Title: a sociological analysis of Linkin Park’s concept album; ‘a thousand Suns’. Aim


Download 86.38 Kb.

Sana09.02.2017
Hajmi86.38 Kb.

Title: A sociological analysis of Linkin Park’s concept album; ‘A Thousand Suns’. 

Aim: The aim of this paper is to analyse the sociological significance of ‘A Thousand Suns’ 

as a form of reflective literature in order to reveal what it has to say about society and the 

human experience. 

Key Words: Linkin Park, Sociology, Hermeneutics, Mythological, Bhagavad Gita 

 

Abstract 

This paper analyses the concept album ‘A Thousand Suns’, by American rock band Linkin 

Park, in a sociological manner in order to dissect what this form of literature has to say about 

the society in which we live. The essay provides both a contextual background and a 

theoretical background before discussing the various themes and elements of the album 

which sonically paint a mythological representation of the collapse of society. The contextual 

background provides a brief history of the band, giving the album its social and historical 

context. The theoretical background describes Paul Ricouer’s ‘hermeneutics of suspicion’ 

and ‘hermeneutics of trust’, two forms of critical analysis that are used when examining and 

critiquing texts. The rest of the paper dedicates itself to applying the ‘hermeneutics of trust’ 

to Linkin Park’s concept album in order reveal what the album is attempting to say. The 

discussion reveals that the album covers a variety of themes such as war and human 

exploitation, all of which could bring about the fall of society and all of which have a modern 

social context. It is argued that human beings are to blame for these destructive activities and 

therefore will be to blame for the apocalypse. The essay concludes by arguing that the album 

also expresses that human beings have the power to avoid such destruction through the 

expression of love.  

 

 

 



 

 


Introduction 

‘Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and on that which cannot remain silent’ 

-Victor Hugo, 1802-1885 

The above quote by French author Victor Hugo suggests that music exists as an artistic 

medium which people use to shed light on significant themes and topics which cannot be 

explored fully by words on a page. The lyrics need to be accompanied by sounds and 

emotions in order to convey the intended sentiment. With that in mind this essay will analyse 

the sociological significance of Linkin Park’s concept album ‘A Thousand Suns’ in order to 

extract its meaning. This paper will provide both a contextual and theoretical background for 

the album in order to put the analysis of the album into its correct context. The following 

discussion will also draw on key relevant sources, historical and social events, literary 

theories and the album content itself in order to provide an informed conclusion as to what 

this text has to say about the world in which we live. 

Contextual Background 

Linkin Park, an American rock band, started off as a nu-metal band combining rock and hip-

hop on their first two albums; ‘Hybrid Theory’ (2000) and ‘Meteora’ (2003). They then 

branched off into other music genres with their third studio album titled ‘Minutes to 



Midnight’ (2007), which was the beginning of an experimental period for the band, both 

musically and conceptually. The title ‘Minutes to Midnight’ was chosen as a reference to the 

Doomsday clock, which was a reflection of the themes that were explored on the album 

(LinkinParkKazakhstan, 2012). This concept of a build up towards the apocalypse sets the 

context for the next album, ‘A Thousand Suns’ (2010). Not only does this album experiment 

further, in terms of music genres, but it also describes a world full of broken people, debris 

and dead woods (Linkin Park, 2010). This imagery, as painted by the band, is what the world 

will look like if we do not do our best to avoid it. This album acts as a social criticism, one 

that is not just personified by sounds and words, but by actions too. 

Outside of their music career the band Linkin Park set up the charity organisation ‘Music for 

Relief’ in 2004 in order to aid survivors of natural disasters. In 2006 they expanded the 

mission of this organisation to environmental protection and restoration (Music for Relief, 

2013). In 2012 they launched their ‘Power the World’ campaign in order to raise awareness 

of the lack of energy access for a number of countries and to try and highlight some solutions 



to energy problems (Music for Relief, 2013). These activities show that Linkin Park are 

social activists who use their music as a means of social criticism. By analysing the album we 

can unveil exactly what it is trying to criticise and what it blames for this mythological 

apocalypse that it proposes. An examination of key theories on literature can also shed light 

on what is at the heart of this conceptual audible experience. 

Theoretical Background 

The opening track of the album creates an eerie atmosphere, very different to any previous 

Linkin Park track. It also starts vocally by posing a question: “will we burn inside the fires of 

a thousand suns?” (Linkin Park, 2010). This unexpected music approach and the opening 

question would automatically leave the listener curious as to what the motive behind it all is. 

This brings to mind the ‘hermeneutics of suspicion’, a term coined by Paul Ricouer which 

was developed as a means of trying to extract the meaning of a text buried underneath the 

obvious, first impressionable appearance (Felski, 2010). Ricouer’s work on suspicious 

critique offers an insightful means of analysing the album and its sociological significance. 

Today, in academic criticism and literature studies, we are taught to adopt Ricouer’s 

‘suspicious’ frame of mind when reading literature and we are encouraged to critique it. 

Reading suspiciously is a form of interpretation driven by a sense of deconstructionism and 

disenchantment. For Ricouer there are three founders behind this suspicious interpretive 

reading; Marx, Nietzche and Freud. Each of these thinkers refused to take texts at face-value 

and aimed to reinterpret and demystify the text they studied (Felski, 2010). By doing so they 

were the first to partake in the hermeneutics of suspicion, however, Ricouer states that this is 

not the only way to read a text for people can also partake in the hermeneutics of trust 

(Felski, 2010). 

The two different forms of hermeneutics, trust and suspicion, are essentially opposite means 

of analysing a given text. While the hermeneutics of suspicion is wary of the text, and seeks 

to expose it for what it really is by unmasking it, the hermeneutics of trust, as the name 

suggests, trusts the text and wants to unveil its meaning (Felski, 2010). Both of these different 

approaches can be applied to the same text and will interpret them very differently. For 

example, if one were to read the Bible adopting the hermeneutics of trust standpoint they 

would seek to unveil its meaning, trust its deeper message and aim to achieve revelation. 

However if a suspicious critic were to read it, adopting a Marxist ideology, they would 

interpret the Bible as a means of control and as a symbol for political power to herd the 


masses. Therefore the hermeneutics of suspicion is a tool, one which the reader uses in order 

to show what the text does not know or cannot fully understand (Felski, 2010). 

In a sense, when we read suspiciously we take on the role of the detective and try to decipher 

clues in order to solve the case. The role of the critic, according to Rita Felski, is to accuse 

the text of what it really is and not of what it is pretending to be. How it appears is not the 

reality but rather a mask; hiding the true self. For Felski, the hermeneutics of suspicion, and 

suspicious thinking, is not against the world but rather a part of it which has its roots in 

philosophy (Felski, 2010). 

However, even though suspicious critique plays an important role in developing 

philosophical ideas it can be criticised itself. A critique of the hermeneutics of suspicion 

formulates when we realise that the critique of a text is a text in itself and can equally be 

accused of masking a hidden agenda. Texts, in themselves, are already suspicious as they 

critique aspects of society, through their use of themes, and they challenge the norms. 

Therefore when someone reads these texts suspiciously and unmasks a certain meaning they 

are in fact revealing their own ideologies and criticisms of the world (Felski, 2010). 

In light of this information it would seem that a more appropriate means of analysing the 

sociological significance of ‘A Thousand Suns’ is by adopting the hermeneutics of trust and 

listening to the album in order to unveil its meaning. The album itself, as a text, is a critique 

which criticises some form of social drama. This criticism is personified by sounds and 

words, acting as symbolic interpretations. The energy of the album helps to paint the image 

of a mythological apocalyptic world, a possible vision for the future.  

According to Roland Barthes, the meaning of a myth is not found in what is being said but 

rather in the way that it is being said. ‘A Thousand Suns’ does not state literally that it is set in 

a post apocalyptic world but the way in which the story of the album unfolds suggests it. For 

Barthes myths act as symbolic manifestations of ideas or values which are scarcely stated or 

talked about (Barthes, 1984). In this sense Linkin Park use symbols and metaphors to create a 

mythological environment which stands as a symbol for their ideas and concerns.

 

By listening 



to the album and discussing it we can reveal these ideas and concerns in order to shed light on 

the social significance of the piece.  



 

 

Analysis 

The album ‘A Thousand Suns’ features three political speeches, each addressing very 

different issues. The speeches featured are those of J. Robert Oppenheimer, Mario Savio and 

Martin Luther King Jr. and were each used in a very particular context. When Linkin Park 

reintroduces them in a very different context they stress that the message behind each of these 

speeches is still relevant and they highlight that the problems have not gone away. 

The first speech the listener encounters on the album is that of Oppenheimer, featured on the 

second track titled ‘The Radiance’ (Linkin Park, 2010). Oppenheimer (1904 – 1967) was a 

theoretical physicist often considered to be ‘the father of the atomic bomb’ for his 

involvement in its development. On the 16

th

 July 1945 the first atomic bomb was detonated in 



what became known as the Trinity test, a showcase of the monster that Oppenheimer helped 

create (Bird and Sherwin, 2005). After the test Oppenheimer gave a speech on the matter in 

which he likened the nuclear bomb to “death, the destroyer of worlds” (Linkin Park, 2010). 

This speech seems to be one filled with regret and criticism stating that war, and the weapons 

it creates, will destroy the world. The theme of war shows up more than once on the album on 

tracks like ‘Empty Spaces’ and ‘When They Come For Me’, where the music and sounds 

used create a war like atmosphere – one that is aggressive in nature. While neither of the 

songs literally state the theme of war Barthes’ work on mythologies helps us to understand 

what the songs are really targeting. It seems that the first social criticism of the album is on 

war, something that has been criticised again and again but yet these criticisms have gone 

ignored and the speeches that warned against it need to be re-addressed (Linkin Park, 2010). 

The need to talk about this commonly discussed topic on the album is a reflection of what 

was going on in society at the time. The years 2009, the year leading up to the album’s 

launch, and 2010, the year of the album’s launch, were the deadliest years in terms of 

casualties in the war in Afghanistan. As of 2010 the Afghanistan war had entered its tenth 

year and the conditions there had gotten worse than ever (Mora, 2010). The year of 2009 was 

also a major turning point in the Somalia war in which the conflict had worsened and 

President Ahmad was forced to ask other countries for aid (BBC News, 2013). Human 

history has been stained by countless wars, stemming back thousands of years, ranging from 

the crusades of the middles ages to the two World Wars of the 20

th

 Century. War is the first 



sociological issued addressed and criticised by the band. 

The second speech found on the album is that of Mario Savio, incorporated into the track – 

‘Wretches and Kings’ (Linkin Park, 2010). The speech featured on the track was that which 

he gave to students in Berkley, whose expressions were being suppressed. Savio was a leader 

of the Free Speech Movement, a group which fought for people’s rights and organised 

protests in the battle against corruption and bureaucracy. This bureaucracy, according to 

Savio, masks itself as respectable and is the enemy of what he called the ‘Brave New World’ 

(Savio, 1968). By giving this speech and by writing a song around its message both Savio and 

Linkin Park are criticising how members of the working class are exploited by an upper class, 

the minority of society. According to this song we live in a society where “the people up top 

push the people down low”. The song describes a revolution, where the lower classes rise up 

against those who have been keeping them down – the wretches and the kings (Linkin Park, 

2010). This narrative is one that has been told again and again and was predicted by Karl 

Marx. In his book ‘Das Kapital’ Marx argues that the exploitation of workers will lead to a 

growth of greed in the bourgeois and an increase of misery in the proletarians which will 

result in a class war (Marx, 1961). This was Marx’s critique of capitalism which is still the 

world’s main economic system. Both Linkin Park and Savio are also criticising it for its faults 

but also realise that it can be fixed. For Marx, greed is not a part of human nature but rather a 

result of social interaction and structures and therefore it is something that can be remedied 

(Marx, 1961). The aggressive nature of ‘Wretches and Kings’, and its previous track 

‘Blackout’, give off the negative implications and emotions that arise due to exploitation. 

‘Blackout’ uses metaphors to describe the situation of an individual born and confined to a 

system created by others who is starting to see through the lies and secrets around them; ‘I’m 

stuck in this bed you made, alone with a sinking feeling, I saw through the words you said, to 

the secrets you’ve been keeping’. This then leads into the revolution, staged sonically in 

‘Wretches and Kings’ (Linkin Park, 2010). This section of the album is reflective of the 

countless cases of class injustice that have taken place throughout the history of society. The 

current economic recession commenced officially in 2008 and since then has caused a variety 

of issues between classes. A strong example of this can be seen with Greece, who have been 

in huge debt and have suffered from class struggles as a result of this failure in capitalism 

(libcom.org, 2010). Essentially, by readdressing the speech made by Savio, Linkin Park are 

criticising another area of society that has often been critiqued but has been allowed to 

continue; the exploitation of “the people down low” (Linkin Park, 2010). 



The third and final political speech encountered on the album is one given by Martin Luther 

King Jr. on the track ‘Wisdom, Justice and Love’. This song features an eerie atmosphere 

which complements the seriousness of the message being delivered in the speech. The quote 

featured is an abstract of the talk delivered by Martin Luther King Jr. in 1967, at the 

Riverside Church in New York City. The speech was a call for peace in relation to the 

Vietnam War and in relation to all wars and forms of social injustices. It argued that by 

remaining silent and refusing to act against violence we are betraying those who fall victim to 

it. It makes reference to the atrocities of war, which leaves people psychologically and 

physically damaged beyond repair, and to the hatred that it brings to mankind. The cure to 

this, according to Martin Luther King Jr., is love – the ultimate force found in every world 

religion, whether it be Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, Judaism or Christianity (American 

Rhetoric, 2010). In light of this speech one could argue that all people respect love, regardless 

of their religious or cultural differences. Love is a common emotion, one which all human 

beings can experience and one which can be used as a framework for peace. Linkin Park’s 

inclusion of this speech demonstrates their proposed solution in order to avoid the apocalypse 

as brought on by man; the expression of love. Throughout the album the band make reference 

to a number of religious beliefs and traditions. A strong example of this can be seen with the 

leading single of the album ‘The Catalyst’ which makes reference to God but doesn’t state 

whether or not it is the Christian God or the God of the Jewish tradition. In any case the song 

cries out for God’s help, stressing that humanity is broken and at this point are one pull of a 

trigger away from being wiped out; “We’re a broken people living under loaded gun” (Linkin 

Park, 2010). This song paints mankind at a point where they are begging for external help, of 

a supernatural kind, because we can no longer save ourselves. This talk of salvation is not the 

only case in which the album makes reference to religious concepts or ideas. The album title 

itself is derived from a quote in the Hindu book ‘The Bhagavad Gita’ and the track title ‘The 

Radiance’ comes from the same quote; “If the radiance of A Thousand Suns....” (The 

Bhagavad Gita, 11.12). The reference to the Bhagavad Gita could’ve been chosen due to 

Oppenheimer’s reference to it in relation to his speech regarding the Trinity test of the atomic 

bomb. If this is the case then the album centres around nuclear catastrophe which would 

explain the post apocalyptic setting but would also disregard the other themes and topics 

which show up. Therefore this essay would argue that Oppenheimer’s speech was chosen to 

be on the album due to its reference to the Gita rather than the reverse being true. The Gita 

has been a highly influential book in the lives of many key historical figures, most notably 

Mahatma Gandhi. Gandhi was so influenced in his life by the Gita that he wrote his own 



works on it titled ‘The message of the Gita’. In this he explained the importance of the Gita in 

his life and its significance to the world as both a religious and non-religious text. He wrote 

that he never regarded the Gita as a historical account but instead as a metaphor for the 

“duel” that went on in the “hearts of mankind” (Gandhi, 2000). While Gandhi was a religious 

man who believed that faith was essential to understand the true message of the Bhagavad 

Gita, his writings would suggest that anyone can take some truth from the sacred text. One of 

the strongest themes throughout the Bhagavad Gita is that people should act without the 

wanting for a reward. ‘A Thousand Suns’ also shares common themes with the Gita, such as 

internal human conflicts and “letting go”. The essential concept and lesson of the Bhagavad 

Gita is to “let go” (Mitchell, 2000). This concept is explored throughout the ‘A Thousand 

Suns’ album, most notably on the tracks ‘Iridescent’, ‘The Catalyst’ and the interlude track 

‘Jornada Del Muerto’, where the words “Lift me up, let me go” are sang in Japanese. (Linkin 

Park, 2010). It is clear that both Linkin Park and Oppenheimer were influenced by the Gita in 

a similar manner in the sense that both are writing about regret and responsibility. In his 

speech Oppenheimer talks about duty and there is a feeling of guilt in his words when he says 

“We knew the world would not be the same” (Kveldes, 2010). Linkin Park’s references to 

this speech, and to the Gita, stresses the meaning of the album: man is to blame. 

The song ‘Burning In The Skies’ tells the story of an individual coming to terms with their 

own faults and that they are to blame for whatever it is that they destroyed. They have lost 

something that they now realise they no longer deserve for how they treated it; “I’m 

swimming in the smoke of bridges I have burned.....I’m losing what I don’t deserve”. (Linkin 

Park, 2010). This ‘something’ is not specified and could mean anything from a relationship to 

a job to a reputation. The fact that it is not specified and that it is sang in the first person 

means that it becomes a very personal experience for the listener who will inevitably 

associate it with something in their own lives. Therefore, when enough people hear it, ‘I’ 

becomes ‘we’ and the song goes from being about ruining something in particular to ruining 

our society as a whole, which can only end in destruction. The chorus of ‘Burning In The 

Skies’ gets repeated in the later track titled ‘Fallout’ which precedes ‘The Catalyst’ (Linkin 

Park, 2010). By repeating the same message the band have stressed that humans will be the 

ones to blame for their own destruction and not external factors. The tracks ‘Robot Boy’ and 

‘Waiting For The End’ describe the condition of the human being facing disaster; people who 

have lost the will to fight and are holding on to that which they don’t have – the hope of a 



better life. Essentially, ‘A Thousand Suns’ is sociologically significant as a critique of human 

fault and not of particular human issues. 

The album explores a variety of themes, such as war and human exploitation. However, many 

of these songs can also be interpreted to mean something else and therefore the album cannot 

merely be a critique of these specific topics. The album also utilises a variety of music 

genres, from rock to hip hop to electronics, and refers to a variety of religious concepts and 

beliefs. The overall inclusiveness of the album suggests that it is open to all people of all 

backgrounds. It uses all of these conceptual and audible tools in order to create a vision of the 

future that will arise as a result of our own flaws and failures (Linkin Park, 2010). The album 

is not only a space for criticism but it also offers possible ingredients for a solution – wisdom, 

justice and love. 

We should be wise and learn from the warnings of people like J. Robert Oppenheimer who 

criticised his own creation and yet human beings continue to use science for the creation of 

weapons and destruction. We should seek justice as Mario Savio did and not allow for human 

beings to be exploited or to be vessels of greed. Finally we should express love, the strongest 

emotion found in all cultures and religions, that which Martin Luther King Jr. preached and 

the true message behind Linkin Park’s concept album. If human beings show each other love 

then they can aspire to create peace rather than continue down this spiral of chaos and 

desolation. In the final song, ‘The Messenger’, the band expresses the message that they have 

been trying to get across over the course of the album; when we are blinded by the hardships 

and cruelty of life “love keeps us kind” (Linkin Park, 2010). 

Conclusion 

Having adopted Ricouer’s hermeneutics of trust in order to unveil the meaning of the album 

it can be understood that ‘A Thousand Suns’ provides a myth in order to say something about 

the human being. The human can be destructive, greedy, deprived and extremely violent. All 

of these negative qualities, explored by the band, are influenced by examples of both 

historical events and current events. The album argues that human beings are the ones 

responsible for these events and must be able to accept the blame; they will only lose what 

they don’t deserve. But the human being is also capable of being righteous and loving and 

these are the qualities that need to be encouraged and displayed in order to avoid the collapse 

of society.   



 

References 

 

American Rhetoric (2010) Martin Luther King Jr., Beyond Vietnam – A Time To Break Silence [online] 

available: 

www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/mlkatimetobreaksilence.htm

 [accessed 18th 

November 2013]. 

Barthes, R. (1984) Mythologies, translated by Lavers, A., New York: Hill and Wang. 

BBC News (2013) Somalia Profile [online] available: 

www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-14094503

 [accessed 

18th November 2013]. 

Bird, K. and Sherwin, M. J. (2005) American Prometheus: The Triumph and Tragedy of J. Robert 



Oppenheimer, New York: Alfred A. Knopf. 

Gandhi, M. K. (2000) ‘Appendix’, in Mitchell, S., The Bhagavad Gita: A Major New Translation of one of the 



World’s Spiritual Classics, London: Rider, p.211-221. 

Felski, R. (2010) ‘Suspicious Minds’, Poetics Today, Volume 32 (Issue 2) available: 

http://poeticstoday.dukejournals.org/content/32/2/215.abstract

 [accessed 10th November 2013]. 

Kveldes (2010) ‘J. Robert Oppenheimer, - Now I am become death, the destroyer of worlds’ [video online] 

available: 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=h948sA-vsZ4

 [accessed 19

th

 November 2013]. 



Libcom.org (2010) Burdened with Debt: “Debt Crisis” and class struggles in Greece – TPTG [online] 

available: 

www.libcom.org/library/burdened-debt-tptg

 [accessed 18th November 2013]. 

Linkin Park (2010) ‘Blackout’, Track 9 of A Thousand Suns, Warner Bros. 

Linkin Park (2010) ‘Burning In The Skies’, Track 3 of A Thousand Suns, Warner Bros. 

Linkin Park (2010) ‘Empty Spaces’, Track 4 of A Thousand Suns, Warner Bros. 

Linkin Park (2010) ‘Fallout’, Track 13 of A Thousand Suns, Warner Bros. 

Linkin Park (2010) ‘Iridescent’, Track 12 of A Thousand Suns, Warner Bros. 

Linkin Park (2010) ‘Jornada Del Muerto’, Track 7 of A Thousand Suns, Warner Bros. 

Linkin Park (2010) ‘Robot Boy’, Track 6 of A Thousand Suns, Warner Bros. 

Linkin Park (2010) ‘The Catalyst’, Track 14 of A Thousand Suns, Warner Bros. 

Linkin Park (2010) ‘The Messenger’, Track 15 of A Thousand Suns, Warner Bros. 


Linkin Park (2010) ‘The Radiance’, Track 2 of A Thousand Suns, Warner Bros. 

Linkin Park (2010) ‘The Requiem’, Track 1 of A Thousand Suns, Warner Bros. 

Linkin Park (2010) ‘Waiting For The End’, Track 8 of A Thousand Suns, Warner Bros. 

Linkin Park (2010) ‘When They Come For Me’, Track 5 of A Thousand Suns, Warner Bros. 

Linkin Park (2010) ‘Wisdom, Justice And Love’, Track 11 of A Thousand Suns, Warner Bros. 

Linkin Park (2010) ‘Wretches And Kings’, Track 10 of A Thousand Suns, Warner Bros. 

LinkinParkKazakhstan (2012) ‘Linkin Park – Making of Minutes To Midnight’ [video online] available: 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=HBZ512xtZOg

 [accessed 13

th

 November 2013]. 



Marx, K (1961) Das Kapital: A Critique of Political Economy, Edited by Friedrich Engels, Chicago: Gateway  

Mitchell, S. (2000) ‘Introduction’, in Mitchell, S., The Bhagavad Gita: A Major New Translation of one of the 



World’s Spiritual Classics, London: Rider. 

Mora, E. (2010) ‘2010 was By Far the Deadliest Year for U.S Troops in Afghanistan – one American Killed 

Every 18 Hours’, CNS news, 31

st

 December, available: 



www.cnsnews.com/news/article/2010-

was-far-deadliest-year-us-troops-afghanistan-one-american-killed-every-18-hours

 [accessed 14th 

November 2013]. 

Music For Relief (2013) About Us [online] available: 

www.musicforrelief.org/page/about-us

 [accessed 13th 

November 2013]. 

Music For Relief (2013) Programs [online] available: 

www.musicforrelief.org/page/programs-1

 [accessed 13 

November 2013]. 



Savio, M. (1968) An End To History, Chicago: Southern Student Organising Committee. 

 


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling