Part 1: mathematics 1 linear algebra and equation solving text: Chapter 1 in core textbook


Download 434.83 Kb.
Pdf ko'rish
Sana24.11.2020
Hajmi434.83 Kb.

 



ASB-1114 BUSINESS ANALYTICS  



PART 1: MATHEMATICS 1 

LINEAR ALGEBRA and EQUATION SOLVING   

TEXT: Chapter 1 in core textbook: Curwin, J., Slater, R. and Eadson, D. (2015). Quantitative 

methods for business decisions, seventh edition. Cengage Learning

 

1. 

Basic Algebra 

1.1 

Rules of linear algebra 

 

This section is revision material. It is worthwhile reading through all of Section 1.1 to make sure 

you are comfortable with the material. We will not go through this material in detail during the 

lecture. Although we will use all of these skills during linear and non-linear algebra examples. If 

you are not comfortable with this material, then you can go online to look for examples, or I 

would encourage the use of a textbook such as Chapter 1 in the core textbook for this course: 



Curwin, J., Slater, R. and Eadson, D. (2015). Quantitative methods for business decisions, 

seventh edition. Cengage Learning. 

 

1.1.1  Addition 

 

a+b = b+a 



 

a+b+c = (a+b)+c = a+(b+c)         

[order of addition does not matter]  

 

1.1.2  Multiplication

 

 

ab = ba 



 

abc = (ab)c = a(bc)        

 

[order of multiplication does not matter] 



 

1.1.3  Factorisation and the use of brackets 

 

a(b+c) = ab +ac       



 

 

[expansion of brackets] 

 

ab+ac = a(b+c)        



 

 

[factorisation] 



 

(a+b) (c+d) = (a+b)c+(a+b)d 

        = ac+bc+ad+bd 

 

When expanding brackets, always perform the operation inside the brackets first. If there are 



brackets within brackets, start from the inside and work outwards. 

  

e.g.  



3{5a+2(a+b)}  = 3{5a+2a+2b} 

                               

= 3{7a+2b} 

                                

= 21a+6b 

 


 

 



 

1.1.4  Subtraction and negative values 

 

The formal definition of a negative number is as follows. For any number, there exists a 



corresponding ‘additive inverse’ number, such that the sum of the number and its additive 

inverse number is zero. 

 

e.g.  


the additive inverse of 3 is –3, so 3+(–3) = 0. 

 

In general, the additive inverse of any positive number is the corresponding negative number. 



Subtraction of a number is the same as addition of that number’s additive inverse. 

 



  

a+(b)  = a+b   

a– (b)   = a–b 

     


a+(–b) = a–b   

a– (–b) = a+b 

 

Rules  


 

(a)  


Two ‘minuses’ make ‘plus’ 

(b)  


A minus sign outside a bracket changes the signs of all the terms inside the bracket 

       


e.g.  

a – (x+2y–3z) = a–x–2y+3z 

(c)  

ab is positive: 



              

either if ‘a’ and ‘b’ are both positive 

                    



or if ‘a’ and ‘b’ are both negative 

(d)   


ab is negative if one of ‘a’ and ‘b’ is positive, and the other is negative 

 

1.1.5  Division, reciprocals and fractions 

 

The formal definition of a reciprocal is as follows: For any number except zero, there exists a 



corresponding ‘multiplicative inverse’ number, or ‘reciprocal’ number, such that the product of 

the number and its reciprocal is 1. 

 

e.g.  


the reciprocal of 2 is 1/2, also written as 2

–1 


 

        


2

1/2 = 1, or 2



(2

–1



) = 1 

 

Division by a number is the same as multiplication by the reciprocal of that number. 



  

a



b or a/b = a

(1/b) or a



(b

–1



 

The number 0 can be used in the numerator of a fraction, but not in the denominator. 



 

0/a = 0 


        

a/0 is undefined 

        

0/0 is undefined 

 


 

 



 

Rules 


Multiplication and division:     

bd

ac



d

c

b



a



;   

bc

ad



d

c

b



a

d

c



b

a



 



                                                 

Cancellation of common factors:        

c

b

ac



ab

 



 

Addition and subtraction:  

To add/subtract two fractions, put them over a ‘common                                                                 

denominator’; then add or subtract the numerators; then (if                                                              

possible) simplify by cancelling common factors. 

 

 



 

 

 



bd

bc

ad



bd

bc

bd



ad

d

c



b

a





 

                                                 



 

 

 



 

bd

bc



ad

bd

bc



bd

ad

d



c

b

a





 



 

1.1.6  Powers (exponents) 

 

Let b be any number, and let n be any positive integer (whole number). The expression b

n

  

(‘b raised to the power n’ where b is the base and n is the exponent) is defined as follows: 



 

b

1



 = b 

b

2



 = b



b

3

 = b



b



b



n

 = b


b



....

b         



 

[n times] 

 

Similar expressions can be defined for values of n that are not positive integers: 



 

b

0



 = b/b = 1 

b

–1



 = b/(b

b) = 1/b 



b

–2

 = b/(b



b



b) = 1/b

2

 



b

–n



 = b/(b

b



...


b) = 1/b


 

 



[n+1 times] 

 

Expressions can also be defined for values of n which are fractional or decimal, provided b  



is not negative: 

 


 

b



1/2

 = square root of b (

b) = the number c such that c



2

 = b 


b

1/3


 = cube root of b (

3



b)  =  the number d such that d

3

 = b 



b

1/n



 = n’th root of b (

n



b)   =  the number k such that k

n

 = b 



 

The following rules and examples may be useful when manipulating expressions containing 

powers. 

 

b



3/2

 = (b


3

)

1/2



 or (b

1/2


)

3

 



b

0.75


 = b

3/4


 = (b

3

)



1/4

 or  (b


1/4

)



b

m

 



 b

n



 = b

m+n 


b

m

 



 b

n



 = b

m–n 


(b

m

)



n

 = b


mn

 

(ab)



n

 = a


b

n



 

(a + b)


2

 = (a + b)(a + b) = a

2

 + ba +ab + b



2

 = a


2

 + 2ab + b

2

 

(a – b)



2

 = (a – b)(a – b) = a

2

 – ba – ab + b



2

 = a


2

 – 2ab + b

(a + b)(a – b) = a



2

 + ba – ab – b

2

 = a


2

 – b


2

 

 



1.1.7  Manipulation of equations 

 

Rules for carrying terms across the ‘equals sign’: 



 

If  a + b = c   then  a = c – b 

If  a – b = c   then  a = c + b 

 

Rules for cross-multiplication: 



 

If  ab = cd  then  

b

cd

a



 

                                             



If  

d

c



b

a



  then  

d

bc



a

  or  ad = bc 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 



 

1.1.8  Inequalities 

 

a



b means ‘a is greater than or equal to b’ 

a>b means ‘a is greater than b’ 

a



b means ‘a is less than or equal to b’ 

a

 

 

Rules for addition and multiplication involving inequalities: 



 

If  a>b  then  a+c>b+c 

If  a>b  then  ac>bc      if   c>0 

                                 ac

 

Similar rules apply for the other inequalities: <, 



 and 


 . 


 

 

 



If you are struggling with Section 1.1, then please be sure to revise it thoroughly, as it will 

benefit you for the rest of the material in this module as well as others.  

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 



 

1.2 

Linear algebra 

 

1.2.1  Linear equations with one unknown variable  

 

Often we need to use the rules of algebra to solve an equation which contains one unknown 



variable. A linear equation is one which has terms in the unknown variable itself, e.g. x, but no 

terms in x

2

, x


3

, x


1/2

 etc.  


 

Question 

You see a pack of six apples in the supermarket for 60 pence. What is the price of one apple?  

Well this is simple as its 10 pence per apple. If you can work this out then you have just used 

algebra!  

 

We can write the problem down formally, let a stand for the cost of an apple, and then we have: 



 

 

 



 

6a 

= 60 

 

Divide both sides by 6, and you get: 



 

 

 



 

a 

= 10 


 

so cost of one apple is ten pence.  

 

Important Rule: Whatever you do to one side of the equation, you must also do to the other side



(look back to Section 1.1.7.) 

 

Examples 

 

Method 


 

1.  


If there are fractions, eliminate them by putting everything over a common denominator, 

and then multiplying through by the denominator. 

  

2.  


If there are brackets, multiply them out. 

  

3.  



Collect all the terms in x on one side of the equation, and all the numerical terms on the 

other side.  

 

4. 


Divide both sides through by the coefficient on x, to obtain the numerical solution for x. 

 

5. 



Substitute the solution back into the original equation and evaluate both sides, to check     

     


whether the solution is correct. 

 

 



 

 



 

Examples   

 

Solve the following equations for x:  



 

(i)  


3x + 4 = 10 

(ii)  


3(x – 3) = 2(x – 5) + 7 

 

  



Solutions 

 

 



(i)  

3x + 4 = 10     

    3x = 10 – 4 



             

   


    3x = 6 

                

      x = 6/3 



                

      x = 2 



 

          [Check : 3(2) + 4 = 10    OK] 

 

(ii)  


3(x – 3) = 2(x – 5) + 7     

        3x – 9    =   2x – 10 + 7 



                               

 



      3x – 2x  =  –10 + 7 + 9 

                                          

 



                   x = 6   [Check : 3(6 – 3) = 2(6 



– 5) + 7    OK] 

 

 



1.2.2  Linear Algebra with two variables 

 

Linear algebra with only one variable such as in Section 1.2.1 have little relevance to ‘real 



world’ problems. What we usually have is problems where there are more than one variable of 

interest. Such as the price and the quantity sold of a certain product.  

 

A shop owner has worked out an equation that links the quantity (q) of t-shirts they sell and the 



price (p) it’s sold at. The equation is as follows: 

 

 



 

 

 



 

q

 



= 250 – 5p 

By substituting different values for the price, p, we can work out 

how much quantity of t-shirts sold as follows: 

 

When p = 5, q



 

= 250 – 5*(5) = 225 

 

Or when p = 10, q



 

= 250 – 5*(10) = 200 

  

 

 



 

 

 



 

Price (£)

Quantity sold

0

250



5

225


10

200


15

175


20

150


25

125


30

100


35

75

40



50

45

25



50

0


 

The data in the above table graphed in Excel: 



Note the ‘quantity sold’ is on the y-axis (or vertical axis) and the ‘price’ is on the x-axis 

(or horizontal axis) 

 

The data draws a straight-line graph. This means that price and quantity sold have a ‘linear’ 



relationship. As price is increased then quantity sold goes decreases. There is an ‘inverse’ 

relationship here.  

 

This is a very simple example, because we have not factored in any costs involved. Because if 



we follow the line left, beyond the £0 price, then the quantity sold would keep going up, but this 

would obviously yield a loss for the shop owner!  

 

We can draw this type of graph very easily in Excel.  



 

Straight-line graphs can always be represented by the equation: 

 

 

 



y = mx + c or y = c + mx 

          

c is the intercept, i.e.  the value of y at which the line cuts the y-axis 

m is the slope, where   

m>0 



 the line is upward sloping 



                                    m=0 

 the line is flat 



                                    m<0 

 the line is downward sloping. 



 

The ‘coordinates’ of any point on a graph can be represented in the form (x-value, y-value). 

   

e.g. (5,8) means ‘x = 5 and y = 8’ 



 

In our example the slope, m = -5, hence the downward sloping line, and the intercept, c = 250.  

 

 


 

Some examples 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 

 

0



10

20

30



40

50

60



70

80

0



2

4

6



8

10

12



14

y-

ax



is

x-axis


y = 5x + 10

-6

-4



-2

0

2



4

6

8



10

-3

-2



-1

0

1



2

3

4



5

y-

ax



is

x-axis


y = 4-2x

 

10 


1.2.3  Simultaneous linear equations with two unknown variables 

 

A slightly more complicated situation arises when we have more than one equation, and there is 



more than one unknown variable to solve for.  In general, we can always solve provided there are 

as many equations as there are unknown variables; i.e. 2 equations in 2 unknown variables  

(x and y); 3 equations in 3 unknown variables (x, y and z); and so on. 

 

There are two methods of solution: algebraic and graphical. 



 

Algebraic method 

 

1.  


Eliminate any fractions or brackets (as in section 1.2.1). Then rearrange both equations so 

that the terms in x and y are on the left hand side, and the numerical terms are on the 

right. 

 

2.  



Multiply each side of one (or both) of the equations through by a number (or numbers) so 

that the coefficient on one of the variables (x or y) has the same numerical value in both  

equations. The signs of the equalised coefficients can be the same or different. 

 

3.  



Eliminate the chosen variable by subtracting one equation from the other (if the signs of  

the equalised coefficients are the same) or adding the two equations (if the signs are 

different). 

 

4.  



Solve the resulting equation for the remaining variable. 

  

5.  



Substitute the solution back into one of the original equations, and solve for the other 

variable. 

 

6.  


Check your solution by substituting both values back into the other original equation. 

 

Examples 



 

Solve algebraically the following pairs of simultaneous equations: 

 

(i)  


x + 2y = 5 

      


x  – y  = 2 

 

 



(ii)  

2y + 14 = 6x 

       

5x – 3y = 1 



 

(iii)  


4x + 2y = 14 

        


2x –  y  = 1  

 

 



 

 

11 


Solutions 

  

(i)                                  



 

            x + 2y = 5         

 

[1] 


             

 

                                    x – y   = 2                    



[2] 

       


[1] – [2]          

                           3y = 3 



              

 



                             y = 1 

 

       



substitute into [1]     

                 x + 2



1 = 5 


                          

   


                           x = 5 – 2 

 

x = 3 



 

      


check in [2]               

           



   3 – 1 = 2      

 

OK



 

 



(ii)  

rearranging               

    


         –6x + 2y = –14                

[1] 


                                                

          5x – 3y  = 1                   

[2] 

 

      



[1] 

 3            



               –18x + 6y = –42               

[3] 

      


[2] 

 2            



                 10x – 6y = 2               

 

[4] 


      

[3] + [4]         

                         –8x = –40 



  

 



                             x = –40/–8  

 



x = 5 

 

     



substitute into [2]       

                5



5 – 3y = 1 

              

               



        24 = 3y  

   


                            y = 24/3  

 

 y = 8 



 

     


check in [1]               

          –6



5 + 2


8 = –14     

OK 

 

 



(iii)                                                       

4x + 2y = 14                 

[1]    

                                                            



2x  –  y =   1                 

[2] 


 

           [2] 

 2                      



               

4x – 2y  =  2                 

[3] 


 

           [1] + [3]                    

               



        8x = 16 

                                                

                              x = 16/8 



 

 

 



 

                              x = 2 



 

          substitute into [1]       

                 4



2 + 2y = 14 

                                          

                            2y = 14 – 8 



                                          

                            2y = 6 



                                          

                              y = 3 



 

12 


 

          check in [2]               

                  2



2 – 3  = 1        

 

OK  


 

Graphical method 

 

1.  


Rearrange both equations so that y appears by itself on the left hand side of both (i.e. get 

both equations in the form y = c+mx, where c and m are numbers). 

 

2.  


For the first equation, find the numerical value of y when x = 0, and plot the point on the  

graph. Next find the numerical value of y for a second, arbitrarily chosen, value of x, and 

plot on the graph.  Join the two points with a straight line. 

 

3.  



Repeat step 2 for the second equation. 

 

4.  



Locate the solution at the point of intersection of the two lines.  If the point of 

intersection is off the graph, try again with different scales on the axes. 

 

For any linear equation of the form y = c+mx or y = mx+c, 



 

          c is the intercept, i.e.  the value of y at which the line cuts the y-axis 

          m is the slope, where   m>0 

 the line is upward sloping 



                                    m=0 

 the line is flat 



                                    m<0 

 the line is downward sloping. 



 

The ‘coordinates’ of any point on a graph can be represented in the form (x-value, y-value). 

   

e.g. (5,8) means ‘x = 5 and y = 8’ 



 

 

Please look at the other notes available in Blackboard for examples how to draw line graphs in 



Excel.  

 

 



Examples 

 

Solve graphically the following pairs of simultaneous equations (taken from the previous 



example): 

 

(i)  



x + 2y = 5 

 

 



(iii)  

4x + 2y = 14 

      

x –   y = 2 



 

 

 



2x –   y  = 1 

 


 

13 


Solutions (to locate two points on each line) 

   


(i)   

x + 2y = 5    

    2y = 5 – x     



     


2

x

2



5

y



 

 



 

[1] 


 

       


x  –  y = 2     

   –y = 2 – x     



     y = x – 2                      

[2] 

 

       



[1]     

    when x = 0, y = 5/2 = 2.5 



                                                     

                             when x = 5, y = 5/2 – 5/2 = 0 

                                                    

       


[2]     

    when x = 0, y = –2 



 

                             when x = 5, y = 5 – 2 = 3 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



(iii)    2y + 4x = 14     

       2y = 14 – 4x   



       y = 7 – 2x          

[1] 

          2x –   y =   1      



       –y = 1 – 2x    

       y = 2x – 1          



[2] 

 

          [1]     



    when x = 0, y = 7  

 

                             when x = 3, y = 7–6 = 1 



 

          [2]     

    when x = 0, y = –1 



X

X

X



X

3

5



1

2.5


3

2

x



2

5

y



y = x



2

x



y

2



(3,1)

 

14 


 

                              when x = 3, y = 6–1 = 5 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.2.4  Economics application: supply and demand under conditions of perfect competition 

 

Example 



 

The quantity demanded of a certain product (q

d

, measured in kilos per week) depends on the 



market price (p per kilo, in £’s), while the quantity supplied (q

s

, measured in kilos per week) 



depends on the price producers receive (p

*

 per kilo, in £’s), as follows:- 



 

           q

d

 = 40–4p 



 

 

 



q

s

 = 2p



*

–8 


 

The market price is the price which producers receive, plus any tax, minus any government  

subsidy, so: 

          p = p

*

+t, where  t>0 



 tax 


t<0 

 subsidy 



 

X

X



X

X

3



7

1



1

5

y=7



2x

y=2x



1

2



3

y

x



(2,3)

 

15 


Using algebraic methods, find the equilibrium values of p, p

*

 and q



d

 (=q


s

 



(i) When there are no taxes or subsidies, 

(ii) When a tax of £3 per kilo is imposed, 

(iii) When a subsidy of £1.50 per kilo is awarded.  

 

Solution 

 

If   p = p



*

+t     


     p


*

 =

 



p – t      

      q



s

 = 2(p–t) – 8 

 

(i) When t=0,  q



d

 = 40 – 4p 

                        q

 = 2p



 

– 8 


 

     For market clearing, let q

d

 = q


s

 = q 


 

     


    40 – 4p = 2p – 8 

 

     


          48  = 6p 

 

     


            p = 48/6 

 

     


            p = 8 

  

     From demand equation, q = 40 – 4



 



     

            q = 40 – 32  



 

     


            q = 8 

 

     Check in supply equation    



      2


8 – 8 = 8       

 

OK  


 

 

(ii) When t=3,  q



d

 = 40 – 4p 

                        q

 = 2(p – 3) – 8      



     q


 = 2p – 14 

 

     For market clearing, let q



d

 = q


s

 = q 


 

     


    40 – 4p = 2p – 14 

 

     


          54  = 6p 

 

     


            p = 54/6 

 

     


            p = 9 

 


 

16 


     From demand equation, q = 40 – 4



 

     


            q = 40 – 36  

 

     


            q = 4 

 

     Check in supply equation    



      2


9 – 14 = 4      

 

OK  


 

 

(iii) When t=–1.5, 



q

d

 = 40 – 4p 



                              

q



 = 2(p + 1.5) – 8    

     q



 = 2p – 5 

 

     For market clearing, let q



d

 = q


s

 = q 


 

     


    40 – 4p = 2p – 5 

 

     


          45  = 6p 

 

     


            p = 45/6 

                            

     


            p = 7.5 

  

     From demand equation, q = 40 – 4



7.5 


 

     


            q = 40 – 30 

 

     


            q = 10 

 

     Check in supply equation    



      2


7.5 – 5 = 10      

 

OK  


 

 

In order to show the graphical solution, note that economists’ graphs of demand and supply 



curves are constructed differently to the normal mathematician’s graphs of the relationship 

between two variables, y and x. Essentially, the x-axis and y-axis are swapped!  

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

17 


 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

q

d



=40

4p



q

s

=2p



8

8



8

p

q



(8,8)

q

d



=40

4p



q

s

=2p



8

8



8

p

q



(8,8)

q

s



=2p

14



9

4

Effect of tax



of £3 per unit

y

x



p

q

y=3



2x

x=1



y=1

q

d



=40

4p



p=6

q=16


read

anti-clockwise

read

clockwise

 

18 


 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Note: We will cover how to draw these types of graphs in Excel during the lecture. And we will 

see how we can draw an ‘economic’ style graph by swapping over the x and y-axis. All this 

information will be made available in Blackboard.  

 

 

 

 

This graph has been drawn in 

Excel: 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

q

d



=40

4p



q

s

=2p



8

8



8

p

q



(8,8)

q

s



=2p

5



7.5

10

Effect of a subsidy



of £1.50 per unit

 

19 


1.3 

Quadratic equations 

 

Quadratic equations are equations in one variable (x), which take the form: 



 

ax

2



+bx+c = 0 , where a, b, c are constants (b or c, but not a, could be equal to zero) 

 

Normally there are two solutions for x (but in some cases there can be one solution or no 



solutions). 

 

Two methods for solving are:- 



 

(a) Factorisation.  

This is easy if you can spot how to do it, but sometimes you can’t! Also, 

the method of factorisation will not help identify a case for which there is 

no solution. 

 

(b) Formula method.   This takes longer and can be tedious, but it is guaranteed to work if you do                                     



it right, and it will always identify cases for which there is no solution. 

 

(a) Method of factorisation 



 

 

Rewrite the equation as the product of two factors: 



 

ax

2



+bx+c = (mx+p)(nx+q) = 0         where  mn = a 

    


 

 

                              



mq+np = b 

       


pq = c 

 

Then, if ax



2

+bx+c = 0,     either 

mx+p = 0     

     x = –p/m 



          or           nx+q  = 0     

     x = –q/n 



 

These expressions give the two solutions. The two factors (i.e. the numerical values of m, n  

and p) have to be determined by trial and error. 

 

If it helps, the original equation can be ‘multiplied or divided through’ by any number to 



simplify the factorisation. 

 

Examples 



 

Solve the following for x: 

 

(i)    x



2

+4x+3 = 0 

 

 

 



(vi)     x

2

+6x+9 = 0 



(ii)   x

2

–5x+4 = 0 



 

 

 



(vii)    2x

2

–x–3 = 0 



(iii)  x

2

+2x–8 = 0 



 

 

 



(viii)   6x

2

+x–12 = 0 



(iv)  2x

2

+2x–40 = 0 



 

 

 



(ix)     x

2

+8x+4 = 0 



(v)   x

2

–9 = 0 



 

 

 



(x)       x

2

–2x+7 = 0 



 

 


 

20 


Solutions 

 

(i)    x



2

+4x+3 = 0         

 

(x+3)(x+1) = 0 



     x = –3 or x = –1 

 

(ii)   x



2

–5x+4 = 0         

        (x–4)(x–1) = 0       



     x = 4  or  x = 1 

 

(iii)  x



2

+2x–8 = 0 

         (x+4)(x–2) = 0      



     x = –4 or x = 2 

 

(iv)  2x



2

+2x–40 = 0     

        x



2

+x–20 = 0      

     (x+5)(x–4)=0    



    x = –5 or x = 4 



 

(v)   x

2

–9 = 0               



        (x+3)(x–3) = 0     

     x = –3 or x = 3    [(a



2

–b

2



) = (a+b)(a–b)] 

  

(vi)   x



2

+6x+9 = 0       

        (x+3)(x+3) = 0     



    x = –3                  [only one solution] 



  

(vii)  2x

2

–x–3 = 0         



        (2x–3)(x+1) = 0    

    x = 3/2 or x = –1 



 

(viii) 6x

2

+x–12 = 0      



        (2x+3)(3x–4) = 0  

    x = –3/2 or x = 4/3 



 

(ix)    x

2

+8x+4 = 0      There is no obvious factorisation which will solve this. In fact, there is a                                        



solution, but the formula method is needed to find it (see below). 

 



    (x+0.5359)(x+7.4641) = 0    

   x = –0.5359, x = –7.4641 



 

(x)     x

2

–2x+7 = 0       Again, there is no obvious factorisation. In this case, application of the                                          



formula method will show that there is no solution (see below).       

 

(b) Formula method 



 

For any quadratic equation of the form: 

 

ax

2



+bx+c = 0 

 

the solution can be obtained by substituting the numerical values of the coefficients a, b and c 



into the following formula: 

 

a



2

ac

4



b

b

x



2



 



 

A solution exists only if b

2

–4ac 


 0, because the square root of a negative number is undefined. 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

21 


Examples 

 

Solve the following for x: 



 

(i)    x


2

+4x+3 = 0 

(ii)   x

2

–5x+4 = 0 



(v)   x

2

–9 = 0 



(ix)  x

2

+8x+4 = 0 



(x)   x

2

–2x+7 = 0 



 

Solutions 

 

(i)    x


2

+4x+3 = 0 



    a = 1, b = 4, c = 3 

 

1



2

3

1



4

4

4



x

2







=

2

12



16

4



=



2

4

4



=



2

2

4



 



 

 

 



x = –6/2 or x = –2/2 

x = –3 or x = –1 

 

(ii)   x



2

–5x+4 = 0             a = 1, b = –5, c = 4 

 

 

 



1

2

4



1

4

5



5

x

2







=

2



16

25

5



=



2

9

5



=

2



3

5



 

 

x = 8/2 or  x = 2/2      



                        x = 4    or  x = 1 

 


 

22 


(v)   x

2

–9 = 0                   a = 1, b = 0, c = –9 



 

 

2



6

0

2



36

0

1



2

9

1



4

0

0



x

2









 

 



x = 3 or x = –3 

 

(ix)  x



2

+8x+4 = 0           a = 1, b = 8, c = 4 

 

 

 



2

9282


.

6

8



2

48

8



2

16

64



8

1

2



4

1

4



8

8

x



2













 

 

x = –7.4641 or x = –0.5359 



 

(x)   x

2

–2x+7 = 0            a = 1, b = –2, c = 7 



 

2

24



2

2

28



4

2

1



2

7

1



4

2

2



x

2









 



 

       There is no solution because the square root of a negative number [

–24] is undefined. 



 

Graphical representation of quadratic equations 

 

Although not recommended as a method for solving quadratic equations, it is sometimes useful 



to draw a sketch-diagram to get a visual representation of the solution. For the equation 

 ax


2

+bx+c = 0, we write: 

         y = ax

2

+bx+c  



 

i.e. ‘let the expression ax

2

+bx+c equal y’ 



   

To obtain a graphical representation, the steps are as follows: 

 

1.  


Find y when x = 0, and plot the point. 

 

2.  



Find the values of x at which y = 0 [by solving the original quadratic equation] and plot 

the points. 

 

3.  


Join the plotted points with a curve. 

 

Note : If a > 0, curve is ‘U-shaped’. If a < 0, curve is ‘dome-shaped’. 

 


 

23 


Example 

 

Produce a graphical representation of the solution to the following quadratic equation: 



 

(ii)    x

2

–5x+4 = 0 



 

Solution 

 

Let y = x



2

–5x+4 


 

When x=0, y = 0

– 5


0 + 4 = 4 

 

When y=0, x=4 or x=1 (solutions obtained above, by factorisation or by the formula method). 



 

 

 



 

This can be quite hard to draw by hand! But Excel allows you to do it easily. Please find Excel 

material in Blackboard.  

 

You will not be asked to draw a detailed curved graph in the exam for this module. But you may 



be asked to draw a rough graph.  

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

24 


1.3.1  Economics application: Demand, revenue, cost and profit equations for a 

monopolist 

  

Consider a monopolist with a linear demand equation, q = 16–p, where q = quantity demanded 



and p = price.   

 

To obtain an expression for the monopolist’s total revenue, TR, in terms of the quantity of output 



which it produces and sells, start by rearranging the demand equation: 

 

                                    q = 16 – p 



         p = 16 – q 

 

By definition, total revenue = price



quantity 

 



     TR = pq = (16–q) 





q = 16q–q

 

So total revenue is a quadratic expression in q, of the form TR = aq



2

+bq+c,  


with a = –1, b = 16 and c = 0. 

 

                                                     



Suppose now the firm’s total cost, TC, in terms of the quantity of output which it produces is the 

following: 

TC = 4q+20 

 

By definition profit, 



, is the difference between total revenue, TR, and total cost, TC.   

Therefore we can write: 

 = TR – TC 



 = (16q – q

2

) – (4q + 20) 



 = –q


2

 + 12q – 20 

 

Profit is a quadratic expression in q, where a = –1, b = 12 and c = –20. 



 

To find the firm’s break-even levels of production, i.e. the values of q at which 

 = 0, we 



should solve the following quadratic equation for q: 

 

–q



+ 12q – 20 = 0 

 

Simplify by multiplying through by –1: 



 

 



   q

2

 – 12q + 20 = 0 



 



   (q – 2)(q – 10) = 0     [using the method of factorisation] 



           q = 2 and q = 10 are the break-even levels of output at which profit, 

 = 0.  



 

Alternatively, using the formula method with a =1, b = –12, c = 20: 

 


 

25 


 

2

8



12

2

64



12

2

80



144

12

1



2

20

1



4

12

12



q

2











 

 





q = 2 or q = 10 as above. 

 

Numerical evaluation of TR, AR, TC and 





 

TR = 16q – q



2

 

   AR = 16 – q 



TC = 4q + 20 

 = –q



2

 + 12q – 20 





20 

–20 


15 


15 

24 


–9 

28 



14 

28 


39 



13 

32 


48 



12 

36 


12 

55 



11 

40 


15 

60 



10 

44 


16 

63 



48 


15 

64 



52 


12 

63 



56 


10 


60 

60 



11 


55 

64 



–9 

 

The shaded areas represent the break-even levels of production. 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

q

TR, TC, 





q

2



+12q

20



10

2

TR=16q



q

2



TC=4q+20

 

26 


Example 

 

A monopolist is faced with the demand equation, q = 100 – p,  where q = quantity demanded  



and p = price. 

 

The total cost equation is:  TC = q



2

 + 36q +120, where q = quantity supplied. 

 

(i)  


By manipulating the demand equation, show that the total revenue equation is: 

 

TR = 100q – q



 

(ii)  



Write down an expression for the firm’s profit (

 = TR–TC) in terms of q, and find the 



firm’s two break-even levels of production,  i.e. the values of q at which 

 = 0. 



 

Solution 

 

(i)  


By definition, TR = price

quantity 



 

Rearranging the demand equation,     q = 100 – p 

 

             



        p = 100 – q 

                                                 

                                                

     TR = pq = (100 – q)



 



             

     TR = 100q – q



 

(ii)  



By definition,                    

           

 = TR – TC 



 

                                                

       


 =  (100q – q

2

) – (q


+ 36q + 120)  

 

                                                



       


 = –2q


+ 64q – 120 

      

     At break-even levels of production, 



 = 0 


 

      –2q



+ 64q – 120 = 0 

 

    


 

 

 



          q

2

 – 32q + 60  = 0   [dividing 



through by –2] 

 



          (q – 2)(q – 30) = 0    

 

     Therefore the break-even levels of production are q = 2 and q = 30. 



 

 

 



 

 

27 


 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



   

 

 

 

q



TR, TC, 



2q



2

+64q


120


30

2

TR=100q



q

2



TC=q

2

+36q+120



Download 434.83 Kb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling