2. 1 What is a “signal”?


Download 0.84 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet3/7
Sana18.09.2020
Hajmi0.84 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7

Eq. 2-3 

 

These  integral  definitions,  however,  do  not  provide  much 



insight  regarding  the  concept  of  delta.  Rather,  it  is  useful  to 

resort to one of the many possible ways of arriving at the delta 

as a sort of “limit” (in a special way) of a sequence of ordinary 

signals. We first need to establish a few preliminary results. The 

first of such results is the following:  

                                                 

 

2

 If 



( )

s t

 was otherwise, Eq. 2-3 might not yield the same result or may not 

make sense at all. We will discuss a few special cases later on. 


 

 

 



Signals and Systems – Poggiolini, Visintin – Politecnico di Torino, 2018/2019 

 

Result: 

if 

( )


s t  is a function that is continuous

3

 over the interval 



,

2 2


T T





, then the following equality holds: 



( )

0

lim



( )

(0)


T

T

t

s t dt

s

T

+

−



=



 

Eq. 2-4 



 

Proof of the result:  

We  start  out  by  writing  down  a  well-known  relationship, 

which is called the “mean value theorem for definite integrals”: 

 

( )



/2

0

0



/2

( )


,

,

2 2



T

T

T T

s t dt

T s t

t

+



=



 −




 



Eq. 2-5 

 

In words, we can say that the integral above has value equal to 



the length  of the integration  interval , times the value which 

the  integrand  function 

( )

s t

  takes  on  at  some  point  in  time 

0

 

within the integration interval 



2,



2

T

T

 



                                                 

 

3



 The result holds for less stringent requirements on 

( )


s t  but for simplicity 

we assume that 

( )

s t  is continuous everywhere.  


 

 

 



Signals and Systems – Poggiolini, Visintin – Politecnico di Torino, 2018/2019 

We then argue that

4



( )



0



2,

2

max { ( )}



t

T

T

s t

s t

 −


 

( )



0



2,

2

min { ( )}



t

T

T

s t

s t

 −


 

Eq. 2-6 

 

Combining Eq. 2-5 and Eq. 2-6 it is possible to write: 



 



/ 2



/ 2

2,

2



2,

2

min { ( )}



( )

max { ( )}



T

T

t

T

T

t

T

T

T

s t

s t dt

T

s t

+



 −

 −




 



Eq. 2-7 

 

We then remark that we can rewrite the center section of Eq. 



2-7 as:  

( )


/2

/2

( )



( )

T

T

T

s t dt

t

s t dt

+



−

=





 

Eq. 2-8 

 

(Why? It is easy to show it, do it on your own). 



Substituting Eq. 2-8 into Eq. 2-7, we have: 

 

                                                 



 

4

 Eq. 2-6 is intuitive but to prove it formally the “extreme value theorem” 



is required. It essentially states that a continuous function over an interval has 

both a maximum and a minimum and it actually reaches both. Proof can be 

found for instance on Wikipedia. 


 

 

 



Signals and Systems – Poggiolini, Visintin – Politecnico di Torino, 2018/2019 



( )



2,

2

2,



2

min { ( )}

( )

max { ( )}



T

t

T

T

t

T

T

T

s t

t

s t dt

T

s t

−



 −

 −






 

Eq. 2-9 

 

We then divide all three members of the formula by 



, which 

we can always do because 



T

 it is a positive non-zero constant: 



( )



2,



2

2,

2



min { ( )}

( )


max { ( )}

T

t

T

T

t

T

T

t

s t

s t dt

s t

T

−



 −

 −




 

 



We now take the limit for 

0

 of all sections of the above 

inequality: 





( )




0

2,



2

0

0



2,

2

lim



min { ( )}

lim


( )

lim


max { ( )}

T

T

t

T

T

T

T

t

T

T

t

s t

s t dt

s t

T

−



 −


 −







 

Eq. 2-10 

 

If we look at the leftmost and rightmost sides of the inequality, 



thanks to the assumption that 

( )


s t

 is continuous, it is clear that: 





( )




( )


0

2,

2



0

2,

2



lim

min { ( )}

0

lim


max { ( )}

0

T



t

T

T

T

t

T

T

s t

s

s t

s

 −



 −


=

=

 



 

 

 

 



Signals and Systems – Poggiolini, Visintin – Politecnico di Torino, 2018/2019 

The  middle  member  of  the  inequality  Eq.  2-10  is  then 



guaranteed to converge to the same value too

5



 

( )


0

lim


( )

(0)


T

T

t

s t dt

s

T

+

−



=



 

Eq. 2-11 

 

Then  Eq.  2-11  coincides  with  the  result  Eq.  2-4  which  is 



therefore proved. 

 

We  now  have  the  “tool”  (Eq.  2-11)  for  studying  delta.  We 



remark that Eq. 2-2 and Eq. 2-11 have the same right-hand side, 

( )


0

s

. We can therefore claim that their left-hand sides must also 

coincide, form which: 

 

( )



0

lim


( )

( )


( )

T

T

t

s t dt

t

s t dt

T

+



+

−

−



=





 

Eq. 2-12 

 

This equality is very important and shows that 



( )

t

 is perhaps 



not such a mysterious object. Rather, it appears to be generated 

by a simple rectangular function of the form: 

 

                                                 



 

5

  This  last  result  is  due  to  the  so-called  “squeeze  theorem”  or  “pinch 



theorem”. Since it is a rather intuitive theorem, we will omit to prove it (you 

can look it up, though, on Wikipedia, if interested). 



 

 

 



Signals and Systems – Poggiolini, Visintin – Politecnico di Torino, 2018/2019 

( )


T

t

T

 



Eq. 2-13 

 

when 



0

. In fact, looking at Eq. 2-12, one could be tempted 

to write: 

( )


0

lim


( )

T

T

t

t

T



=

 



 

Unfortunately, the above limit is meaningless in the sense of 

conventional functions, since, as already mentioned, 

( )


t

 is not 



a properly defined function. However, the integral identity: 

 

( )



0

lim


( )

( )


( )

T

T

t

s t dt

t

s t dt

T

+



+

−

−





=



 

 



is instead a perfectly legitimate expression. In fact, based on it, 

a new form of “limit” can be defined, which has meaning in the 

framework  of  the  so-called  theory  of  generalized  functions  or 

distributions.  Dirac’s  delta  is  not  a  function  but,  within  this 

theory,  a  “generalized  function”  or  “distribution”.  In  the 

framework of such “generalized functions”, one can write: 

 

( )



dist

0

lim



( )

T

T

t

t

T



=

 



Eq. 2-14 

 


 

 

 



Signals and Systems – Poggiolini, Visintin – Politecnico di Torino, 2018/2019 

where this new limit operator 

dist

lim


 is said to be “in the sense 

of distributions”. Apart from the mathematical details, what this 

limit operator really means, in lay terms, is that:  

 

•  “the 



( )

T

t

T

  function  tends  to  acquire  the  same  integral 



properties as the Dirac’s delta, in the limit of 

0

”. 

 

Note that there are many signals that have this same property of 



“converging”  to  ( )

t

,  besides 



( )

T

t T

.  For  instance,  the 



Gaussian signal or the triangular signal do too. In fact, it can be 

shown that: 

 

(

)



2

2

2



dist

0

lim



exp

/ 2


2

( )


T

t

T

T

t



=



 

( )



dist

0

lim



( )

T

T

t

t

T



=

 



 

Less obvious, but very important in practice, also the Sinc 

signal can be made to “generate”  ( )

t



dist

dist


0

0

sin



1

lim


Sinc

lim


( )

T

T

t

t

T

t

T

T

t







 


=



=

 


 

 

Eq. 2-15 

 


 

 

 



Signals and Systems – Poggiolini, Visintin – Politecnico di Torino, 2018/2019 

On your own: using a mathematical software like Matlab, plot 

all the functions whose “limit” is Dirac’s delta. What happens to 

their value at the origin when 



 shrinks? What happens to the 

temporal  “width”  of  these  functions?  Also  use  Matlab  to 

calculate their integral, numerically. What do you observe? 

2.5.1.1  computational rules 

There  are  some  useful  immediate  extensions  of  the  basic 

integral property of Dirac’s delta. In particular: 

 



(

)



( )

( )


0

0

1



t

t

s t dt

s t

 


+

−



=





 

Eq. 2-16 

 

More  in  general,  to  be  able  to  solve  an  integral  involving  a 



delta with  an  argument  of the type  as  shown in  Eq. 2-16, it is 

enough to: 

1)  find out what the integration variable is (it is the one 

appearing in the differential, in this case t); 

2)  find  the  value  of  the  integration  variable  for  which 

the  argument  of  the  delta  is  zero;  in  the  example 

above 





0

0

t



t



=  for 

0

t



t

= ; 


3)  the  result  of  the  integral  is  the  integrand  function 

( )


s t

 evaluated at 

0

t

t

= , divided by 

  

 

Eq.  2-16  can  be  easily  proved  by  first  changing  integration 



variable into 



0

t

t

 


=

 and then applying Eq. 2-2.  



 

 

 



Signals and Systems – Poggiolini, Visintin – Politecnico di Torino, 2018/2019 

On your own: perform the calculation and prove the result Eq. 

2-16 

2.5.1.2 delta as the “time-sampling” function 

Notice the “time-sampling” property of the delta function: 

 

0

0



(

)

( )



( )

t

t

s t dt

s t

+



−



=

 



 

In other words, by integrating a signal  together  with  a delta, 

centered at a specific time instant 

0

t

, one can “extract” from the 

signal the value that the signal takes on at 

0

t

. That is, the signal 

( )

s t  is “sampled” at the instant 

0

t

.  

From  the  property  above,  we  can  also  derive  the  very 



important property

 

0



0

0

( )



(

)

( )



(

)

s t



t

t

s t

t

t



=



 



 

Why? Can you prove this? Do it on your own. (Remember that 

delta  is  defined  in  terms  of  its  integral  behavior  so  the  above 

identity should be checked under integration… However, it can 

also be justified graphically, at an intuitive level.) 

 

Dirac’s delta has the following useful property: 



 

( )


(

)

t



t



= −

 

 



 

 

 



Signals and Systems – Poggiolini, Visintin – Politecnico di Torino, 2018/2019 

Prove it On your own: based for instance on Eq. 2-14. 

 

2.5.2 Some integral transformation rules 

(OPTIONAL) 

Here are some basic integration variable transformations. 

(

)

( )



( )

1

1



0

0

0



1

1

0



1

0

t



t

t

t

t

t

s t dt

s

t dt

s t dt













= 






 

( )



( )

( )


1

1

0



0

0

1



0

0

t



t

t

t

t

t

s t dt

s t

dt

s t dt









= 







 

(



)

( )


1

1

0



0

d

d

t

t

t

d

t

t

t

s t

t

dt

s t dt



=



 

(



)

( )


1

1

0



0

d

d

t

t

t

d

t

t

t

s t

t

dt

s t dt

+

+



+

=



 



(

)



( )



( )





1

1



0

0

0



1

1

0



1

0

d



d

d

d

t

t

t

t

t

d

t

t

t

t

t

s t dt

s

t

t

dt

s t dt







 −


 −

 −


 −



 −



= 





 



 

 

 



Signals and Systems – Poggiolini, Visintin – Politecnico di Torino, 2018/2019 



(

)

( )



( )



(



)

( )




(

)



1

1

0



0

0

1



1

0

1



0

d

d

d

d

t

t

d

t

t

t

d

t

t

t

d

t

t

s t g

t

dt

s

t

t

g t dt

s t g

t

dt









 −



 −

 −


 −

+





 −

= 


+





 



 

They all derive from the substitution rule of integration which 

can be written in a rather general form as: 

 

( )



(

)

( )



( )

( )


( )

(

)



( )

( )


1

1

0



0

1

1



1

where      =

,

t

t

t

t

s

t

dt

s

d

t

t





  

 


 



=

=



 



 

The relationship is easily proved as follows. Since 

( )

=

t



 

 , 


then differentiating both sides of this relationship we get: 

 

( )



( )

( )


(

)

1



=

d

d

d

t dt

dt

dt

t



 

  





=

=



 



where 

( )


( )

d

t

t

dt



=



 

Note  also  that this  form of the substitution rule requires  that 

the function 

 be invertible, since 



( )

1

 



 is explicitly required 

in the formula. Remember that being invertible is assured if 

 



 

 

 



Signals and Systems – Poggiolini, Visintin – Politecnico di Torino, 2018/2019 

is  monotonous,  either  increasing  or  decreasing.  More  general 

rules can be written, but we will not need them for now. 

 

On your own: try to prove one of the previous transformations 



using the substitution rule. 

Note that if two functions, say 



s

 and 


w

, are multiplied in the 

integrand function, and the argument substitution is made with 

respect to one of them, say 



s

, the argument of the other must be 

changed accordingly: 

 

( )



(

)

( )



( )

( )


( )

( )


(

)

( )



(

)

( )



( )

1

1



0

0

1



1

with     



t

t

t

t

w

s

t

w t dt

s

d

d

t

t

dt



 



  




=



=



 

 



 

 

 

 



Signals and Systems – Poggiolini, Visintin – Politecnico di Torino, 2018/2019 

2.6 

Questions 

The questions on the use of Dirac’s delta are very important 

questions.  Failure  to  show  that  one  can  handle  integration  or 

manipulation of the delta may result by itself in a failed exam, 

given the importance of delta throughout the course. 


Download 0.84 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling