Clinical study


Download 186.97 Kb.

Sana04.10.2017
Hajmi186.97 Kb.

CLINICAL STUDY

Genetic and epigenetic states of the GNAS complex in

pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib using methylation-specific

multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay

Akiko Yuno

1,2


, Takeshi Usui

1

, Yuko Yambe



3

, Kiichiro Higashi

4

, Satoshi Ugi



5

, Junji Shinoda

6

, Yasuo Mashio



7

and Akira Shimatsu

1

1

Clinical Research Institute, National Hospital Organization Kyoto Medical Center, 1-1 Mukaihata-cho, Fukakusa, Fushimi-ku, Kyoto 612-8555, Japan,



2

Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Kin-i-kyo Chuo Hospital, Sapporo, Japan,

3

Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, National Hospital



Organization Nagoya Medical Center, Nagoya, Japan,

4

Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, National Hospital Organization Kumamoto Medical



Center, Kumamoto, Japan,

5

Department of Medicine, Shiga University of Medical Science, Otsu, Shiga, Japan,



6

Department of Endocrinology, Toyota

Memorial Hospital, Toyota, Japan and

7

Kyosai Clinic, Sapporo Kosei Hospital, Sapporo, Japan



(Correspondence should be addressed to T Usui; Email: tusui@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp)

Abstract


Context: Pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib (PHP-Ib) is a rare disorder resulting from genetic and

epigenetic aberrations in the GNAS complex. PHP-Ib, usually defined by renal resistance to parathyroid

hormone, is due to a maternal loss of GNAS exon A/B methylation and leads to decreased expression of

the stimulatory G protein a (Gsa) in specific tissues.

Objective: To clarify the usefulness of methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe

amplification (MS-MLPA), we evaluated genetic and epigenetic changes of the GNAS locus in Japanese

PHP-Ib patients.

Design: Retrospective case series.

Patients: We studied 13 subjects with PHP-Ib (three families with eight affected members and one

unaffected member and four sporadic cases).

Measurements: The methylation status of GNAS differentially methylated regions (DMRs) was evaluated

using MS-MLPA. The main outcome measure was the presence of deletion mutations in the GNAS

locus and STX16, which were assessed using MLPA.

Results: In all familial PHP-Ib cases, a w3 kb deletion of STX16 and demethylation of the A/B domain

were identified. In contrast, no deletion was detected throughout the entire GNAS locus region in the

sporadic cases. Broad methylation abnormalities were observed in the GNAS DMRs.

Conclusions: MS-MLPA allows for precise and rapid analysis of the methylation status in GNAS DMRs as

well as the detection of microdeletion mutations in PHP-Ib. Results confirm the previous findings in

this disorder and demonstrate that this method is valuable for the genetic evaluation and visualizing

the methylation status. The MS-MLPA assay is a useful tool that may facilitate making the molecular

diagnosis of PHP-Ib.

European Journal of Endocrinology 168 169–175

Introduction

Pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) is characterized by

hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia due to the

resistance to parathyroid hormone (PTH)

(1)

. PHP


type 1 (PHP-I) comprises a group of heterogeneous

disorders caused by different genetic/epigenetic defects

within the same locus

(2)


. Analysis of PHP patients over

the past several years has provided remarkable insight

for understanding GNAS expression, function, and

regulation

(3)

. PHP-Ib patients present predominantly



with renal PTH resistance and lack any features of

Albright’s hereditary osteodystrophy in the majority of

cases

(1)


. Most PHP-Ib cases are sporadic, but some

cases are familial and show an autosomal dominant

mode of inheritance (AD-PHP-Ib)

(4)


. In contrast to

most cases of PHP-Ia, which are caused by a mutation

in the coding sequence of the GNAS gene, the majority

of PHP-Ib cases are reportedly caused by a methylation

alteration of the GNAS locus

(5, 6)


. The GNAS complex

contains at least four distinct differentially methylated

regions (DMRs)

(7, 8, 9)

. By a parent-specific methyl-

ation pattern of most of its different promoters, the

GNAS locus gives rise to several transcripts, including

the a-subunit of the heterotrimeric stimulatory G

protein a (Gsa), the Gsa extra-large variant (XLas), a

second alternative gene product encoded by the

XL-exon 1 (ALEX), neuroendocrine protein 55

(NESP55), untranslated exon A/B (also known as

exon 1A), and an additional antisense transcript (AS)

European Journal of Endocrinology (2013) 168 169–175

ISSN 0804-4643

q

2013 European Society of Endocrinology



DOI:

10.1530/EJE-12-0548

Online version via www.eje-online.org


(10)

. The XLas, A/B, and AS transcripts derive

exclusively from the paternal allele, whereas NESP55

is maternally derived

(7, 9)

. Consistent with this



imprinted expression pattern, the promoters of these

genes are methylated on the silenced allele.

An epigenetic defect of exon A/B DMR that reduces

the expression of Gsa from the maternal GNAS allele

leads to PTH resistance in patients with PHP-Ib.

AD-PHP-Ib, which is maternally transmitted in an

autosomal dominant manner, is typically associated

with loss of imprinting at exon A/B DMR due to

microdeletions disrupting the upstream STX16 gene,

which likely harbors a cis-acting control element crucial

for establishing the methylation imprint at exon A/B

(10)


. A heterozygous 3 or 4.4 kb deletion of STX16 has

been identified in affected individuals and unaffected

carriers of AD-PHP-Ib cases

(11, 12, 13, 14)

and a few

apparently sporadic PHP-Ib cases

(14)

. In addition,



deletions of NESP and/or AS have been identified in

AD-PHP-Ib patients

(15, 16, 17)

. Interestingly, most

sporadic PHP-Ib cases also exhibit GNAS imprinting

abnormalities that involve multiple DMRs: NESP, AS,

XL, and A/B

(5, 6)


. Therefore, the loss of methylation of

A/B DMR is common in all patients with PHP-Ib.

Genetic deletions within STX16 and NESP55/AS are not

present in most sporadic PHP-Ib cases

(12, 13, 14, 18)

.

In particular, the PTH concentration in the absence of



treatment is positively correlated with the percent of

methylation at the A/B DMR of GNAS

(18)

.

Thus, molecular analyses including analysis of the



methylation pattern of the GNAS locus provide useful

information in PHP-Ib, but conventional techniques to

detect large deletion or epigenetic alterations are both

time-consuming and costly. Multiplex ligation-depen-

dent probe amplification (MLPA) assays allow for

relative quantification of w50 different DNA sequences

in a single reaction requiring only 20 ng human DNA.

The MLPA technique is a powerful tool for evaluating

genetic deletions that cannot be detected using PCR-

based sequencing techniques. The MLPA assay has been

adapted to detect aberrant methylation

(19)


. Methyl-

ation-sensitive (MS)-MLPA is a modification of the MLPA

assay with a methylation-sensitive restriction endonu-

clease that simultaneously detects the methylation state

of CpG islands. The potential usefulness of MS-MLPA

for analyzing PHP-Ib had been reported in some cases

(20, 21, 22)

. In this study, we aimed to clarify the

usefulness of this method by evaluating the MS-MLPA

results for 13 Japanese PHP-Ib patients.

Materials and methods

Patients


We studied a total of 13 subjects with PHP-Ib (three

families with eight affected members and one unaffected

member and four sporadic cases). The clinical diagnosis

was based on the physical and laboratory findings. The

clinical background and the data are summarized in

Table 1


. Patient 4 was a 1-year-old girl with no features

of PTH resistance; nevertheless, her parents requested

that we perform presymptomatic genetic testing. We

performed the analysis after providing careful genetic

counseling to her parents. Informed consent was

obtained from all patients or their parents.

PCR and direct sequencing of the GNAS gene

Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood

leukocytes or saliva. Genomic DNA was extracted using

a QIAamp DNA Blood Kit (Qiagen) for blood samples

and a PUREGENE DNA Purification kit for saliva. All 13

exons, including the GC-rich exon 1 and intron–exon

boundaries of the GNAS gene, were amplified by PCR

using specific primers. The PCR products were purified

using Montage PCR Centrifugal Filter Devices (Millipore,

Billerica, MA, USA) and subsequently sequenced.

Sequencing was performed using a BigDye Terminator

Cycle Sequencing Kit and an ABI PRISM 310 Genetic

Analyzer (Applied Biosystems).

MLPA and MS-MLPA assays

Aberrant methylation within the GNAS locus was

identified by MS-MLPA using the SALSA MLPA kit

ME031-A1 GNAS (MRC-Holland, Amsterdam, The

Netherlands) according to the manufacturer’s protocol.

After hybridization with the probe mix, each sample

was divided into two aliquots. One tube was used to

identify the presence of deletions in the GNAS locus,

including DMRs and STX16 (MLPA). The other tube was

treated with the HhaI restriction enzyme, which

recognizes the unmethylated GCGC sequence, to assess

methylation status (MS-MLPA). Following PCR amplifi-

cation, the products were separated by electrophoresis.

Each sample peak was assigned to a specific probe

according to its length. The peak ratio was determined

by dividing the sample peaks of patients by those of

controls; undigested samples were used as controls for

MS-MLPA. Automated fragment and data analysis for

MLPA were performed using GeneMapper Software

(Applied Biosystems).

Methylation-specific PCR

The DNA samples (control, case 9 for AD-PHP-Ib and

case 11 for sporadic PHP-Ib) were treated with sodium

bisulfite using the MethylEasy Xceed Rapid DNA

Bisulfite Modification Kit (Human Genetic Signatures,

North Ryde, NSW, Australia). DNA methylation of the

NESP55 and A/B regions was analyzed using EpiTect

MSP Kit (Qiagen). Two sets of PCR primers were

designed using Methyl Primer Express Software v1.0

(Applied Biosystems): one for unmethylated and one for

170


A Yuno and others

EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF ENDOCRINOLOGY (2013) 168

www.eje-online.org


methylated DNA sequences in each region. The primer

sequences are shown in

supplementary Fig. 1C

, see


section on

supplementary data

given at the end of this

article. The PCR involved an initial denaturation at

95 8C for 10 min, followed by 35 cycles of 94 8C for 15 s,

predetermined optimal annealing temperature of 45 8C

for 30 s, 72 8C for 30 s, and a final extension at 72 8C for

10 min. Five microliters of PCR product were analyzed

on a 3.0% agarose gel.

Microsatellite marker analysis and poly-

morphism genotyping

Eight previously described polymorphic microsatellite

markers (D20S117, D20S889, D20S115, D20S112,

D20S107, D20S196, D20S171, and D20S173) were

labeled with fluorescent dye and used for PCR. The

genomic DNA template (100 ng) was amplified by

adding each marker. PCR products were subjected to

capillary electrophoresis. Data were analyzed using

GeneMapper Software (Applied Biosystems).

PCR-based detection of the 3 kb microdeletion

Exons 4–6 of the STX16 gene were amplified by PCR

using the following primers: forward primer, 5

0

-CTCA-


AGAGGCCCTGAAGTCCTCCAGCTGTC-3

0

; reverse primer,



5

0

-GGTCTTGTGTAGGGATTTTCCCACCTGTGGC-3



0

). PCR


was carried out in a final volume of 25 ml containing

10 mM Tris–HCl (pH 8.3), 50 mM KCl, 1.5 mM MgCl

2

,

200 nM of each dNTP, 1 mM of each primer, 100 ng



genomic DNA, and five units of LA Taq polymerase

(Takara, Shiga, Japan). Amplifications were performed as

follows: 95 8C for 30 s and 68 8C for 5 min. The PCR

products were purified using Montage PCR Centrifugal

Filter Devices (Millipore) and subsequently sequenced.

Sequencing was performed using a BigDye Terminator

Cycle Sequencing Kit and an ABI PRISM 310 Genetic

Analyzer (Applied Biosystems).

Results

As a GNAS mutation had been reported in some PHP-Ib



patients

(23)


, we first confirmed that none of the

patients carried a mutation in the GNAS gene by PCR

direct sequencing. Normal control subjects showed a

50% reduction of the signal intensity by HhaI digestion

compared with nondigested samples in all the DMRs,

suggesting a one-allele methylation in these domains

(

Fig. 1


A, lower panel closed bars). These findings are

consistent with the previously reported normal methyl-

ation pattern (

Fig. 1


A, upper panel). Although all nine

cases of AD-PHP-Ib exhibited a methylation pattern

identical to that of normal controls in the NESP55, AS,

and XL regions, a complete loss of PCR products after

HhaI digestion was observed in the two distinct A/B

regions, suggesting a biallelic unmethylated A/B region

Table

1

C



linical

and


biochem

ical


features

PHP-


Ib

cases


.

Case


Diseas

e

Sex



Age

Height


(cm;

SDS)


Weigh

t

(kg;



SDS)

BMI


AHO

Calcium


(m

g/dl)


Phos

phate


(mg/dl)

iPTH


(pg

/ml)


TSH

(m

U/ml)



1

AD-PH


P-Ib

Female


19

160


(C

0.3)


51

(K

0.03)



19

.9

No



4.4

6.

1



N

A

0.01



a

2

AD-PH



P-Ib

Male


20

174


(C

0.4)


66

(C

0.02)



21

.8

No



7.1

4.

6



620

7.18


a

3

AD-PH



P-Ib

Female


18

163


(C

0.95)


66

(C

1.99)



24

.8

No



8.2

4.

3



570

4.05


a

4

AD-PH



P-Ib

Female


1

9

0



(C

2.23)


15

(C

3.3)



18

.5

b



No

10

.1



6.

0

3



4

1.1


5

AD-PH


P-Ib

Male


14

180


(C

2.43)


63

(C

1.05)



19

.4

No



8.8

5.

8



240

7.73


a

6

AD-PH



P-Ib

Female


51

NA

NA



NA

No

6.5



4.

9

312



NA

7

AD-PH



P-Ib

Female


25

155


(C

0.74)


45.7

(K

0.83)



19

.0

No



7

5

.4



1410

0.392


8

AD-PH


P-Ib

Female


NA

NA

NA



NA

No

NA



N

A

NA



NA

9

AD-PH



P-Ib

Male


8

159.4


c

(K

2.31



)

66.4


c

(C

0.



29)

26

.1



No

9.7


d

4.

0



d

50

d



2.65

10

Sporad



ic

PHP-


Ib

Female


40

151


(K

1.48)


51

(K

2.45)



22

.4

No



3.4

3.

6



7

3

d



NA

11

Sporad



ic

PHP-


Ib

Male


44

160


(K

2.13)


74

(C

0.42)



28

.9

No



9.5

d

N



A

42

.0



d

19.29


a

12

Sporad



ic

PHP-


Ib

Female


74

137


e

(K

2.93)



36.8

(K

2.12)



19

.6

No



f

5.3


4.

8

158



NA

13

Sporad



ic

PHP-


Ib

Female


12

148


(K

0.63)


41

(K

0.33)



18

.7

No



5.3

8.

3



369

NA

Age,



age

at

diagnosis;



AHO,

Albright’s

hereditary

osteodystrophy

(clinical

features


of

either


s

hort


stature

!

K



2.5

SDS,


shortened

fourth


and

fifth


metacarpals,

or

rounded



facied);

NA,


data

not


available.

a

Under



levothyroxine

replacement

therapy.

b

Centile,



2

0.2%.


c

Height


and

weight


data

a

t



the

age


of

19.


d

Under


treatment

for


PTH

resistance.

e

Underestimated



due

to

kyphosis.



f

Short


s

tature


only,

due


to

kyphosis.

MS-MLPA in PHP-Ib

171


EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF ENDOCRINOLOGY (2013) 168

www.eje-online.org



or loss of methylation in the maternal A/B region.

Figure 1


B shows the MLPA analysis results for the nine

AD-PHP-Ib patients. All the probes covering the GNAS

locus regions (data not shown) and STX16 had two

copy number amplifications in the normal control

subjects (

Fig. 1


B, lower panel closed bars). All nine

AD-PHP-Ib patients, however, had a copy number loss

of exons 5 and 6 of STX16, suggesting a one-allele

deletion in this region. PCR amplification and sub-

sequent sequencing analysis of the corresponding

region revealed that one of two direct repeats and the

intervening nucleotides were deleted, thus removing a

3 kb region including STX16 exons 4, 5, and 6 as

previously reported (

Fig. 1


C). Although the DNA of case

8 was extracted from saliva, we confirmed that the

MS-MLPA results on saliva DNA were identical to the

data obtained from DNA extracted from peripheral

blood in control subjects (data not shown).

The results of the MS-MLPA in the four sporadic PHP-

Ib patients (cases 10–13) are shown in

Fig. 2


. In these

four cases, a gain of methylation of NESP55 in the

maternal allele and a loss of methylation in the AS, XL,

and A/B domains in the maternal allele were detected

(

Fig. 2


A). We confirmed the methylation alterations in

the NESP55 and A/B domains using a methylation-

specific PCR method (

supplementary Fig. 1

). MLPA

analysis showed no copy number alterations in any of



the four patients (

Fig. 2


B). We performed microsatellite

analysis to exclude paternal disomy. Analysis of the

microsatellite markers indicated normal biparental

inheritance, suggesting that paternal uniparental

isodisomy did not occur (

Table 2


). As the parents’

DNA was not available, however, paternal heterodisomy

could not be excluded from this study.

Discussion

In this study, we clearly identified the genetic and

epigenetic alterations of GNAS in 13 of 13 Japanese

1.0

0.5


0

3

2



1

1

3



4

7

8



6

5

0



Relative copy number

Sample peak ratio of

digested / undigested

NESP Intron l

Maternal

Paternal


A

B

C



NESP55

AS

XL



A/B

NESP AS


exon l

GNAS XL

exon l


GNAS

exon A/B


GNAS

exon A/B


STX16

exon 1


STX16

STX16

exon 3


STX16

exon 5


STX16

exon 6


STX16

exon 8


3741 bp

3741 bp


763 bp

763 bp


3

4 5 6


3

Case 9


Case 8

Case 7


Case 6

Case 5


Case 4

Case 3


Case 2

Case 1


Control

Case 8


Case 7

Case 6


Case 5

Case 4


Case 3

Case 2


Case 1

Case 1


Case 2

Case 3


Case 4

Case 5


Case 6

Case 7


Case 8

Case 9


Control

Control


Figure 1 (A) MS-MLPA analysis of AD-PHP-

Ib patients (cases 1–9). Upper panel shows a

schematic representation of the GNAS

promoter region. Gray bars represent the

allele-specific methylation state. Lower panel

shows the MS-MLPA results. Closed bar

indicates the normal control. In the NESP55,

AS, and XL regions, all the AD-PHP-Ib

patients showed the same one-allele

methylation pattern as the control. In con-

trast, in both A/B domains, all the patients

showed a complete loss of PCR products

after HhaI digestion, suggesting biallelic

demethylation. (B) The upper panel shows

the STX16 structure. The filled boxes

indicate the exons, and the triangles indicate

direct repeat sequences. Lower panel shows

the MLPA analysis of AD-PHP-Ib patients. A

copy number reduction was observed in

exons 5 and 6 of STX16. (C) Upper right

panel shows the PCR strategy for detecting

the STX16 deletion. Triangles indicate direct

repeat sequences and arrows indicate the

primers used for PCR. Left upper panel

shows the family tree of the AD-PHP-Ib and

lower panel shows the PCR analysis corre-

sponding to family members. Lower panel

shows the electrophoresis of PCR products

on agarose gel. In all the AD-PHP-Ib

patients, the smaller product (763 bp),

corresponding to a 3 kb deletion due to

recombination between the direct repeat

sequences, and wild-type product (3.7 kb)

were observed.

172

A Yuno and others



EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF ENDOCRINOLOGY (2013) 168

www.eje-online.org



PHP-Ib patients using the MS-MLPA technique. We

identified an identical 3 kb deletion of STX16 and a loss

of methylation in the A/B domain in all nine Japanese

AD-PHP-Ib patients from three families. Recent studies

reported that most familial cases with PHP-Ib display a

loss of methylation on maternally inherited exon A/B

DMR without imprinting defects in other DMRs. In

addition to those epigenetic alterations, genetic

deletions are found within STX16, NESP55, or AS. A

3 kb deletion of STX16 was first identified and

considered to be the most frequent mechanism of

AD-PHP-Ib

(11, 12, 13, 14)

. Several other deletions

have been reported since then, including a 4.4 kb

deletion within STX16

(24)

, a 19 kb deletion in NESP55



(15)

, 4 and 4.7 kb deletions of NESP55/AS

(16)

, and a


4.2 kb deletion within AS

(17)


. In our patient series,

however, we detected none of these deletions other than

the dominant 3 kb deletion of STX16.

None of the four Japanese sporadic PHP-Ib patients

showed genetic alterations in the entire GNAS locus,

including STX16 and NESP55, in MLPA analysis. Broad

losses of methylation of DMRs were demonstrated by

MS-MLPA. The maternal NESP55 was extra-methyl-

ated, and the AS, XL, and A/B domains of the maternal

allele were demethylated. The resulting methylation

pattern could be caused by paternal uniparental

isodisomy. Uniparental isodisomy of the long arm is

considered a plausible cause of the disease in a few

sporadic PHP-Ib cases with broad GNAS methylation

defects

(25, 26)


. Although paternal heterodisomy could

not be ruled out, microsatellite marker analysis did not

identify paternal uniparental isodisomy of chromosome

20q in any of the present sporadic PHP-Ib cases

(

Table 2


). The MLPA kit used in this study for the

GNAS locus allows for analysis of most of the exons

throughout the GNAS locus, including NESP55, but

does not contain probes covering AS exons 2, 3, and 4.

Therefore, the present MLPA analysis could not rule out

the possibility of a recently identified 4.2 kb deletion in

AS

(17)


. Heterogeneity in the methylation abnormal-

ities at the GNAS locus in patients affected with PHP-Ib

was first reported by Liu et al.

(6)


. Recent studies showed

that methylation alterations in DMRs and/or deletion

within STX16 play a critical role in PHP-Ib pathogenesis

Paternal


Maternal

NESP55


AS

XL

A/B



1

0.5


0

3

NESP55



exon 1

STX16 e


xon 1

STX16 e


xon 3

STX16 e


xon 5

STX16 e


xon 6

STX16 e


xon 8

NESP55 e


xon 1

NESP 


AS e

xon 1


GN

AS XL e


xon 1

GN

AS e



xon 1

GN

AS e



xon 1

GN

AS e



xon 2

GN

AS e



xon 3

GN

AS e



xon 4

GN

AS e



xon 6

GN

AS e



xon 7

GN

AS e



xon 9

GN

AS e



xon 11

GN

AS e



xon 13

NESP AS


exon 1

A

B



GNAS XL

exon 1


GNAS

exon A/B


GNAS

exon A/B


STX16

NESP55


AS

XL

A/B



GNAS

2

1



0

Sample peak ratio of

digested / undigested

Relati


v

e cop


y number

Control


Case 10

Case 11


Case 12

Case 13


Control

Case 10


Case 11

Case 12


Case 13

Figure 2 (A) MS-MLPA analysis of four

sporadic PHP-Ib patients. Upper panel

shows a schematic representation of the

GNAS promoter region. Gray bars represent

the methylation state. Lower panel shows

the results of MS-MLPA. Closed bar

indicates the normal control. In NESP55, all

four patients showed resistance to HhaI

digestion, suggesting biallelic methylation in

this domain. In contrast, the remaining three

regions (NESPAS, XL, and A/B) showed no

PCR products after digestion of HhaI,

suggesting biallelic demethylation in these

domains. Two GNAS exon A/B domains

showed biallelic demethylation pattern.

(B) MLPA analysis of sporadic PHP-Ib

patients. None of the four patients showed

copy number alterations.

Table 2 Genotyping of the polymorphic markers at the GNAS region.

Location

Case 10


Case 11

Case 12


Case 13

D20S117


20p13

172


182

153


173

151


174

Not done


D20S889

20p13


105

105


90

107


90

96

Not done



D20S115

20p12.3


239

239


239

241


239

239


Not done

D20S112


20p12.1

223


226

211


230

221


221

Not done


D20S107

20q12


211

216


214

214


216

216


Not done

D20S196


20q13.13

264


285

271


289

263


289

Not done


GNAS

20q13.3


D20S171

20q13.32


140

144


142

144


140

142


Not done

D20S173


20q13.33

178


178

127


178

176


182

Not done


MS-MLPA in PHP-Ib

173


EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF ENDOCRINOLOGY (2013) 168

www.eje-online.org



(18)

. Moreover, PHP may be reclassified on the basis of

these molecular analyses.

The most commonly used assays for these purposes

include restriction fragment length polymorphism

analysis using methylation-sensitive enzymes followed

by Southern blot analysis and methylation-specific PCR

using bisulfite-treated DNA samples and allele-specific

PCR followed by gel electrophoresis

(27)


. These

conventional techniques, although considered to be

relatively efficient, are both time-consuming and costly

and do not provide accurate information on copy

number variation

(28)


. In contrast, MS-MLPA requires

a smaller amount of DNA and the data generated can be

used to determine both copy number changes and

methylation status of multiple loci in a single-tube

experiment. MS-MLPA was an easy to use and rapid

molecular diagnostic tool for detecting both the genetic

and/or the epigenetic defects underlying PHP-Ib. Recent

data showed that GNAS-related disorders are more

heterogeneous than previously understood. Molecular

overlap between clinically diagnosed PHP-Ia and -Ib has

been reported

(29, 30, 31, 32)

. In addition to

sequencing analysis of GNAS, MS-MLPA is a powerful

tool for molecular diagnosis in individual patients and

provides fruitful information that will lead to a better

understanding of these disorders by revealing various

genetic and/or epigenetic alterations in each clinical

case. There are some limitations, however, to the use of

MS-MLPA as follows. MS-MLPA probes select CpG islands

only. Moreover, a single HhaI site methylation status

may not be representative of the status of the entire CpG

island. Furthermore, probe signals may also be affected

by mutations and/or polymorphisms situated either in

the vicinity of or at the probe ligation site. Interpretation

of the test results should be conducted in the context of

the patient’s ethnicity, clinical and family histories, and

other laboratory test results and molecular analyses of

family lineage. In conclusion, we identified genetic

and/or epigenetic alterations in all 13 Japanese PHP-Ib

patients using MS-MLPA and MLPA assays. This simple

method provides important information regarding the

genetic and epigenetic status of patients with PHP-Ib.

Supplementary data

This is linked to the online version of the paper at

http://dx.doi.org/10.

1530/EJE-12-0548

.

Declaration of interest



There is no conflict of interest that could be perceived as prejudicing

the impartiality of the research reported.

Funding

This work is a part of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports,



Science, and Technology KAKENHI 21500816; a grant from the

Smoking Research Foundation; and Grant-in-Aid for Intractable

Diseases from the Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare for

Intractable Diseases.

Acknowledgements

The authors are grateful to Ms Matsuda and Ms Shiraiwa for technical

assistance with PCR, sequencing, and MS-PCR. They are also grateful

to Dr Takahashi and Falco Biosystems, Inc. for supporting the MLPA

data analysis.

References

1 Mantovani G. Pseudohypoparathyroidism: diagnosis and treat-

ment. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 2011 96

3020–3030. (

doi:10.1210/jc.2011-1048

)

2 Bastepe M & Juppner H. GNAS locus and pseudohypoparathyroid-



ism. Hormone Research 2005 63 65–74. (

doi:10.1159/0000

83895

)

3 Mantovani G, Elli FM & Spada A. GNAS epigenetic defects and



pseudohypoparathyroidism: time for a new classification? Hormone

and Metabolic Research 2012 44 716–723 (doi: 10.1055/s-0032-

1314842).

4 Winter JS & Hughes IA. Familial pseudohypoparathyroidism

without somatic anomalies. Canadian Medical Association Journal

1980 123 26–31.

5 Bastepe M, Pincus JE, Sugimoto T, Tojo K, Kanatani M, Azuma Y,

Kruse K, Rosenbloom AL, Koshiyama H & Juppner H. Positional

dissociation between the genetic mutation responsible for

pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib and the associated methylation

defect at exon A/B: evidence for a long-range regulatory element

within the imprinted GNAS1 locus. Human Molecular Genetics

2001 10 1231–1241. (

doi:10.1093/hmg/10.12.1231

)

6 Liu J, Litman D, Rosenberg MJ, Yu S, Biesecker LG & Weinstein LS.



A GNAS1 imprinting defect in pseudohypoparathyroidism type

IB. Journal of Clinical Investigation 2000 106 1167–1174.

(

doi:10.1172/JCI10431



)

7 Hayward BE & Bonthron DT. An imprinted antisense transcript

at the human GNAS1 locus. Human Molecular Genetics 2000 9

835–841. (

doi:10.1093/hmg/9.5.835

)

8 Liu J, Yu S, Litman D, Chen W & Weinstein LS. Identification of a



methylation imprint mark within the mouse Gnas locus. Molecular

and Cellular Biology 2000 20 5808–5817. (

doi:10.1128/MCB.20.

16.5808-5817.2000

)

9 Coombes



C,

Arnaud


P,

Gordon


E,

Dean


W,

Coar


EA,

Williamson CM, Feil R, Peters J & Kelsey G. Epigenetic properties

and identification of an imprint mark in the Nesp–Gnasxl domain

of the mouse Gnas imprinted locus. Molecular and Cellular Biology

2003 23 5475–5488. (

doi:10.1128/MCB.23.16.5475-5488.

2003

)

10 Bastepe M. The GNAS locus: quintessential complex gene



encoding Gsa, XLas, and other imprinted transcripts. Current

Genomics 2007 8 398–414. (

doi:10.2174/13892020778340

6488


)

11 Bastepe M. Autosomal dominant pseudohypoparathyroidism type

Ib is associated with a heterozygous microdeletion that likely

disrupts a putative imprinting control element of GNAS. Journal

of Clinical Investigation 2003 112 1255–1263. (

doi:10.1172/

JCI200319159

)

12 Linglart A, Bastepe M & Juppner H. Similar clinical and laboratory



findings in patients with symptomatic autosomal dominant and

sporadic pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib despite different

epigenetic changes at the GNAS locus. Clinical Endocrinology

2007 67 822–831. (

doi:10.1111/j.1365-2265.2007.02969.x

)

13 Liu J. Distinct patterns of abnormal GNAS imprinting in familial



and sporadic pseudohypoparathyroidism type IB. Human Molecu-

lar Genetics 2004 14 95–102. (

doi:10.1093/hmg/ddi009

)

14 Mantovani G, Bondioni S, Linglart A, Maghnie M, Cisternino M,



Corbetta S, Lania AG, Beck-Peccoz P & Spada A. Genetic

analysis and evaluation of resistance to thyrotropin and growth-

hormone releasing hormone in pseudohypoparathyroidism type

Ib. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 2007 92

3738–3742. (

doi:10.1210/jc.2007-0869

)

174


A Yuno and others

EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF ENDOCRINOLOGY (2013) 168

www.eje-online.org


15 Richard N, Abeguile G, Coudray N, Mittre H, Gruchy N,

Andrieux J, Cathebras P & Kottler ML. A new deletion ablating

NESP55 causes loss of maternal imprint of A/B GNAS and

autosomal dominant pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib. Journal of

Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 2012 97 E863–E867.

(

doi:10.1210/jc.2011-2804



)

16 Bastepe M, Frohlich LF, Linglart A, Abu-Zahra HS, Tojo K,

Ward LM & Juppner H. Deletion of the NESP55 differentially

methylated region causes loss of maternal GNAS imprints

and pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib. Nature Genetics 2005 37

25–27. (


doi:10.1038/ng1560

)

17 Chillambhi S, Turan S, Hwang DY, Chen HC, Juppner H &



Bastepe M. Deletion of the noncoding GNAS antisense transcript

causes pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib and biparental defects

of GNAS methylation in cis. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and

Metabolism 2010 95 3993–4002. (

doi:10.1210/jc.2009-2205

)

18 Maupetit-Mehouas S, Mariot V, Reynes C, Bertrand G, Feillet F,



Carel JC, Simon D, Bihan H, Gajdos V, Devouge E et al.

Quantification of the methylation at the GNAS locus identifies

subtypes of sporadic pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib. Journal of

Medical Genetics 2010 48 55–63. (

doi:10.1136/jmg.2010.

081356


)

19 Stuppia L, Antonucci I, Palka G & Gatta V. Use of the MLPA assay

in the molecular diagnosis of gene copy number alterations in

human genetic diseases. International Journal of Molecular Sciences

2012 13 3245–3276. (

doi:10.3390/ijms13033245

)

20 Lecumberri B, Fernandez-Rebollo E, Sentchordi L, Saavedra P,



Bernal-Chico A, Pallardo LF, Bustos JMJ, Castano L, de Santiago M,

Hiort O et al. Coexistence of two different pseudohypopara-

thyroidism subtypes (Ia and Ib) in the same kindred with

independent Gs coding mutations and GNAS imprinting defects.

Journal of Medical Genetics 2009 47 276–280. (

doi:10.1136/jmg.

2009.071001

)

21 Fernandez-Rebollo E, Lecumberri B, Garin I, Arroyo J, Bernal-



Chico A, Goni F, Orduna R, Castano L & de Nanclares GP. New

mechanisms involved in paternal 20q disomy associated with

pseudohypoparathyroidism. European Journal of Endocrinology

2010 163 953–962. (

doi:10.1530/EJE-10-0435

)

22 Jin HY, Lee BH, Choi J-H, Kim G-H, Kim J-K, Lee JH, Yu J, Yoo J-H,



Ko CW, Lim H-H et al. Clinical characterization and identification

of two novel mutations of the GNAS gene in patients with

pseudohypoparathyroidism and pseudopseudohypoparathyroid-

ism. Clinical Endocrinology 2011 75 207–213. (

doi:10.1111/j.

1365-2265.2011.04026.x

)

23 Wu WI, Schwindinger WF, Aparicio LF & Levine MA. Selective



resistance to parathyroid hormone caused by a novel uncoupling

mutation in the carboxyl terminus of Ga(s). A cause of

pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib. Journal of Biological Chemistry

2001 276 165–171. (

doi:10.1074/jbc.M006032200

)

24 Linglart A, Gensure RC, Olney RC, Juppner H & Bastepe M.



A novel STX16 deletion in autosomal dominant pseudohypopar-

athyroidism type Ib redefines the boundaries of a cis-acting

imprinting control element of GNAS. American Journal of Human

Genetics 2005 76 804–814. (

doi:10.1086/429932

)

25 Bastepe M, Altug-Teber O, Agarwal C, Oberfield SE, Bonin M &



Juppner H. Paternal uniparental isodisomy of the entire chromosome

20 as a molecular cause of pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib (PHP-

Ib). Bone 2011 48 659–662. (

doi:10.1016/j.bone.2010.10.168

)

26 Bastepe M, Lane AH & Juppner H. Paternal uniparental isodisomy



of chromosome 20q – and the resulting changes in GNAS1

methylation – as a plausible cause of pseudohypoparathyroidism.

American Journal of Human Genetics 2001 68 1283–1289.

(

doi:10.1086/320117



)

27 Krueger F, Kreck B, Franke A & Andrews SR. DNA methylome

analysis using short bisulfite sequencing data. Nature Methods

2012 9 145–151. (

doi:10.1038/nmeth.1828

)

28 Lee C, Iafrate AJ & Brothman AR. Copy number variations and



clinical cytogenetic diagnosis of constitutional disorders. Nature

Genetics 2007 39 S48–S54. (

doi:10.1038/ng2092

)

29 de Nanclares GP, Fernandez-Rebollo E, Santin I, Garcia-



Cuartero B, Gaztambide S, Menendez E, Morales MJ, Pombo M,

Bilbao JR, Barros F et al. Epigenetic defects of GNAS in patients

with pseudohypoparathyroidism and mild features of Albright’s

hereditary osteodystrophy. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and

Metabolism 2007 92 2370–2373. (

doi:10.1210/jc.2006-2287

)

30 Mantovani G, de Sanctis L, Barbieri AM, Elli FM, Bollati V, Vaira V,



Labarile P, Bondioni S, Peverelli E, Lania AG et al. Pseudohypopar-

athyroidism and GNAS epigenetic defects: clinical evaluation of

Albright hereditary osteodystrophy and molecular analysis in 40

patients. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 2010 95

651–658. (

doi:10.1210/jc.2009-0176

)

31 Mariot V, Maupetit-Mehouas S, Sinding C, Kottler ML & Linglart A.



A maternal epimutation of GNAS leads to Albright osteodystrophy

and parathyroid hormone resistance. Journal of Clinical Endo-

crinology and Metabolism 2008 93 661–665. (

doi:10.1210/jc.

2007-0927

)

32 Fernandez-Rebollo E, Garcia-Cuartero B, Garin I, Largo C,



Martinez F, Garcia-Lacalle C, Castano L, Bastepe M & Perez de

Nanclares G. Intragenic GNAS deletion involving exon A/B in

pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1A resulting in an apparent of

exon A/B methylation: potential for misdiagnosis of pseudohypo-

parathyroidism type 1B. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and

Metabolism 2009 95 765–771. (

doi:10.1210/jc.2009-1581

)

Received 23 June 2012



Revised version received 17 October 2012

Accepted 6 November 2012

MS-MLPA in PHP-Ib

175


EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF ENDOCRINOLOGY (2013) 168

www.eje-online.org



Document Outline



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling