Water Quality Summary


Download 135.27 Kb.

Sana29.10.2017
Hajmi135.27 Kb.

Homossasa Spring 

      May 2015  

 Page 1 of 21 

 

Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs 



Wildlife State Park 

              



Water Quality Summary 

 

 



Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park 

One of several old Florida tourist attractions that were built around first-magnitude springs, this 

is now a state park. It showcases native Florida wildlife, including red wolves, Florida panthers, 

black bears, bobcats, Key and white-tailed deer, alligators, river otters, and many others—all 

seen by visitors from an elevated boardwalk that winds through their enclosures in a natural 

setting. The main attraction is the endangered West Indian manatee. 

 

Spring Location and Characteristics 

The  Homosassa  Springs  Group,  a  first-magnitude  spring,  is  located  in  Homosassa  Springs 

Wildlife  State  Park,  within  the  town  of  Homosassa  Springs  in  Citrus  County.    First-magnitude 

springs  discharge  a  very  large  volume  of  water—at  least  100  cubic  feet  per  second  (cfs),  or 

almost 65 million gallons each day.  

Archaeological evidence has shown that prehistoric Native Americans inhabited the area around 

the springs, as did the Seminole Indians after European settlers arrived. The word "Homosassa" 

is a Creek Indian word meaning "place of many pepper plants." 

The Homosassa springshed, which covers portions of Citrus and Hernando Counties, is about 

270 square miles in size. The springs form the head of the Homosassa River, which flows west 

approximately  eight  miles  to  Homosassa  Bay  in  the  Gulf  of  Mexico.  Downstream  from  the 

springs,  two  small  spring-fed  tributaries,  the  southeast  fork  and  Halls  River,  flow  into  the 

Homosassa River. The entire river system, including the springs, is tidally influenced, especially 

in winter.  

Homosassa Springs is unique in that the headspring vent flows from three points underground, 

each with a different water quality and salinity level that blend together before exiting into the 

spring pool. The vents for Homosassa Springs # 1, 2, and 3 are 67, 65, and 62 feet deep, 

respectively.  The springs issue from a conical depression, with limestone exposed along the 



                                                                                                                                                                         www.FloridaSprings.org

 

 



 

Homosassa Spring 

     June 2015  

 Page 2 of 21 

 

sides and bottom of the spring pool. The spring pool measures 189 feet by 285 feet. There is a 



large boil in its center.  

The pool is teeming with salt water and freshwater fish, and the water is clear and light blue. 

The surrounding land is low-lying, with thick hardwood–palm forest cover. Approximately 1,000 

feet downstream, there is a fence spanning the river to keep boats out of the spring pool.  

A floating observation deck in the spring pool has a submerged aquatic observation room 

(Figure 1). Injured and rehabilitating West Indian manatees—an endangered native species—

are kept captive for year-round observation, and a barrier immediately outside the spring area 

keeps them in the spring pool. Wild manatees frequent the spring pool and river year-round, 

but are especially common in winter, 

when they seek warmer water during cold spells.  

These 

huge, gentle animals, averaging 1,000 pounds, eat only aquatic plants.  They cannot survive 



for extended periods in water colder than about 63°F.

 

The Florida Park Service recently allowed wild manatees to enter the spring bowl at for the first 



time in 30 years. The park’s eight captive manatees have been placed behind a newly 

constructed gate in the spring pool, allowing the rest of the spring bowl to be available for wild 

manatees during cold spells. The gate will be closed when the wild manatees have left the 

spring at the end of the season, usually March, and the rehabilitating manatees will again have 

the entire spring pool for their use. 

Homosassa Springs has been a tourist attraction since the early 1900s, when trains loaded 

with fish, crabs, cedarwood, and spring water would stop to let their passengers rest at the 

springs.  It was subsequently converted to a zoolike park with exotic animals such as lions, 

bears, a hippopotamus, and monkeys, as well as non-native trees and plants.  

The Florida Park Service purchased the springs in 1988 with funds from the state’s 

Conservation and Recreation Lands (CARL) Program. Several other parcels were 

subsequently purchased under the Land Acquisition Trust Fund and Preservation 2000 

Programs. Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park currently comprises about 197 acres.  

During the park’s restoration, all the exotic animals and non-native plants were removed. The 

only non-native animal remaining is Lucifer the hippopotamus, now 55 years old, who has 

been officially designated as an honorary Florida citizen. The park is now an interpretive center 

for endangered West Indian manatees and Florida native wildlife education. Recreational 

activities include picnicking, nature study, and birdwatching. However, swimming is not 

allowed. A children's education center provides hands-on experiences about Florida's 

environment. The park also has a large and active volunteer program.  



Biology 

                                                                                                                                                                         www.FloridaSprings.org

 

 



 

Homosassa Spring 

     June 2015  

 Page 3 of 21 

 

Native wildlife that can be viewed at the park include West Indian manatees, black bears, red 



wolves, whooping cranes, Key deer, bobcats, white-tailed deer, American alligators, American 

crocodiles, and river otters.  

Bird species in the park include flamingos, pelicans, sandhill cranes, roseate spoonbills, and 

shorebirds. A new state-of-the-art facility, the Felburn Shorebird Aviary, opened in

 

2013. It 



allows visitors to enter the aviary on a walkway for an up-close, unobstructed view of the birds. 

Wild native species such as wood ducks, limpkins, herons, and egrets can also be observed 

along the park’s waterways.  

Canals and seawalls constructed along the Homosassa River have affected water clarity and 

habitat quality for native animals and plants. In addition, increased salinity in the river, which 

the Southwest Florida Water Management District attributes to sea-level rise and not increased 

consumptive use, is altering riverine habitats.  Freshwater fish are disappearing, to be replaced 

by saltwater fish. Trees along the river are dying due to the increased salinity, and barnacles 

have been observed in the river.  

Land Use 

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the population of Citrus County was 12,458 in the 2000 

Census.  The principal land uses in the springshed consist of urban and agricultural lands, 

forested uplands, and wetlands. 

In 2015, a year-long study was completed which looked at the potential nutrient contributions 

to the upper Homosassa River originating from the Wildlife Park portion of Ellie Schiller 

Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park (Maddox et al, 2015). Sampling results determined 

that Wildlife Park discharge contributed only 0.34% of the mean total nitrate+nitrite load 

present in the headwaters discharge. Orthophosphate contributions from Wildlife Park waters 

comprised 3.5% of the total Homosassa River headwaters load.  

 

Restoration/Protection Efforts 

In 2014, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) determined that the 

Homosassa-Trotter-Pumphouse Springs Group, as well as nearby Bluebird and Hidden River 

springs (Figures 1; 3-8), were impaired with respect to nutrients—meaning that increased 

nutrient concentrations were causing an imbalance in natural populations of aquatic plants and 

animals. FDEP established a Total Maximum Daily Load for each spring in the form of a 63-

76% reduction in average annual nitrate concentrations (Bridger et al, 2014). A TMDL is the 

maximum amount of a given pollutant that a waterbody can assimilate and still meet water 

quality standards. The restoration of ecological health in the spring and spring run depends 

heavily on the active participation of stakeholders in the springshed, who are required to 

develop projects to reduce nutrient concentrations.  


                                                                                                                                                                         www.FloridaSprings.org

 

 



 

Homosassa Spring 

     June 2015  

 Page 4 of 21 

 

 

The Southwest Florida Water Management District is currently developing a Minimum Flow 



and Level (MFL) for the Homosassa River. An MFL establishes how much water can be 

withdrawn for consumptive use before significant environmental harm occurs.  

The district has also proposed several restoration projects for the springs and river: the 

Homosassa Habitat Enhancement project and Homosassa Pepper Creek Stormwater Retrofit 

project.  

Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park has participated in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s 

Manatee Rescue, Rehabilitation, and Release Program for 30 years, and has helped 

rehabilitate more than 40 injured manatees during that time. 

The park is a participant in the Great Florida Birding and Wildlife Trail, a program of the Florida 

Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. This 2,000-mile, self-guided highway trail consists 

of a network of 515 sites throughout Florida selected for their excellent birdwatching, wildlife 

viewing, or educational opportunities. It is designed to conserve and enhance Florida's wildlife 

habitats by promoting birding and wildlife viewing activities, conservation education, and 

economic opportunity.  



Water Quality 

 

The Homosassa Springs Group consists of over 20 Floridan aquifer system springs, all tidally-



influenced, which discharge directly or indirectly into the Homosassa River or its tributaries 

(Figure 2).  The main trunk of the Homosassa River is predominantly fed by the three 

Homosassa Main Spring vents, along with six other minor vents. Spring Cove, located just 

south of the Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park along the southeast fork of 

the Homosassa River, contains at least six named springs: Pumphouse #1 (Figure 3), 

McClain, Trotter Main (Figure 4), Trotter #1, Belcher and Abdoney springs. Bluebird Spring 

(Figures 5,6), located in a county park approximately 0.7 mile southeast of Spring Cove, is 

included in this spring group, as are the Hidden River Head (Figure 7) and #2 springs (Figure 

8), located about 2.2 miles south of the Homosassa Main Spring vents. The Hidden River 

springs (Hidden River Head and #2 springs) discharge into Hidden River, a spring run which 

flows west for approximately two miles before disappearing underground. Also included are the 

Halls River spring vents: Halls River Head, #1 and #2 (Figure 9) springs, located about 1.7 

miles to the north, which form the headwaters of Halls River, a major tributary to the 

Homosassa River. 

 

The Homosassa springshed extends east across southern Citrus and southeast into east-



central Hernando County (Knochenmus et al, 2001). Predominant land use consists primarily 

of medium-density residential communities, mostly along and extending inland east of U.S. 19-

98 for about 6 miles, and upland forest within the Withlacoochee State Forest (WSF), located 


                                                                                                                                                                         www.FloridaSprings.org

 

 



 

Homosassa Spring 

     June 2015  

 Page 5 of 21 

 

east of the residential communities and sitting astride the Brooksville Ridge. Pasture lands are 



also a significant land use, with the largest areas sandwiched between the medium-density 

residential areas and WSF, southeaast of Homosassa, as well as extending south of the WSF 

into Hernando County (Jones et al, 1997). 

 

The combined Homosassa Main Spring vents have been sampled for major ions and nutrients 



as far back as 1946 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and the Southwest Florida Water 

Management District (SWFWMD) has collected a large suite of water quality analytes including 

nutrients, field and salinity indicators at nine of the major spring vents of this Group during the 

period from 2002 through 2012. Tables 1-9 summarize the results for selected analytes for 

each major spring. 

 

Like many Florida springs, nitrate levels in all of the monitored Homosassa River spring vents 



have been trending upward during the period of study (2002-2012), with an approximate 

increase of 0.010 mg/L nitrate + nitrite (measured as N) per year for the three Homosassa 

Main Spring vents. By the end of 2012, nitrate + nitrite values for these three vents were 

between 0.62 – 0.67 mg/L (Figure 10). The similarity in trends and nitrate + nitrite values 

indicates that all three Homosassa Main vents likely have adjacent or overlapping ground 

water sources. Looking back at the few nitrate + nitrite results collected from Homosassa Main 

Spring prior to the 2000’s confirms that this upward trend has been continuing for at least the 

past 66 years. In 1946, the nitrate concentration at Homosassa Main Spring was measured at 

0.20 mg/L; in 1972 it was 0.26 mg/L, and by the 1980’s the mean value of the three samples 

on record was 0.30 mg/L (no nitrate + nitrite samples were reported at this site during the time 

period 1973 - 1984 and from 1989 – 2000). 

 

The Spring Cove springs (Trotter Main, Pumphouse #1 springs) and Bluebird Spring also 



showed increasing nitrate + nitrite trends, with values increasing about 0.017 mg/L per year for 

the years with water quality data available (Figure 11). These trends are very similar to those 

measured in the three Homosassa Main vents. In addition to similar trends, the nitrate+nitrite 

values from these spring vents are all similar; these values ranged from 0.54 – 0.74 mg/L at 

the end of 2012.  

 

The Hidden River Head and Hidden River #2 spring vents (Figure 11) also show an increasing 



nitrate + nitrite trend during the study period, and similarities in concentrations and trends also 

indicates a similar ground water source area for these two springs. Nitrate + nitrite values for 

these springs were in the range of 0.86 – 0.92 mg/L at the end of 2012, the highest of any 

springs sampled within the Homosassa area.  

 

Nitrate + nitrite values for Halls River Head Spring range from 0.02 – 0.36 mg/L between 2005 



and 2012; however, there was not enough data available to discern any trends. 

                                                                                                                                                                         www.FloridaSprings.org

 

 



 

Homosassa Spring 

     June 2015  

 Page 6 of 21 

 

 

Monthly rainfall measured at Tarpon Springs indicates a slight increase of 1.5 inches per year 



from 2002 to 2012 (Florida Climate Center, 2012). Precipitation peaks do not seem to correlate 

well with increasing quarterly nitrate + nitrite values; however, rainfall totals and nitrate 

concentrations both show long-term increases during the period of study (Figure 10).  

 

Plotting the ratios of nitrogen isotopes (



15

N

NO3



/

14

N



NO3

) versus oxygen isotopes (

18

O

NO3



/

16

O



NO3

in nitrate measured from ground water can reveal likely nitrate sources: inorganic (chemical 



fertilizers) or organic (wastewater, septic discharge, animal waste) (Roadcap et al, 2002). 

Nitrogen and oxygen isotopes were analyzed from single samples collected from Bluebird, 

Hidden River Head, Hidden River #2, Homosassa Main #1, Homosassa Main #2, Pumphouse 

#1 and Trotter springs in January, 2013. The results show that all values plot along a 

denitrification trend which, when traced back to its source, indicates an inorganic (fertilizer) 

nitrogen source. Denitrification was most apparent from the Bluebird Spring sample; the 

Hidden River Head and Hidden River #2 springs showed the lowest denitrification. As 

previously noted, the Hidden River spring samples also showed the highest nitrate 

concentrations measured in the study area. 

 

The other macronutrient of concern in Florida surface waters, orthophosphate, is only present 



in low concentrations in all Homosassa-area springs, with mean values ranging from 0.015 – 

0.028 mg/L (Tables 1-5) during the period of study. While elevated orthophosphate levels are 

problematic in many of Florida’s lakes and rivers where surface runoff carries this nutrient into 

these waterbodies from its sources, measured orthophosphate levels are low in springs. This 

is due to its attenuation within limestone aquifers where, given enough time, orthophosphate 

reacts with calcium carbonate to produce low-solubility calcium phosphate minerals which 

remain within the host rock (Brown, 1981). This effectively removes orthophosphate from the 

waters within the aquifer, and is the probable geochemical mechanism by which “hard rock” 

phosphate deposits have developed in the state.  

 

Salinity indicators (sodium, chloride, sulfate and specific conductance) have been historically 



high in these springs, showing increasing values during the last decade (Figure 12), continuing 

an upward trend observable since 1946 at Homosassa Main Spring, when sodium was 308 

mg/L, chloride was 570 mg/L, sulfate was 87 mg/L and specific conductance was 2240 µs/cm 

(1946 samples were taken from the Homosassa Main Spring Basin, and are a combination of 

values from Homosassa Main #1, #2 and #3 spring vents). Comparing 1946 data to mean 

values measured at Homosassa Main #1 Spring during the period 2002-2012, sodium and 

chloride concentrations have increased over two-fold, sulfate has increased more than seven-

fold and specific conductance has increased almost two-fold. Water quality data from samples 

collected from the three Homosassa Main vents show that Homosassa Main #3 has the overall 

lowest concentration of salinity indicators, and Homosassa Main #2 has the highest. It is not 



                                                                                                                                                                         www.FloridaSprings.org

 

 



 

Homosassa Spring 

     June 2015  

 Page 7 of 21 

 

known why sulfate concentrations at Homosassa Main #1 spring have increased at a higher 



rate than increases in sodium and chloride concentrations. There is strong temporal correlation 

at each spring between all of the salinity indicators. The highest overall mean salinity indicator 

values were found in Homosassa #1 and #2, and Halls River Head springs. The lowest values 

were found in the Spring Cove spring vents (Pumphouse #1, Trotter Main springs – Figure 13). 

The longer-term measured increases in salinity indicators reflect one or more of the following 

potential causes: upconing of deeper, more saline ground water due to increasing fresh ground 

water withdrawals from the Floridan aquifer system, decreasing precipitation patterns, or 

steadily rising sea level. 

 

Dissolved oxygen (DO) levels are important for fish and other biota, and are generally 



measured at levels below 5 mg/L in fresh ground water issuing from spring vents. The levels 

measured in the Homosassa Group springs are within this normal ground water range, with 

mean DO values in the 2.23 – 4.29 mg/L range. Some fish species can tolerate lower 

dissolved oxygen levels, and thrive in spring vent environments. Dissolved oxygen levels 

generally rise rapidly in surface waters downstream from spring vents, due to plant respiration; 

however, the headwaters of the Homosassa River within Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs 

Wildlife State Park are largely devoid of submerged aquatic vegetation.   

 

Boron, not known to occur naturally in high concentrations in fresh Floridan aquifer system 



ground water, has recently been sampled as a possible wastewater tracer in wells and springs, 

due to its widespread use in laundry detergents. Historic (2002-2012) mean boron 

concentrations from Homosassa Springs #1, #2 and #3 were compared to historic chloride 

concentrations (from Tables 1-3), and boron/chloride ratios were calculated: 

 

Homosassa Spring #1: Boron/Chloride ratio =  0.000202 



Homosassa Spring #2: Boron/Chloride ratio =  0.000220 

Homosassa Spring #3: Boron/Chloride ratio =  0.000157 

 

All of these values are close to, but below the mean boron/chloride ratio measured in Atlantic 



Ocean seawater sampled along the U.S. coastline from south of Cape Cod to Bermuda, which 

is 0.000240 (Rakestraw et al, 1935). If one assumes that boron/chloride ratios in the Atlantic 

Ocean are similar to boron/chloride ratios of the small percentage of seawater entrained in 

Floridan aquifer system ground water, these numbers do not indicate a human boron 

wastewater component present in spring discharge from the Homosassa Main spring vents. 

Boron results were not available for the other Homosassa Group springs. 

 

Sucralose is used as an artificial sweetener. Because it passes through water treatment 



systems largely intact, it has recently been used as a potential human wastewater tracer. Only 

one sample of sucralose has been collected to date from Bluebird, Hidden River Head, Hidden 



                                                                                                                                                                         www.FloridaSprings.org

 

 



 

Homosassa Spring 

     June 2015  

 Page 8 of 21 

 

River #2, Homosassa Main #1 & #2, Pumphouse #1 and Trotter Main springs. Very low 



detections (values between the laboratory method detection limit and the practical quantitation 

limit) were seen only at Pumphouse #1 and Trotter Main springs; at the other springs, 

sucralose was at concentrations below laboratory detection limits. Sucralose detections could 

be indicative of possible wastewater influences within the springshed. 



 

Sources and 

References  

 

Behrendt, B. January 25, 2010. Lu the hippo hitting the half-century mark. Tampa Bay Times. 

http://www.tampabay.com/news/humaninterest/lu-the-hippo-hitting-the-half-century-

mark/1067996 

 

Bridger, Kristina, J. Dodson and G. Maddox, 2014, Draft TMDL Report: Nutrient TMDLs for 



Homosassa-Trotter-Pumphouse Springs Group, Bluebird Springs, and Hidden River Springs 

(WBIDs 1345G, 1348A, and 1348E); Florida department of Environmental Protection, 105 p. 

Online at: 

http://www.dep.state.fl.us/water/tmdl/docs/tmdls/draft/gp5/Homosassa-TMDL-

Draft.pdf

 

 



Brown, J.L., 1981, Calcium phosphate precipitation: Identification of kinetic parameters in 

aqueous limestone suspensions: Soil Science Society of America Journal, Volume 45, Number 

3, pp. 475-477. Abstract online at: 

https://www.crops.org/publications/sssaj/abstracts/45/3/SS0450030475?access=0&view=pdf

 

 

Cox, D. Accessed October 2013. Homosassa Springs State Park–Homosassa Springs, 



Florida. 

http://www.exploresouthernhistory.com/homosassa.html

 

Florida Climate Center, Florida State University; Products and Services – Data: Long-Term 



Precipitation Data through 2012. Online at: 

http://climatecenter.fsu.edu/products-services/data

 

 

Florida Department of Environmental Protection.  June 3, 2005. Homosassa Springs Wildlife 



State Park unit management plan. Tallahassee, FL: Division of Recreation and Parks. 

http://www.dep.state.fl.us/parks/planning/parkplans/HomosassaSpringsWildlifeStatePark.pdf

 

 

———. Accessed October 2013. Florida’s springs: Protecting native gems. Homosassa 



Springs. Tallahassee, FL. 

http://www.floridasprings.org/tags/homosassasprings/ 

 

Florida Park Service website.  Accessed October 2013. Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs 



Wildlife State Park. 

http://www.floridastateparks.org/homosassasprings/default.cfm

 and 

http://www.citruscounty-fl.com/menu.html 



 

Friends of Homosassa Springs State Park website. Accessed October 2013. Felburn 



Shorebird Aviary. 

http://www.friendshswp.org/felburn_shorebird_aviary.html 



                                                                                                                                                                         www.FloridaSprings.org

 

 



 

Homosassa Spring 

     June 2015  

 Page 9 of 21 

 

 

Great Florida Birding and Wildlife Trail. Accessed October 2013. I51. Ellie Schiller Homosassa 



Springs Wildlife State Park. 

http://floridabirdingtrail.com/index.php/trip/trail/Homosassa_Springs_Wildlife_State_Park/ 

 

Hammond, M. October 5, 2013. Restoring our springs. Southwest Florida Water Management 



District. 

http://www.floridaspringsinstitute.org/Resources/Documents/Hammond_Restoring%20our%20

Springs_Reduced%20Oct%205.pdf 

 

Jones, Gregg W., S.B. Upchurch, K.M. Champion and D.L. DeWitt, 1997, Water quality and 



hydrology of the Homosassa, Chassahowitzka, Weeki Wachee and Aripeka spring complexes, 

Citrus and Hernando counties, Florida – Origin of increasing nitrate concentrations: SWFWMD 

Ambient Ground-Water Quality Monitoring Program; 167 p. 

 

Knochenmus, Lari A. and D. K. Yobbi, 2001, Hydrology of the Coastal Springs Ground-Water 



Basin and Adjacent Parts of Pasco, Hernando and Citrus Counties, Florida: USGS Water 

Resources Investigations Report 01-423088 p. 

 

Maddox, Gary and Edgar Wade, 2015, DRAFT Final Report: Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs 



Wildlife State Park - Wildlife Park Water Quality Assessment; Citrus County, Florida: Florida 

Department of Environmental Protection, Ground Water Management Section; 20 p. 

 

Pittman, C. September 17, 2011. Salty flow into Chassahowitzka and Homosassa rivers 



blamed on sea level rise, not overpumping. Tampa Bay Times.  

http://www.tampabay.com/news/environment/water/salty-flow-into-chassahowitzka-and-

homosassa-rivers-blamed-on-sea-level/1192217 

 

Rakestraw, Noris W. and Henry E. Mahncke, 1935, Boron content of sea water of the North 



Atlantic Coast: Industrial Analytical Chemistry – Analytical Edition, Volume 7, Number 6, p. 

425. Online at: 

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/ac50098a026

 

 



Roadcap, George S., K.C. Hackley, and H. Hwang, 2002, Application of nitrogen and oxygen 

isotopes to identify sources of nitrate: Report to the Illinois Groundwater Consortium, Southern 

Illinois University; 30 p. 

 

Save the Manatee Club website.  2013. 



http://www.savethemanatee.org/ 

 

Scott, T.M., et al, 2004, Springs of Florida; Florida Geological Survey Bulletin No. 66; 377 p. 



Online at:  

http://www.dep.state.fl.us/geology/geologictopics/springs/bulletin66.htm

 

 


                                                                                                                                                                         www.FloridaSprings.org

 

 



 

Homosassa Spring 

     June 2015  

 Page 10 of 21 

 

Southwest Florida Water Management District. Accessed October 2013. Homosassa Springs. 



http://www.swfwmd.state.fl.us/springs/homosassa/

 

 

———.  Springs in West-Central Florida; SWFWMD website:  

http://www.swfwmd.state.fl.us/springs/

 

 

———.  Water Management Information System, online at: 



http://www18.swfwmd.state.fl.us/WMISMap/WMISMap/Default.aspx?function=search&layer=re

source&return=extResource&UniquePageID=a0f85afc-bfb8-4173-a64f-d766f8cf38c9

 

 

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, STORET/WQX: EPA’s repository and framework for 



sharing water monitoring data; Online at: 

http://www.epa.gov/storet/

 

 

U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources of Florida; online at: 



http://fl.water.usgs.gov/infodata/

 

 



 

 

For more information, contact: 

Gary Maddox, P.G. 



Ground Water Management Section 

Water Quality Evaluation & TMDL Program 

Division of Environmental Assessment & Restoration 

Florida Department of Environmental Protection 

2600 Blair Stone Road 

Tallahassee, FL 32399-2400 

(850) 245-8511 

Gary.Maddox@dep.state.fl.us

 

 



 

 


                                                                                                                                                                         www.FloridaSprings.org

 

 



 

Homosassa Spring 

     June 2015  

 Page 11 of 21 

 

 

Figure 1: Homosassa Main Spring – three vents are located beneath the Underwater Observatory. Photo taken in 



May, 2010 (Gary Maddox – FDEP) 

 


                                                                                                                                                                         www.FloridaSprings.org

 

 



 

Homosassa Spring 

     June 2015  

 Page 12 of 21 

 

 

Figure 2: Location of spring vents in the headwaters area of the Homosassa River 



 

 

Figure 3: Pumphouse #1 Spring – Photo taken in January, 2013 (Gary Maddox – FDEP) 



                                                                                                                                                                         www.FloridaSprings.org

 

 



 

Homosassa Spring 

     June 2015  

 Page 13 of 21 

 

 

Figure 4: Trotter Main Spring – Photo taken in January, 2013 (Gary Maddox – FDEP) 



 

 

Figure 5: Bluebird Spring – Photo taken in January, 2013 (Gary Maddox – FDEP) 



 

                                                                                                                                                                         www.FloridaSprings.org

 

 



 

Homosassa Spring 

     June 2015  

 Page 14 of 21 

 

 

Figure 6: Algae - Bluebird Spring – Photo taken in January, 2013 (Gary Maddox – FDEP) 



 

 

 



 

                                                                                                                                                                         www.FloridaSprings.org

 

 



 

Homosassa Spring 

     June 2015  

 Page 15 of 21 

 

 

Figure 7: Hidden River Head Spring - Photo taken in January, 2013 (Gary Maddox – FDEP) 



 

 

 



Figure 8: Hidden River #2 Spring -  Photo taken in January, 2013 (Gary Maddox – FDEP) 

                                                                                                                                                                         www.FloridaSprings.org

 

 



 

Homosassa Spring 

     June 2015  

 Page 16 of 21 

 

 

Figure 9: Halls River #2 Spring - Photo taken in September, 2010 (Gary Maddox – FDEP) 



 

                                                                                                                                                                         www.FloridaSprings.org

 

 



 

Homosassa Spring 

     June 2015  

 Page 17 of 21 

 

 

 



 

 

 



Figure 10: Nitrate + Nitrite trends in Homosassa Main #1, #2 and #3 springs: 2002 – 2012 

 

 



 

 


                                                                                                                                                                         www.FloridaSprings.org

 

 



 

Homosassa Spring 

     June 2015  

 Page 18 of 21 

 

Figure 11: Nitrate + Nitrite trends in the southern Homosassa spring vents: 2002 – 2012 



 

 

Figure 12: Salinity indicator trends in Homosassa #1 Spring: 2002 - 2012 



 

 

 



Figure 

13: Salinity indicator trends in Trotter Main Spring: 2002 - 2012 

 

 

 



                                                                                                                                                                         www.FloridaSprings.org

 

 



 

Homosassa Spring 

     June 2015  

 Page 19 of 21 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Table 1: Summary of selected water quality results for Homosassa Main #1 Spring  



 

 

 



Table 2: Summary of selected water quality results for Homosassa Main #2 Spring 

 

 



 

 

Table 3: Summary of selected water quality results for Homosassa Main #3 Spring 



 

 

 



                                                                                                                                                                         www.FloridaSprings.org

 

 



 

Homosassa Spring 

     June 2015  

 Page 20 of 21 

 

 

Table 4: Summary of selected water quality results for Pumphouse #1 Spring  



 

 

 



 

Table 5: Summary of selected water quality results for Trotter Main Spring  

 

 

 



 

 

Table 6: Summary of selected water quality results for Bluebird Spring  



 

 

 



                                                                                                                                                                         www.FloridaSprings.org

 

 



 

Homosassa Spring 

     June 2015  

 Page 21 of 21 

 

 

Table 7: Summary of selected water quality results for Hidden River Head Spring  



 

 

 



 

Table 8: Summary of selected water quality results for Hidden River #2 Spring  

 

 

 



 

Table 9: Summary of selected water quality results for Halls River Head Spring  



 


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling