To the Point Packard and Scottsbluff


Download 26.33 Kb.
Pdf ko'rish
Sana14.09.2018
Hajmi26.33 Kb.

To the Point

Packard and Scottsbluff

Neal H. Lopinot

Packard

Description: 

This point type rep-

resents a relatively narrow lanceolate 

form.  The  blade  exhibits  very  sys-

tematic flaking that terminates at the 

midline. This causes it to be thickest 

throughout  the  middle  of  the  blade 

and diamond-shaped in cross section. 

Grinding can extend from one third 

to one half of its length. It is widest 

at or slightly above the midpoint and 

contracts toward the base, which can 

be slightly convex, straight, or slightly 

concave.


Age: 

Its age is still somewhat un-

certain, although it appears to post-

date  Dalton.  Some  classify  it  as  a 

Late Paleoindian point, while others 

consider  it  to  be  an  early  Early  Ar-

chaic  type.  Packard  points  were  as-

sociated  with  four  radiocarbon  ages 

of 9888 ± 90 b.p., 9830 ± 70 b.p., 9770 

± 80 b.p., and 9416 ± 193 b.p. at the 

type site, the Packard site, in north-

eastern Oklahoma (Wyckoff 1985:14). A date of 9950 ± 50 

b.p. was recently obtained for deeply buried deposits that 

yielded a Packard point at the Jameson 

site (23cn579) along the James River in 

Christian County, Missouri (Ray and 

Lopinot 2005:280).

Distribution: 

Although very un-

common,  it  likely  occurs  throughout 

most  of  Missouri.  Closer  scrutiny  of 

similar previously and newly collected 

lanceolate  points  is  needed  to  better 

define its distribution in the state.

Comments: 

Often confused with 

Agate Basin and sometimes referred to 

as “Eastern Agate Basin,” the Packard 

point is thicker and may date later in 

time (Ray 1998: 145). Points identified 

as  Agate  Basin  have  been  recovered 

from  a  number  of  Missouri  sites,  in-

cluding the lower levels of Arnold Re-

search Cave and Graham Cave, but many of these points 

may, in fact, be Searcy (sometimes termed Rice Lanceolate) 

points.


Some  Packard  points  can  be  distinguished  from 

resharpened Searcy points in that Packard points are never 

beveled or serrated. The flaking on Searcy points is also 

less systematic. For the novice, Packard points also might 

be confused at times with Nebo Hill points, but the flaking 

on Packard points is generally much finer.



Scottsbluff

Description: 

Scottsbluff  is  a 

large  point  with  weak  shoulders 

(no  barbs),  a  straight  to  slightly 

expanding stem, and a straight to 

slightly convex base. The stem is 

often  wide  in  comparison  to  the 

blade. The blade is never beveled. 

Most  specimens  are  well  made 

and exhibit fine collateral flaking 

across the blade. It is lenticular in 

cross section.



Age: 

This type is Early Archaic. 

A  time  range  of  about  8750  b.p. 

to  8350  b.p.  (6800-6400  b.p.)  has 

been given for Scottsbluff (Justice 

1987:49), but earlier radiocarbon dates have been reported 

for several sites in the Plains. At Big Eddy, a radiocarbon 

date of 9,525 ± 65 b.p. was obtained for a Scottsbluff oc-

cupation level.

Distribution: 

Scottsbluff points are rarely found and 

often manufactured from exotic lithic material (e.g., Ray 

2000: 128-129). They occur most commonly in the western 

and northern prairie regions, but they are probably distrib-

uted throughout Missouri.



Comments

Resharpened Hardin points (those with-

out barbs) resemble Scottsbluff points, and it may be that 

Hardin  and  Scottsbluff  were  contemporary  points,  one 

made principally by people living in the central Mississippi 

Valley and the other made primarily by bison hunters in 

the High Plains and adjacent regions. Justice (1987:51) notes 

some differences between the two, particularly the fact that 

resharpened Hardin points often exhibit beveled blades and 

Scottsbluff points do not.



Figure 1. Packard 

from 23

ce

426.

Figure 2. Packard 

from 23

wr

59. 

Figure 3. Scottsbluff 

from 23

ce

519.

Figure 4. (a) Packard from 23

gr

151-

c

; (b) Scottsbluff from 

23

dl

157.

a

b



b

c

d



References

Justice, Noel D.

1987  Stone Age Spear and Arrow Points of the Midcontinental and East-

ern United States. Indiana University Press, Bloomington.

Ray, Jack H.

1998  Cultural  Components.  In  The  1997  Excavations  at  the  Big 

Eddy Site (23

ce

426) in Southwest Missouri, edited by Neal H. 

Lopinot, Jack H. Ray, and Michael D. Conner, pp. 111-220. 

Special Publication No. 2. Center for Archaeological Research, 

Southwest Missouri State University, Springfield.

2000  Chert Procurement and Use. In The 1999 Excavations at the Big 

Eddy Site (23

ce

426), edited by Neal H. Lopinot, Jack H. Ray, 

and Michael D. Conner, pp. 113-131. Special Publication No. 3. 

Center for Archaeological Research, Southwest Missouri State 

University, Springfield.

Ray, Jack H., and Neal H. Lopinot

2005  Early Archaic. In Regional Research and the Archaic Record at 



the  Big  Eddy  Site  (23

ce

426),  Southwest  Missouri,  edited  by 

Neal H. Lopinot, Jack H. Ray, and Michael D. Conner, pp. 

223-283. Special Publication No. 4. Center for Archaeological 

Research, Southwest Missouri State University, Springfield.

Wyckoff, Don G.

1985  The Packard Complex: Early Archaic, Pre-Dalton Occupations 

on  the  Prairie  Woodlands  Border.  Southeastern  Archaeology 

4:1-26.


All drawn points actual size

Figure 6. Scottsbluff from the Montgomery site (23

ce

261). 

Figure 5. Packard points and hafted end-scraper from the 

Packard type site, Oklahoma (photos of casts provided 

courtesy of Don Wyckoff).

Figure 7. Scottsbluff points. (a) 23

ce

519, (b) 23

ce

491, (c) 23

ce

444, 

(d) 23

ce

519, (e) 23

ce

435. 

a

e




Download 26.33 Kb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling