Ukrainian Journal of Food Science


Download 3.98 Kb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet7/20
Sana19.11.2017
Hajmi3.98 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   ...   20

Conclusions 
 
Being  the  most  desirable  feature  for  the  consumer  the  emulsion  and  foam  stability 
significantly influences on the product quality. Up to now,  both proteins and polysaccharides 
are in a scope of interest of the dispersion science. Proteins being an indispensable component 
of  all  processed  foods  have  proved  to  be  effective  functionally,  providing  the  necessary 
stability  and  rheological  properties  to  the  final  food  products,  because  of  their  naturally 
amphiphilic nature and surface active. The combined presence of proteins and polysaccharides 
strongly increases the emulsion and foam stability. The conditions and treatments of formation 
of  multicomponent  foam  and  emulsion  which  are  stabilized  by  protein-polysaccharide 
complexes, should be more investigated.  
 
References 
 
1. 
Christina  Stave,  Marianne  Törner.  Exploring  the  organisational  preconditions  for 
occupational  accidents  in  food  industry:  A  qualitative  approach  Original  Research  Article 
Safety Science, Volume 45, Issue 3, March 2007, Pages 355-371. 
2. 
А.  Jacinto,  M.  Canoa,  C.  Guedes  Soares    Workplace  and organisational  factors  in 
accident analysis  within the Food Industry Original Research Article Safety Science, Volume 
47, Issue 5, May 2009, Pages 626-635. 
3. 
Сметанин В. С. Исследование и разработка технологии  молочного десерта на 
основе пенообразных масс из молочных белковых концентратов в установке ГИД-100/1: 
дис. …канд. техн. наук, 05.18.04. – Кемерово, 2010. – 127 с. 
4. 
Держапольская  Ю.  И.  Разработка  технологии  ферментированного  взбитого 
десерта  на  молочно-соевой  основе:  дис.  …канд.  техн.  наук,  05.18.04.  –  Благовещенск, 
2009. – 125 с. 
5. 
Остроумова  Т.  Л.,  Жуков  О.  С.  Использование  стабилизационных  систем  в 
технологии пенообразных продуктов / Молочная промышленность – 2006 – №12 – С. 46-
48. 
6. 
С.  Е.  Димитриева,  Т.  Л.  Остроумова,  В.  Г.  Будрик  Производство  взбитых 
молочных продуктов /  Переработка молока – 2007 – №6 – С. 54-55. 
7. 
D.  J.  McClements,  E.  A.  Decker,  J.Weiss.  Emulsion-based  delivery  systems  for 
lipophilic bioactive components /  Journal of Food Science – 2007 – Vol. 72(8) – P. 109-124. 
8. 
McClements, D. J. Food emulsion: Principles, practice and techniques (2nd ed) / D. 
J. McClements. – :CRC Press In, 2005 – 609 p. 
9. 
Friberg S. E. Food Emulsions / S. E. Friberg, K. Larsson, J. Sjöblom. – New York, 
USA Marcel Dekker, 2004 – 640 p.  
10. 
Остроумова Т. Л. Закономерности структурообразования дисперсной системы 
/  Т.  Л.  Остроумова,  С.  Е.  Димитриева,  А.  Ю.  Просеков,  Е.  В.  Строева  //  Хранение  и 
переработка сельхозсырья – 2006 – №7 – С. 19-21. 

─── 
Food Technology 
───
 
 
─── 
Ukrainian Journal of Food Science.  2013.  Volume 1. Issue 1
 ───
 
48 
11. 
Kulmyrzaev  A.  Influence  of  pH  and  CaCl2  on  the  stability  of  dilute  whey  protein 
stabilized  emulsions  /  A.  Kulmyrzaev,  R.  Chanamai,  D.  J.  McClements  //  Food  Research 
International – 2000 – Vol. 33 (1) – P. 15-20. 
12. 
Ye  A.  Influence  of  polysaccharides  on  the  rate  of  coalescence  in  oil-in-water 
emulsions formed with highly hydrolysed whey proteins / A. Ye, Y. Hemar, H. Singh // Journal 
of Agricultural and Food Chemistry – 2004 – Vol. 52 (17) – P. 5491-5498. 
13. 
Ye  A.  Heat  stability  of  oil-in-water  emulsions  formed  with  intact  or  hydrolysed 
whey proteins: influence of polysaccharides / A. Ye, H. Singh // Food Hydrocolloids – 2006 – 
Vol. 20 (2-3) – P. 269-276. 
14. 
Dickinson  E.  Stability  and  rheology  of  emulsions  containing  sodium  caseinate: 
combined effects  of ionic calcium and non-ionic surfactant / E. Dickinson, S. J. Radford, M. 
Golding // Food Hydrocolloids – 2003 – Vol. 17 (2) – P. 211-220. 
15. 
Dickinson E. Milk protein interfacial layers and the relationship to emulsion stability 
and rheology / E. Dickinson // Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces – 2001 – Vol. 20 (3) – P. 
197-210. 
16. 
Dickinson  E.  Interfacial  structure  and  stability  of  food  emulsions  as  affected  by 
protein-polysaccharide interactions / E. Dickinson // Soft Matter – 2008 – Vol. 4 (5) – P. 932-
942. 
17. 
Benichou A. Protein-polysaccharide interactions for stabilization of food emulsions / 
A.  Benichou,  A.  Aserin,  N.  Garti  //  Journal  of  Dispersion Science  and  Technology  –  2002  – 
Vol. 25(1-3) – P. 93-123. 
18. 
Murray B. S. Stabilization of bubbles and foams / B. S. Murray // Current Opinion 
in Colloid & Interface Science – 2007 – Vol. 12(4-5) – P. 232-241. 
19. 
Dickinson  E.  Hydrocolloids  at  interfaces  and  the  influence  on  the  properties  of 
dispersed systems / E. Dickinson // Food Hydrocolloids – 2003 – Vol. 17(1) – P. 25-39. 
20. 
Dickinson  E.  Structure  formation  in  casein-based  gels,  foams,  and  emulsions  /  E. 
Dickinson // Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects – 2006 – Vol. 
255(1-3) – P. 3-11. 
21. 
Huang  X.  Hydrocolloids  in  emulsions:  particle  size  distribution  and  interfacial 
activity / X. Huang, Y. Kakuda, W. Cui // Food Hydrocolloids – 2001 – Vol. 15 (4-6) – P. 533-
542. 
22. 
Walstra  P.  Physical  Chemistry  of  Food  /  P.  Walstra  –  New  York:  Marcel  Dekker, 
Inc, 2003 – 807p. 
23. 
Dalgleish D. G. Food emulsions – their structures and structure-forming properties / 
D. G. Dalgleish // Food Hydrocolloids – 2006 – Vol. 20 (4) – P. 415-422. 
24. 
Справочник  по  производству  мороженого  /  [Оленев  Ю.А.,  Творогова  А.А., 
Казакова Н.В., Соловьева Л.Н.]. – М.: ДеЛи принт, 2004. – 798 с. 
25. 
Murray B. S. Foam stability: proteins and nanoparticles / B. S. Murray, R.  Ettellaie 
// Current Opinion in Colloid & interface Science – 2004 – Vol. 9(5) – P. 314-320. 
26. 
Von  Klitzing  R.  Film  stability  control  /  R.  von  Klitzing,  H.  J.  Muller.  //  Current 
Opinion in Colloids and Interface Science – 2002 – Vol. 16 (7) – P.42-49 
27. 
Baeza  I.  Interactions  of  polysaccharides  with  β-lactoglobulin adsorbed  films at the 
air-water interface / I. Baeza, C. Carrera Sanchez, A. M. R. Pilosof, J. M. Rodriguez Patino // 
Food Hydrocolloids – 2005 – Vol. 19 (2) – P. 239–248. 
28. 
Ennis M. P. Milk proteins / M. P. Ennis, D. M. Mulvihill // In: G. O. Phillips, & P. 
A  Williams,  Handbook  of  Hydrocolloids  –  Cambridge,  UK:  Woodhead  Publishing  Limited, 
2000 – P. 189-217. 

───
 Food Technology
 ───
 
 
─── 
Ukrainian Journal of Food Science.  2013.  Volume 1. Issue 1 
───
 
49 
29. 
Baeza  I.  Interactions  of  polysaccharides  with  b-lactoglobulin  spread monolayers  at 
the air-water interface / I. Baeza, C. Carrera Sanchez, A. M. R. Pilosof, J. M. Rodriguez Patino 
// Food Hydrocolloids – 2004 – Vol. 18 (6) – P. 959-966. 
30. 
Doublier  J.  L.  (2000).  Protein–  polysaccharide  interactions  /  J.  L.  Doublier,  C. 
Garnier, D. Renard, C. Sanchez // Current Opinion in Colloid and Interface Science – 2000 – 
Vol. 5 (3-4) – P. 202–214. 
31. 
Rouimi  S.  Foam  stability  and  interfacial  properties  of  milk  protein–surfactant 
systems / S. Rouimi, C. Schorsch, C. Valentini, S. Vaslin // Food Hydrocolloids – 2005 – Vol. 
19(3) – P. 467-478. 
32. 
Abascal  D.  M.  Surface  tension  and  foam  stability  of  commercial  calcium  and 
sodium caseinates / D. M. Abascal, J. G. Fadrique // Food Hydrocolloids – 2009 – Vol. 23(7) – 
P.1848-1852. 
33. 
Martin  A.  H.  Network  forming  properties  of  various  proteins  adsorbed  at  the 
air/water interface in relation to foam stability / A. H Martin, K. Grolle, M. A. Bos and other // 
Journal of Colloid and interface Science – 2002 – Vol. 254(1) – P. 175-183. 
34. 
Britten M. Emulsifying properties of whey protein and casein composite blends / M. 
Britten, H. J. Giroux // Journal of Dairy Science – 1991 – Vol. 74(10) – P. 3318-3325. 
35. 
Bezelgues  J.  B.  Interfacial  and  foaming  properties  of  some  food  grade  low 
molecular weight surfactants / J.-B. Bezelgues, S. Serieye, L. Crosset-Perrotin, M. E. Leser // 
Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects – 2008 – Vol. 331(1–2) – 
P. 56-62. 
36. 
Euston S. R. Aggregation kinetics of heated whey protein-stabilized emulsions / S. 
R. Euston, S. R. Finnigan, R. L. Hirst // Food Hydrocolloids – 2000 – Vol. 14 (2) – P. 155-161. 
37. 
Singh  A.  M.  The  emulsifying  properties  of  hydrolyzates  of  whey  proteins  /  A  M. 
Singh, D.G. Dalgleish // Journal of Dairy Science – 1998 – Vol. 81(4) – P. 918-924. 
38. 
Chanamai R. Comparison of gum Arabic, modified starch and whey protein isolate 
as  emulsifiers:  Influence  of  pH,  CaCl2  and  temperature  / R.  Chanamai,  D.  J.  McClements  // 
Journal of Food Science – 2002 – Vol. 67(1) – P. 120-125. 
39. 
Miquelim J. N. pH Influence on the stability of foams with protein–polysaccharide 
complexes  at  their  interfaces  /  J.  N.  Miquelim,  S.  C.  S.  Lannes,  R.  Mezzenga  //  Food 
Hydrocolloids – 2010 – Vol. 24 (4) – P. 398-405. 
40. 
Chanamai  R.  Depletion  flocculation  of  beverage  emulsions  by  gum  arabic  and 
modified starch / R. Chanamai, D. J. McClements // Journal of Food Science – 2001 – Vol. 66 
(3) – P. 457-463. 
41. 
Herceg  Z.  Effect  of  carbohydrates  on  the  emulsifying,  foaming  and  freezing 
properties of whey protein suspensions / Z. Herceg, A. Režek, V. Lelas and other // Journal of 
Food 
Engineering 
– 
2007 
– 
Vol. 
79 
(1) 
– 
P. 
279-286.

─── 
Food Technology 
───
 
 
─── 
Ukrainian Journal of Food Science.  2013.  Volume 1. Issue 1
 ───
 
50 
Assessment of prospects using the latest technology 
stabilization of beverage
 
 
Volodimir Piddubniy, Mykola Sova, Oleksandr Shevchenko 
 
National University of food technologies, Kyiv, Ukraine 
 
 
ABSTRACT 
Keywords:
  
Stabilization 
Microbial cells 
Bacteria 
Pasteurization 
Concentration 
 
Article history: 
Reсeived  20.11.2012 
Reсeived  in revised form 
26.12.2012 
Accepted 22.02.2013 
 
Corresponding author: 
Oleksandr Shevchenko  
E-mail: 
tmipt@ukr.net
 
  The  article  presents  information  related  to  microbiological 
stabilization  of  carbonated  and  non-carbonated  beverages, 
including  high  energy  value  from  raw  materials  of  plant 
origin  due  to  the  choice  of  parameters  and  modes  of  heat 
treatment. 
An  analysis  of  the  possible  varieties  of  microflora  in 
beverages  and  provides  information  on  the  selection  of 
pasteryzatsiynyh  units  for  its  inactivation.  Analyzed  the 
relationship  between  osmotic  pressure,  pH  environment  and 
the  content  of  carbon  dioxide  in  beverages  and  their  impact 
on the stabilization of beverages. 
These  schemes  the  terms  sustainability  carbonated  and  non-
carbonated  drinks  in  the  absence  of  these  chemical 
preservatives. 
 
 
 
Ensuring  the  quality  of  Ukraine's  population  drinks,  berry,  fruit  and  vegetable  juices 
require further development as a source of raw materials and processing technologies incoming 
material flows. An important part of production processes is to  ensure microbiological purity 
products,  or  at  least  create  a  bacteriostatic  environment  [1-3].  Obviously,  the  requirement  of 
100 percent level guarantees aseptic condition significantly  narrows the choice of methods of 
the  latter.  In  this  choice  recently  in  Ukraine  palm  belonged  thermal  processing  methods  of 
products at pasteurization and sterilization. However, in the last decade rapidly growing use of 
chemical preservatives, including uncontrolled, creating another environmental problem. 
Assessment of prospects for technologies that have a different basis to ensure stabilization 
of quality indicators drinks and juices is the purpose of this study. 
Beverage  industry  higher  energy  value  from  raw  materials  of  plant  origin  continues  to 
grow,  requiring  revision  for  these  microbiological  requirements.  Usually  in  these  drinks  no 
pathogenic  microflora  and  bacteria  resistant.  Experience  points  to  the  possibility  of  the 
emergence and development of these acidophilic or acid-fast bacteria (Fig. 1). 
In  this  regard,  drinks,  saturated  with  carbon  dioxide  may  produce  no  heat  treatment 
provided  microbiological  purity  blending  and  packaging  equipment.  However,  the  desire  to 
"nationalize" products based on cherries, grapes, red berries and so leads to the fact that pH 3,7 
and  carbon  dioxide  content  of  6  g  /  l  did  not  provide  microbial  protection,  as  is  the  case  in 
orange drinks. There have been indications that this is a consequence of the ingestion of drinks 
lactic  bacteria  (Lactobacillus  perolens)  for  packaging  [3].  High  level  of  risk  associated  with 

───
 Food Technology
 ───
 
 
─── 
Ukrainian Journal of Food Science.  2013.  Volume 1. Issue 1 
───
 
51 
high malic acid under the influence of lactic acid bacteria is converted into lactic. The result of 
these changes is to increase the pH or at least stabilization of the latter. 
 
 
 
Fig. 1. Scheme on varieties of microorganisms in beverages 
 
The desire to increase the biological value of drinks leads to the use of insoluble additives 
as  ballast  substances,  flour  from  grain  or  fruit  cells.  Around  these  substances  can  be  created 
"alkaline island" in the micro environment of germinating endospores of bacilli and kostrydiy, 
which  will  result  in  total  damage  output  even  with  accurate  exposure  modes  of  heat 
pasteurization. 
In  these  "alkali  islands"  also  can  develop  pathogens  (Bacillus  cereus,  Clostridium 
perfringens, Staphylokokken, Enterokokken) and thus offset the effects of such selective factor, 
which is the pH. 
The only solution in such cases is still increasing number sterilized units, the determination 
of which is necessary to take into account the types of microorganisms (Fig. 2). 
Among  the  influential  factors  to  yield  beyond  regulated  mikrobiological  standards  are 
upgraded to 0.1 - 0.2 mg per liter of zinc content. In lemonade and mixed drinks over time has 
marked  the  rapid  growth  of  yeast  cells. 
However,  the  drinks  limited  presence  of 
zinc content of yeast cells is not shown. 
Named  standart  should  be  considered 
when  designing  new  mixed  drinks,  and 
fortified  with  nutrients  and  growth 
substances  "multi  beverages"  or  other 
special drinks. 
It is known that an important factor in 
staying  microorganisms  in  bacteriostatic 
state  is  osmotic  pressure  environments.  If 
concentrates 
(base) 
subject 
to 
pasteurization 
or 
drinks 
of 
various 
temperatures, the result of condensation on 
the  surface  of  water  vapor  formed  local 
area  with  low  concentration  of  solids  and 
limited  osmotic  pressure.  This  creates  the 
conditions 
for 

rapid 
exponential 
multiplication  of  microorganisms  and 
increase  their  concentration  to  levels  at 
Т, 
0
С 
4,5   5,0     5,5     6,0      6,5    7,0     7,5 
                   
The pH in the drink 
Endospores of bacilli and 
clostridia 
120 
110 
100 
90 
80 
70 
60 
50 
Clostridium acetobutylicum 
Bacillus coagulans 
Heat resistant bacteria 
Acid Enterobacteriaceen 
Fig. 2. Dependencies temperature 
pasteurization at cutting beverages  
within 1 minute 

─── 
Food Technology 
───
 
 
─── 
Ukrainian Journal of Food Science.  2013.  Volume 1. Issue 1
 ───
 
52
which products become unfit for further use. 
In this regard, regulated microbiological standards not canned bases (Table 1). 
 
Table 1. Microbiological standards for non-canned bases 
 
Total cell                                                     max         100    in    1  g 
Yeast                                                           max           5      in    10g 
Disputes filamentous fungi                         max           5      in    10g 
Lactic acid bacteria                                     max           5      in    1  g  
Acetic bacteria                                            max           5      in    1  g 
E. Owl and bacteria Escherichia stick        absent                in    10g 
Disputes bacteria                                        max           10     in    1  g 
 
 
Effect of dissolved carbon dioxide in beverages has a dual character. Firstly it affects the 
pH, and secondly its effect is caused by increasing the osmotic pressure of solutions. For non-
carbonated beverages without preservatives are necessary sterilized processing, the parameters 
of which are shown in Fig. 3. 
 
 
 
Fig. 3. Scheme to the terms of the sustainability of carbonated  
and non-carbonated beverages 
 
High demands from the standpoint of Microbiology take place for reasons that are used in 
the manufacture of yoghurt. A sample of the parameters of some of them: 
Banana-apple basis - 19o Brix, 2.6% acid, pH 3.4; 
multifruit carrot basis - 36o Brix, 2.6% acid, pH 3.4; 
orange-apple-strawberry basis - 33o Brix, 1.7% acid, pH 3.7. 
Basics due to the high possibility of infection should packing aseptically and 100 g must 
be neither yeast or lactic acid and acetic acid bacteria. At 10 g should not be present disputes 
filamentous fungi. The total number of cells should not exceed 1 in 20 h, and the contents of 
spores  of  bacteria  should  be  10  /  h.  Under  such  conditions  the  resistance  is  2-3  months  at  a 
temperature  of  5-10  °C  or  4-6  weeks  at  a temperature  of  10-20  oC.  Combining  a mixture  of 

───
 Food Technology
 ───
 
 
─── 
Ukrainian Journal of Food Science.  2013.  Volume 1. Issue 1 
───
 
53 
fruit and dairy products difficult situation microbiological and temperature pasteurization bases 
and finished beverages should exceed 85 oC. Although pH <4.0 should ensure microbiological 
stability,  but  significant  presence  in  beverages  particles  of  fruit  is  accompanied  by  the 
formation of "alkaline island" with all their consequences. Thanks to the latter, included with 
dairy  products  clostridia  spores  and  spore-forming  bacteria  survive  in  parameters 
pasteurization. 
 
Conclusions 
 
The information and analysis of the literature can note the following. 
1. Refusal to use chemical preservatives in conjunction with the development of new fruit 
and  berry  foundations meet  contemporary  needs  of  society.  The  latter  is particularly  relevant 
with regard to baby food. 
2.  Select  the  number  of  units  sterilized  by  heat  treatment  should  be  carried  out  with  the 
minimum possible while maintaining aseptic packaging equipment. 
 
References 
 
1.  Domaretskyy V.A. Prybylskyy  V.L., Mikhailov M.G. Technology  extracts, concentrates 
and beverage from herbal / Vinnitsa. A new book, 2005. - 408 p. 
2.  Sokolenko  A.,  Costin  VB,  Vasilkovsky  KV  and  others.  Physico-chemical  methods  of 
processing raw materials and food / K. Artek, 2009. - 306 p. 
3.  Werner 
Buck, 
Freising 
Weihenstephan. 
Podverzhennost 
of 
new 
beverages 
ynfytsyrovanyyu - predotvraschenye microbiological problems / BRAUWELT - Peace of 
beer, № 4, 2001. - P. 24-28. 
4.  Elham  Rezvani,  Gerhard  Schleining,  Ali  R.  Taherian  Assessment  of  physical  and 
mechanical properties of  orange oil-in-water beverage emulsions using response surface 
methodology  /  LWT  -  Food  Science  and Technology,  Volume  48,  Issue  1,  2012,  Pages 
82-88 
5.  Ali  R.  Taherian,  Patrick  Fustier,  Hosahalli  S.  Ramaswamy.  Effect  of  added  oil  and 
modified  starch  on rheological  properties,  droplet  size  distribution,  opacity  and  stability 
of  beverage  cloud  emulsions  /  Journal  of  Food  Engineering,  Volume  77,  Issue  3,  2006, 
Pages 687-696 
6.  Seyed  Mohammad  Taghi  Gharibzahedi,  Seyed  Mohammad  Mousavi,  Manouchehr 
Hamedi, Mehran Ghasemlou Response surface modeling for optimization of formulation 
variables  and  physical  stability  assessment  of  walnut  oil-in-water  beverage  emulsions 
Food Hydrocolloids, Volume 26, Issue 1, 2012, Pages 293-301 
7.  Giovanni  Spagna,  Pier  Giorgio  Pifferi,  Maurilio  Tramontini  Immobilization  and 
stabilization of pectinlyase on synthetic polymers for application in the beverage industry 
/ Journal of Molecular Catalysis A: Chemical, Volume 101, Issue 1, 29 July 1995, Pages 
99-105 
 

─── 
Food Technology 
───
 
 
─── 
Ukrainian Journal of Food Science.  2013.  Volume 1. Issue 1
 ───
 
54 
Refinement of the physical and chemical methods for the 
determination of sugars 
 
Elena Deriy, Svitlana Litvynchuk, Anatoliy Meletev,  
Volodymуr Nosenko  
 
National University of food technologies, Kyiv, Ukraine 
 
  ABSTRACT 
Keywords:
  
 
Sugars 
Fermentable sugars 
Determination  
Express-analysis 
 

Download 3.98 Kb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   ...   20




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling