A Quarterly Journal
Spring,  1991
C
o n t e n t s
Editorial:  D
emocratic
  R
eferendum
 —  
or
 I
mperialist
 H
o a x

2
1990 
in
 U
kraine
:  T
he
 E
mpire
 S
trikes
  B
ack
Eugene Kachmarsky 
3
Q u o  V
a dis
;  T
he
 D
ialectics
 
of
 L
iberation
 P
olitics
 
in
 
the
S
oviet
 U
n i o n
......................................................
Roman Zwarycz 
10
U
kraine
 
and
 T
he
 U
nion
 T
reaties
 
of
  1920 
and
  1922
Yaroslav Dashkevych 
19
E
ng land
,  R
ussia
 
and
 
the
 U
krainian
 Q
uestion
 D
uring
the
 G
reat
 N
orthern
 W
ar
  (P
art
  1 ) .  .  . 
Theodore Mackiw 
26
NEWS FROM U K R A IN E ..................................................................35
DOCUMENTS  AND  REPORTS.....................................................  
80
Published by
The Association of Ukrainians in Great Britain Ltd. 
Organization for the Defense of Four Freedoms for Ukraine Inc. (U.S.A.) 
Ucrainica Research Institute (Canada)
ISSN 0041-6029

ED ITO RIA L
Democratic  Referendum  — or  Im perialist H o a x ?
The  right  of every  nation  to  independence,  sovereignty  and  statehood  cannot  be  denied, 
particularly in this contemporary  historical period in the development of humankind, which has 
oftentimes  been  characterised  as  the  “age  of decolonisation”.  This  right  was  one  of  the 
cornerstones upon  which US President Woodrow Wilson laid the foundation for a “new  world 
order”  in  his  Fourteen  Points.  It  has  been  “guaranteed”  in  a  series  of binding  international 
documents  and  agreements,  most prominent  among  which  is  the  United  Nations  Declaration 
on  the  Granting  of  Independence  to  Colonial  Countries  and  Peoples  of  1960.  The  level  of 
respect and active adherence accorded  to  this right of all peoples  to national  independence has 
been  one  of  the  critical  benchmarks  by  which  a  nation-state’s  behaviour  is  judged  and 
measured in the international community.
A nation, or a people, which has been colonised, i.e.,  forcibly annexed, within an imperialist 
structure,  can  never  genuinely  express  its  national  will.  With  regard  to  the  USSR,  the  entire 
Soviet political and  legal  system  in the  so-called  “Soviet republics”  has  fundamentally  been  a 
colonial device,  the primary purpose of which was two-fold: a) to establish a legal basis for the 
legitimacy  of an  ostensibly  “democratic  and  federated”  Soviet state,  through  which a  colonial 
policy  of subjugation  could  be  further reinforced  under the legal auspices  o f maintaining “law 
and  order”;  b)  to  create  and  promote  the  illusion  of “lawfulness”  and  o f  the  “rule  of law” 
before  the  world,  and  to,  thereby,  obscure  the  inherent  lawlessness  and  illegitimacy  of  the 
Soviet Russian imperialist infrastructure.
Imperialism,  in  all  its  forms,  precludes  democracy.  There  can  be  no  basis  for  genuine 
citizenship  in a colony,  in which  each  individual is alienated  from  a  forcibly-imposed political 
and  pseudo-legal  system  that  is  buttressed  by  brute  military  force,  and  disenfranchised  from 
participating in real,  genuinely  democratic processes.  Democracy  can  never develop within the 
constricting,  politically  asphyxiating  conditions  of colonial  subjugatio r.  A  colonised  nation  is 
comprised only  of serfs  without any rights,  since the fundamental prerequisite for  such  human 
rights and individual liberties is completely lacking:  an independent and sovereign nation-state.
On  March  17,  1991,  a referendum will  be  held  throughout  the USSR on  the draft proposal 
of a new union treaty, which purports to allocate greater “sovereign” powers  to the “republics”. 
In  Ukraine  and  the  other  subjugated  nations,  this  referendum  is  being  presented  as  an 
opportunity  for  “Soviet citizens”  to  manifest  their will  in a popular,  mass  expression of “self- 
determination”.  Regardless  of  the results  of this  deceptive  colonial  referendum,  under  no 
circumstances can it become an acceptable vehicle for the expression of the  genuine will of the 
subjugated peoples. Under conditions of military occupation, continuing state-sponsored terror, 
political,  cultural  and religious repression,  and colonial lawlessness,  any  and all political,  legal 
and/or  constitutional  procedures  cannot  be  regarded  as  valid,  since  there  are  absolutely  no 
grounds for Soviet —  or more precisely —  Soviet Russian colonial  legitimacy and legality.
How can a colonised  nation truly, fully and  freely express its will within the parameters of a 
political  process  that  has  been  initiated,  sanctioned  and  “legitimated”  by  the  very  same 
illegitimate  system  of repression  and  lawlessness,  within  which  this  nation  is  denied  its 
fundamental right to independence, and within which every individual is treated as a politically 
disenfranchised  serf?  Simply  put  —   this  referendum  is  completely  non-binding  on  the 
Ukrainian people, regardless of how Moscow decides to manipulate and present its results.

3
1990 
in
  U
kraine
: T
he
  E
mpire
  S
trikes
  B
ack
By Eugene Kachmarsky
With  the  dawning  of  1991,  yet  another  year  has  passed  and,  in  Ukraine,  high 
hopes turned to great disappointments and harsh, brutal realisations.
Revival
The  new  year  in Ukraine  was  rung  in  with  a  sense  of long-awaited jubilation. 
Glasnost  was  allowing  Ukrainians  to  release  the  anger  building  up  from  over 
seventy years  of repression.  Perestroika was promising to rebuild  the political and 
economic systems and usher in a democratic polity and a better life. Ukrainians, at 
least  massively  in  western  Ukraine  and  on  a  smaller  scale  in  the  eastern  half, 
openly  celebrated  Christmas  in  the  traditional  Ukrainian  way  —  with  religious 
services,  carolling  and  public  vertepy  (dramatisations  of Christmas  themes).  The 
events  of  the  months  preceding  1990  saw  increased  nationalist  activity  go 
unpunished  by  Soviet authorities  and  this  caused  the  latent nationalist  spirit  in 
Ukraine to reawaken, bringing with it great expectations for the year to come.
Following the Christmas season, the first popular manifestation of this rebirth on 
a  wide  scale  was  the  commemoration  of the  22  January  1918  Declaration  of an 
Independent Ukrainian State.  The public meetings to mark the date held in various 
cities  throughout Ukraine  served  to emphasise the point that the nationalist rebirth 
was  not  an  isolated  outburst,  but  a  nation-wide  phenomenon.  Nothing  better 
underscored this  than  the human  chain which  was  formed in Kyiv, passed through 
Zhytomyr, Rivne,  Temopil,  and  was  finally  completed  in Lviv,  a  distance of over 
500 km.  Although the chain remained intact for only one hour,  the very fact of its 
completion  and  the  massive  turnout  it  inspired  demonstrated  to  Ukrainians,  to 
Soviet authorities  and to  the world,  that the Ukrainian people  stood  united in  their 
desire for an independent state. The human chain became the symbol of this unity.
Perhaps  most indicative of the popular distaste for the Communist Party and its 
rule  was  a demonstration  to  commemorate the  anniversary  in  Donetsk.  The  party 
proposed a counter-demonstration on  the same day, and pleaded with the people of 
Donetsk to rally around the red flag of the USSR. The people,  however, crossed to 
the  other  side  of the  square  where  the  blue-and-yellow  Ukrainian  national  flag 
stood.  This  act  is  especially  significant  when  considering  the  fact  that  due  to 
several hundred  years of direct Russification, eastern Ukraine was  thought to have 
been lost to the nationalist cause. The people of Donetsk and elsewhere proved this 
an erroneous assumption.
The  early  months  of  1990  prior  to  the  4  March  elections  witnessed  the 
continuation  of  the  national  rebirth  in  all  spheres  of public  and  even  private  life.

4
THE UKRAINIAN REVIEW
Publicly,  the  time  preceding  the  elections  saw  the  creation  of various  political 
parties  and  organisations,  youth  and  student  groups,  cultural  and  religious 
organisations,  all  of which  had  a  strictly  Ukrainian  character  and  supported  the 
concept of Ukrainian independence, autonomy and freedom of choice in all affairs. 
Thus,  groups  such as Rukh  (which existed  in  the pre-1990 months),  the Ukrainian 
Language  Society,  the  Ukrainian  Helsinki  Union  (later  reorganised  into  the 
Ukrainian  Republican  Party),  the  Ukrainian  Christian-Democratic  Front,  the 
Memorial Society, the Lev Society, and the Union of Independent Ukrainian Youth 
became  more and  more open  in  their activities and prominent in public Ukrainian 
life.  The  proliferation  of  such  organisations  and  the  wide  scale  support  they 
received from the general populace was evidence that Ukrainians wanted  to live in 
a  state  where  for once  they  could  be  proud  of their  national  character  and  their 
history and  culture,  without having to be ashamed of them  or fearing reprisals  for 
their  manifestation.  Privately,  even  the  individual  became  transformed  from  a 
prisoner  to  a  free  entity,  if only  in  the  realm  of thought.  People  were  no  longer 
afraid to think, yet more importantly, they were no longer afraid to speak and to act 
on  the  basis  of their  thoughts.  This  freeing  from  intellectual  and  psychological 
shackles was perhaps the most significant development of the pre-election period.
The election  campaign only further demonstrated the continuity and mass  scale 
of the national  revival.  Candidates from  nationalist-minded parties  or groups  were 
put forth to such a great extent that it was decided to form a coalition  of democratic 
nationalist  candidates,  the  Democratic  Bloc  (DemBloc).  In  their  election 
campaigns,  democratic  nationalist  candidates  endeavoured  to  gain  support  by 
appealing to the people’s sense of national pride and reiterating the fact that the ills 
of the  system  were  directly  and  unequivocally  to  be  blamed  on  communist  rule. 
This strategy proved to be a sound one, and the people gave overwhelming  support 
to  the  DemBloc.  Thus,  it  was  no  surprise  that  80,000  gathered  to  support  Rukh 
candidates  in  Kyiv.  Mass public  meetings  in  support of DemBloc candidates  were 
also  held  in  Mykolayiv,  Odessa,  Donetsk,  Chernivtsi,  Kharkiv,  Poltava,  Rivne, 
Zhytomyr, Dnipropetrovsk, Vinnytsia and Lviv.
However,  while  the  people  were  demonstrating  popular  support  for  the 
DemBloc,  communist authorities  were busy ensuring that power remained  in  their 
hands, at least at the national  level.  Thus,  the Ukrainian Communist Party  tried  to 
capitalise on  the tide of independence-oriented nationalism,  thereby  gaining votes, 
by  proclaiming  its  independence  from  the  Moscow-based  party.  The  communists 
did  not  shy  away  from  proven  methods  of  Soviet  electioneering,  employing 
election-rigging  Reties.  Although  “openness”  would  no  longer  allow  blatant 
electoral  violations,  election-rigging  methods  were  used  and  the  communist 
majority that emerged in the Ukrainian SSR Supreme Soviet after the elections can 
be  attributed  to  this,  despite  mass  popular  support  for  the  DemBloc.  The  most 
popular  tactic  was  to  have  the  electoral  committees,  which  were  government-

1990 IN UKRAINE: THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK
5
controlled, refuse to register DemBloc candidates on a series of contrived reasons. 
The  KGB  did not remain  inactive either  in  this  period.  Several  documented  cases 
arose  where  KGB  instigators  attempted  to  provoke  inter-ethnic  animosity  or 
violence,  which  served  to  discredit  democratic  nationalists  in  constituencies  with 
large  non-Ukrainian  populations.  In  Kyiv,  25  Rukh  campaigners  were arrested on 
the  eve  of  the  election,  which  contributed  to  the  failure  of  their  candidates’ 
campaigns.  In  addition,  a  group  of  students  was  arrested,  which  prompted 
widespread student strikes all across Ukraine.
Recovery
Although  the  elections  ended  with  an  “anti-dem ocratic”  majority  in  the 
Ukrainian  SSR  Supreme Soviet, they  were seen as a victory in  a sense that for the 
first time since the inception of Soviet rule in Ukraine, candidates with democratic 
nationalist platforms were chosen to represent the desires of the Ukrainian people. 
(At  the  start,  the  DemBloc  claimed  only  100  People’s  Deputies.  However,  as  the 
year  went  on,  many  Deputies  crossed  over to join  the  DemBloc  —  later People’s 
Council — to increase the democratic deputy contingent to 200)1 With this sense of 
victory, an added impulse was given to the Ukrainian people in general. Ukrainians 
began  to  hope  that  the  DemBloc  would  be  able  to  meaningfully  influence  the 
legislative  and  executive  processes  in  a  manner  conducive  to  nationalist 
aspirations.
It was also with great expectations that regional  governments began  their work. 
In western Ukraine, the Lviv, Ivano-Frankivsk and Temopil provincial councils, all 
with  overwhelming  DemBloc  majorities,  began  their  sessions  with  agendas 
including  a  complete  restructuring  of political,  economic  and  socio-cultural  life 
along  nationalist  lines.  Programmes  were  put  forth  in  all  these  provincial 
legislatures  that  foresaw  such  aspects  as  regional  control  and  allocation  of 
economic,  human  and  natural  resources,  the  clean-up  of ecologically  threatened 
areas,  educational  reforms.  All  the  while,  the  leaders  of the  provincial  councils 
stressed  that  no  representatives  of any  political  persuasions  would  be  excluded 
from  the  legislative  or  executive  process.  Thus,  at  the  first  session  of  the  Lviv 
provincial council, the newly-elected chairman, Vyacheslav Chomovil, pointed out 
to  a  hotheaded  deputy  who  was  for  excluding  communists  from  the  council,  that 
the council was a democratic  body in which all voices  had a right to be  heard  and 
to participate in the governing process.
The  highlights  of  this  second  period  included  the  raising  of the  Ukrainian 
national  flags  over  the  Lviv  and  Kyiv  city  council  buildings,  and  later,  over  the 
Ukrainian  SSR  Supreme  Soviet  itself,  all  of which  were  very  emotional  events. 
Other  events  included  the  commemoration  in  many  cities  and  villages  of  the 
anniversary  of the  30  June  1941  re-establishment  of  an  independent  Ukrainian 
state, which again proved to be a highly emotional celebration. None  of the events,

6
THE UKRAINIAN REVIEW
however,  surpassed  the  emotionalism  of  the  celebration  of Easter.  In  1990, 
Ukrainians  were  able  to  openly  celebrate Easter  for  the  first  time  in  fifty  years. 
Masses  thronged  to  already  overfilled  churches  for  Easter  services.  All  the 
tra d itio n al  custom s  o f  E aster  celebrations  were  observed.  In  L v iv ’s 
Shevchenkivskyi  Hai  park,  thousands  of  youth  and  residents  from  the  whole 
province  turned  out  for performances  of Ukrainian  Easter  songs  and  for  outdoor 
concerts. The custom  of dousing people with  water on Easter Monday was carried 
out  with  extreme  vigour,  especially  when  youths  in  Lviv  bombarded  militia  with 
water  from  buckets  or balloons.  The  reason  for  the  special jubilation  of the  1990 
Easter  celebration  was  obvious to  all:  Easter is  symbolic  with  rebirth,  and just as 
Christ rose from death to new life, so Ukrainians felt that their nation had risen. No 
one,  however, could  foresee,  or wanted  to  foresee,  that  the rebirth  would  soon be 
threatened by a different kind of rebirth — that of communist reaction.
Relapse
While the Ukrainian people were experiencing a mass rebirth and manifestation 
of popular  support  for  democratic  nationalism  and  Ukrainian  state  independence, 
the authorities in Kyiv and Moscow were not idle. Moscow was not about to allow 
its  most productive  and  richest  republic  to  leave.  The  authorities  in  Moscow  felt 
that as long as the manifestations of nationalism remained apolitical,  they could be 
tolerated.  However,  they  miscalculated  from  the  very  start  in  that  any  nationalist 
tendencies,  at  least  in  Ukraine,  would  inexorably  be  political,  with  the  goal  of 
complete independence from Moscow being a chip that would not be bargained for 
by Ukrainians. Therefore, in order to put the cork back in the bottle, Moscow began 
to  orchestrate  a  campaign  that  would  slowly  and  subtly  reintroduce  its  primacy 
over Ukraine.
According to  Serhiy  Holovatyi,  DemBloc  Deputy  from  Kyiv,  the last straw  for 
Moscow  came  with  the  first  session  of  the  Ukrainian  SSR  Supreme  Soviet,  in 
which  President  Volodymyr Ivashko  stated  that  a conciliation  between  nationalist 
and communist forces in Ukraine was possible.  This was perceived by Moscow as 
a direct  threat  to  Soviet  rule over Ukraine,  for Moscow  correctly  understood  that 
were the nationalists to gain unequivocal popular support and an upper hand in  the 
halls  of power,  it would  not be  long before Ukraine  would  be  leaving  the USSR. 
Thus,  Ivashko was  recalled  to  Moscow, ostensibly  for the CPSU Congress  in  late 
June, and there he announced his resignation as President of the Ukrainian SSR and 
Head of the CPU. His replacement with Leonid Kravchuk, a well-known hard-liner 
and Sovietophile,  was  interpreted  in Ukraine as  a step backwards, and democratic 
nationalists began to augment their anti-Soviet campaigns.
In  order  to  dispel  these  fears  and  to  take  the  wind  out of nationalist  sails,  the 
Ukrainian  SSR Supreme Soviet passed a Declaration of Sovereignty  on  16 July. It 
theoretically  approved  a whole  spectrum  of measures  that would  in  principle lead

1990 IN UKRAINE: THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK
7
towards  the  establishment of a  sovereign  Ukraine.  Yet,  wedged  into  the clauses 
regarding economic  autonomy  and  military  service  in  Ukraine  only,  was  a clause 
stating  that  the Ukrainian  SSR  had  no  intentions  of leaving  the USSR.  Everyone, 
including  many  in  Ukraine  and  Ukrainians  in  the  West,  were  blinded  with 
celebration, heralding the coming of an independent Ukrainian state on the basis of 
this declaration.
However,  die  celebrations  did  not  yet  die  down  before  Ukrainians  began  to 
realise  that  the  Declaration  was  no  more  than  a  classic  exercise  in  Soviet double- 
talk.  Ukrainians  began  to  demand  that  the  promises  made  in  the  Declaration  be 
transformed  into  concrete  action,  legislated  by  law.  The  damage,  though,  was 
already  done.  The  temporary  period  of jubilation  in  Ukraine  gave  the  anti­
democratic forces in Kyiv and their mentors in Moscow time to finalise the plan for 
neutralising the democratic nationalist threat
Meanwhile, mass rallies began  to be organised all over Ukraine, demanding  the 
realisation  of the Declaration promises.  Strikes  were instigated.  At a rally in  Kyiv 
on  12 August,  Mykhailo Ratushnyi, head of the Kyiv  Strike Committee,  called  for 
the demands  of Ukrainians  to be met by  the Supreme Soviet and set a deadline of 
17  September.  When  the  demands  were  not  met  and  the  prom ises  of  the 
Declaration  were  not  fulfilled,  mass  rallies  were again  held,  at  which  democratic 
nationalists threatened more radical action.
At this time, a secret directive was sent to all Ukrainian MVD  units, instructing 
them  to  disrupt nationalist  rallies  in  any  way  possible.  Provocations  of all  kinds 
were suggested to instigate violence so that pretexts could be made for the arrest of 
nationalist  activists.  MVD  troops  were  placed  in  a  constant  state  of readiness  to 
deal  with  demonstrations  and  with  incidents  provoked  by  MVD  and  KGB 
plainclothesmen.
The  authorities  did  not foresee,  however,  the  student phenomenon  of October. 
Ukrainian students set up a tent city in Kyiv and proclaimed a hunger strike in order to 
force the communist-dominated Supreme Soviet to meet their demands. The students 
were soon joined by  thousands of young supporters, and a rally of over 100,000 was 
held in conjunction with the hunger strike. The students were partially appeased when 
Leonid  Kravchuk  announced  that Ukrainian  SSR Premier  Vitaliy  Masol  would  be 
forced  to resign,  and the demands  of the students  would  be  considered.  What  went 
unrealised was that Masol served as a sacrificial lamb.  Kravchuk could not afford to 
have a hunger striker die, which would fuel the nationalist cause, therefore, to end the 
strike, he put Masol’s  head on  the block.  The students dismantled  their tent city and 
went  home.  Thus,  it  is  evident  that the  events  of the  summer  and  mid-autumn 
constituted  a  series  of democratic  nationalist  advances,  which  were  met  by 
government appeasement in order to  stop  the  nationalists  from  going  too  far.  If any 
one  of the  protests  was  allowed  to  be  prolonged,  the  communist  majority  in  the 
Supreme Soviet correctly feared that it would snowball into country-wide unrest. They

8
THE UKRAINIAN REVIEW
thus  devised  measures  (a  toothless  Declaration  of Sovereignty  and  the  forced 
resignation of Masol) to avert such a development
This strategy, however, gave the reactionary forces in Kyiv and Moscow time to 
put their plan into action. Its culmination came with the demonstration in Kyiv on 7 
November  to  protest  against  the  military  parade  on  the  anniversary  of  the  1917 
Bolshevik  coup.  While  the  military  parade  was  scheduled  to  go  on,  democratic 
nationalists planned a counter-demonstration at the other end of the city, so that no 
possibilities  would  exist  for  any  altercations  between  the  m ilitary  and  the 
protesters.  However,  the  protest  was  attended  by  MVD  plainclothesmen,  whose 
aim  it  was  to  provoke  an  incident.  One  such  incident  took  place  when  MVD 
Colonel  Ihor  Hryhoriev  was  disarmed  by  a  group  of nationalists  led  by  People’s 
Deputy  Stepan  Khmara  and  Mykhailo  Ratushnyi,  after  a  woman  complained  she 
was harassed by Hryhoriev. (It was later revealed that the woman was employed by 
the  KGB).  When  Khmara  and  others  appealed  to  nearby  militia  to  deal  with  the 
matter,  their  pleas  were  ignored.  The  group  then  harmlessly  disarmed  Hryhoriev, 
and a ring  was  formed around him  while militia help  was  sought, so that no  harm 
could be done to him. The  incident was  used as  the basis  for the arrest of Khmara 
and Ratushnyi (as well as others), on the false charges of assault. The absurdities of 
the  charges  became  evident as  circumstances  of the  incident  were  revealed  by 
witnesses.  While  witnesses  verified  that  Hryhoriev  was  unharmed,  authorities 
claimed he was  severely beaten  and  was  in  hospital.  Khmara and  Ratushnyi  were 
imprisoned  and  as  a result of their  hunger  strikes  were  in  very  poor  health,  the 
former so much so that he was transferred to a hospital for treatment.
This  incident was followed by  the arrest or detainment of various other leading 
nationalist  figures  over  the  last  few  months,  including  the  arrest  of 21-year-old 
Oles Doniy, the organiser of the October student hunger strike in Kyiv.
These recent events are sadly proving that the latest reformist cycle in the USSR 
has  come  to  an  end.  Gorbachev  has  amassed  for  himself  more  power  in  the 
party/state apparatus than any other leader in Soviet history, including Stalin. With 
the  December  state  structure  reorganisation  approved  by  Moscow’s  Congress  of 
Peoples’  Deputies, Gorbachev can  legally  invoke direct presidential  rule  wherever 
and whenever he sees  fit.  This  means  that Gorbachev can resort to  armed  force to 
protect  the  Soviet hold  over  the  republics.  The  creation  of a Federation  Council, 
headed by  Gorbachev, also  gives him  direct rule over the republics.  The ramming 
through  of the  new  union  treaty  is  an  example  of the  new  Soviet  intolerance  of 
nationalistic and independence-minded republics.
The  growing  anti-nationalist campaign  in  Ukraine,  with  a  new  wave of arrests 
and  harassment of nationalists,  indicates  that Moscow,  with  its  surrogate  in  Kyiv, 
has  ended  its  tolerance  of popular  revolt.  Defence  Minister  Dmitri  Yazov,  in  a 
televised  speech  from  Moscow,  stated  that  the  army  will  no  longer  allow  the 
demolition  of Soviet  monuments  and  the  erection  of  monuments  to  “fascist

1990 IN UKRAINE: THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK
9
collaborators  and  murderers”,  a  veiled  reference  to  the  tearing  down  of Lenin 
monuments  in  Ukraine  and  the  erection  of  a  statue  in  the  native  village  o f 
Ukrainian nationalist leader Stepan Bandera, who was assassinated by  the KGB in 
Munich  in  1959.  This  threat became  less  veiled  when  in  late  December  a  bomb 
exploded at the Bandera monument, destroying the statue and a nearby chapel.
It is clearly evident that we are today witnessing the beginning of a new phase in 
the Soviet cycle. When Gorbachev announced his reformist policies in  1985, he did 
not foresee that he would literally be opening Pandora’s Box. When he realised that 
the  forces  he  unleashed  were  on  the  brink  of tearing  apart  the  Soviet  empire, 
Gorbachev had no choice, as the head of the imperial government, to take measures 
to  prevent its  downfall  and  his  own.  Thus,  troops  have  been  sent  into  Kyiv  and 
Vilnius and Tbilisi and other capitals where anti-Soviet nationalism has been strong 
over  the  past  year.  It  is  perhaps  no  coincidence  that  these  troops  were  being 
deployed at a time when the West was involved in war in the Persian Gulf. With the 
West  at  war,  Gorbachev  knew  that  he  could  safely  crackdown  on  the  republics 
without reproach,  since the West needed his  support against Hussein.  Once  again, 
the  fate  of  small  nations  is  being  decided  by  big  power  politics.  Just  as 
Czechoslovakia was sacrificed in Munich in  1938 and Hungary in  1956, so are the 
republics,  foremost  of which  is  Ukraine,  being  sacrificed  now.  The  horrifying 
images  from  the  military  crackdown  in  Vilnius  on  January  13,  during  which 
defenceless  civilians  were  beaten  with  rifle  butts,  shot  at  and  run  over  by  Soviet 
tanks are haunting proof that for all intents and purposes, freedom has, for the time 
being, been subordinated to the more important goal (in the eyes of the Kremlin) of 
restoring “order” and  the primacy of Moscow’s dictatorial  rule. The placidity with 
which President  Bush  and other Western  leaders  accepted  news of these events  is 
even  greater  cause  for  alarm,  for  should  Gorbachev  go  unreproached  for this  act 
(beyond  the  customary  Western  expression  of indignation),  he  will  certainly  be 
encouraged to extend military dictatorial rule to the other republics.
However,  Ukraine  is  not  yet  ready  to  lie  down  and  roll  over.  The  taste  of 
freedom over the past year has demonstrated to the people what is possible, and no 
one will be satisfied with a reversion to the past. While a change in strategy may be 
in  order,  where  nationalist  activity  becomes  more  small-scale  and  coordinated  as 
opposed  to  massive  acts,  there  is  no  reason  to  believe  that  the  final  chapter  has 
already been  written.  A possible development of nationalist strategy may  be  mass 
individual acts of civil disobedience.  As a mass unit, Ukrainians cannot stand up to 
armed Soviet might without great losses. However, should individuals take to  mass 
and  simultaneous  acts  of civil  disobedience,  the  Soviet  authorities  will  have  51 
million  individual  armies  with  which  to  contend.  In  any  case,  1990  proved  that 
Ukraine has the will and the potential to become an independent state.

10
Quo  V
adis
?


Download 11.13 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   32




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling