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CULTURAL RESOURCES REPORT COVER SHEET 

 

 



 

Author: Sarah J. Van Galder, Sarah R. Hibdon and Stephanie A. E. Jolivette  

 

 

Title of Report: Cultural Resources Investigations for the East Wenatchee North Baker Avenue 



Improvement Project, Douglas County, Washington

 

 



Date of Report: January 5, 2016 

 

County(ies): Douglas County Sections: 35 Township: 23 N Range: 20 E  



 

 

 



 

  

Quad:   2008 Wenatchee, WA    



Acres: 44 acres  

 

PDF of report submitted (REQUIRED) X Yes 



 

Historic Property Inventory Forms to be Approved Online? X Yes No 

 

Archaeological Site(s)/Isolate(s) Found or Amended? Yes X No 



 

TCP(s) found? 

 Yes X No 

 

Replace a draft? 



 Yes X No 

 

Satisfy a DAHP Archaeological Excavation Permit requirement? 



 Yes X No 

 

Were Human Remains Found? 



 Yes DAHP Case # X No 

 

 



DAHP Archaeological Site #:  

 

           



           

           

           

           

           

 

Submission of PDFs is required.  



 

 

Please be sure that any PDF submitted to 



DAHP has its cover sheet, figures, 

graphics, appendices, attachments, corre-

spondence, etc., compiled into one single 

PDF file. 

 

 

 



Please check that the PDF displays cor-

rectly when opened. 

 

  

 



 

 


 

 

Cultural Resources Investigations for the 



East Wenatchee North Baker Avenue 

Improvement Project, 

Douglas County, Washington 

 

Sarah J. Van Galder, Sarah R. Hibdon and Stephanie A. E. Jolivette 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Final report submitted to 



Justin Roozen 

Douglas County Transportation and Land Services 

140 19

th

 Street NE, Suite A 



Wenatchee, WA 98802 

 

Technical Report 15-102 



 

 

 



 

 

Statistical Research 



Lacey, Washington 

 

January 2016



 

 


 

iii 


C O N T E N T S  

 

 



 

 

 



 

List of Figures ...................................................................................................................................... v

 

List of Tables ...................................................................................................................................... vii



 

Executive Summary ............................................................................................................................ ix

 

Introduction ............................................................................................................................................ 1



 

Physical Background .............................................................................................................................. 1

 

Cultural Background .............................................................................................................................. 3



 

Precontact ......................................................................................................................................... 3

 

Ethnohistory ..................................................................................................................................... 4



 

Historical Period .............................................................................................................................. 5

 

Records Search ....................................................................................................................................... 6



 

Cultural Resources Investigations: Methods and Results ....................................................................... 9

 

Surface and Shovel Test Probe Survey .......................................................................................... 13



 

Built Environment Inventory ......................................................................................................... 17

 

150 20th Street NE (Parcel No. 53200001100) ....................................................................... 18



 

2021 North Baker Avenue (Parcel No. 55800300904) ........................................................... 19

 

2061 North Baker Avenue (Parcel No. 55800200508) ........................................................... 20



 

2121 North Baker Avenue (Parcel No. 55800200603) ........................................................... 21

 

2125 North Baker Avenue (Parcel No. 55800200604) ........................................................... 22



 

2129 North Baker Avenue (Parcel No. 55800200602) ........................................................... 23

 

2211 North Baker Avenue (Parcel No. 55800200707) ........................................................... 24



 

2215 North Baker Avenue (Parcel No. 55800200705) ........................................................... 25

 

2218 North Baker Avenue (Parcel No. 40900003711) ........................................................... 26



 

2226 North Baker Avenue (Parcel No. 40900003708) ........................................................... 28

 

2230 North Baker Avenue (Parcel No. 40900003713) ........................................................... 29



 

Summary and NRHP-Eligibility Discussion ........................................................................................ 30

 

150 20


th

 Street NE (Parcel No. 53200001100) ............................................................................... 30

 

2021 North Baker Avenue (Parcel No. 55800300904) .................................................................. 30



 

2061 North Baker Avenue (Parcel No. 55800200508) .................................................................. 30

 

2121 North Baker Avenue (Parcel No. 55800200603) .................................................................. 31



 

2125 North Baker Avenue (Parcel No. 55800200604) .................................................................. 31

 

2129 North Baker Avenue (Parcel No. 55800200602) .................................................................. 31



 

2211 North Baker Avenue (Parcel No. 55800200707) .................................................................. 31

 

2215 North Baker Avenue (Parcel No. 55800200705) .................................................................. 32



 

2218 North Baker Avenue (Parcel No. 40900003711) .................................................................. 32

 

2226 North Baker Avenue (Parcel No. 40900003708) .................................................................. 32



 

2230 North Baker Avenue (Parcel No. 40900003713) .................................................................. 33

 

Summary and Management Recommendation ..................................................................................... 33



 

References Cited ................................................................................................................................... 34

 

Appendix A. Washington State Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation 



Historic Property Inventory Forms ............................................................................................ 43

 


 

 


 

L I S T   O F   F I G U R E S  



 

 

 



 

 

 



Figure 1. Proposed project location .............................................................................................................. 2 

Figure 2. Map showing the proposed project APE, HPIs, and STPs and previous work locations ............ 10 

Figure 3. Overview of APE from the intersection of N. Baker Ave. and Auburn, view to the south ......... 11 

Figure 4. Overview of APE showing a rock wall along the eastern side of N. Baker Ave., 

view to the north ................................................................................................................................... 11 

Figure 5. Overview of APE from the intersection of N. Baker Ave. and 23rd, view to the south .............. 12 

Figure 6 . Overview of orchard on west side of the road, view to the west ................................................ 14 

Figure 7. Overview of southeastern staging area, view to the west ............................................................ 14 

Figure 8. Overview of proposed stormwater pond locale, view to the east ................................................ 15 

Figure 9. STP 2 ........................................................................................................................................... 15 

Figure 10. STP 5 ......................................................................................................................................... 16 

Figure 11. STP 10 ....................................................................................................................................... 16 

Figure 12. HPI at 150 20th St. NE .............................................................................................................. 18 

Figure 13. HPI at 2021 N. Baker Ave ......................................................................................................... 19 

Figure 14. HPI at 2061 N. Baker Ave ......................................................................................................... 20 

Figure 15. HPI at 2061 N. Baker Ave ......................................................................................................... 21 

Figure 16. HPI at 2121 N. Baker Ave ......................................................................................................... 22 

Figure 17. HPI at 2125 N. Baker Ave ......................................................................................................... 23 

Figure 18. HPI at 2129 N. Baker Ave ......................................................................................................... 24 

Figure 19. HPI at 2211 N. Baker Ave ......................................................................................................... 25 

Figure 20. HPI at 2215 N. Baker Ave ......................................................................................................... 26 

Figure 21. HPI at 2218 N. Baker Ave ......................................................................................................... 27 

Figure 22. HPI at 2218 N. Baker Ave ......................................................................................................... 27 

Figure 23. HPI at 2226 N. Baker Ave ......................................................................................................... 28 

Figure 24. HPI at 2230 N. Baker Ave ......................................................................................................... 29 

 


 

 


 

vii 


L I S T   O F   T A B L E S  

 

 



 

 

 



 

Table 1. Known Archaeological Sites within 1 Mile of the Proposed Project APE ..................................... 7 

Table 2. NRHP-Listed Properties within 1 Mile of the Proposed Project APE ............................................ 7 

Table 3. Previous Projects Conducted within 1 Mile of the Proposed Project APE ..................................... 7 

Table 4. Historic Property Inventories inside or within One Parcel of the Project APE .............................. 8 

Table 5. Shovel-Test Probe Sediment Descriptions .................................................................................... 12 

 


 

 


 

ix 


E X E C U T I V E   S U M M A R Y  

Statistical Research, Inc. (SRI), conducted a cultural resources survey for the proposed East Wenatchee 

North Baker Avenue Improvement project for Douglas County Transportation and Land Services (County). 

The project is located along North Baker Avenue between the East Wenatchee city limits and 23

rd

 Street 


NE in Douglas County, Washington. The County proposes to widen this length of North Baker Avenue to 

32 to 44 feet with a curb, add gutters and 5-foot-wide sidewalks and install a left turn channelization and 

larger radii curbs at intersections. The proposed area of potential (APE) effects is 44 acres in size including 

the road right of way (ROW), several turn outs, the stormwater pond location and three potential staging 

areas.  

The County proposes to replace the current roadside ditches with an enclosed drainage system and 

stormwater drainage pond. Utility poles and other obstructions along the road will be relocated and retaining 

walls installed to minimize impacts to the orchards. The project is funded by the Federal Highways Admin-

istration (FHWA) and must comply with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 

(NHPA). 


SRI archaeologists completed a records search within 1-mile of the proposed project APE and con-

ducted a cultural resources survey on September 30 and October 1, 2015. The survey consisted of a pedes-

trian surface survey, shovel test probe (STP) excavations within the proposed APE and a reconnaissance-

level built environment survey of the proposed APE and properties immediately adjacent to the APE that 

are visible from North Baker Avenue. A total of ten STPs were excavated within the APE, the historic 

Highline Canal to the east of the project area was noted, and 11 buildings constructed between 1930 and 

1965 were documented in the field. The 11 buildings are located on private property immediately adjacent 

to the proposed APE. No precontact or diagnostic historical period cultural materials were identified during 

the surface survey or within the STPs. SRI recommends that none of the eleven buildings are eligible for 

listing in the National Register of Historic Places and that the project be allowed to proceed.  



 

 


 

Introduction 



Statistical Research, Inc. (SRI) was contracted by Douglas County Transportation and Land Services 

(County) to conduct a cultural resources survey for a road improvement project along North Baker Avenue 

from the East Wenatchee city limits to 23

rd

 Street NE (Figure 1). The proposed project area of potential 



effects (APE) is within Section 35, Township 23 North, Range 20 East, on the 2008 Wenatchee, Washing-

ton, 7.5-minute U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) quadrangle. The proposed APE consists of the road right 

of way (ROW), several turn outs, a stormwater pond location and three potential staging areas which total 

approximately 44 acres. Much of this area has already been impacted by road construction and utility place-

ment. The County proposes to widen this portion of North Baker Avenue between 32 to 44 feet including 

a curb, add gutters and 5-foot-wide sidewalks and install a left turn channelization and larger radii curbs at 

intersections. The County also plans to replace the current roadside ditches with an enclosed drainage sys-

tem and stormwater drainage pond. Utility poles and other obstructions along the road will be relocated and 

retaining walls installed to minimize impacts to the orchards. 

The project is funded by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and administered by the Wash-

ington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) Local Programs Division. As the project is federally 

funded it must comply with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (NHPA). Section 

106 directs federal agencies to consider the effects on historic properties in carrying out their activities.  

SRI completed the cultural resources records search, archival review and conducted the cultural re-

sources survey on September 30 and October 1, 2015. A physical and cultural background overview for the 

project vicinity, the methods and results of the records search and field survey, NRHP evaluations for the 

11 buildings 50 years old or older, and management recommendations are detailed below.  

Physical Background 

The project APE is located within the Columbia River valley 1 mile east of the Columbia River. During the 

last glacial maximum ice sheets began advancing about 17,000-18,000 years ago and stopped by 14,000 

years ago with the onset of climatic warming (Easterbrook 1993). In north-central Washington the surface 

of the ice sloped from more than 7,000 feet above sea level near the international boundary to an elevation 

of 1,300 feet 75 miles to the south (NWAA 2005). This portion of the Columbia River valley was shaped 

by repeated catastrophic Missoula floods 

Between 16,000 and 12,000 years ago as the glacial ice melted (Atwater 1984, NWAA 2005). The 

flooding resulted from multiple outbursts from the ice-dammed glacial Lake Missoula in northern Idaho 

and western Montana (Atwater 1984, NWAA 2005).  

The sediments within the project area consist of Quincy loamy fine sand on terraces with 0 – 15 percent 

slopes with eolian sand comprises the parent material (USGS Web Soil Survey 2015). A portion of the APE 

at the north end consists of Cashmere fine sandy loam which occurs on terraces with 3 to 8 percent slopes. 

The parent material for Cashmere fine sandy loam consists of glaciofluvial deposits (USGS Web Soil Sur-

vey 2015). 

Average annual precipitation in the region is about 8.5 inches, with November and December being the 

wettest months. In the lower valleys, summer temperatures range from 80–90º F with few days above 100º 

F. Winter high temperatures in the valleys are generally 25–35º F with lows averaging around 20º F (Fer-

guson and and Root 2005). The project area is within the shrub-steppe vegetation zone, which is dominated 

by Artemisia tridentata (big sage)/Agropyron spicatum (bluebunch wheatgrass), the latter a perennial form 

of bunchgrass (Franklin and Dyrness 1973). Stiff sage (A. rigida), rabbitbrush, balsam, buckwheats, lupine, 

and needle and thread grass are also common within this vegetation zone as is intrusive flora such as mus-

tard, cheatgrass and knapweeds (Franklin and Dyrness 1973). 

 


 

 



 

Figure 1. Proposed project location. 



 

Numerous large game species are present in the area such as deer (Odocoileus spp.), Pronghorn (An-



tilocapra americana) and bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis). Bison (Bison bison) were also common in the 

Columbia basin as late as A.D. 1500 until 

A

.

D



. 1800, likely due to changes in hunting pressure due to the 

introduction of both horses and firearms (Jolivette et al. 2015, Laliberte and Ripple 2003). Before European 

settlement in the nineteenth century, the Columbia Valley and the mountains to the west supported popula-

tions of bear (Ursus sp.), cougar (Puma concolor), bobcat (Lynx rufus), rabbits (Lepus spp., Sylvalagus 

sp.), coyote (Canus latrans), muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus), beavers (Castor canadensis), and wolves 

(Canus lupus). Ducks, geese, and grouse were also abundant.  

Many species of salmon and trout migrated through the Columbia River system including chinook 

(Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), sockeye (O. nerka), steelhead (O. mykiss) and coho (O. kisutch) (Butler and 

Schalk 1986, NWAA 2005). The chinook spawning run begins in early May and extends through early 

October. Sockeye appear in a single run during mid-summer, between July and September (NWAA 2005). 

The steelhead migration occurs in the spring and another more abundant run in the fall/winter (NWAA 

2005). Coho begin moving up the river in late August as a single run (Butler and Schalk 1986).  

Cultural Background 

Precontact 

Recent genetic studies coupled with archaeological data suggest that the Americas were populated from 

Asia through at least three waves of colonization, beginning with a coastal migration of Paleoindians along 

the recently deglaciated west coast of North America as early as 17,000 years ago, followed by a second 

migration across Beringia and through the mid-continental ice free corridor as early as 13,500 years ago, 

followed by a final migration of Neo-eskimo ancestors into the high arctic by 1000 years ago (Achilli et al. 

2013, Raff and Bolnick 2014). Although craniofacial measurements of North and South American human 

remains have been used to suggest a discontinuity between early and late Holocene skeletons (Jantz and 

Owsley 2001, Neves and Hubbe 2005), genetic evidence shows a direct link between Paleoindians and 

contemporary Native American groups with no evidence of mixing with European groups prior to histori-

cal-period colonization of the New World (Goebel et al. 2008, Rasmussen et al. 2014).  

Correlating these genetic results with archaeological data is still in its initial stages. The earliest 

occupants of North America have traditionally been distinguished by the presence of large fluted Clovis 

points (Waters and Stafford 2007). The only firmly dated Clovis period site in the Pacific Northwest, the 

East Wenatchee Clovis Cache (45-DO-482), is located in the Middle Columbia region and dates to 11,250 

years before present (BP) based on Glacier Peak ash adhering to the points (Mehringer and Foit 1988). 

Although this cache site, as well as the presence of additional isolated fluted points, suggests the presence 

of Clovis hunters in the region, the evidence is quite sparse.  

The earliest occupation site in the greater Pacific Northwest region is in the Paisley 5 Mile Point caves 

dated to 14,400 BP based on human coprolites (Gilbert et al. 2008). The evidence that Non-Clovis sites may 

predate Clovis sites in the region is discussed extensively by Beck and Jones (2010, 2012), and studies of 

early shared point styles around the northern Pacific rim suggest that stemmed rather than fluted projectile 

points may have been utilized by the earliest migrants into North America (Erlandson and Braje 2011).  

Non-Clovis sites in the region dating between 11,400 and 8000 BP have traditionally been assigned to 

the Western Stemmed (or Windust) Tradition and are associated with a variety of point styles, large bifacial 

knives, scrapers, blades, a variety of pebble tools and bone tools, and a lack of microblades (Borden 1969). 

Stemmed points at the Paisley Caves site in Oregon have been found to date as early as 12,900 B.P. (Jenkins 

et al. 2012). There are also a growing number of sites in the Columbia Basin assigned to this period 

including Marmes Rockshelter (45FR50) possibly beginning as early as 11,230 

B

.

P



. (Hicks 2004), the 

Sentinel Gap site at 10,230 

B

.

P



. (Galm and Gough 2000), and the Lind Coulee site (45GR97) at 10,250 

B

.



P

(Craven 2004). Unlike contemporaneous sites in the Great Plains that focus on large terrestrial mammals 



 

for subsistence, the people of the plateau display a more generalized subsistence pattern during the 



beginning of this period (>10,000 

B

.



P

.) incorporating large numbers of rabbits, hares, and marmots into 

their diet along with the more traditionally recognized large ungulates such as deer, elk, pronghorn, bison, 

and bighorn sheep that are only common on the plateau after 10,000 

B

.

P



. (Lyman 2013).  

The middle Holocene (8000–5000 

B

.

P



.) occupation is characterized by small sites with artifact 

assemblages that include both Cascade style leaf-shaped and stemmed atlatl dart points during the latter 

half of the period, along with a large number of flake and cobble implements made of basalt and andesite, 

as well as microblades at some sites (Ames et al. 1998). In the South-central plateau this period was initially 

termed the Vantage Phase due to the clustering of sites found in the Vantage, Washington area (Swanson 

1962). Sites are situated on high river terraces (Pokotylo and Mitchell 1998), where subsistence practices 

focus on the procurement of anadromous fish (particularly salmonids), ungulates, and rabbits (Draper 1986; 

Root and Ferguson 2007), although the presence of small grinding stones suggests an increased use of seeds 

(Hollenbeck and Carter 1986). 

The transition into the middle Holocene is when the Ancient One/Kennewick Man lived. At least one 

of the multiple radiocarbon dates place these remains slightly before this period (9,200-8,340 calibrated 

years B.P.) (Rasmussen et al. 2015), however, the presence of a serrated Cascade style serrated leaf-shaped 

point embedded in his pelvis means that he was associated with this cultural tradition. Unfortunately no 

other artifacts were found associated with these intentionally buried remains. Site 45CH58, located just 25 

miles north of the project APE on the Columbia River contains a fire feature with freshwater mussel shell, 

chipped stone, ground stone, and bone dating to ca. 8000 years 

B

.

P



. (Mierendorf and Bobalik 1983).  

Late Holocene (5000 

B

.

P



.–1850 

A

.



D

.) occupations are characterized by increasing human populations, 

increasing sedentism with the appearance of rectangular semisubterranean houses, and increasing 

exploitation of anadromous fishes and root crops (Ames et al. 1998). Houses from the beginning of this 

period are semisubterranean and contain internal fire pits and food processing areas, including large milling 

stones and anvils, and concentrations of shell, lithic, and bone debris (Ames and Marshall 1980, Brauner 

1976, and summary Ames et al. 1998). Faunal remains diversify to include a greater proportion of fish and 

fresh water mussels (Lyman 1980) and near the end of the period salmon becomes a predominant 

subsistence resource (Campbell 1985, Chatters 1986).  

The number of sites found in upland areas during this period also increases indicating a greater 

emphasis on upland hunting and mountain sheep become an important resource alongside the bison, elk, 

deer, and pronghorn found in the middle Holocene (Hollenbeck and Carter 1986). By 2000 

B

.

P



. pit houses 

and large villages became widespread throughout the Middle Columbia, and the shape and size of these 

dwellings becomes more variable (Ames et al. 1998). The ethnographic pattern defined by winter residence 

in longhouse villages along rivers and a seasonal-round subsistence pattern is established by 2000 

B

.

P



.. 

Exotic artifacts, including dentalia and Olivella marine-shell beads, incised steatite and soapstone pendants, 

and smoking pipes, become common in sites dating to this period (Root and Ferguson 2007), but the 

production of tools relies primarily on local cryptocrystalline silica instead of the fine-grained basalt utilized 

so heavily in earlier periods (Ames et al. 1998).  

Ethnohistory 

Today the project area lies within the traditional territory of the Wenatchi and Moses Columbia Tribes, two 

of the twelve tribes that make up the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (also known as the 

Colville Confederated Tribes. Early ethnographers assigned the territory to the Sinkayuse and Wenatchi, 

both members of the Middle Columbia River Salish language group (Miller 1998, Spier 1938). Ethnog-

raphers used the Columbia River to split the region, isolating the Sinkayuse on the eastern side of the river 

and Wenatchi on the west (Ray 1936, Spier 1936). However, the reality of living on the river no doubt 

made these boundaries fluid, and other researchers have located traditional Wenatchi villages on both the 

eastern and western banks of the Columbia River (Miller 1998). The Entiat and Chelan, who were also 

members of this language group, likely also utilized this portion of the river to help maintain trade and 

social relationships. Trade partnerships also existed across the Cascade Range to the west with members of 



 

the Snoqualmie Indians who spoke Southern Coast Salish, and sometimes hostile contact with Plains tribes 



such as the Blackfoot occurred, especially after the introduction of the horse (Miller 1998). 

During the historic period the people of the Middle Columbia region lived in small, temporary lodges at 

short-term camps; and large, communal longhouses, often semi-subterranean at winter villages along protected 

areas of the Columbia River (Teit 1928). In winter months subsistence relied primarily on stored foods such as 

salmon, root crops, and huckleberries. In the spring, summer, and fall small groups would travel to hunt and 

gather a variety of resources, building temporary summer lodges in prairies or highlands. Huckleberries and 

rootcrops such as camas, biscuitroot, and bitterroot were also gathered in meadows and along lake edges. 

Salmon, particularly sockeye and chinook, were a staple for the Middle Columbia peoples although 

other species such as Dolly Varden and whitefish were also important. The Sinkayuse self-identified as 

river people, calling themselves Kawachens, or those “living on the banks” (Ruby and Brown 1992: 204). 

Large game species such as deer, elk, and mountain goats were regularly hunted and after obtaining horses 

in the eighteenth century they also sought bison seasonally on the Great Plains. Bison were native to eastern 

Washington prior to the 19

th

 century (Osborne 1953) and several kill sites have been found in the region 



(Chatters et al. 1995, Morgan 1993) although the cause of their local extinction is currently unknown 

(Lyman 2004). Horses had a major impact on the Middle Columbia River culture, allowing for longer 

distance travel, changes in hunting practices, and changing trade routes and partners.  

Historical Period 

Euro-Americans began entering the Middle Columbia region in the 1800s, with the first reported contact 

occurring in July 1811 at Rock Island between David Thompson of the Northwest Fur Company of Canada 

and a group of Indians that were most likely Sinkayuse (Ruby and Brown 1992). The establishment of Fort 

Okanogan in the same year by the American Pacific Fur Company from Astoria created a permanent Euro-

American presence in the region.  

The Yakima Treaty of 1855 created reservations, significantly disrupting the traditional lifestyle of the 

Sinkayuse, Wenatchi, and their neighbors. The resulting Indian Wars of 1855-1858 led to the region being 

officially closed to settlement, but eager groups of homesteaders, fur trappers, and miners began to trickle into 

the region, sometimes leading to skirmishes with native groups. In one instance a group of U.S. military soldiers 

were dispatched in an unsuccessful attempt to intercept the warrior Qualchan who had fought with a group of 

Euro-American miners attempting to enter his traditional territory (Hackenmiller 1995, Scheuerman 1982). 

Native groups that had not already been decimated by old world diseases felt the impact of these incursions, 

leading to significant population reductions by the early 1900s (Boyd 1985, Ruby and Brown 1992). 

Even after the end of the Indian Wars which saw the movement of many local native groups to the Colville 

Reservation, non-treaty Indian groups continued to have conflicts with early settlers. The Ingraham and 

McBride fur trading post was established at the mouth of the Wenatchee River ca. 1867 and the Galler 

homestead established in 1868 just 5 miles downriver from the project APE. The Columbia Reservation was 

established in 1879 by executive order of President Rutherford B. Hayes for the use of Chief Moses, his 

people, and other friendly Indians in an attempt to make way for further settlement, but this reservation was 

dissolved by 1884. Local Native American groups were then encouraged to move to the Colville Reservation, 

but some chose to remain on allotments within the former Columbia Reservation boundaries. Today the Con-

federated Tribes of the Colville Reservation encompasses twelve member tribes, including the Wenatchi. 

The City of Wenatchee was established in 1888 in anticipation of railroads coming to the area, but the 

city was not fully platted until 1892 when the Great Northern Railway finally reached the area. The 

establishment of the railway encouraged the harvest of lumber in the region, as well as the agricultural 

production of fruit and grain crops. The use of the river for transportation continued through Euro-American 

occupation, with the operation of the steamboat City of Ellensburgh between Rock Island and the head of 

the Okanogan River (Mitchell 1968), but new uses for the water were also established.  

The Wenatchee Water Power Company established extensive irrigation on the western side of the river 

for agriculture, but it was not until after the construction of the Columbia River Bridge (1906-1908) that 

irrigation was established on the east side of the river. The establishment of the Greater Wenatchee 


 

Irrigation District in 1923 allowed for significant agricultural expansion, making Wenatchee a major hub 



for apple production (Artifacts Consulting 2007).  

Because of the agricultural industry, the impact of the 1929 stock market crash was delayed in Wenatchee, 

although it was felt. The establishment of the Rock Island Dam (1932) and the Grand Coulee Dam (1942) 

which supplied electricity for increased manufacturing aided early recovery from the Great Depression. Local 

mining efforts, such as the Holden Mine at Lake Chelan, provided local materials, and aluminum manufacture 

just south of the city at the Aluminum Company of America (Alcoa) Plant helped with the recovery.  

After World War II the population of Wenatchee began to slowly increase, leading to new construction 

and the updating of building facades during the 1950s and 60s throughout the city (Artifacts Consulting 2007). 

A Metsker’s Atlas of Chelan County from 1959 shows the area surrounding the project APE includes plats 

owned by the Wenatchee Land Company, with the East Wenatchee Fruit Farms owning other portions of the 

platted lands. A 1966 USGS topographic map shows the presence of nine buildings along N. Baker Avenue 

in the immediate vicinity of the current project APE. Slow but steady growth continued in the Wenatchee area 

through the 1970s and 80s, and it was not until the 1990s, that the population again saw significant growth.  

Records Search 

A records search covering the area within 1 mile of the project APE was conducted using the online data-

base of the Washington Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation (DAHP), Washington Infor-

mation System for Architectural and Archaeological Records Data (WISAARD). A total of eleven archae-

ological sites, two NRHP listed properties are located within 1 mile of the project APE, and 21 cultural 

resource projects have been completed within the same radius (Tables 1---3). The two NRHP- listed proper-

ties are the Pangborn-Herndon Memorial (45DO398), less than .5 miles to the northeast of the proposed 

APE, and the Columbia and Okanogan Steamship Company Boat Yard (45CH22) located just under 1 mile 

to the southwest. Eleven Washington State Historical Property Inventories (HPIs) older than 50 years are 

located within one parcel of the proposed project APE (Table 4). These HPIs are further discussed below 

in the ‘‘Built Environment Survey’’ section.  

The WISAARD database indicates that four precontact sites, three multi-component sites, and four 

historical period sites exist within 1 mile from the proposed project APE (see Table 1). All of these sites 

are located to the west near the shoreline of the Columbia River. The precontact sites consist composed 

largely of lithic scatters with concentrations of fire cracked rock and faunal material. Two precontact sites 

and three multi-component have been determined eligible for lisitng in the NRHP. One of these precontact 

sites, the Avey’s Orchard Cemetery and site (45DC176), contains a child burial in addition to lithic scatter, 

a housepit, hearths, shell, and fauna, and has also been determine eligible for NRHP. The four historical 

period sites within the 1 mile radius of the project APE include a historic hydroelectric water pumping 

station and filtration plant (45CH280); a historic Vinegar Works Factory Foundation and associated house 

(45CH281); historic debris consisting of metal scrap, coal, charcoal/ash, glass, brick, and ceramics 

(45CH282); and a historic structure foundation and debris scatter (45DC686). The former three sites have 

not been evaluated for a NRHP listing, while the latter has been determined not eligible.  

Three previous projects encompass or overlap with the current proposed APE. One project was for the 

East Wenatchee Water District Pipe Reliability and Capacity Improvements Project along North Baker 

Avenue, another for Douglas County’s 23

rd

 Street NE Improvement project in 2012 (Schumacher 2012), 



and the last a survey for the Douglas County North Baker Avenue Improvements project in 2006 (Schu-

macher). In 2006, Western Shore Heritage Services, Inc. (WSHS) conducted a pedestrian surface survey 

along N Baker Ave which includes the current project APE. No cultural materials were identified during 

this survey and no historic properties were inventoried (Schumacher 2006). In 2012, CRC excavated nine 

STPs within the northeastern-most staging area within the current proposed APE as part of the 23

rd

 Street 



NE Improvement project. Modern debris was noted in these STPs up to depths of 100 cmbs but no precon-

tact or historical-period cultural materials were identified. In 2013, CRC conducted a pedestrian survey and 



 

Table 1. Known Archaeological Sites within 1 Mile of the Proposed Project APE 



Site No. 

Description 

Age

NRHP Listing 



Reference

45CH280 Historic 

Hydroelectric: Water pumping station and 

filtration plant 

Historical Period 

Not Evaluated 

Simmons and 

Harvey 1981 

45CH281 

Historic Struct-ure: Vinegar Works factory 

foundation, associated house still standing in 1981 

Historical Period 

Not Evaluated 

Simmons and 

Harvey 1981 

45CH282 


Historic Debris: metal scrap, coal, charcoal/ash, 

glass, brick, ceramics and other 

Early 1900s 

Not Evaluated  **DAHP Inventory 

Form 

45DC175 


Kellers Drain field site Precontact lithic scatter, 

unidentifiable bone and shell 

Precontact Not 

Evaluated 

Mastin and Galm 

1985 


45DC176 Avey's 

Orchard 


Cemetery and site: Child burial, 

lithic scatter, housepit, hearths, shell, fauna 

Precontact Determined 

Eligible 

CRC 2007; Galm 

1983 


45DC681 

Multi-component: Precontact lithic scatter, Historic 

structures and debris 

Precontact, Pre-1950s 

Determined 

Eligible 

Kopperl and Juell 

2003a 


45DC682 

Multi-component: Precontact lithic scatter, FMR 

concentration, fauna; Historical period glass 

Precontact; 1950s-1960s

Determined 

Eligible 

Kopperl and Juell 

2003b 


45DC683 

Multi-component: Precontact lithic scatter, FMR, 

bone, amethyst glass 

Precontact; Historical 

Period 

Determined 



Eligible 

Kopperl and Juell 

2003c 

45DC685 


Precontact lithic scatter; Historic debris scatter 

Precontact; Historical 

Period 

Determined Not 



Eligible 

Parvey and 

Campbell 2003 

45DC686 


Historic structure foundations and despris scatter 

Historical Period 

Determined Not 

Eligible 

Parvey and Juell 

2003 


45DC687 

Multicomponent: Precontact lithic scatters, faunal 

bone, FMR 

Cayuse Phase; c. 2000-

5850 BP 

Determined 

Eligible 

 

 



 

 

Table 2. NRHP-Listed Properties within 1 Mile of the Proposed Project APE 



Site No. 

Property Name

Date

NRHP Criteria 



Reference

45DO398 


Pangborn-Herndon Memorial 

1931 


Weaver 1969

45CH242 

Columbia and Okanogan Steamship Company Boat Yard 

1892–1914 

Local 


Eckman 1973

 

 



 

Table 3. Previous Projects Conducted within 1 Mile of the Proposed Project APE 

DAHP No.  Description 

Associated 

Archaeological Sites

Reference 

1340739 

CR Survey of WSDOT St SR 28: 31st St to Hadley 

Project 

None 


Gough and Axton 2001 

1342857 


CR Survey ofor Sand Canyon Flood Hazard Mitigation 

Project 


None Rooke 

2003 


1343601 

CR Technical Discipline Report SR 28 Eastside 

Corridor Project 

45DO684, 45DO688, 45DO687  Northwest Archaeological 

Associates, Inc. 2005 

1344675 


CR Assessment for Badger Mountain Road 

Improvement Project 

None Chambers 

2005 


1346230 

Survey of the Vista del Rio Housing Project 

None 

Ferguson and Root 2005 



1347474 

CR Survey for GDCD Electrical Residential 

Development 

None Fee 

2006 


 

DAHP No.  Description 



Associated 

Archaeological Sites

Reference 

1348218 


CR Survey of SR 28:27th St Parcel 

None 


Shong 2006 

1348584 


CR Survey for River Pointe Development Project 

None 


Lenz 2006 

1348770 


Survey of the Aspen Hills Development 

None 


Root and Ferguson 2006 

1348997 


CR Survey for North Baker Ave Improvements Project

None 


Schumacher 2006 

1349411 


Survey of the Aspen Hills III Development 

None 


Root and Ferguson 2007 

1349612 


CR Survey for Proposed Riverside Drive Improvements

None 


Schumacher 2006 

1349623 


Historic resources Survey--Inventory Orondo Ave 

None 


Lentz 2001 

1350000 


CR Survey for Wenatchee Riverfront Park 

Improvements Project 

None Schumacher 

2007 


1350010 

Monitor Survey of the Rock Island Hydroelectric 

Project 

45CH250H, 45CH295H, 

45CH209 

Shumacher 2007 

1350125 

CR Survey of Downtown Wenatchee 

None 

Sullivan 2007 



1351276 

CR Assessment for Lenssen Homes Stoneridge Drive 

Project 

None Schumacher 

2008 

1352443 


CR Survey for Wenatchee Wastewater Treatment Plan 

Improvements 

None Schumacher 

2009 


1684572 

CR Assessment for EWWD Pipe Improvements Project

None 

Kelly, Katherine M. 2013



1684276 

CR Assessment - 23rd St Improvement Project 

None 

Schumacher 2012 



1685333 

CR Survey of Beaches Exposed in Extraordinary 

Drawdown on Rock Island Reservoir 

45CH209, 45CH309, 45CH791, 

45CH206, 45CH207, 45CH210, 

45CH212, 45DO177, 45DO438, 

45CH302, 45CH874, 45CH875, 

45CH876, 45DO1007, 45CH878 

Cowan & Ozbun 2014 

 

 



 

Table 4. Historic Property Inventories inside or within One Parcel of the Project APE 

Address Parcel 

No. 


Construction 

Date 


Historic Use 

Current Use NRHP 

Eligibility

150 20th St NE 

53200001100 

1959 


Single Family House 

Single Family House 

Not Determined

2021 N Baker Ave  55800300904 

1953 

Single Family House 



Single Family House 

Not Determined

2061 N Baker Ave  55800200508 

1945 


Single Family House 

Single Family House 

Not Determined

2121 N Baker Ave  55800200603 

1956 

Single Family House 



Single Family House 

Not Determined

2125 N Baker Ave  55800200604 

1947 


Single Family House 

Single Family House 

Not Determined

2129 N Baker Ave  55800200602 

1961 

Single Family House 



Single Family House 

Not Determined

2211 N Baker Ave  55800200707 

1965 


Single Family House 

Single Family House 

Not Determined

2215 N Baker Ave  55800200705 

1930 

Single Family House 



Single Family House 

Not Determined

2218 N Baker Ave  40900003711 

1939 


Single Family House 

Single Family House 

Not Determined

2226 N Baker Ave  40900003708 

1940 

Single Family House 



Single Family House 

Not Determined

2230 N Baker Ave  40900003713 

1951 


Single Family House 

Single Family House/At 

Home Day Care 

Not Determined

 

 

 



 

 


 

excavated four auger probes in two locations (two probes in each location) with a bobcat gas auger to depths 



up to 44 cmbs within the N Baker Ave ROW on the east side of the road (Figure 2). The sediments within 

the STPs consisted of gravel and cobbles and are likely fill sediments from previous utility or road work 

(Kelly 2013). 

A GLO map from 1884 does not indicate any trails, roads, buildings, structures, or other features in the 

APE vicinity. Metzker Maps dating to 1932 and 1959 indicate that land within the proposed project APE 

was platted and part of the East Wenatchee Fruit Farms. Nine buildings are shown along N. Baker Avenue 

within or near the current project APE in a 1966 USGS map. The Highline Canal, just east of the survey 

area, was constructed between 1903 and 1908 (Donavan and Associates 2002; Holstine 2009; Schumacher 

2006b). The canal is visible on 1913 and 1966 USGS maps. Improvements have been made to the original 

earthen ditch canal since its construction, including the installation and removal of wood slats and the 

placement of concrete slabs to line the canal. The portion of the canal visible from the survey area is lined 

with concrete. The canal was first documented in 2002, determined eligible for listing in the NRHP in 2003, 

and documented again by Craig Holstine in 2009 (Donavan and Associates 2002; Holstine 2009). The canal 

played a large role in the economic and environmental development of the Wenatchee Valley and continues 

to provide water to farms and orchards in the Wenatchee Valley today. The canal is further discussed below.  

Cultural Resources Investigations: Methods and Results 

SRI archaeologists conducted an intensive cultural resources survey of the proposed project APE along 

North Baker Avenue (Figures 3–5; see Figure 2) was completed by SRI archaeologists Sarah Van Galder 

and Sarah Hibdon on September 30 and October 1, 2015. The work included a surface survey of the pro-

posed project APE, shovel probe testing in select locations and a reconnaissance-level built environment 

inventory survey of buildings and structures within one parcel of the proposed project APE (see Figure 2).  

SRI archaeologists conducted the initial pedestrian surface survey, walking one transect on either side 

of Baker Avenue within the existing road ROW and transects spaced every 15 m within the possible staging 

areas where there was exposed ground surface. Ten shovel probes (STPs) were excavated within the North 

Baker Avenue ROW to depths between 65 and 100 cm below surface (cmbs) (Table 5). An auger was used 

to extend select probes to depths up to 155 cmbs. Sediments from the STPs and auger probes were screened 

through ¼-inch hard mesh for artifacts and described. SRI documented all sediments and cultural materials 

in field notes and photographs. STP locations were mapped with a hand held Trimble GPS. Upon comple-

tion of each shovel probe, the hole was backfilled. Written, landowner permission was acquired for the 

three proposed staging areas and verbal landowner permission was acquired for the stormwater pond loca-

tion.  

A reconnaissance-level built environment inventory was completed. Eleven historical-period buildings 



(greater than 50 years old) were inspected and photographed and their Historic Property Inventory (HPI) 

reports updated with the Washington State Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation (DAHP). 

These buildings are outside of but within one parcel of the proposed APE on privately owned parcels. The 

buildings were inspected from the road or sidewalk as they are located on private property. 

 

 


 

10 


 

 

Figure 2. Map showing the proposed project APE, HPIs, and STPs and previous work locations.



 

11 


n  

Figure 3. Overview of APE from the intersection of N. Baker Ave. and Auburn, 

view to the south.

Figure 4. Overview of APE showing a rock wall along the eastern side of N. 

Baker Ave., view to the north. 


 

12 


 

 

 



Table 5. Shovel-Test Probe Sediment Descriptions 

STP No. 


Stratum 

Depth (cmbs)  Description



0–70 



10YR3/6 (dark yellowish brown) sand, damp, no inclusions; diffuse boundary with 

stratum II 

 

II 


70–130 

10YR4/6 (dark yellowish brown) silty sand, damp, no inclusions 



0–80 



10YR4/3 (olive brown) sand, damp, containing occasional small rounded pebbles, 

small roots from 0-5cmbs; diffuse boundary with stratum II 

 

II 


80–105 

2.5YR5/3 (light olive brown) sand, damp, no inclusions 



0–40 



10YR5/3 (olive) silty sand, containing some gravels decreasing near base of layer, 

chunk of blacktop and 1 piece clear non-diagnostic glass at 30 cmbs; diffuse 

boundary with stratum II 

 

II 



40–100 

10YR5/3 (olive) silty sand, no inclusions 



0–20 



2.5YR5/3 (light olive brown) medium-grained sand, containing small roots from 10-

20cmbs; Discontinuous band of darker sediments visible in south and west walls 



<1cm in thickness near bottom of stratum 

 

II 



20–100 

2.5YR5/4 (light olive brown) medium-grained sand, damp, calcined mammal bone 

fragment and charcoal fleck at 50cmbs 



0–80 

2.5Y4/3 (olive brown) sand, containing small roots from 0-20cmbs and small 

charcoal flecks from 25-30cmbs, round-headed rusted nail at 70cmbs 

 

II 



80–100 

2.5Y4/4 (olive brown) sand, damp, no inclusions 

Figure 5. Overview of APE from the intersection of N. Baker Ave. and 23rd, view 

to the south. 



 

13 


0–95 



2.5Y4/4 (olive brown) sand, containing dense small roots from 0-20cmbs decreasing 

in density until 80cmbs; 1 piece rebar, 2 round-headed nails, 1 piece clear bottle 

glass, 1 piece amber bottle glass, 1 rusted staple (all non-diagnostic) from 20-

30cmbs; 1 piece clear non-diagnostic glass at 50cmbs. 



0–95 



2.5Y4/4 (olive brown) sand, containing small-medium roots from 0-30cmbs; 2 pieces 

non-diagnostic amber bottle glass and 1 piece rusted metal from 0-35cmbs 



0–95 



10YR5/3 (brown) silty sand (fluffy), no inclusions 

 

II 



95–155 

2.5YR6/3 (light reddish brown) sandy silt/loess, no inclusions 



0–80 



2.5Y5/3 (light olive brown) sand, very dry, containing grass roots from 0-80cmbs 

10 


0–30 


2.5Y5/4 (light olive brown) sandy silt, some oxidation; 2 pieces non-diagnostic 

amber bottle glass from 0-10cmbs; diffuse boundary with stratum II 

 

II 


30–65 

2.5Y5/4 (light olive brown) silt, some oxidization 

 

III 


65–115 

2.5Y6/4 (light yellowish brown) silt, very compact 

 

Surface and Shovel Test Probe Survey  



There is poor ground visibility along most portions of the proposed APE and staging areas except for areas 

immediately adjacent to the road. Modern trash was observed along the road but no precontact or historical 

period artifacts were identified. STP excavations along North Baker Avenue were restricted due to the 

presence of utilities along the ROW, cut and fill disturbance from previous road construction activities and 

pavement and sidewalks which cover a good portion of the APE. A utility locate request was submitted and 

utilities were located and marked within the APE prior to the survey. Ten STPs were excavated (see Fig-

ure 2); three within the orchard on the west side of North Baker Avenue (Figure 6), three STPs within the 

southeastern staging area (Figure 7), three in the proposed stormwater pond locale (Figure 8) at the south-

eastern end of the project APE and one on the west side of the North Baker Avenue in the southern portion 

of the APE (see Figure 2). No STPs were excavated in the staging area at the northeastern-most portion of 

the project APE. In 2012, Cultural Resource Consultants, Inc. (CRC) excavated nine STPs as part of a 

cultural resources assessment for the 23

rd

 Street NE Improvement project (Schumacher 2012). No precon-



tact or historical-period cultural materials were identified in any of these STPs. Modern debris was noted 

to depths of 100 cm below ground surface (cmbs) in this location (Schumacher 2012).  

Sediments within STPs consisted of primarily sands and silty sands (Figures 9–11; see Table 5). A 

small number of cultural materials were discovered in five of the STPs (STPs 3 – 7), no prehistoric or 

diagnostic historical-period cultural remains were identified. The identified materials included one small 

calcined mammal bone fragment in STP 4 and varying numbers of nondiagnostic glass, metal fragments 

and round-headed wire nails in STPs 3 and 5–7 (see Table 5). STPs 4–6 all were excavated within the 

southeast staging area. All three contained a number of nondiagnostic materials. Google Earth also shows 

that various buildings, possibly trailers or storage sheds, existed on the property between 2002 and 2009 in 

the general vicinity of STP 6. The materials identified from this STP may be associated with these buildings. 



 

14 


 

 

 



Figure 6 . Overview of orchard on west side of the road, view to the west. 

Figure 7. Overview of southeastern staging area, view to the west. 



 

15 


 

 

Figure 8. Overview of proposed stormwater pond locale, view to the east. 



Figure 9. STP 2.

 

16 


 

 

Figure 10. STP 5. 



Figure 11. STP 10. 

 

17 


Built Environment Inventory 

SRI completed a reconnaissance-level built environment survey along North Baker Avenue, identifying 11 

historical-period buildings (greater than 50 years old), all of which are single family houses and noting the 

historic Highline Canal to the east of the survey area. The canal was documented and recommended eligible 

for listing in 2002 and determined eligible for listing in the NRHP by DAHP in 2003. Craig Holstine pre-

pared a detailed description and NRHP evaluation of the canal in 2009 in addition to that done in 2002. 

This canal is further described below. 

Basic information regarding the 11 buildings was recorded during an assessor’s survey in 2011 (Arti-

facts Consulting 2011). During the current survey, the 11 buildings were inspected and further documented 

in field notes and photographs to the extent possible from within the APE along North Baker Avenue. All 

11 Historic Property Inventory (HPI) Reports with the Washington State Department of Archaeology and 

Historic Preservation (DAHP) were updated and properties evaluated based on available information. The 

11 buildings, constructed between 1930 and 1965, are discussed below and the HPI reports are provided in 

Appendix A. Several photos of each building are included in their respective HPI reports, in addition to 

those photos included in this section below.  

Historic Highline Canal 

The historic Highline Canal, today known as the Wenatchee Reclamation District Canal, was initially doc-

umented and recommended eligible for listing in the NRHP in February, 2002 and determined eligible for 

listing in the NRHP in March 2003 by DAHP (Holstine 2009). Craig Holstine (2009) developed a Historical 

Context for the 11-mile segment of the canal in East Wenatchee within the larger 34-mile-long canal system 

which supplies water to 12,500 acres in Chelan and Douglas Counties. The segment documented by 

Holstine (2009) includes the portion of the canal to the east of the current survey area.  

Small ditches supplied irrigation to the Wenatchee Valley beginning in the late 1800s. The Wenatchee 

Improvement Company proposed a plan for a larger, more complex canal system while developing plans 

for the City of Wenatchee (Holstine 2009). Officials with the Wenatchee Improvement Company convinced 

W.T. Clark, a Yakima businessman and his chief Engineer Marvin Chase to evaluate the canal project in 

1901. Clark and Chase saw the benefit of the proposal and agreed to construct the canal. Construction began 

in 1902 after obtaining financial backing and securing water rights for 300 cubic feet per second from the 

Wenatchee River in 1902. The 11-mile Highline Canal is a good example of early twentieth century hy-

draulic engineering and played a key role in the development of East Wenatchee and continues to supply 

water to farms and orchards in the East Wenatchee region today (Holstine 2009).  

The Highline Canal runs north-south through the City of East Wenatchee from the Wenatchee River 

Pipe south to the Columbia River Pipeline. The canal is eight feet wide at the upper edges of its concrete-

lined sides. The walls of the canal slope inward at roughly a 60-degree angle to its flat bottom at a maximum 

depth of just over three feet (Holstine 2009). Many Improvements have been made to the original earthen 

ditch canal since its construction, including the installation and removal of wood slats and the placement of 

concrete slabs to line the canal. The portion of the canal visible from the survey area is lined with concrete.


 

18 


150 20th Street NE (Parcel No. 53200001100) 

The single family, ranch -style house at 150 20

th

 Street NE was built in 1959. The house is difficult to see 



from both North Baker Avenue and 20

th

 Street. Trees and shrubs completely surround the house along the 



roads except along the driveway. The house is situated below the North Baker Avenue grade on a 0.70-acre 

lot. The building is a single story house with a basement and poured concrete foundation. The house has 

horizontal vinyl cladding (Figure 12). A porch was added in 2007 and the house remodeled in 2014 (Doug-

las County Assessor 2015). The extent of the remodel is not known, however the Douglas County Asses-

sor’s website shows photos of the house taken on August 10, 2014 prior to the remodel. These photos 

indicate that the roof and siding were replaced and possibly the windows as well. The main portion of the 

house has a gable roof with asphalt shingles. The attached two-car garage extends off the north facade of 

the house and has a hip on gable roof. A portion of the house at the south end extends west beyond the 

western wall of the rest of the house. Based on Google Earth, this portion has a hip on gable roof.  

 

 



Figure 12. HPI at 150 20th St. NE.

 

19 


2021 North Baker Avenue (Parcel No. 55800300904) 

The shed-style house at 2021 North Baker Avenue, built in 1953, is an irregularly shaped, 1-story single 

family home with an attached garage and daylight basement (Figure 13). The house sits above the road 

grade on a 0.57-acre lot. The building features a combination of horizontal wood cladding on the main floor 

and concrete siding on the visible exterior walls of the daylight basement visible on the south and west 

facades of the house. The building has a shed style roof made of corrugated metal. No chimney is visible 

from the street however the assessor’s records indicate that there is a double 1-story fireplace. The attached 

garage is on the north facade of the house and opens to the east. The Douglas County assessor’s records do 

not indicate any additions or remodels to the house except for plans for the 17-by-21 foot deck addition to 

the west façade of the house at an unknown time. Another porch with a roof and metal railings is visible on 

the south facade of the house. The house features rectangular sash windows on the west and south facades 

of the house. The windows in back have thicker trim and may have been updated since the houses original 

construction. However, this was difficult to confirm from the road. The aluminum screen door on the west 

facade of the house appears to be original. A window air conditioner is visible on the north wall of the 

house. There is a utility building east of the house which is not visible from the road.  

 

 



Figure 13. HPI at 2021 N. Baker Ave. 

 

20 


2061 North Baker Avenue (Parcel No. 55800200508) 

The L-shaped, single family house on a 0.48-acre parcel located at 2061 North Baker Avenue was built in 

1945 (Figures 14 and 15). The Williamsburg revival–style house has two stories and a basement which is 

partially finished (Douglas County Assessor 2015). The house appears to rest on a combination of a con-

crete-slab foundation and a concrete foundation wall; the foundation walls form the perimeter of the base-

ment.


 

The house has a cross-gabled roof with a steep pitch and dormer windows. Standing-seam metal 

panels cover the roof. The house is clad with vinyl siding on the main and second floors and concrete blocks 

on the garage. There are two slab porches with roofs, one on the south facade of the house and the other on 

the west facade and an enclosed porch with screened walls on the east facade of the house (Douglas County 

Assessor 2015). The porch on the west (front) facade of the house is open on two sides with a support with 

a support on the northwest corner of the porch. The attached 2-car garage is on the north end of the house 

and has two doors. There are two small round windows with six wedge-shaped panes on north facades of 

the house (see Figure 15). Three brick chimneys are visible from the road.  

The County assessor’s records indicate there have been no additions, remodels or improvements to the 

house. However, the exterior vinyl siding and the roof do not appear to be original and some of the windows 

have been replaced. The double hung windows on the second floor and the fixed sash windows on the first 

floor have been updated. The two double hung, aluminum framed windows above the garage appear to be 

original. Likely, the basement was finished after the original construction of the house as well. 

 

 

Figure 14. HPI at 2061 N. Baker Ave.



 

21 


 

2121 North Baker Avenue (Parcel No. 55800200603) 

The single family house on a 0.28-acre plot at 2121 North Baker Avenue was constructed in 1956 (Fig-

ure 16). The house is a single story, ranch-style house that now has an L-shape plan and an attached 1-car 

garage. The hip on gable roof is made of composition shingle which replaced the original wood shake roof 

visible in photos on the Douglas County Assessor’s website. The house is clad with horizontal vinyl siding 

except in the northeast portion of the house which appears to be a sunroom. The portion of the house fea-

tures three large rectangular fixed sash windows on the south and east facades. There is a slab porch in back 

along southern wall of sunroom. The windows of the sunroom are difficult to see from the road but are 

different in style from those of the rest of the house. The vinyl window on the south facade of the house is 

a two rectangular sash style with horizontal sliding. The two double hung windows visible on the eastern 

facade of the house and the large windows in front (western facade) have aluminum frames and are likely 

original. The sunroom was added sometime between 1990 and 1998 based on Google Earth aerial images. 

Photos available on the Douglas County Assessor’s website indicate the garage door and front door have 

been replaced.  

 

Figure 15. HPI at 2061 N. Baker Ave. 



 

22 


 

 

2125 North Baker Avenue (Parcel No. 55800200604) 



The building at 2125 North Baker Avenue is a 1-story, single family house was built in 1947 and sits on a 

0.25-acre (Figure 17). The west (front) facade of the small ranch house is the only portion visible from the 

North Baker Avenue. The house has a poured concrete foundation and is clad with horizontal wood siding 

which is in poor condition. Paint is visibly flaking and peeling off the west façade of the house. Concrete 

stairs, consisting of two steps, lead from ground level to the front entry level. There is an attached 1-car 

garage at the south end of the house. A brick chimney is visible behind the garage. The large rectangular 

fixed sash window and the two double hung windows on the front of the house look to be original. The 

gable roof is covered with composition shingles and most likely is not the original roof. Based on photos 

available on the County Assessor’s website it appears the front door was replaced and the house repainted 

prior to July 2014.  

 

Figure 16. HPI at 2121 N. Baker Ave. 



 

23 


 

 

2129 North Baker Avenue (Parcel No. 55800200602) 



The single family house at 2129 North Baker Avenue was built in 1961 on a 0.78-acre parcel set just above 

current road grade. The 1-story, ranch-style house has aluminum windows and a concrete foundation (Fig-

ure 18). The gable roof of the house is covered with composition shingles and the projecting rafters are 

exposed. A small slab breezeway with a roof separates the house from the detached 1-car garage to the 

south. The garage has a shed style roof with composition shingles. A brick chimney is located on the south-

ern facade of the house in front of the breezeway. The two aluminum windows in front and the two alumi-

num windows and the sliding glass door in back are likely original to the house. Striped awnings cover the 

windows. Concrete stairs lead to the front door which is covered by a small corrugated metal roof. The 

house features horizontal wood clapboard on 2/3

rd

 of the exterior walls and vertical wood siding on the top 



1/3

rd

 of the exterior walls.  



No additions or remodels to the house are noted on the County Assessor’s website. A shed, not noted 

in plan maps on the County Assessor’s website, is attached to the east facade of the garage and has the same 

gable roof with composition shingles and horizontal siding. The shed was added sometime between 1990 

and 1998 based on Google Earth aerial images. The roof is not original to the house. A hay shed was added 

to the property, northeast of the house, in 2001 (Douglas County Assessor 2015). 

 

Figure 17. HPI at 2125 N. Baker Ave. 



 

24 


 

 

2211 North Baker Avenue (Parcel No. 55800200707) 



The 1965 single family house at 2211 North Baker Avenue is a single wide, manufactured home on a 0.44-

acre lot (Douglas County Assessor 2015). It is one story with horizontal wood log veneer siding (Figure 

19). The house has a low gable roof made of corrugated metal. Many tires are on top of the roof, presumably 

to hold down the corrugated metal. A door on the south facade of the house has been covered with plywood. 

The door on the west (front) façade does not appear to be original. There are a variety of aluminum window 

types including double hung, horizontal sliders, and possibly hinged windows that are likely original.  

There is a portion of the house on the back or east facade that likely has been added since the original 

construction of the house in 1965. This portion has plywood siding and a shed style roof also made of 

corrugated metal. A metal shed is attached to the east end of this possible addition. The west end of the 

house behind the front porch has newer cladding compared to the rest of the house. It is unclear if this 

portion of the house is an addition or just been re-sided. The Douglas County Assessor’s records do not 

indicate that there have been any improvements, additions or remodels to the house and Google Earth aerial 

images indicate that there has not been an addition to the building since 1990.  

 

Figure 18. HPI at 2129 N. Baker Ave. 



 

25 


 

 

2215 North Baker Avenue (Parcel No. 55800200705) 



The single-family residence at 2215 North Baker Avenue is located on a 0.29-acre parcel above current 

road grade. The house was built in 1930 and is the oldest house along this portion of North Baker Avenue. 

The 1-story dwelling has a minimal traditional architectural style and features a cross-gabled roof covered 

with composite shingles (Figure 20). It has a poured concrete foundation and T-shaped floor plan. A de-

tached, 2-car garage is located to the northeast of the house. The garage is difficult to see from the road but 

appears to have a newer gabled, composite-shingled roof and two new garage doors on the western (front) 

façade. The house has horizontal sliding and double hung vinyl windows which are not original to the 

house. A wood fence surrounds the house on the north and east sides. 

Douglas County Assessor’s records indicate that a new foundation, small addition and wall repair was 

completed in March 2014. The home-owners added an 8 by 12 foot room to the NW facade of the house 

and a 5 by 24 foot covered deck on the NE facade of the house (Douglas County Assessor’s Records 2015). 

Photos on the County Assessor’s website indicate that the house was re-sided at this time as well. Google 

Earth aerial images indicate that the roof was replaced at some point between 2002 and 2012.  

Figure 19. HPI at 2211 N. Baker Ave. 



 

26 


 

 

2218 North Baker Avenue (Parcel No. 40900003711) 



The house at 2218 North Baker Avenue is documented as a single family house built in 1939 in the Douglas 

County Assessor’s records and on the DAHP HPI database. However, from the North Baker Avenue this 

house looks to be a contemporary ranch-style house. If the original residence was indeed built in 1939 it is 

completely unrecognizable as such at this time (Figures 21 and 22). The L-shaped, 1-story house has a 

concrete foundation and a cross-gabled roof covered with composition shingles. The attached 2-car garage 

is on the south end of the building. The residence is clad with newer vertical wood and horizontal wood 

siding (see Figure 22). The rectangular fixed sash windows and the door on the east (front) façade as well 

as the windows on the north facade appear to be modern in age. The County Assessor’s records do not note 

any additions or remodels to the property. It is possible that the records available on the County Assessor’s 

webpage are incorrect. A closer inspection of the house would be required to make this determination. 

Figure 20. HPI at 2215 N. Baker Ave. 


 

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