Chapter 1: Population Growth and Economic


Download 90.52 Kb.

Sana06.02.2018
Hajmi90.52 Kb.

Chapter 1: Population Growth and Economic

Development

Harvard Kennedy School

PED 365, Spring 2011

(Harvard Kennedy School)

Hillel Rapoport

PED 365, Spring 2011

1 / 33


Plan

1

Introduction



2

The demographic transition

3

Two con‡icting views on population and development



4

From stagnation to growth

(Harvard Kennedy School)

Hillel Rapoport

PED 365, Spring 2011

2 / 33


Introduction

The world population has been growing very slowly for millennia, at

yearly growth rates lower than .1 percent until ... 1700.

Then population growth started to rise in Western Europe and its

o¤shoots in the 18th and 19th centuries, peaking around 1850 at 1

percent and then decreased to 0.5 percent nowadays. In the

developing world population growth remained low throughout the

19th century, rose sharply after 1950 to peak at 2 percent in 1970

and has since gradually decreased to about 1 percent today.

The …rst billion was reached in 1804, the second in 1927 (123 years

later), the third in 1960 (33 years), the fourth in 1974 (14 years), the

…fth in 1987 (13 years) and the sixth in 1999 (12 years). Note that the

seventh billion has not been reached yet (while 12 years have passed).

Realistic scenarios predict a stabilization by 2050 at 10 billion.

(Harvard Kennedy School)

Hillel Rapoport

PED 365, Spring 2011

3 / 33


Introduction

In this chapter we want to go beyond the description of the

demographics and analyze the relationship between population growth

and economic development: what causes what?

To answer this question we will …rst present basic demographic

concepts and historical evidence on the demographic transition.

We will then present two broad views on the links between population

growth and economic development – a pessimistic or fatalistic view

inspired by Thomas Malthus and its modern disciples (such as Paul

Ehrlich), and an optimistic view advocated by economists and

demographers such as Julian Simon, Simon Kuznets and Esther

Boserup –, and discuss the empirical evidence.

(Harvard Kennedy School)

Hillel Rapoport

PED 365, Spring 2011

4 / 33


Plan

1

Introduction



2

The demographic transition

3

Two con‡icting views on population and development



4

From stagnation to growth

(Harvard Kennedy School)

Hillel Rapoport

PED 365, Spring 2011

5 / 33


Basic demographic concepts

Population dynamics:

P

t

+



1

=

P



t

+

B



t

D

t



+

M

t



with

P

t



= population at time t

B

t



= number of births, hence the birth rate: b

t

=



B

t

/P



t

D

t



= number of deaths, hence the mortality rate: d

t

=



D

t

/P



t

M

t



= net migrations, hence the migration rate: m

t

=



M

t

/P



t

Growth rate of the population:

P

t

+



1

/P

t



=

1

+



n

t

where n



t

=

b



t

d

t



+

m

t



(Harvard Kennedy School)

Hillel Rapoport

PED 365, Spring 2011

6 / 33


The three phases of the demographic transition

First phase: for millennia, birth and deaths rates have been very high

and of similar magnitudes, yielding extremely low population growth.

Second phase: death rates started declining thanks to better health

practices and increases in agricultural and industrial productivity; with

…rst steady birth rates and then demographic inertia due to the age

structure, this caused population to explode in Europe in the 19th

century and in the developing world in the mid-20th century.

Third phase: with declining birth rates and an aging population,

birth and death rates again converge to a low-level equilibrium already

reached by developed countries while developing countries are either

in the second or at the beginning of the third phase.

(Harvard Kennedy School)

Hillel Rapoport

PED 365, Spring 2011

7 / 33


Examples of demographic transitions

The English demographic transition

0.00

5.00


10.00

15.00


20.00

25.00


30.00

35.00


40.00

45.00


1500

1600


1700

1800


1900

2000


CBR

CDR


(Harvard Kennedy School)

Hillel Rapoport

PED 365, Spring 2011

8 / 33


Examples of demographic transitions

The Japanese demographic transition

0

5

10



15

20

25



30

35

40



1875

1925


1975

CBR


CDR

(Harvard Kennedy School)

Hillel Rapoport

PED 365, Spring 2011

9 / 33


The changing geographic distribution of the world

population

As a result of di¤erences in the timing of the demographic transition,

the geographic distribution of the world population has changed over

time.

1650


1800

1933


1995

2010


World Population

545


906

2057


5716

6909


Europe

18.3


20.7

25.2


12.7

10.6


North America

0.2


0.7

6.7


5.1

5.1


Oceania

0.4


0.2

0.5


0.5

0.5


Latin America

2.2


2.1

6.1


8.4

8.5


Africa

18.3


9.9

7.0


12.8

15.0


Asia

60.6


66.4

54.4


60.5

60.3


(Harvard Kennedy School)

Hillel Rapoport

PED 365, Spring 2011

10 / 33


Plan

1

Introduction



2

The demographic transition

3

Two con‡icting views on population and development



4

From stagnation to growth

(Harvard Kennedy School)

Hillel Rapoport

PED 365, Spring 2011

11 / 33


The Malthusian view

Thomas Robert Malthus (1766-1934) - Cambridge UK

"An Essay on the Principle of Population as it A¤ects the Future Improvement of

Society" (1798)

(Harvard Kennedy School)

Hillel Rapoport

PED 365, Spring 2011

12 / 33


The "old" Malthusian view

Main idea: demographic growth exceeds the capacity of agriculture to

sustain a growing population (geometric v. arithmetic growth); this

leads to demo-economic cycles with adjustments through famine,

epidemies, wars

Any increase in income (real wages) is absorbed through higher

population growth, leading to constant wages at survival levels in the

long-run (Ricardo-Malthus’s "iron law of wages")

Salvation comes from abstinence: the poor should refrain from giving

birth to too many children.

(Harvard Kennedy School)

Hillel Rapoport

PED 365, Spring 2011

13 / 33


The Malthusian view: illustration

England:  1200-1850

0

2

4



6

8

10



12

14

16



1215

1305


1395

1485


1575

1665


1755

1840


0

20

40



60

80

100



120

140


160

180


Population

Farm real wage

(Harvard Kennedy School)

Hillel Rapoport

PED 365, Spring 2011

14 / 33


A Natural Experiment Con…rming the Malthusian View:

the Black Death

1347: originating from Asia, the Black Death enters through the port

of Marseilles and spreads throughout Europe in two years, killing one

third of the population (from 80 to 56 million); the plague comes

back in other forms episodicaly in the 2nd half on the 14th century.

Due to the fall in population, the ratio of land per worker rises; real

wages started to rise tremendously all over Europe, doubling within

one century; at the turn of the 16th century however, population

started to grow again and real wage decreased; by 1650 they were

back to their 1350 levels

(Harvard Kennedy School)

Hillel Rapoport

PED 365, Spring 2011

15 / 33


(Harvard Kennedy School)

Hillel Rapoport

PED 365, Spring 2011

16 / 33


The "new" Malthusian view

Paul Ehrlich, "The population bomb", 1968: predicts that within a

decade, overpopulation will cause repeated famines and resurgence of

diseases, eventually killing one …fth of the world’s population.

This did not happen but the emphasis is now on sustainable

development; examples:

Lester Brown, World Watch Institute, "Beyond Malthus" (1999):

overpopulation will constrain and even reverse economic progress

Population Action International: ”the capacity of farmers to feed the

world’s future population is in jeopardy”

Population Institute: ”The Four Horsemen of the 21st century

apocalypse: overpopulation, deforestation, water scarcity, famine”

Many examples of historical collapses of societies (Easter Island,

Mayas, Anasazi settlements) and modern con‡icts (Rwanda, Haiti)

triggered by population pressure on fragile environments (see Jared

Diamond’s "Collapse", 2004)

(Harvard Kennedy School)

Hillel Rapoport

PED 365, Spring 2011

17 / 33


The Kuznets-Simon-Boserup view

Economists have long been skeptical about the alarmist view. Why?

Theoretical arguments:

The view that people have zero productivity is incompatible with the

principle that people respond to incentives (pro…t opportunity for

employers, motives to increase one’s income for the individual).

People are not just "labor", they are also creators and innovators. In

other words, technical progress is endogenous to population size.

On the supply side, the "genius principle": the higher the population,

the more likely it is another Mozart or Einstein will come, raising the

stock of ideas; and since ideas can be shared at zero cost, new ideas

are used more e¤ectively in large than in small populations. This

principle was initially put forward by Julian Simon (1977) and Simon

Kuznets (1960).

(Harvard Kennedy School)

Hillel Rapoport

PED 365, Spring 2011

18 / 33


The Kuznets-Simon-Boserup view

On the demand side, the "population pressure" principle: population

growth spurs technological innovation precisely because it puts

pressure on scarce ressources (necessity is the mother of invention).

This was initially put forward by the Danish, UN-based economist

Esther Boserup.

If this is true, this should apply …rst and foremost to agriculture, the

sector which has the task to feed a growing population

Boserup (1981) classi…ed countries into …ve groups of increasing

population density, and showed that high-density countries have more

irrigation, use chemical fertilizers, practice multiple cropping, etc. In

short, high population densities go hand in hand with technologically

more intensive farming. Correlation and causation.

(Harvard Kennedy School)

Hillel Rapoport

PED 365, Spring 2011

19 / 33


The Kuznets-Simon-Boserup view

Esther Boserup (1910-1999) - Danish

UN-based development and agricultural economist

(Harvard Kennedy School)

Hillel Rapoport

PED 365, Spring 2011

20 / 33


The Kuznets-Simon-Boserup view

Simon Kuznets (1901-1985) - American (Russian-born)

Economic historian, Winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics in 1971

(Harvard Kennedy School)

Hillel Rapoport

PED 365, Spring 2011

21 / 33


Empirical evidence: observations

First, the doomsday scenario did not happen. For example, while the

world population doubled between 1960 and 1998, food production

tripled (including in developing countries). Still, it may be the case

that such growth is not sustainable, is discounting the future (eating

the capital of "Mother Earth")

Second, in the long-run, population growth and economic growth

have been closely associated: low for millennia, accelerating at the

same time and then both slowing down in the last period (for

industrialized nations).

Third, there are also examples of societies that grew large

demographically while at the same time preserving their environment

thanks to bottom-up (New Guinea) or top-down (Japan)

management ((see Jared Diamond’s "Collapse", 2004)

(Harvard Kennedy School)

Hillel Rapoport

PED 365, Spring 2011

22 / 33


Empirical evidence: cross-sectional results

A cross-sectional analysis gives no clear indications: today population

growth and economic growth seem randomly associated;

in addition, variations in population growth (ranging from 1 to 4

percent over the period 1960-92) are small relative to variations in

economic growth (from -2 to 10 percent). Assuming population

growth decreases economic growth one for one (ie, additional people

have zero productivity), this could at best explain one fourth of the

variation in per capita growth

(Harvard Kennedy School)

Hillel Rapoport

PED 365, Spring 2011

23 / 33


Empirical evidence: long-run results

Michael Kremer: "Population Growth since 1 Million BC", QJE1993

Testable implication: the Kuznets-Simon-Boserup hypothesis implies

a positive relationship between initial population and population

growth (in a Malthusian world), the Malthus-Ehrlich-Brown

hypothesis implying a negative relationship.

In the very long-run, population growth has been accelerating, not

decelerating; the positive relationship is compatible with the KSB

view and incompatible with the MEB view.

In the last period population growth has been decelerating;however

this is due to falling birth rates, not to to increasing death rates, as

the Malthusian theory would predict.

(Harvard Kennedy School)

Hillel Rapoport

PED 365, Spring 2011

24 / 33


Plan

1

Introduction



2

The demographic transition

3

Two con‡icting views on population and development



4

From stagnation to growth

(Harvard Kennedy School)

Hillel Rapoport

PED 365, Spring 2011

25 / 33


From stagnation to growth

As we have seen in the previous chapter, for millennia population

growth remained low (accelerating very slowly) and income levels

remained at survival levels: this is called a "Malthusian regime".

Any increase in income (due, e.g., to technological progress or to

exogenous shocks such as wars or epidemies) was matched after some

time by increases in population, keeping average income more or less

constant.

It is estimated that real incomes were about 20% higher in 1800

compared to the year 0; Europe’s peasants had about the same real

income as Egyptians peasants in pharaonic times

(Harvard Kennedy School)

Hillel Rapoport

PED 365, Spring 2011

26 / 33


From stagnation to growth

Then, around 1700 (for Western Europe), the demographic transition

started. At about the same time, an agricultural revolution had

started, followed by the industrial revolution.

For the …rst time in history, real output increased steadily, with

population …rst also growing steadily (during the transition phase),

leading to moderate gains in per capita income: this is called a

regime of "extensive (or post-malthusian) growth". Extensive growth

has now reached every region of the world.

Eventually population growth slowed down while output kept growing,

leading to sharp increases in living standards: this is called an

"intensive (or modern) growth" regime, now well established in the

Western hemisphere and in East Asia.

In other words, the demographic transition has also been an economic

transition from Malthusian to modern growth.

(Harvard Kennedy School)

Hillel Rapoport

PED 365, Spring 2011

27 / 33


From stagnation to growth

The long-term evolution of income per capita

Average world GDP per capita (USD per year)

0

1000



2000

3000


4000

5000


6000

7000


-5000

-4000


-3000

-2000


-1000

0

1000



2000

DeLong


Nordhaus

(Harvard Kennedy School)

Hillel Rapoport

PED 365, Spring 2011

28 / 33


From stagnation to growth

Another measure of real incomes

Source: Gregory Clark: "The long march of history: Farm wages, population, and

economic growth, England 1209–1869", Economic History Review, February 2007.

(Harvard Kennedy School)

Hillel Rapoport

PED 365, Spring 2011

29 / 33


From stagnation to growth

From Malthusian to post-malthusian growth

England: 1200-1850

40

60



80

100


120

140


160

180


0

4

8



12

16

Population



Far

real



 wage

1840


1750

1670


1220

1340


1460

(Harvard Kennedy School)

Hillel Rapoport

PED 365, Spring 2011

30 / 33


From stagnation to growth

From extensive to intensive growth

Output growth in Western Europe

-0.25% 0.25% 0.75%

1.25%

1.75% 2.25%



2.75%

1 - 1000


1000 - 1500

1500-1700

1700-1820

1820-1870

1870-1913

1913-2001

Population

GDP per capita

(Harvard Kennedy School)

Hillel Rapoport

PED 365, Spring 2011

31 / 33


From stagnation to growth

At this point, we can ask: what caused what? Given that the timings

are so intricated, the answer is complex.

There are theories explaining the long stagnation that characterises

the Malthusian epoch, and theories explaining the demographic and

economic take-o¤, and others explaining the transition to modern

growth.

In general these theories emphasize a number of (proximate?) causes,



such as the rise of property rights (Douglas North) in the cities of

medieval Europe, the sanitation and hygiene revolution, or the advent

of general purpose technologies (Schumpeter) and can explain one or

at best two of the three phases

(Harvard Kennedy School)

Hillel Rapoport

PED 365, Spring 2011

32 / 33


From stagnation to growth

For example, Nobel Prize Winner (in 1995) Robert Lucas, in "The

Mechanics of Economic Development" (JPE1988), explains that

technological progress is "skill-biased", i.e. gradually increases the

return to skills:

- at some point, this rate of return became higher than the rate at which

we discount the future (which, in equilibrium, is the rate of return to

capital), prompting people to start investing in human capital and

producing more output per capita

- this also implies that altruistic parents will invest more in the education

(human capital) of their children, gradually trading o¤ quantity for quality

(Becker, 1981), prompting population growth to decrease – see next

chapter on fertility.

Are there ultimate causes, that can account for the three phases in a

uni…ed theoretical framework? This is the ambition of the "uni…ed

growth theory" proposed by Oded Galor (Handbook of Economic

Growth, Chapter 4, 2005).

(Harvard Kennedy School)

Hillel Rapoport

PED 365, Spring 2011



33 / 33

Document Outline



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling