The Tools of the Islamic Ethico-Legal Tradition (Usul) Shaykh Jawad Qureshi


Download 3.26 Kb.

bet5/5
Sana12.02.2017
Hajmi3.26 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5

Irreversibility of vital functions of the brain
The OIC-IFA’s stipulation of irreversibility is also problematic for medical scientists.
Since brain death generally leads to withdrawal of life support or at least limitation of care,
a natural history of what is the final clinical state of brain dead individuals is wanting.
While we do know that the prognosis of those who are declared brain dead is abysmal,
that none will likely ever recover any semblance of consciousness, we do not know if
certain functions of the brain may return. Given the lack of clarity around the vital
functions of the brain, this becomes all the more important. Some researchers note that
some brain stem reflexes may reappear after initial absence in brain dead individuals, and
we do know that some proportion of the brain may continue to function in brain dead
individuals. Are these important discussion points within Islamic deliberation?
30
While it may not be practical due to scarcity of resources to continue life support
indefinitely for individuals who are brain dead, or the return of various brain functions
may be trivial, these are different questions that require a separate clear framework to
address. Furthermore there have been rare reports of individuals returning to life after
being classified as brain dead which are dismissed by most clinicians as cases of
improper diagnosis.
31
Nonetheless, these reports speak to difficulty of diagnosing brain
death and the potential for misdiagnosis given the widespread variability in clinical
criteria.
32
Should the inaccuracies of diagnoses and variability in brain death policies be
considered when formulating religious rulings on brain death? The OIC-IFA ruling does
not address these issues.
Degeneration of the brain
Lastly, the OIC-IFA ruling requires that the brain has started to degenerate as
witnessed by specialist physicians. Again, a lack of clarity exists, leaving the clinician
without adequate guidance on how to proceed with diagnosing brain death. While the
medical community recognizes, as a basic conceptual level, degeneration of the brain
(such as in dementia or stroke), never do clinicians speak about an acute process of loss
of brain cell function until the process is clearly severe and irreversible. In brain death
protocols around the world there is no mention of verifying brain degeneration, at best
a proxy where physicians measure blood flow to the brain is listed as an optional
diagnostic test. No protocol asks one to look at cellular damage since ascertaining
degeneration of the brain would require obtaining brain tissue for visual analysis. The
American Academy of Neurology continues to struggle with intermediate diagnoses,
such as “persistent vegetative state,” “minimally conscious state,” and other neurological
diagnoses that speak to severe brain injury, but none are in general use for making
30
McCullagh, 1993.
31
“Dead Man Says He Feels Pretty Good.” Herald Sun 2008.
32
David M. Greer, Panayiotis N. Varelas, Shamael Haque, and Eelco F. M. Wijdicks. “Variability of Brain
Death Determination Guidelines in Leading Us Neurologic Institutions.” Neurology, 2008. 284–89.
T
he Muslim World

V
olume
101

J
anuary
2011
68
© 2011 Hartford Seminary.
42

end-of-life decisions. It is unclear as to why the OIC-IFA considered it important to add
this caveat, and it is at best, clinically irrelevant and at worst, confusing to practicing
doctors. This confusing criterion begs the question as to whether health policy or
appropriate medical expertise where given voice in the deliberation.
Gaps in the IMANA statement
The IMANA statement takes an opposite extreme to the OIC-IFA statement. They
don’t venture into conceptual issues around brain death and simply put, brain death, to
IMANA, is determined when the physician says so. IMANA bypasses or answers the
questions to the OIC-IFA statement of who decides the functions of the brain; the
question of irreversibility; and the diagnostic criteria for brain death in the same manner.
To that end, the IMANA statement, which came out nearly 20 years after the OIC-IFA, fills
a needed gap by deferring to physicians.
Non-acceptance of brain death in Islamic circles abroad and the US
This simplicity of their statement is not without its shortcomings. The IMANA
statement raises new questions and potential problems that are no less important than
those raised by the IFA-OIC statement. Unlike the OIC-IFA statement, which explicitly
allows for non-acceptance of brain death, the Perspective does not offer a dissenting
opinion and seems to cite uniformity within Islamic law that brain death equated to legal
death. There exists a long history of non-acceptance of brain-death among prominent
Islamic scholars beginning with the first recorded discussion of brain death at an
International Fiqh conference where the conference attendees declined to issue a
statement citing the need for additional study, consultation and consensus building to
regarding brain death, to a 1994 decision by the Majlis al-Ulama in Port Elizabeth South
Africa where organ procurement from brain dead individuals was judged to be akin to
murder, implicitly considering brain dead individuals as still living.
33
As there exists a
substantial back-and-forth within the Muslim legal community that would ostensibly be
important to Muslim medical practitioners and religious leaders such oversight is a failing
of the Perspective.
The issue of not explicitly offering a dissenting opinion allowing for non-acceptance
of brain death is key in the context of IMANA’s stated goal to speak to the needs of
Muslims in North America. In particular, it ignores the Shiite minority denominations that
had religious leaders present at the OIC-IFA table and are implicitly allowed to not accept
brain death through recourse to the cardiopulmonary criteria. Grand Ayatollah Sayyid Ali
al-Husayni al-Sistani, the grand Shi
‘ite muftı¯ of Iraq, does not accept neurological criteria
for death, noting that every cell has a soul. His opinion carries significant weight within
the American Muslim Shiite population, numbering in the hundreds of thousands, and
most significantly for Muslims in Southeast Michigan. Southeast Michigan is significant
for being home to the largest concentration of Arabs outside of the Middle East and the
largest concentration of Shiite Muslims in the United States and they look to him for
33
Haque, 2008. Ebrahim 2005. “Organ Transplantation- Fatwas.” In Islamic Voice: Islamic Voice, 1998.
M
edical Experts & Islamic Scholars Deliberating over Brain Death
69
© 2011 Hartford Seminary.
43

spiritual guidance in all realms of life.
34
Indeed, there are reports of Shiite Muslims who,
even when presented brain death, seek all methods, including legal, to continue life
support on a patient who is brain dead.
35
Controversies in the bioethics community
Finally, the Perspective, being much more recently written, fails to deal with new
questions raised since the earliest deliberations over brain death. Since the widespread
adoption of brain death, there have been multiple issues in practice. New science further
breaks down the levels of brain injury, complicating the diagnosis of brain death.
Published reports suggest wide variability across medical centers in how brain death is
determined.
36
And, the linking of physiologic determinations of “partial” death for the
purposes of organ donation and recovery has led now to a new controversial method of
organ recovery, donation after cardiac determination of death (DCDD), which further
complicates the relationship between physiology, life support, and the definition of
death. These and other questions remain entirely unanswered by the source that one
would expect to be able to most effectively comment on these controversies, which are
largely medical in nature.
Discussion
We are examining the writings on brain death with the intent of comparing them to
an asserted “gold standard” we claim exists on how to best approach a bioethics
question. With this in mind, we believe that to best measure the products of bioethical
deliberation, we can and should hold them up to one or several referents:
1.
We can ask if currently available products meet the aims of applied Islamic bioethics
outlined above, and elaborate on how, if it all, the products meet those aims and where
they fail.
2.
We can see if the products meet the needs of the stakeholders outlined above, and where
and how they fail to meet the needs of those stakeholders,
3.
We can see if the products adequately reflect the process of answering a bioethics
question, and where shortcomings in any of those products reflect failures to maintain
fidelity to the process we outlined above.
First, the challenges of dealing with the question of brain death as viewed from the
Islamic tradition and Muslim peoples:
1.
Brain death is, at best, controversial among Sunni Scholars and not accepted fully, or at
all, by several Islamic scholars and juridical councils in the Muslim world.
2.
There are other denominations in Islam, with large numbers of adherents in the US, who
do not accept brain death at all.
34
Rachel Zoll, “Activists Urge Shiite Muslims to Embrace American Citizenship.” In USA Today: USA
Today, 2010.
35
Hasan Shanawani, “Cross-Cultural Perspectives in End-of-Life Care: What Do Our Patients Want?” In
Health Services Research Conference, Henry Ford Hospital, 2006.
36
Greer, 2008.
T
he Muslim World

V
olume
101

J
anuary
2011
70
© 2011 Hartford Seminary.
44

3.
Outside of Islam, there are prominent bioethics and clinical scholars who question the
use of brain death clinically.
4.
The definition of brain death is not uniform, and varies from institution to institution and
over time.
5.
The Islamic legal considerations surrounding the question of brain death are complex
and require substantial knowledge beyond that of physicians and Islamic jurists alone.
Looking at the OIC-IFA and IMANA statements on brain death, they certainly attempt
to grapple with bioethical issues that are new to the Islamic tradition. Arguably, the
OIC-IFA statement does a relatively better job of dealing with the questions of its time
than the Perspective from IMANA. With regard to the second aim of applied Islamic
bioethics, that of dealing with modernity, the OIC-IFA statement is clearly adequate in
that traditional scholars attempt to deliberate on new challenges to Islamic tradition,
although they fail to raise important existential questions raised above. The IMANA
statement, on the other hand, makes comparatively little attempt to engage Islamic
tradition or law. Finally on the third aim, both statements arguably set the stage for
discussions outside their circles, but neither set up a process to engage other intellectual,
religious, academic, or professional disciplines.
Do the statements meet the needs of their stakeholders? The OIC-IFA statement
certainly speaks to the community of Muslim religious scholars in understandable
language. But it does not speak to doctors, medical centers, and other, non-religious
people with an interest in brain death. Likewise, the Perspective gives its reader few, if
any, tools to contemplate bioethical questions for his own practice. It also offers little to
religious leaders, medical centers, and policy institutes to guide discussions on how to
implement IMANA’s support of brain death. In this regard, both statements are good
starts, but ultimately, incomplete.
Using the process outline above, both statements share similar successes and
failures. It would seem at first glance that the various statements of religious organiza-
tions (OIC-IFA, IMANA) and of individuals all attempt to similarly State the issue or
question: What, if anything, defines death to the Muslim; does God guide His servants as
to how to define death? Furthermore, they make a good faith effort, within their own
circles, to identify and clarify important elements: the OIC-IFA experts do a good job of
identifying important terms and religious principles and the IMANA statement improves
on previously ambiguous statements on the pathophysiology of brain death and the
necessary qualifications of the doctors the best they can, short of bringing in additional
expertise, to identify relevant facts. However, none of them bring in a plurality of
religious, medical, or ethical perspectives, and none consider lay peoples and their
possible response to pronouncements on brain death. From there, the next step in the
process, Re-examination of the question in the light of the key identified elements, fails on
its face because it cannot possibly occur without the previous step. The failure of IMANA
to acknowledge the concerns of Southeast Michigan’s Shiite community and other
camps that do not recognize brain death, suggests that the consideration of implications
and practical constraints to have been incomplete. Finally, there exists no current
M
edical Experts & Islamic Scholars Deliberating over Brain Death
71
© 2011 Hartford Seminary.
45

consensus on a proposed solution, or reconciliation or acknowledgement of controver-
sies, our ultimate goal.
To develop an omnibus statement to guide Muslims on the question of brain death,
it would be necessary to have experts familiar with the following:
1.
The physiology of the brain and clinical implications of varying levels of brain death,
2.
The medical profession’s understanding and peer statements on brain death,
3.
Popular understanding and acceptance of definitions of death,
4.
Social scientists familiar with select communities (such as Shiite Muslims and Orthodox
Jews) who will do not accept brain death,
5.
The debate among Muslim legal scholars across the Muslim World,
6.
Islamic arguments for and against definitions of brain death,
7.
Policy experts who would develop “conscience clauses” and other legal and adminis-
trative methods of grappling with patients and health practitioners who do not accept
brain death,
8.
Clinical, administrative, and other people from the transplant community, who are most
likely to interact with families of brain-dead patients and will be impacted by any change
in definitions and clinical practice,
The above list of experts is evident from statements of brain death analyzed in this
paper, and the shortcomings of the various statements on brain death are brought to light
when measured against one another, and when considered in light of easily available
news and information about the controversies and challenges of brain death. It is not
intended to be complete, for example, a new method of “diagnosing death” for the
purposes of facilitating donation after cardiac death (DCDD) brings new controversies
to the physiology, popular understanding, and social uses of death.
In the end, the OIC-IFA and IMANA statements, when considered as glimpses into
the deliberative processes that led to their development, are valuable first steps.
However, as we proceed forward with efforts to grapple with new bioethical questions,
and continue to struggle with older ones, we believe the process would benefit from a
more well-rounded team of experts that will provide a richer, more excogitate response
to complex bioethical and religious questions raised from medicine, biology, and health.
Acknowledgements
This paper was presented in partial form at the 2009 Islamic Medical Association
of North America Annual Convention in Washington DC, and at the 3
rd
Islam and
Bioethics International Conference in Antalya Turkey in 2010. Dr. Padela’s time-effort
and project funding was through the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical
Scholars Program. We thank the tireless effort, teaching, and intellectual content
review of Shaykh Mohamed Amin Kholwadia, resident scholar at the Dar-ul-Qasim
Islamic Educational Institute, Glen Ellyn, IL and all those who participated in our
bi-monthly scholastic seminars.
T
he Muslim World

V
olume
101

J
anuary
2011
72
© 2011 Hartford Seminary.
46

Islamic bioethics: between sacred law, lived
experiences, and state authority
Aasim I. Padela
Published online: 16 April 2013
© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013
Abstract
There is burgeoning interest in the field of “Islamic” bioethics within
public and professional circles, and both healthcare practitioners and academic
scholars deploy their respective expertise in attempts to cohere a discipline of
inquiry that addresses the needs of contemporary bioethics stakeholders while using
resources from within the Islamic ethico-legal tradition. This manuscript serves as
an introduction to the present thematic issue dedicated to Islamic bioethics. Using
the collection of papers as a guide the paper outlines several critical questions that a
comprehensive and cohesive Islamic bioethical theory must address: (i) What are
the relationships between Islamic law (Sharı¯
ʿah), moral theology (us
˙
u¯l al-Fiqh), and
Islamic bioethics? (ii) What is the relationship between an Islamic bioethics and the
lived experiences of Muslims? and (iii) What is the relationship between Islamic
bioethics and the state? This manuscript, and the papers in this special collection,
provides insight into how Islamic bioethicists and Muslim communities are
addressing some of these questions, and aims to spur further dialogue around these
overaching questions as Islamic bioethics coalesces into a true field of scholarly and
practical inquiry.
Keywords
Moral theology · Muslim medical ethics · Islamic legal theory
A. I. Padela (
&)
Initiative on Islam and Medicine, Program on Medicine and Religion, The University of Chicago,
5841 S. Maryland Ave., MC 5068, Chicago, IL, USA
e-mail: apadela@bsd.uchicago.edu
A. I. Padela
Section of Emergency Medicine, Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago, 5841 S.
Maryland Ave., MC 5068, Chicago, IL, USA
A. I. Padela
Maclean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics, The University of Chicago, 5841 S. Maryland Ave.,
MC 5068, Chicago, IL, USA
123
Theor Med Bioeth (2013) 34:65–80
DOI 10.1007/s11017-013-9249-1
47

Patients and healthcare providers embody the engagement of religion with modern
medicine on a daily basis. Patients’ salient health beliefs and health care choices are
often informed by religious values and understandings. Religion also influences the
practice patterns of healthcare professionals in both visible and unconscious ways
[
1
,
2
]. Religion, therefore, significantly shapes both patients’ and providers’ health
related behaviors. Yet, when it comes bioethics, the physician’s obligations toward
patients are more commonly framed within a secular professional framework. The
venture toward an ethics detached from religion is a more recent phenomenon
—“bioethics began in religion,” notes the prominent ethicist Albert Jonsen [
3
, p.
23]. The need to speak a common ethical language across cultural and religious
differences has given rise to a secular bioethics, especially as medical education,
practice, and technology continue to globalize and societies become increasingly
diverse and morally plural. Nonetheless, since the field of bioethics is concerned
with the moral and philosophical implications of biomedicine, it stands to reason
that religious understandings and interpretations continue to provide their adherents
(both patients and providers) with resources for defining, articulating, and
evaluating the moral, philosophical, and ethical questions relevant to biomedicine.
Islam employs a number of ethical frameworks to guide the more than 1.5 billion
Muslims toward three important ends: that which is believed to be “good”; that
which God requires of them (obligations); and those actions that lead to Paradise.
Traditional Islamic ethical frameworks, however, have only recently been applied to
controversies in biomedicine in an attempt to meld together an “Islamic bioethics.”
This is in part due to the fact that Islam is both a lived tradition with its own
intellectual development, and a revealed religion from the perspective of its own
epistemological paradigm. Thus, the source-material for “Islamic” bioethical
inquiry is scattered across several disciplines (theology, moral philosophy, and
law). Further, since Muslims lack a singular religious authority charged with
distilling doctrine for the community, Islam deploys a variety of approaches to
ethics. In fact, the tradition enshrines ethical pluralism in its epistemic approach,
and as its core tenet, the tradition teaches man’s inherent fallibility and consequent
inability to wholly discern Divine will.
The present issue of the Journal of Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics provides a
glimpse into the emerging field of Islamic bioethics. The papers collected herein are
products of a conference entitled, “Where Religion, Bioethics, and Policy Meet—
An Interdisciplinary Conference on Islamic Bioethics and End-of-Life Care.” The
conference was hosted by the University of Michigan on April 10–11, 2011, and
directed by me and Dr. Hasan Shanawani. It was motivated by a concern that
Islamic bioethical discourse, particularly in the United States, does not adequately
meet the needs of its ground-level consumers: Muslim health professionals, patients,
and religious leaders [
4
]. It is true that many stakeholders, from physician
professional organizations to Islamic juridical bodies, engage in Islamic bioethics
work, and a variety of disciplinary experts, including anthropologists and legal
scholars, speak of an Islamic bioethics. There is also burgeoning interest in the field
from all of these and other stakeholders. However, the disseminated products of
Islamic bioethical discourse often appear disconnected from the bedside realities of
medicine, and remain inconsistent in their modes of ethical analysis. These palpable
66
A. I. Padela
123
48

shortcomings stem, in part, from disciplinary experts frequently remaining
sequestered in their professional circles and rarely engaging in conversations with
multiple ground-level bioethics consumers. Our conference at the University of
Michigan, therefore, aimed to bring together Islamic scholars, religious leaders,
social scientists, health professionals, and other disciplinary experts to discuss the
Islamic ethico-legal tradition, bioethics, medical practice, and health policy in the
American context. The structure of the conference centered around a series of
panels, each representing a particular discipline or stakeholder community engaged
in Islamic bioethics work. The presenters laid out their methodological approaches
to bioethics concerns, and the conference concluded with a set of roundtable
discussions about end-of-life care.
1
In the spirit of the conference, the contributors to this special issue are a diverse
set of scholars, including a professor of law (Robert Vischer), several seminary-
trained Islamic jurisconsults (e.g., M. Amin Kholwadia and Steven Furber),
physicians (e.g., Faisal Qazi, Ahsan Arozullah), bioethicists (e.g., Howard Brody),
and an anthropologist (Sherine Hamdy). Collectively, the articles introduce the
reader to some of the reasoning, methods, and debates within Islamic bioethics, and
map out contemporary contexts that frame Islamic bioethical discourse. The
collection also offers insight into several critical overarching questions that a
comprehensive and cohesive Islamic bioethical theory must address. In what
follows, I highlight some of these questions by referring to the papers in this
collection. At the outset, I would like to refer the reader to the glossary at the end of
this paper, which defines several of the Islamic ethico-legal terms used throughout
this collection.
What are the relationships between Islamic law (Shar
īʿah), moral theology
(u
ṣūl al-Fiqh), and Islamic bioethics?
Often translated as Islamic law, the Shar
īʿah and its related sciences enjoy a
privileged status within the Islamic tradition as the crowning achievement of
Muslim intellectual effort. These sciences continue to be a primary focus of study
within traditional seminaries and within the academy. Indeed, Islamic law occupies
a central place in both the individual Muslim psyche and in the greater Muslim
society, and the Shar
īʿah is a primary tool for Muslim engagement with modernity.
Therefore, one must rely heavily on the tools and resources of Islamic law when
attempting to judge, as a matter of “Islamic” bioethics, the appropriate ordering of
medicine and righteous conduct of patients and healthcare providers.
This becomes clearer when one understands that Islamic law has both legal and
moral content. Shar
īʿah etymologically means “the way to the water” and represents
an Islamic path to salvation. In other words, a Muslim living within the bounds of
the Shar
īʿah is deemed to be living in accordance with what God requires of him or
1
For more information about the conference as well as video recordings of the lectures, see
https://
pmr.uchicago.edu/studies/content/where-religion-bioethics-and-policy-meet-interdisciplinary-conference
(accessed March 12, 2013). .
Islamic bioethics
67
123
49

her. The Shar
īʿah, therefore, more accurately represents both a corpus of rules
(a
ḥkām, sing. ḥukm) and a moral code. Accordingly, to discern the rules of the
Shar
īʿah is to attempt to assess whether actions lead to salvation or to condemnation
in the hereafter. The science that serves as the fountainhead for this type of ethical
deliberation is u
ṣūl al-fiqh and it is the arbiter of right and wrong. Uṣūl al-fiqh both
identifies the sources of ethico-legal knowledge, and lays down discursive rules for
ethico-moral reasoning. The end product of Islamic ethical deliberation employing
the u
ṣūl al-fiqh methodology is fiqh, commonly translated into English as law.
Fiqh is a term widely used in modern parlance and in ethico-legal discourse, but
it is often misunderstood. With reference to the Shar
īʿah and uṣūl al-fiqh, fiqh refers
to an understanding of what the divine law has to say about the merits and
obligations attached to an action. When a jurist employs the u
ṣūl al-fiqh
methodology, he is attempting to gain an understanding (
fiqh) of the “rightness”
or “wrongness” of an action by “discovering” the rule (
ḥukm) communicated by
God through the medium of the source-texts of Islam. A source of confusion for
non-specialists is that often times the terms
fiqh and ḥukm are used interchangeably
to refer to an Islamic ruling, although technically the two terms are distinct.
According to the u
ṣūl al-fiqh methodology, the end process of coming to an
understanding, or discovering the Divine law, is arriving at a
ḥukm taklīfī or a ḥukm
wa
ḍʿī [
5
,
6
].
Ḥukm taklīfī is a specific determination of whether there is a moral
obligation for a Muslim to perform or to avoid a particular action. This
determination is made by assessing the expected afterlife ramification—God’s
reward, punishment, or indifference—attached to an action. The second type of
fiqh
is
ḥukm waḍʿī. A ḥukm waḍʿī imposes a cause, condition, or hindrance to a specific
action as gleaned from the source texts of Islam, in essence, by linking the merit of
every action to God’s approbation, condemnation, or indifference (as best as
humans can) through interpretation of the scriptural source texts. The Shar
īʿah
represents a moral code: it is a guide to that which is ethical.
Yet, while Islamic law has an undeniable ethical character, it does not represent
the totality of what the Islamic tradition has to say about ethical formation. For
example, the cultivation of Godly virtue (an activity that gains reward in the
hereafter) is the central concern of Islamic sciences related to spirituality, ta
ṣawwuf.
Similarly, ethical and virtuous character development is a core concern of the
Islamic science of manners and morality,
ʿilm al-ahklāq. While there is room for
reasoned debate about how these somewhat esoteric sciences come together with
Islamic law in the construction of an Islamic bioethics, such a dialogue is often
precluded by experts trying to apply distinctions between the legal, ethical, and
moral, as derived from a Western philosophical perspective, to the Islamic tradition.
Such clear distinctions are not inherent to an Islamic moral universe.
Four papers in this collection provide windows into the complex methods,
constructs, and content of Islamic ethico-legal deliberation. Khalil Abdur-Rashid, a
doctoral candidate in Islamic Law at Columbia University and a seminary-trained
Imam, along with colleagues Musa Furber, a seminary trained Islamic jurisconsult,
and Taha Abdul Basser, a university-based Islamic law expert, offers a typology of
Muslim ethical decision-makers and the sources and methods used in Islamic ethical
deliberation. According to these authors, bioethics is “Islamic” only when “the
68
A. I. Padela
123
50

foundation upon which it is constructed, the process which is undertaken in
progressing towards the end, and the means through which its goals are achieved are
accomplished utilizing an Islamic methodology from the sources of Islamic ethics
[read law].” This methodology, for them, is u
ṣūl al-fiqh, and it follows that
“Islamic” ethicists must possess training in u
ṣūl al-fiqh and specialize in its
application to the field of bioethics. Given this thesis, the authors provide a general
overview of sources (u
ṣūl) of Islamic ethics (al-fiqh) and proceed to outline three
archetypes of Islamic ethicists: (1) the jurisconsult (muft
ī/faqīh), (2) the professor
(mudarris), and (3) the author (mu
ṣannif). After introducing the reader to a typology
of Islamic ethicists and the sources these ethicists use to determine whether actions
are ethical (the yardstick being reward or punishment in the hereafter), the authors
introduce the reader to the inner workings of an Islamic ethical deliberation.
Methodological techniques used by Islamic ethicists, such as differentiation (fur
ūq),
preponderization (tarj
īḥ), and the consideration of public interest (maṣlaḥah) are
explained, and the authors close by outlining several methodological devices to
which an Islamic ethicist may resort when seeking to further refine his assessment.
These devices include referring to the higher objectives/aims of Islamic law
(maq
āṣid) in order to “determine the overall correctness and value of the decision,”
or looking to Islamic legal principles (qaw
āʿid) and controls (ḍawābiṭ) since they
are “instruments to guide one’s precision and accuracy in reaching a conclusion,”
but are not overall determinants of a decision. Finally, the authors note the
increasing use of group decision making processes (ijtih
ād jamāʿī) in Islamic
bioethics.
Dr. Ahsan Arozullah, along with Shaykh Amin Kholwadia, a seminary trained
Islamic scholar, contribute a piece that highlights Islamic theology in bioethical
decision making. Their paper expounds on the implications the theological concept
of wil
āyah (authority and governance) has for Islamic bioethics discourse. Starting
from where Abdur-Rashid et al. left off, these authors suggest that the concept of
wil
āyah undergirds moral authority accorded to Islamic juridical councils employ-
ing ijtih
ād jamāʿī for bioethics. They note that Islamic authorities are imbued with
three different levels of wil
āyah (moral, legal, political) and that each level of
authority places a commensurate set of obligations upon Muslims to act in
accordance with a particular authority’s decree.
Rooting themselves within the Ma¯turı¯dı¯ school of theology,
2
the authors begin by
referencing the theological supposition that is the foundation of Sunni u
ṣūl al-fiqh—
most prominently that of the H
˙
anafı¯ school of law
3
—which states that “sound
human reason may determine moral value in human actions in this world, such as
goodness in speaking the truth or evil in lying … [yet] divine revelation is the only
source from which to determine sin or reward for these actions in the afterlife.”
Accordingly, Islamic bioethical decision making is primarily concerned with “sin or
reward in the afterlife” and evaluates the worldly consequences of Islamic
2
Sunni Islam has two prominent schools of extant scholastic theology (kal
ām): the Ma¯turı¯dı¯ and the
Ash
ʿarı¯. Often referenced in discussion of kalām is the Muʿtalizite school which more closely relates to
Shiite Islam. Please see Sherman Jackson [
7
, chs. 1–4] for a concise overview.
3
The extant Sunni schools of Islamic law are four and are named after their promulgators: Ma¯likı¯,
H
˙
anafı¯, Sha¯fi
ʿı¯, and H
˙
anbalı¯. Please refer to any of a number of Islamic legal manuals for further details.
Islamic bioethics
69
123
51

judgments secondarily. According to the authors, actions that are rewarded in the
afterlife have a “tangible ‘benefit’ in this world,” and similarly, actions that are
sinful (punishable in the hereafter) carry with them “a tangible ‘harm’ in this
world.” They emphasize that sound human reason may determine these tangible
“benefits” and “harms,” whereas revelation is the only source of knowledge about
afterlife ramifications. Given this backdrop, these authors also comment on the
primary sources (u
ṣūl) of Islamic knowledge (al-fiqh) and categorize the output of
Islamic ethical deliberation about an act (
ḥukm taklīfī) along a moral gradient and
with a corresponding level of obligation to perform or avoid the action. The authors
then proceed to discuss the types of wil
āyah and the duty of Muslims to obey
authorities with each of these types of wil
āyah. For example, they note that Muslims
living in a non-Muslim land are not bound by political wil
āyah since there is no
Muslim state authority to obey, yet they are required to “follow the law of the land.”
Moving to the application of wil
āyah in the realm of bioethics, the authors note a
moral obligation of Muslims to ask Islamic jurisconsults about ethical dilemmas
since only Islamic jurists have knowledge about whether an action carries sin. Such
scholars, in turn, have an academic wil
āyah over the laity and a Muslim “is
accountable … for not following through on the opinion of the scholar.” Using the
case example of whether or not it is ethico-legally permissible to use porcine
insulin, the authors conclude by working through the levels of wil
āyah and the
corresponding obligations of Muslims to act in accord with those who have wil
āyah.
Tariq Ramadan, professor of contemporary Islamic studies at the University of
Oxford, begins his piece by discussing the relationship between
fiqh and uṣūl al-fiqh
and from there moves to discuss other aspects of the Islamic ethico-legal tradition.
His commentary focuses on mapping out several challenges for the field of applied
Islamic ethics. He discusses first the “need to acquire a better understanding of
terminology.” For example, he notes that the term ethics has Greek origins and does
not have an exact correlate within the Islamic tradition. He proceeds to comment on
whether the Islamic ethico-legal tradition must be propounded solely by referring to
the scriptural sources or whether the context, i.e., social reality, can serve as a
normative source material. He also questions the preoccupation Muslims have with
the end-products of u
ṣūl al-fiqh deliberation—the rules (aḥkām singular ḥukm). In
his view, the Maq
āṣid as-Sharīʿah, the objectives or end-goals of Sharīʿah, should
be a parallel concern in Islamic ethical deliberation. Since the objectives of the law
are rationally derived while the rules, a
ḥkām, rely more heavily on textual sources,
considering both the rules and the objectives together leads one to rely equally on
reason and revelation. This harmonious “middle path” in applied Islamic ethics is
arrived at only when scholars search for ethical guidance in both the text and the
context and consider the rulings (a
ḥkām) as well as the objectives (maqāṣid) of the
Islamic ethico-legal tradition. In the final portion of his paper, Professor Ramadan
outlines several concepts that are critical for any Islamic bioethics project. He notes
that the Islamic ethico-legal tradition leans toward a reformatory paradigm, al-i
ṣlāḥ,
and that Islamic ethics should be focused not on adapting the moral code to meet the
needs of society but, rather, on “betterment and purification” of society. His piece
closes with a comment on Islamic authority structures. Traditionally, Islamic
scholars were considered the sole authority in matters of ethics and law. Professor
70
A. I. Padela
123
52

Ramadan advocates a “shift in the center of gravity of authority” such that alongside
Islamic jurisconsults, scholars of the context, e.g., experts in fields of social and
natural sciences, are accorded authority within Islamic ethical deliberation. By
doing so, he argues that the natural and social sciences will be able to provide
normative ethical content to Islamic ethics projects.
In their manuscript, Dr. Faisal Qazi, a neurologist and ethicist, and his colleagues
point out that the end-product of Islamic ethico-legal deliberation, a
ḥukm, is only
an approximation of divine law. These authors suggest that within Islamic bioethical
debates, rulings (a
ḥkām) arrived at by Islamic jurisconsults are often treated as
certain knowledge and not as probabilistic assessments. Consequently, when rulings
are treated as determinate, little space is accorded for dissenting opinions or for
challenging a particular legal scholars’ ethico-legal reasoning. These authors
consider this current situation to be antithetical to the spirit of Islamic ethico-legal
discourse. They note that u
ṣūl al-fiqh is founded upon the fact that there may be
multiple “right” answers to any scenario. This pluralism implies that most ethico-
legal rulings are probable determinations and not conclusive assessments.
Overlooking this innate characteristic of Islamic law results in a rigid “Islamic”
bioethics.
To illustrate their thesis, the authors analyze Islamic ethico-legal deliberations
about brain death. They note that one of the arguments used by Islamic ethicists to
oppose brain death is that the medical diagnosis of brain death is not definitive.
Hence the legal principle that “certainty is not eroded by doubt” (al-yaq
īn la yuzulu
bi
‘l-shakk) is used to buttress arguments that legal death occurs only with
cardiopulmonary collapse. The authors suggest that while Islamic ethicists are
willing to reject medical data because it is probability based, Islamic ethico-legal
judgments for or against brain death also do not reach a level of certainty. Indeed,
the u
ṣūl al-fiqh methodology only approximates God’s intent because it relies on the
fallible medium of human interpretation. Given that both Islamic ethicists and
scientists use methodologies that are probabilistic, the authors suggest the need for a
more humble multidisciplinary Islamic bioethics discourse in which clinicians and
Islamic legal experts work side by side to meet the needs of Islamic bioethics
consumers and acknowledge that any conclusion they put forth is only an
approximation, whether the determination is made in the realm of medical science
or in the realm of Islamic ethics.
What is the relationship between an Islamic bioethics and the lived experiences
of Muslims?
The place of lived experience as source-material for ethical norms is a widely
debated area in religious ethics. Seminary based religious studies often focus on
engaging sacred source-texts to derive a particular approach to evaluating human
behavior and social reality. Alongside a written tradition that preserved sacred texts,
religious communities often also preserved an oral tradition and authority structures
that assisted with the interpretation of the textual sources. Academic religious
studies, therefore, commonly involved exploring the ways in which religious texts
Islamic bioethics
71
123
53

and textual authorities evolved and developed. In the past several decades, however,
there has been a shift in the academic study of religion away from texts and the
interpreters of texts towards more detailed studies about the lives of religious
adherents. While sociological approaches to religious studies offer a new vantage
point for investigating how religious traditions provide meaning to believers on the
ground, there is considerable debate about the normative value of these experiences.
Some suggest that social science approaches redefine religious traditions as purely
social phenomena, bracketing off any truth claims that religious systems may
propagate. Others suggest that religion only exists through the interpretive medium
of human life. Therefore, examining the lives of religious adherents is central to
discerning the ideal structure of society and of human conduct advanced by a
particular religious tradition. Different religious traditions, as well as the different
religious streams within each of them, may approach these controversies in varied
ways. Hence, attempts at distilling an Islamic bioethics must tackle the thorny issue
of determining where the lived experiences of Muslims belong in a normative
framework.
In an attempt to bring clarity to the study of Islamic approaches to bioethical
challenges, I have called for a distinction between the field of Islamic bioethics and
Muslim bioethics [
4
,
8
]. I consider Islamic bioethics to be a field anchored within
the ethico-legal traditions of Islam and concerned with the bioethical discourse
produced by the bearers of that tradition. Muslim bioethics, in my view, represents
the sociological and anthropological study of how Muslims act when encountering
medicine and biotechnological advances. In other words, the former concerns itself
with the study of texts, doctrines, and those who produce texts and doctrines, while
the latter studies the human actors that in partial and varied ways engage these texts
and doctrines while facing bioethics challenges.
Such a partition between Islamic and Muslim bioethics gives rise to questions
about the relationship between the social sciences and the Islamic ethico-legal
sciences. To date, Islamic approaches to bioethics have largely ignored these
questions, and as a result, Islamic bioethical discourse often devolves into meetings
in which social scientists and medical practitioners talk past the experts in Islamic
law, and vice versa.
To illustrate the challenge, let us consider surrogate decision making at the end-
of-life. Studies show that the majority of surrogate decision makers find making
choices about the continuation of medical intervention for their loved ones to be
highly stressful [
9
,
10
]. Indeed, some studies find the levels of stress in these
surrogates to be analogous to levels found in people suffering from severe trauma.
This empirical fact may be interpreted as a variable that should be weighed when
considering the proper models of surrogate decision making in end of life care.
Leaving aside the fact that Islamic bioethics discourse is silent when it comes to
models of decision making, the question is how to incorporate the “truths” from
empirical social science into an Islamic bioethical approach. In the traditional u
ṣūl
al-
fiqh paradigm, such “facts” may only enter the discursive processes of ethico-
legal assessment after a thorough interrogation of the primary sources, u
ṣūl. If the
textual sources are silent, then facts from social science may be considered. One
manner in which this may be accomplished is through recourse to the secondary
72
A. I. Padela
123
54

source of
ʿurf, custom, and its related legal maxim, qāʿidaḥ, al-ʿādah al-
mu
ḥakkimaḥ, “customs inform rules.” Both the secondary source and the legal
maxim privilege social considerations and habit when the primary sources are silent.
Maq
āṣidī approaches to fiqh do not directly address the issue in so far as they do not
dictate a prioritization schema for when and how social reality governs ethico-legal
deliberation. It is therefore apparent that social science data does not easily fit into a
normative Islamic ethico-legal framework.
So how does Islamic bioethics weigh social science data about patients, medical
practice, and biotechnology in setting out Islamic bioethics norms? On the one hand,
if Islamic bioethics approaches neglect lived experiences, the field would be a
disembodied intellectual exercise. On the other hand, if Islamic bioethics
approaches do not clearly demarcate the place for social science in its methodology,
confusion as to what is “Islamic” about Islamic bioethics would abound. Further, in
so far as Islam upholds Deistic subjectivism (the concept that “things” are
meritorious only because God has labeled them as such and wrong because He has
declared them to be) as a foundational principle for ethico-legal theory, caution
must be exercised to clearly mark out the entry points of social science approaches
and natural law theory into the inner workings of Islamic bioethics. Otherwise,
Islamic bioethics as a field may become a confused amalgam of clashing
epistemological frameworks that cannot set out ideals for human conduct.
Two papers in this series relate to the debate around how to consider religious
ideas in the formulation of a religious approach to bioethics. Howard Brody, a
prominent scholar of modern bioethics, and colleague Arlene Macdonald, a
religious studies expert, pen a piece that calls for an expanded definition of religion
beyond sacred texts and textual authorities, such that it encompasses religion’s
sociological influence on individual’s identities and values. They remark that for
bioethics to appropriately engage with religious beliefs, values, and identities, “it
helps to view religion as lived experience as well as a body of doctrine.” According
to these authors, the bioethics community still remains attached to “defining the
substance of religion as sacred texts, authoritative structures, and comprehensive
systems of meaning.” In doing so, they privilege a Christian and Western
conceptualization of religion that “artificially stabilizes” religious identity. The
problem they note with this view is that it leads to stereotyping religious people as
they are assumed to act in “ways pre-determined by authoritative scriptures and
institutional bodies.” Such an account of religion only provides bioethicists with
knowledge about what the religious orthodoxy ought to believe. It does not provide
insight into what is actually believed and practiced.
Brody and Macdonald suggest instead that bioethicists should look to the
developing social theory approaches to religion, in which scholars postulate that
religious knowledge may be as much somatic as it is textual, and study the practices
of ordinary religious adherents. In doing so, religious tradition becomes one of the
“multiple social and cultural inputs that construct religious persons,” and the
diversity of ways in which members of a faith community are influenced by their
religious tradition becomes recognizable. A sociological conceptualization of
religion would foster a patient centered approach to bioethical challenges that is
attuned to finding solutions based on an individual’s particular conceptualization of
Islamic bioethics
73
123
55

his or her religious identity. Brody and Macdonald’s proposal has implications at a
societal level and for public policy—a topic to which I shall return shortly.
Sherine Hamdy, an anthropologist, in her article, studies the reasons for the
refusal of Egyptian doctors to diagnose death by neurological criteria. Relying on
years of ethnographic study, she recounts the concerns and experiences of Egyptian
patients, religious scholars, and medical practitioners with organ transplantation and
brain death. In her view, the “lived experiences” of Egyptian patients and medical
practitioners belies a “cohesive or homogeneous” field of Islamic bioethics. She
suggests that health policy stakeholders and mass media misrepresent the debate
over Egyptian organ transplantation policy as a clash between the values of a
Western medical and bioethics community and the objectives of Islamic law.
Hamdy suggests that the narrative of a clash of civilizations serves to tap into post-
colonial fervor about upholding traditional values in the face of a corrupted and
Western modernity. Hamdy argues that the underlying concerns that the Egyptian
populace and health care workforce have about a cadaveric procurement program
are about the protection of vulnerable people, the equitable distribution of organs,
and fair access to treatment. These types of concerns are not Islamic per se, since
they are concerns shared across societies and religious traditions. And as long as the
concerns over cadaveric organ procurement programs in Egypt remain misclassified
as stemming from the Islamic ethico-legal tradition, legitimate concerns about the
vulnerabilities of marginalized patients and social justice will remain unaddressed,
thereby impeding the establishment of a properly running organ transplantation
system in Egypt.
Professor Hamdy’s manuscript adds an additional wrinkle to the conceptualiza-
tion of religion as a primary source for bioethical theory. Some of her subjects
couched their rejection of brain-death criteria and of organ transplantation in
“Islamic” terminology. They suggest that brain death cannot be equated with legal
death in Islam because, for example, “the soul is still there” or it affronts the Islamic
views on the dignity of the body. Such concerns, while shared by other religious
communities, are said to be rooted in the Islamic tradition within the Egyptian
(Muslim) context. If the bioethics community adopts a more sociological
conceptualization of religion in its engagement with Islam and Muslims, then what
is the criterion by which to distinguish genuine Islamic concerns from concerns
mislabeled as Islamic? If human actors tell us what “is” for them an “Islamic”
concern, does it not, in reality, become a concern stemming from the tradition?
Labeling a problem as one stemming from religious valuation implies that solving
the problem requires engaging religious ideas and authorities.
Health interventions to promote organ donation among Muslims illustrate this
conundrum. Surveys from across the Muslim world note that Muslim populations
are generally less likely to donate their organs and often cite religious reasons as
underlying their disinclination [
11

18
]. Recognizing religious interpretations as
barrier beliefs, health care stakeholders have engaged religious authorities across
the world in a conversation over the Islamic views on organ donation and
transplantation. These initiatives have led to multiple fat
āwā that declare organ
donation to be permissible according to Islam [
19

21
]. Yet, subsequent surveys
often find that Muslim attitudes toward organ donation remain largely unchanged
74
A. I. Padela
123
56

[
22
]. The failure to change Muslim attitudes concerning organ donation despite
multiple widely disseminated juridical rulings is puzzling. One explanation may be
that the people who cite religious concerns as a dissuading factor are mislabeling
their concerns as religious and thus the fat
āwā are ineffective in changing their
opinions. Alternatively, even though the concerns may be religious in nature, fat
āwā
may be the incorrect medium through which to change health behavior [
23
]. This
example highlights the challenge of labeling a social phenomenon as rooted in
religion. At times, human actors may outfit their beliefs in religious garb even when
those beliefs are unrelated to religion. Alternatively, while a social value may be
described as originating from a shared set of universal values, an individual’s
motivation to act in accordance with that value may stem from the belief that their
religion upholds that value.
Religious traditions do set cultural norms and are manifest in human behaviors.
In my view, however, looking at what “is” (social reality) will only generate an
incomplete picture of what religious traditions suggest “ought” to be. Islamic
bioethics projects will have to come up with yardsticks to measure the “Islamicity”
of values and ideas as gleaned from the voices and experiences of Muslims. How to
do that remains a challenging and controversial enterprise.
What is the relationship between Islamic bioethics and the state?
The place of religion in the public square is a highly important and hotly contested
topic. In a pluralistic and diverse society such as ours, the use of religious arguments
to promote public policies and law understandably makes individuals who do not
share the same religious views feel uneasy. Even religious adherents may be
troubled by the co-opting of religion to promote a specific policy or law, since the
idea of a “neutral” public square, where debate occurs in secular terms, seems
essential to a liberal democracy. Yet, public debates on a variety of bioethical issues
invariably have religious overtones. From the controversies surrounding stem cell
research and partial-birth abortion to public debates over health care reform, faith
communities offer religious rationales for advocating one policy over another, and
religious adherents note that being forced to repackage their religiously rooted
values into secular concepts leads to disingenuousness.
Brody and Macdonald revisit the concept of a neutral public square in the works
of John Rawls and Martha Nussbaum. They trace the development of Rawls’s
political philosophy and minimalist view of religious toleration. Rawls suggested
that public laws and policies should be argued for by appeal to values that are shared
by the citizenry and not to those of specific religious traditions, as they are unlikely
to be shared by all. According to the authors, Rawls insisted that while citizens may
benefit from learning about the religious rationale of their colleagues’ opinions, “the
citizen demonstrating ideal civic virtue would restate whatever he had previously
said in religious terms, in the language of the overlapping consensus.” But the
authors suggest that we need to move beyond mere tolerance so that the public
square may be enriched by citizens discussing their religious values in debates over
policies and law. They propose that “the best route to an appreciation of religion in
Islamic bioethics
75
123
57

the public square, in a way that enhances the practice of bioethics, is to apply … [a]
concept of social reciprocity” whereby individuals explain fully how their positions
are grounded in their belief structure and religious tradition. In conclusion, these
authors harken back to their suggested reconceptualization of religion as an
embodied social reality. They argue that the fear of allowing religious arguments in
the public square stems from seeing religion as a totalizing body of doctrine. If
religion is alternatively viewed as a social force negotiated in partial and varied
ways by individuals, then there may be no need to fear absolutist and irrational
argumentation by religious adherents in the public square. Instead, a diversity of
interpretations would allow for reasoned negotiation between individuals belonging
to different religious traditions.
Moving from political theory to legislation, Robert Vischer, a professor of law,
discusses the relationship of health care and religion in the legal system. He notes
that a particular religious community’s commitments may inform the writing of law
such that all citizens are bound to that commitment. As an example, he cites the
criminalization of assisted suicide in the United States as originating from Christian
teachings that, when enshrined into law, bind both Christians and non-Christians.
Obviously, other non-Christian moral traditions, including Islam, hold the same
view on assisted suicide, but this is not the case for every tradition or for every
bioethical issue. Over the past few decades, however, “the Supreme Court has taken
a skeptical stance toward laws that limit personal liberty based solely on the
assertion of a moral claim.” This changing landscape may reflect a nod to Rawlsian
ideas about the public square and evidences an inclination towards allowing the
citizenry to live out their lives without religious communities infringing on personal
liberty. At the same time, the legal system has been trying to create a space in which
religious health care providers have the liberty to integrate their faith commitments
with their own work. This debate centers on the liberty of conscience and how far
health care institutions need to accommodate the religious commitments of
individual providers over treatments that are proscribed by their faith. The most
common examples revolve around contraceptive services and abortion, where the
law must protect the right to conscience while at the same time insuring that the
health care needs of the population are met. For Vischer, some of these tensions may
be reduced by recapturing “the notion that the dictates of conscience are defined,
articulated, and lived out in relationship with others.” This relational view of
conscience recognizes that while “conscience might be expressed and defended by
the individual … its substance and real-world implications are relational by their
very nature.” Recognizing that one’s recourse to conscience-based arguments
affects the lives of others may lead to reasoned negotiation and compromise. Thus,
like Brody and Macdonald, he calls for a public square that allows recourse to
arguments based on religious commitments. By conveying one’s “perception of
reality’s normative implications,” an individual “makes truth claims that possess
authority over” his own conduct and that of individuals who share those same
commitments. Too often, he argues, conscience arguments are portrayed as personal
or institutional hang-ups that preclude compliance with a professional standard of
care. Yet, it is also possible that by allowing individuals to express their religious
commitments, a different standard of care arises that would enrich the profession
76
A. I. Padela
123
58

and benefit the populace. Professor Vischer argues that cultivating and maintaining
the conditions necessary for freedom of conscience should be the priority for our
society and its legal system.
Professor Vischer concludes his commentary by noting that for Muslim health
care workers, exercising their freedom of conscience at the institutional level
becomes more difficult because institutional efforts to accommodate Muslims are
often seen as “equivalent to legal enshrinement of those convictions.” This is
witnessed by anti-Shar
īʿah legislative initiatives, which mistake the attempt of
Muslim communities to seek recourse to their religious norms for an attempt by
Muslims to have the American legal system adopt Islamic rules of conduct. Thus
when a Muslim couple asks for a dissolution of marriage based on Islamic tenets,
they are asking the court to honor a contractual provision already agreed upon by
the couple in the marriage contract. They are not asking the court to adopt Islamic
laws of divorce. This misperception fuels a distaste for accommodating Muslims’
values in personal and professional realms and challenges the Muslim health care
provider’s recourse to conscience clauses in the health care domain.
So what does this all mean for Islamic bioethics? Some of the implications are
hinted at in the article by Arozullah and Kholwadia. In it, they discuss the concept
of wil
āyah as controlling the tenor of Muslim obligations within Islamic bioethical
theory. The authors state that “Muslims living in non-Muslim lands today are
required to follow the law of the land and there is no obligation on them to gain
political or legal wil
āyah.” In the context of their discussion of wilāyah, sin is only
attributed to Muslims who disobey an Islamic ethico-legal injunction or disobey a
Muslim state authority’s laws (as long as the law does not contravene an Islamic
obligation). From their discussion, it seems that there may be space within Islamic
law for Muslims living under non-Muslim rule to claim liberty of conscience when
laws conflict with religious commitments. While Muslims should follow the law of
the land within a non-Muslim state, they do not automatically sin when not obeying
the laws of a non-Muslim state actor, where there is conflict between an Islamic
injunction and the secular law. Arozullah and Kholwadia also note that there is no
obligation to gain political or legal wil
āyah for Muslims living in a minority status.
If this is the case, then Muslim communities living under non-Muslim rule need not
seek to enshrine their religious commitments into law. Muslims in a non-Muslim
state may instead incline toward, to use Professor Ramadan’s terminology, an
“adaptive” ethics rather than a “transformative” paradigm for society. This type of
Muslim response has implications for the public square. Brody and Macdonald and
Vischer call for religious communities to more fully explain their religion-infused
arguments for or against a public policy or law. They argue that public discourse is
enriched by understanding where Islam comes from, yet an adaptive ethico-legal
mindset may disincentivize the Muslim community from engaging in a dialogue that
lays bare their religious values and commitments.
Further, there is a long-standing tradition within the United States of seeking the
voice of religious communities in matters of health law and bioethics. For example,
the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues often seeks opinions
from religious authorities when advising the President on bioethical issues arising
from advances in biomedicine and related areas of science and technology. If
Islamic bioethics
77
123
59

Islamic bioethical theory suggests that Muslims are in no obligation to seek
influence over policies and laws that reflect their ethico-legal commitments in a
non-majority state, and if the public square remains hostile to Muslims voicing
religious views, then it stands to reason that Islamic bioethics may remain an insular
field. Fleshing out what Islamic bioethics requires of Muslims in a minority status,
and whether those obligations are different in a majority status when it comes to
health policies and state laws, is critically important.
Final remarks
This special issue of Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics represents a window into
Islamic bioethical discourse. While Islamic bioethics draws upon the depth and
breadth of the Islamic ethico-legal tradition, there are many important questions to
address about the sources it draws upon before one can expound a comprehensive
Islamic bioethical theory. When seeking to develop a robust and complete
framework for Islamic bioethics, one must also be cognizant of the methods of
moral reasoning the field employs, and the points at which it departs from modern
bioethics as well as from Western ethical and political theories. The papers in this
collection provide insight into how Islamic bioethicists and Muslim communities
are addressing some of these questions, and I hope this work will spur further
dialogue around these critical questions as Islamic bioethics coalesces into a true
field of scholarly and practical inquiry.
A glossary of relevant Islamic Ethico-legal terms used in this collection
al-Akhl
āqiyāt
Ethics as related to human behavior or conduct
Am
īr
A (Muslim) political authority
Ḍarūrah
Dire necessity
Fiqh
Jurisprudential understanding or an ethico-legal ruling
Fatw
ā (pl. fatāwā) A non-binding, context specific Islamic ethico-legal assessment or ruling issued by
a trained Islamic jurist
Ghayb
Unseen realm
Ḥukm (pl. aḥkām)
Ruling; judgment; decree
Ḥukm taklīfī
One of the two types of judgments (
ḥukm) that result from using uṣūl al-fiqh
methodology. This type of
ḥukm locates an action along an ethical gradient from
obligatory to perform to obligatory to refrain from, each gradient having its own
afterlife ramifications
Ijm
āʿ
Consensus agreement; a formal source (u
ṣūl) of Islamic law
Ijtih
ād
Juristic effort or methodology used to construct a fatwa
Ijtih
ād jamāʿī
The process of group decision making based on u
ṣūl al-fiqh within a council of
Islamic jurisconsults
al-
ʿIllah
The intention of God when He revealed a Qu’ranic rule or inspired a Prophetic
tradition stating a rule. I
ṭāʿah Obedience
Ittib
āʿ
Following the example of (an individual)
Madhhab (pl.
madh
āhīb)
The ‘schools’ of Islamic law which have tradition-based legal theories
78
A. I. Padela
123
60

Table a
continued
al-Maq
āṣid
The objectives of Islamic Shar
īʿah
Ma
ṣlaḥah
Public interests or benefit. A variably interpreted source of Islamic law
Muft
ī/faqīh
Islamic ethicist; jurisconsult
Nafs
Self, sometimes used interchangeably with r
ūḥ
Na
ṣṣ
Textual sources of the Islamic ethico-legal tradition, such as the Qu’ran and the
Sunnah
Q
āḍī
A judge who is given legal authority by an Islamic government
Qa
ṭʿī
A term used to denote univocal texts that lead to a definitive and singular judgment
Qiy
ās
Precedent based analogy, a formal source (u
ṣūl) of Islamic law
R
ūḥ
Soul
Shar
īʿah
Islamic (moral) law
ʿUlamā’
Literally “the learned.” The term refers to scholars of the Islamic tradition trained in
Islamic seminaries. A near-equivalent term or synonym is Fuqah
ā’ (singular
Faq
īh), meaning, “scholars of fiqh,” which specifically refers to Islamic scholars
of law and ethics
ʿUrf
Refers to the social practice and norms of a community—a disputed source of
Islamic ethics
U
ṣūl al-fiqh
Islamic legal theory or moral theology; the science identifies the sources of ethico-
legal knowledge and lays down the discursive rules for moral-ethical reasoning
Wal
ī
Guardian and protector; one who is responsible for someone else
Wil
āyah
Authority and governance
Yaq
īn
Absolute certainty
Ẓannī
Refers to a judgment (or proof text interpretation) that is probability based
All transliterations of Arabic terms in this special issue have been standardized according to the
romanization tables produced by the Library of Congress [
24
]
Acknowledgments
This special collection as well as the conference Where Religion, Bioethics, and
Policy Meet: An Interdisciplinary Conference on Islamic Bioethics and End-of-Life Care was supported by
the following University of Michigan programs, centers, and institutes: the Center for Ethics and Public
Life, the Center for Middle Eastern and North African Studies, the International Institute, the Islamic
Studies Program, the Office of the Vice President for Research, the Program in Society and Medicine, and
the Division of General Internal Medicine in the Department of Medicine. Additional support and funding
was provided by the Greenwall Foundation, Darul Qasim Institute, and the Institute for Social Policy and
Understanding. Special acknowledgements go to Drs. Rod Hayward, Dan Sulmasy, and Farr Curlin for
encouragement and advice and for helping me to traverse all the barriers and hoops on the path towards
this issue. We acknowledge the timely reviews and critical comments of the cadre of peer-reviewers who
helped to enhance the quality of the papers. My deepest gratitude to Katie Gunter for being an exceptional
research assistant and project coordinator. Lastly, my thanks to Brigid Adviento and Daniel Kim for their
varied assistance with this project.
References
1. Curlin, Farr A., Ryan E. Lawrence, Marshall H. Chin, and John D. Lantos. 2007. Religion, con-
science, and controversial clinical practices. New England Journal of Medicine 356: 593–600.
Islamic bioethics
79
123
61

2. Curlin, Farr A. 2008. A case for studying the relationship between religion and the practice of
medicine. Academic Medicine 83(12): 1118–1120.
3. Jonsen, Albert R. 2006. A history of religion and bioethics. In Handbook of bioethics and religion, ed.
D.E. Guinn, 23–36. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
4. Padela, Aasim I., Hasan Shanawani, and Ahsan Arozullah. 2011. Medical experts and Islamic
scholars deliberating over brain death: gaps in the applied Islamic bioethics discourse. Muslim World
101(1): 53–72.
5. Kamali, Mohammad Hashim. 2003. Principles of Islamic jurisprudence. Cambridge, UK: Islamic
Texts Society.
6. Nyazee, Imran Ahsan Khan. 2005. Theories of Islamic law. Islamabad, Pakistan: Islamic Research
Institute.
7. Jackson, Sherman. 2009. Islam and the problem of black suffering. New York: Oxford University
Press.
8. Padela, Aasim I., Steven W. Furber, Mohammad A. Kholwadia, and Ebrahim Moosa. 2013. Dire
necessity and transformation: entry-points for modern science in Islamic bioethical assessment of
porcine products in vaccines. Bioethics. doi:
10.1111/bioe.12016
.
9. Anderson, Wendy G., Robert M. Arnold, Derek C. Angus, and Cindy L. Bryce. 2008. Posttraumatic
stress and complicated grief in family members of patients in the intensive care unit. Journal of
General Internal Medicine 23(11): 1871–1876.
10. Givens, Jane L., Ruth P. Lopez, Kathleen M. Mazor, and Susan L. Mitchell. 2012. Sources of stress
for family members of nursing home residents with advanced dementia. Alzheimer Disease and
Associate Disorders 26(3): 254–259.
11. Bilgel, Halil, Nazan Bilgel, Necla Okan, Sadik Kilicturgay, Yilmaz Ozen, and Nusret Korun. 1991.
Public attitudes toward organ donation: a survey in a Turkish community. Transplant International 4
(4): 243–245.
12. Shaheen, Faissal A.M., Mohammad Z. Souqiyyeh, Besher Al-Attar, Ahmed Jaralla, and Abdul
Rahman Al-Swailem. 1996. Survey of opinion of secondary school students on organ donation. Saudi
Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation 7: 131–134.
13. Randhawa, Gurch. 1998. An exploratory study examining the influence of religion on attitudes
towards organ donation among the Asian population in Luton, UK. Nephrology, Dialysis, Trans-
plantation 13(8): 1949–1954.
14. Sheikh, Aziz, and Sangeeta Dhami. 2000. Attitudes to organ donation among South Asians in the
UK. Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine 93(3): 161–162.
15. Bilgel, Halil, Ganime Sadikoglu, Olgun Goktas, and Nazan Bilgel. 2004. A survey of the public
attitudes towards organ donation in a Turkish community and of the changes that have taken place in
the last 12 years. Transplant International 17(3): 126–130.
16. Alkhawari, F.S., G.V. Stimson, and Anthony N. Warrens. 2005. Attitudes toward transplantation in
UK Muslim Indo-Asians in west London. American Journal of Transplantation 5(6): 1326–1331.
17. Loch, A., I.N. Hilmi, Z. Mazam, Y. Pillay, and D.S.K. Choon. 2010. Differences in attitude towards
cadaveric organ donation: Observations in a multiracial Malaysian society. Hong Kong Journal of
Emergency Medicine 17: 236–243.
18. Padela, Aasim I., Shoaib Rasheed, Gareth J.W. Warren, Hwajung Choi, and Amit K. Mathur. 2011.
Factors associated with positive attitudes toward organ donation in Arab Americans.
Clinical
Transplantation 25(5): 800–808.
19. Yilmaz, Tonguc Utku. 2011. Importance of education in organ donation. Experimental and Clinical
Transplantation 9(6): 370–375.
20. Ghaly, Mohammed. 2012. Religio-ethical discussions on organ donation among Muslims in Europe:
an example of transnational Islamic bioethics. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15: 207–220.
21. Ghaly, Mohammed. 2012. Organ donation and Muslims in the Netherlands: a transnational fatwa in
focus. Recht Van De Islam 26: 39–52.
22. Razaq, Samar, and Mohammed Sajad. 2007. A cross sectional study to investigate reasons for low organ
donor rates amongst Muslims in Birmingham. Internet Journal of Law, Healthcare and Ethics 4(2).
23. Rasheed, Shoaib A. 2011. Organ donation among Muslims: an examination of medical researchers’
efforts to encourage donation in the Muslim community. BA diss., University of Michigan.
http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/handle/2027.42/85315/sarashee.pdf;jsessionid=AE555C6EC
5983516FCF464D2926AAE9E?sequence=1
. Accessed March 12, 2013.
24. Library of Congress. 2012. Romanization tables: Arabic.
http://www.loc.gov/catdir/cpso/roman.html
.
Accessed March 15, 2013.
80
A. I. Padela
123
62

Document Outline

  • preconf jqureshi
  • preconf kholwadia
  • preconf padela


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   2   3   4   5


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling