Redox Status and Aging Link in Neurodegenerative Diseases


Download 4.74 Kb.

bet1/28
Sana16.12.2017
Hajmi4.74 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   28

Redox Status and Aging 
Link in Neurodegenerative 
Diseases
Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Guest Editors: Verónica Pérez de la Cruz, Sathyasaikumar V. Korrapati, 
and José Pedraza-Chaverrí 

Redox Status and Aging Link in
Neurodegenerative Diseases

Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Redox Status and Aging Link in
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Guest Editors: Ver´onica P´erez de la Cruz,
Sathyasaikumar V. Korrapati, and Jos´e Pedraza-Chaverr

Copyright © 2014 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. All rights reserved.
This is a special issue published in “ Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity .” All articles are open access articles distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided
the original work is properly cited.

Editorial Board
Mohammad Abdollahi, Iran
Antonio Ayala, Spain
Peter Backx, Canada
Consuelo Borrs, Spain
Elisa Cabiscol, Spain
Vittorio Calabrese, Italy
Shao-Yu Chen, USA
Zhao Zhong Chong, USA
Felipe Dal-Pizzol, Brazil
Ozcan Erel, Turkey
Ersin Fadillioglu, Turkey
Qingping Feng, Canada
Swaran J. S. Flora, India
Janusz Gebicki, Australia
Husam Ghanim, USA
Daniela Giustarini, Italy
Hunjoo Ha, Republic of Korea
Giles E. Hardingham, UK
Michael R. Hoane, USA
Vladimir Jakovljevic, Serbia
Raouf A. Khalil, USA
Neelam Khaper, Canada
Mike Kingsley, UK
Eugene A. Kiyatkin, USA
Ron Kohen, Israel
Jean-Claude Lavoie, Canada
Christopher Horst Lillig, Germany
Kenneth Maiese, USA
Bruno Meloni, Australia
Luisa Minghetti, Italy
Ryuichi Morishita, Japan
Donatella Pietraforte, Italy
Aurel Popa-Wagner, Germany
Jos´e L. Quiles, Spain
Pranela Rameshwar, USA
Sidhartha D. Ray, USA
Francisco Javier Romero, Spain
Gabriele Saretzki, UK
Honglian Shi, USA
Cinzia Signorini, Italy
Richard Siow, UK
Oren Tirosh, Israel
Madia Trujillo, Uruguay
Jeannette Vasquez-Vivar, USA
Victor M. Victor, Spain
Michal Wozniak, Poland
Sho-ichi Yamagishi, Japan
Liang-Jun Yan, USA
Jing Yi, China
Guillermo Zalba, Spain

Contents
Redox Status and Aging Link in Neurodegenerative Diseases
, Ver´onica P´erez de la Cruz,
Sathyasaikumar V. Korrapati, and Jos´e Pedraza-Chaverr´ı
Volume 2014, Article ID 270291, 2 pages
Thioredoxin System Regulation in the Central Nervous System: Experimental Models and Clinical
Evidence
, Daniela Silva-Adaya, Mar´ıa E. Gonsebatt, and Jorge Guevara
Volume 2014, Article ID 590808, 13 pages
Metallothionein-II Inhibits Lipid Peroxidation and Improves Functional Recovery after Transient Brain
Ischemia and Reperfusion in Rats
, Araceli Diaz-Ruiz, Patricia Vacio-Adame, Antonio Monroy-Noyola,
Marisela M´endez-Armenta, Alma Ortiz-Plata, Sergio Montes, and Camilo Rios
Volume 2014, Article ID 436429, 7 pages
Kynurenines with Neuroactive and Redox Properties: Relevance to Aging and Brain Diseases
,
Jazmin Reyes Ocampo, Rafael Lugo Huitr´on, Dinora Gonz´alez-Esquivel, Perla Ugalde-Mu˜niz,
Anabel Jim´enez-Anguiano, Benjam´ın Pineda, Jos´e Pedraza-Chaverri, Camilo R´ıos,
and Ver´onica P´erez de la Cruz
Volume 2014, Article ID 646909, 22 pages
Amyloid Beta: Multiple Mechanisms of Toxicity and Only Some Protective Effects?
, Paul Carrillo-Mora,
Rogelio Luna, and Laura Col´ın-Barenque
Volume 2014, Article ID 795375, 15 pages
Oxidative Stress and Metabolic Syndrome: Cause or Consequence of Alzheimer’s Disease?
,
Diana Luque-Contreras, Karla Carvajal, Danira Toral-Rios, Diana Franco-Bocanegra,
and Victoria Campos-Pe˜na
Volume 2014, Article ID 497802, 11 pages
Early Onset Alzheimer’s Disease and Oxidative Stress
, Marco Antonio Meraz-R´ıos,
Diana Franco-Bocanegra, Danira Toral Rios, and Victoria Campos-Pe˜na
Volume 2014, Article ID 375968, 14 pages
Copper and Copper Proteins in Parkinson’s Disease
, Sergio Montes, Susana Rivera-Mancia,
Araceli Diaz-Ruiz, Luis Tristan-Lopez, and Camilo Rios
Volume 2014, Article ID 147251, 15 pages
Curcumin Pretreatment Induces Nrf2 and an Antioxidant Response and Prevents Hemin-Induced
Toxicity in Primary Cultures of Cerebellar Granule Neurons of Rats
, Susana Gonz´alez-Reyes,
Silvia Guzm´an-Beltr´an, Omar Noel Medina-Campos, and Jos´e Pedraza-Chaverri
Volume 2013, Article ID 801418, 14 pages
Modulation of Antioxidant Enzymatic Activities by Certain Antiepileptic Drugs (Valproic Acid,
Oxcarbazepine, and Topiramate): Evidence in Humans and Experimental Models
,
Noem´ı C´ardenas-Rodr´ıguez, Elvia Coballase-Urrutia, Liliana Rivera-Espinosa, Arantxa Romero-Toledo,
Aristides III Sampieri, Daniel Ortega-Cuellar, Hortencia Montesinos-Correa, Esa´u Floriano-S´anchez,
and Liliana Carmona-Aparicio
Volume 2013, Article ID 598493, 8 pages

The Role of Thyroid Hormones as Inductors of Oxidative Stress and Neurodegeneration
, I. Villanueva,
C. Alva-S´anchez, and J. Pacheco-Rosado
Volume 2013, Article ID 218145, 15 pages
Antioxidants Supplementation in Elderly Cardiovascular Patients
, Matilde Otero-Losada, Susana Vila,
F. Azzato, and Jos´e Milei
Volume 2013, Article ID 408260, 5 pages
Accelerated Aging in Major Depression: The Role of Nitro-Oxidative Stress
, Maria Luca, Antonina Luca,
and Carmela Calandra
Volume 2013, Article ID 230797, 6 pages

Editorial
Redox Status and Aging Link in Neurodegenerative Diseases
Verónica Pérez de la Cruz,
1
Sathyasaikumar V. Korrapati,
2
and José Pedraza-Chaverrí
3
1
Departamento de Neuroqu´ımica, Instituto Nacional de Neurolog´ıa y Neurocirug´ıa Manuel Velasco Su´arez, S.S.A.,
14269 M´exico, DF, Mexico
2
Maryland Psychiatric Research Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, MD 21228, USA
3
Departamento de Biolog´ıa, Facultad de Qu´ımica, Universidad Nacional Aut´onoma de M´exico, 04510 M´exico, DF, Mexico
Correspondence should be addressed to Ver´onica P´erez de la Cruz; veped@yahoo.com.mx
Received 18 February 2014; Accepted 18 February 2014; Published 20 March 2014
Copyright © 2014 Ver´onica P´erez de la Cruz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons
Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is
properly cited.
Longevity is a complex and multifactorial process in which
the balance in redox state has an important role. The produc-
tion of reactive oxygen/reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS)
at low level is involved in physiological process as signal-
ing molecules in various cellular and developmental pro-
cesses. However, the increase in the production of these
species and/or the decrease in the antioxidant capacity
can lead to perturbation of the redox balance, causing
oxidative/nitrosative stress which ultimately leads to cell
death. The aging and neurodegenerative diseases are closely
associated with the unbalance in the redox environment.
This special issue contributes to the understanding of the
impact of impairment in the balance of antioxidant defense
and ROS/RNS generation as well as the mechanisms that are
involved, which will lead to a better comprehension of several
processes related to aging and neurodegeneration biology.
Three review articles are focused on Alzheimer’s disease.
D. Luque-Contreras et al. reviewed the role of extracellular
??????-
amyloid, tau, and apoE, three main proteins associated with
the development of Alzheimer’s disease, in the generation
of oxidative stress as well as the mitochondrial alterations
induced by extracellular
??????-amyloid and its relationship with
vascular damage. Moreover, P. Carrillo-Mora et al. mentioned
that although there is a lot of information of the possible
mechanisms that may be involved in the role of
??????-amyloid, its
participation in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer’s disease is
not fully understood. The authors described both toxic (exci-
totoxicity, mitochondrial alterations, synaptic dysfunction,
and altered calcium homeostasis) and some neuroprotective
mechanisms of
??????-amyloid in vitro and in vivo, which may
contribute to the understanding of the processes in which this
protein is present and lead to the design of future therapeutic
interventions. Additionally, M. A. Meraz-R´ıos and coworkers
provide a review of the mutations present in APP, PS1, and
PS2 observed in patients with familial Alzheimer’s disease
and its association with oxidative stress.
M. Luca and coworkers describe the importance of
nitrooxidative stress as an important factor in the aging and
neurodegeneration and as a link of all these factors with major
depression and also the authors correlated these factors with
cell functioning, gene expression, and proteins folding.
The research article by S. Gonz´alez-Reyes and coworkers
shows the protective effect of curcumin against hemin-
induced damage in primary cultures of cerebellar granule
neurons. Specifically, the mechanisms by which curcumin
can show its benefic properties are through Nrf2 modu-
lation and the induction of antioxidant response. In the
same context, the original article of M. Otero-Losada and
coworkers demonstrates that an antioxidant supplementation
with alpha-tocopherol,
??????-carotene, and vitamin C improved
the biochemical profile associated with oxidative metabolism
in elderly cardiovascular patients. These original articles
represent excellent evidence in which the modulation of
antioxidants response can be seen as a fertile line to explore
both experimental and clinical studies in which the oxidative
stress is an important factor.
Hindawi Publishing Corporation
Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2014, Article ID 270291, 2 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/270291

2
Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Also the review of N. C´ardenas-Rodriguez and cowork-
ers describes how the antiepileptic drugs as valproic acid,
oxcarbazepine, and topiramate modulate antioxidant status
by modifying the activity of antioxidant enzymes both in
human and animals models and these effects can be also
independent of their principal mechanism of action.
D. Silva-Adaya and coworkers introduced for us an
interesting review that focuses on thioredoxin system (thiore-
doxin, thioredoxin reductase, and NADPH) expression into
the central nervous system. The authors also described the
conditions that modulate the thioredoxin system in both
animal models and the postmortem brains of human patients
associated with the most common neurodegenerative disor-
ders, in which this system could play an important role.
On the other hand, J. R. Ocampo and coworkers discuss
the redox properties of kynurenine pathway metabolites
which have been involved in many brain diseases and aging.
They also describe the effect of these kynurenines under
different conditions since the environment can modify their
activity. Additionally, the authors reviewed the changes in the
levels of these metabolites during the age and some brain
disorders; the review also takes the evidence in the literature
and explains the possible impact that these kynurenines levels
alteration can have on the NAD
+
production.
In the review article of S. Montes and coworkers was
summarized updated information regarding copper and
copper proteins in Parkinson’s disease. Some evidences have
revealed that transition metals play important roles in the
setup and development of neurodegenerative diseases; cop-
per is a special case, since its physiological actions influence
other metals, such as iron. The specific reports regarding
Parkinson’s disease (and experimental models) and copper-
related proteins, ceruloplasmin, superoxide dismutase, and
metallothionein, are reviewed in detail. The participation of
copper transporters and the relationship of this transition
metal and Parkinson’s disease-related proteins such as alpha
synuclein are also reviewed. Evidence suggests that antiox-
idant function of copper proteins could be an interesting
experimental strategy to test neuronal death in Parkinson’s
disease.
The original article by A. Diaz-Ruiz and coworkers shows
the metallothionein-II capability to inhibit lipid peroxidation
and to improve functional recovery after transient brain
ischemia and reperfusion in an experimental model in rats
using biochemical, functional, and histological evaluations.
Their results suggest that MT-II may be a neuroprotective
treatment to prevent tissue damage after cerebral ischemia.
Thyroid hormones are related to oxidative stress not only
by their stimulation of metabolism but also by their effects
on antioxidant mechanisms. I. Villanueva and coworkers
analyzed the participation of thyroid hormones on ROS
production and oxidative stress and the way the changes in
thyroid status in aging are involved in neurodegenerative
diseases.
Together all the papers of this special issue provide a
better understanding of the mechanisms involved during the
process of aging and brain diseases, which could be potential
therapeutic targets in the future.
Acknowledgment
We thank all the authors and the referees for their remarkable
contribution that made this special issue possible.
Ver´onica P´erez de la Cruz
Sathyasaikumar V. Korrapati
Jos´e Pedraza-Chaverr´ı

Review Article
Thioredoxin System Regulation in the Central Nervous System:
Experimental Models and Clinical Evidence
Daniela Silva-Adaya,
1
María E. Gonsebatt,
2
and Jorge Guevara
3
1
Laboratorio Experimental de Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas, Instituto Nacional de Neurolog´ıa y Neurocirug´ıa,
14269 M´exico City, DF, Mexico
2
Departamento de Medicina Gen´omica y Toxicolog´ıa Ambiental, Instituto de Investigaciones Biom´edicas,
Universidad Nacional Aut´onoma de M´exico, 04510 M´exico City, DF, Mexico
3
Departamento de Bioqu´ımica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Aut´onoma de M´exico, 04510 M´exico City, DF, Mexico
Correspondence should be addressed to Daniela Silva-Adaya; dan04siad@hotmail.com
Received 11 October 2013; Revised 21 January 2014; Accepted 23 January 2014; Published 27 February 2014
Academic Editor: Sathyasaikumar V. Korrapati
Copyright © 2014 Daniela Silva-Adaya et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution
License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly
cited.
The reactive oxygen species produced continuously during oxidative metabolism are generated at very high rates in the brain.
Therefore, defending against oxidative stress is an essential task within the brain. An important cellular system against oxidative
stress is the thioredoxin system (TS). TS is composed of thioredoxin, thioredoxin reductase, and NADPH. This review focuses on
the evidence gathered in recent investigations into the central nervous system, specifically the different brain regions in which the
TS is expressed. Furthermore, we address the conditions that modulate the thioredoxin system in both, animal models and the
postmortem brains of human patients associated with the most common neurodegenerative disorders, in which the thioredoxin
system could play an important part.
1. Introduction
The thioredoxin system (TS) consists of an electron donor
and two types of antioxidant oxidoreductase proteins: thiore-
doxin (Trx) and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and NADPH
as the electron donor. Trx was first identified as a hydrogen
donor for ribonucleotide reductase in Escherichia coli [
1
].
Trx is a small 12 kD protein that has an active conserved
site, Cys-Pro-Gly-Cys, which is essential for its function as
both an active oxidoreductase and an electron donor of
some peroxiredoxins that are important molecules for the
reduction of peroxides [
2
]. Trx is also a regulator of cellular
functions in response to redox signals and stress, modu-
lating various signaling pathways, transcription factors, and
immunological responses [
3
]. Trx is an important regulator
of redox balance in the cell and has been implicated as
playing a role in cell survival in many conditions including
cancer and neurodegenerative diseases [
4
]. Human cells
contain 3 different thioredoxins [
5
]. Trx1 has been reported
as cytoplasmic, Trx2 as a mitochondrial form, and a third
variant highly expressed in spermatozoa. Trx1 has been
located in several cell compartments such as the nucleus
and the plasma membrane or as a secreted protein [
6
,
7
].
Posttranslational modifications to cysteine on Trx1 appear
critical to its localization and function in different cell types
[
7
]. Organelles such as the mitochondrion and nucleus
require Trx to preserve a local reducing environment to
minimize damage from ROS leakage during mitochondrial
respiration [
8
]. In the nucleus the activation of transcription
factor requires the presence of reduced Trx [
9
]. Cytosolic
Trx1 is important in the control of growth and apoptosis and
during chronic inflammation; likewise Trx1 is also secreted as
a cocytokine and for chemokine activities [
5
].
TrxR is a homodimer, first described in bovine tissue by
Holmgren and Luthman in 1978 [
10
], which catalyzes the
reduction of the disulfide at the Trx active site, using NADPH
with one FAD cofactor per subunit and a selenocysteine
active site [
5
,
8
]. There are three distinct genes in mammals
that encode three different TrxRs: the cytosolic TrxR (TrxR1),
mitochondrial TrxR (TrxR2), and thioredoxin-glutaredoxin
Hindawi Publishing Corporation
Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2014, Article ID 590808, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/590808

2
Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
reductase (TGR o TrxR3). TrxR1 and TrxR2 are expressed in
all mammalian cells and tissues, while TrxR3 is expressed in
the testicles [
11
].
Besides Trx, TrxR can directly reduce the number of
other substrates, such as peroxides (including lipid hydroper-
oxides), hydrogen peroxide [
12
,
13
], and protein disulfide
isomerases, which participate in the posttranslational folding
and processing of cellular proteins [
14
]. TrxR also participates
in the regeneration of some antioxidant molecules with
antioxidant activity such as dehydroascorbate [
15
,
16
], lipoic
acid [
17
], and ubiquinone [
18
].
The brain is more susceptible to oxidative damage com-
pared with other organs, due to several factors that promote
the formation of reactive species: high oxygen consumption,
high iron levels found in some brain regions, and high fat
content of unsaturated fatty acids, accompanied by low levels
and low activities of some antioxidant enzymes such as super-
oxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase
(Gpx) [
19
]. Both Trx and TrxR are widely expressed in tissues
and organs; their distribution seems to be tissue and cell
specific [
20
], including the brain tissue in which Trx and TrxR
are found.
This review discusses the expression of the TS in different
brain regions and cells and the participation of the TS
in neurotoxic insults and the variety of neurodegenerative
disorders where oxidative stress plays a key role.
2. Protein or mRNA Expression of Trx
\newline and TrxR in the Nervous System
The identification and localization of Trx and TrxR in the
different brain regions have been made possible mostly
through the use of immunochemistry techniques using mon-
oclonal and polyclonal antibodies and by in situ hybridization
techniques. Differentiation between the different isoforms is
not always mentioned in the reports (
Table 1
). However, Trx,
probably Trx1, due to its cytoplasmic localization, has been
detected in the human brain and that of several mammal
species including the rat, gerbil, cow (a yearling calf, more
precisely), and mouse [
10
,
21

24
]. Trx and TrxR were first
identified in the sciatic nerve of the rat, in which both
proteins showed strong cytoplasmic immunoreactivity in the
Schwann cells at the Ranvier nodes and neuronal cells [
20
,
21
].
Studies in rats demonstrate high levels of Trx mRNA in
regions with high energy demands and high activity that
involves redox reactive metabolites including the substantia
nigra and the subthalamic nucleus. According to the authors,
this suggests that the TS participates in the maintenance
of the redox homeostasis in these regions. At the same
time, the C1 area of the hippocampal formation shows very
small expression in contrast to CA2/CA3 and the dental
gyrus of the hippocampus. These are regions in contact with
peripheral blood such as the choroid plexus which expresses
a significant quantity of Trx mRNA [
25
]. Godoy et al. (2011)
reported immunoreactivity to Trx1 in the Purkinje cell layer
of the rat, as well as the motor neurons of the spinal cord,
ependymal cell layer, and the cells of the choroid plexus. In
contrast with Trx1, TrxR1 was abundantly expressed in the
glial cells of the cerebellar white matter. Trx2 (mitochondrial
Trx) was detected in the axonal fibers of the cerebral cortex,
striatum, cerebellar white matter, and spinal cord, while


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   28


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling