Domaine le roc des anges, roussillon


Download 6.21 Mb.

bet1/87
Sana21.11.2017
Hajmi6.21 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   87

 

 - 1 - 


 

 

November 2017 

 

 

 

 



 

 

DOMAINE LE ROC DES ANGES, ROUSSILLON 



 

 

If you tell a joke in the forest, but nobody laughs, was it a joke? 

 

Steven Wright 



 

 

Il faut être aveugle et sourd, abruti par le matraquage de la propagande, pour ignorer qu’il ne s’agit nullement de « protéger le 



citoyen », mais au contraire, sous les prétextes fallacieux de l’ordre, de l’hygiène et de la sécurité, de réprimer sans nuances et sans 

soucis d’élémentaire civilité, en un mot d’instituer la répression seule comme principe et mode de gouvernement. 

  

R. Dumay, La Mort du Vin 



 

 

“What passes for wine among us, is not the juice of the grape. It is an adulterous mixture, brewed up of nauseous ingredients, by dunces, 

who are bunglers in the art of poison-making; and yet we, and our forefathers, are and have been poisoned by this cursed drench, without 

taste or flavour..." 

 

 

 

INDEX KEY 

 

Organic Wines – * 

Biodynamic Wines – ** 

Natural Wines –! 


 

 - 2 - 


The Alternative Natural Wine Manifesto 

1. Start from the following simple premise: to borrow from Gertrude Stein, the wine is the wine is the wine and the grower is the grower 

and  the  vintage  is  the  vintage  etc.  It  is  not  about  “this  is  good” and  “that’s  better”.  There  is  no  uncritical  freemasonry  of  natural  wine 

aficionados and its devotees will happily diss a faulty wine if it deserves it.  

2. Who is the leader of the natural wine movement and articulates its philosophy? Probably, whoever chooses to – over a drink. We are all 

Spartacus  in  our  cups.  Think  camaraderie  and  comity  with  these  guys,  not  po-faced  table-thumping,  self-indulgent  tract-scribbling  and 

meaningless sloganeering.  

3. But wouldn’t it be a heck of a lot easier for consumers if there was a manifesto detailing what winemakers are supposed to do and not to 



do? What conceivable difference would that make? Take several hundred individuals and ask them if they agree on every single point of 

viticulture and vinification. See what I mean. Rules is for fools. There are enough guidelines for natural winemakers to be getting on with 

and as long as they work within the spirit of minimal intervention they may be said to be natural.  

4. But that’s cheating! How can you claim the moral high ground for natural wines if you won’t submit to scrutiny? We’re not claiming 

any high ground; in fact we prefer rootling in the earth around the vines getting our snouts grubby; we’re simply positing an alternative way 

of making wines that doesn’t involve chucking in loads of additives or stripping out naturally-occurring flavours. Yes, this is self-policed – 

there are no certificates to apply for or accreditation bodies to satisfy. Praise be.  

5. If natural wine is not sufficiently equipped/bothered to organise itself into a movement why should anyone take it seriously? To paraphrase 

Groucho Marx: a natural winegrower wouldn’t want to belong to any club that would accept him or her as a member. The world of wine is 

far too clubby and cosy. In the end it is about what’s in the bottle of wine on the table.  

6. But we do know who they are, these growers? Some are certainly well known, some fly under the radar. Yes, some of them are best 

mates; they drop in on each other, share equipment (including horses!), go to the same parties, wear quirky t-shirts, attend small salons and 

slightly larger tastings. And quite a few don’t because they have so little wine to sell (such as Metras, Dard & Ribo...) By their craggy-faced 

and horny hands shall ye know them. But their activity is not commercialised; there is no single voice that speaks authoritatively for the 

whole natural wine movement – and therein lies its beauty, so many character simply getting on with the job without hype or recourse to 

corporate flimflam.  

7. A certain amount of silliness and cod-referentiality is required to appreciate natural wine. Especially those goofy labels. Plus a working 

knowledge of French argot. And probably an intimate acquaintance with the oeuvre of Jacques Brel.  

8. People who love natural wine are not preachy nor are they competitive. We are thankful when we drink a bottle that hits all the right 

notes and que sera sera if it doesn’t. Those who love natural wines don’t mark them out of 100 because that scale is too limiting (darling, I 

love you, I award you 97 points); and rarely, if ever, are natural wines submitted to international tasting competitions.  

9. We believe that wine is a living product and will change from day from day just as we ourselves change.  

10. Oak is the servant of wine not its master. Natural winemakers understand this.  

11. If it is a movement (and it’s not) how big could it possibly be? We must threaten our growers with violence, we get on our knees and 

wail piteously, we bribe and cajole for our pittance of an allocation. Take out those Parisian cavistes and wine bar owners with their hot 

line to the growers, the Japanese who won’t drink anything else and a healthy rump of Americans led by Dressner et al. And there’s barely 

enough to whet your appetites and wet our whistles, let alone begin to satisfy the market we’re priming over here. Small is beautiful and 

marginal is desirable, but it makes a nonsense out of continuity. We gnash our teeth, but we love it as the knowledge that the wine is such 

a finite commodity makes it all the more precious (my precious) and we become ever more determined that it goes to an appreciative home.  

12. 99% of people who criticise natural wine have never made a bottle of wine in their lives. 110% of statistics like this are invented. 

13. The heroes of the natural wine movement are the growers. There are teachers and pupils, there are acolytes and fans, but no top dog, no 

blessed hierarchy, no panjandrum of cool. Some growers are blessed with magical terroir; others fight the dirt and the climate, clawing that 



terroir  magic  from  the  bony  vines.  They  are  both  artisans  and  artists.  What  impresses  us  about  the  growers  is  their  humility  and  their 

congeniality, a far cry from the arrogance of those who are constantly being told their wines are wonderful a hundred times over and end 

up dwelling in a moated grange of self-approval.  

14. One new world grower wrote to me that he felt had more in common with vignerons several thousand miles away; he understood their 

language, loved drinking their wines – these people were his real family. 

 



 

 - 3 - 


 

15. Natural wines – they all taste the same, don’t they? D’oh! Of course they do, there isn’t a scintilla of difference between these bacterially-

infected wines which are all made to an identical formula of undrinkability; they are totally without nuance, subtlety, complexity, and those 

who drink, enjoy and appreciate natural wines evidently had their taste buds removed at a very young age with sandpaper. This canard is 

one dead duck.  

16. Does the process of natural winemaking mask terroir? Terroir is in the mouth of the beholder, perhaps, but the clarity, freshness and 

linear quality of natural wines, supported by acidity, makes them excellent vehicles for terroir expression.  But bad wine-making, be it in 

the conventional or natural idiom, always masks terroir. 

17. Natural wines are incapable of greatness. Let us put aside for a moment the notion that good taste is subjective and transport ourselves 

to our favourite desert island with our dog-eared copy of the Carnet de Vigne Omnivore, the natural wine mini-bible. Because the natural 

wine  church  has  many  mansions;  you  will  discover  a  constellation  of  stars  lurking  in  its  firmament.  Natural  wine  growers  don’t  work 

according precise calibrations of sulphur levels; instead they seek to express the quality of the grapes from their naturally farmed vineyard 

by keeping interventions to a bare minimum. In certain regions such as Beaujolais, Jura and the Languedoc-Roussillon, virtually all the 

great names are what we might term “natural growers”. Again we don’t seek to make anyone join the family or fit in with an overarching 

critique. Natural wine is fluid, in that vignerons who are extremists, row back from their position, whilst others, who start out conventionally, 

feel emboldened to take greater risks by reducing the interventions.  

18. Natural wines don’t age well. Hit or myth? Myth! It is true that many natural wines are intended to be drunk in the first flush of fruit 

preferably from the fridge. So sue them for being generous and gouleyant. Ironically, many white wines with skin contact and  deliberate 

oxidation have greater longevity and bone structure than red wines. But it is simply not true to assert that natural wines can’t age. A 1997 

Hermitage from Dard et Ribo was staggeringly profound (et in Parkadia ego), old magnums of Foillard’s Morgon Côte du Py become like 

Grand Cru Burgundy as they morgonner, some of Breton’s Bourgueils demand that you tarry ten years before becoming to grips with their 

grippiness. Last year we tasted a venerable 10.5% Gamay d’Auvergne from Stéphane Majeune, as thin as a pin, and still as fresh as a playful 

slap with a nettle, whereas the conventional big-named Burgs, Bordeaux and Spanish whatnots alongside it all collapsed under the weight 

of expectation and new oak. If the definition of an ageworthy wine is that you can still taste the knackered lacquer twenty years after, then 

give me the impertinence of youth any day.  

19. Natural wines are unpredictable. You said it, kiddo. And three cheers for that. Their sheer perversity is embodied in these lines by 

Gerard Manley Hopkins:  

 

And all things counter, original, spare, strange;  



Whatever is fickle, freckled (who knows how?)  

With swift, slow; sweet, sour; adazzle, dim...  

20. My glass is empty. As it should be – it was a glass of delicious Pinot Meunier from Thierry Puzelat.  

Natural wine recognises that not everything can be made in a petri dish. To capture the spirit of the vineyard and the flavour of the grape, 

one has to let go. Natural wine is the freedom to get it wrong, and the freedom to get it very right indeed.  It relishes and embraces the 

contradictions and dangers inherent in not being in control.  

We want people to drink without fear or favour, not worry about right and wrong, leave critical judgement on hold, and enjoy  wine in its 

most naked form.  

 

 



 

 - 4 - 


INDEX

 

 

FRANCE 

 

SOUTH-WEST FRANCE 



 

 

Gascony & The Landes 

Plaimont Co-op 

 

 

 

 

15 

Château d’Aydie 

 

 

 

 

16 

Domaine de Ménard 

 

 

 

16 

Château Darroze, Armagnac   

 

 

17 

Domaine d’Aurensan, Armagnac 

 

 

19 

Château de Léberon, Armagnac  

 

 

19 

 

Bergerac & The Dordogne Valley 



Domaine de l’Ancienne Cure, Monbazillac* 

 

20 

Château Tirecul-la-Graviere, Monbazillac 

 

20 

Château Tour des Gendres, Bergerac*/(!) 

 

21 

 

Wines of the Middle Garonne 



Domaine de Laulan, Côtes de Duras 

 

 

24 

Domaine Elian da Ros, Marmandais*/ ! 

 

24 

Domaine du Pech, Buzet**/ !  

 

 

25 

 

Gaillac & The Tarn 



Château Clément-Termes 

 

 

 

26 

Cave de Labastide de Lévis   

 

 

26 

Domaine d’Escausses 

 

 

 

27 

Domaines Bernard & Myriam Plageoles*/ ! 

 

28 

Maison Laurent Cazottes, Distillerie Artisanale*/** 

29 

 

Marcillac & Aveyron 



Domaine du Cros, Marcillac   

 

 

30 

Le Vieux Porche, Marcillac   

 

 

30 

Domaine Nicolas Carmarans*/! 

 

 

33 

 

Cahors & The Lot 



Château du Cèdre*  

 

 

 

35 

Château Paillas 

 

 

 

 

36 

Clos Saint-Jean*   

 

 

 

36 

Clos de Gamot 

 

 

 

 

36 

 

Fronton & Villaudric 



Château Le Roc 

 

 

 

 

37 

Château Plaisance* 

 

 

 

38 

 

Madiran & Pacherenc 



Domaines Alain Brumont  

 

 

 

39 

Domaine Berthoumieu 

 

 

 

40 

 

Wines of the Pyrenees 



Clos Lapeyre, Jurançon*/(!)   

 

 

41 

Cave de Saint Etienne de Baïgorry, Irouléguy 

 

43 

Domaine Arretxea, Irouléguy**/ ! 

 

 

43 

 

LANGUEDOC-ROUSSILLON 

 

Vin de Pays 

Les Clairières, Pays d’Oc 

 

 

 

48 

Bergerie de Bastide, Pays d’Oc 

 

 

48 

Villa Saint-Jean, Pays d’Oc   

 

 

48 

Nordoc & La Boussole, Pays d’Oc 

 

 

49 

Granges des Rocs, Coteaux du Languedoc 

 

49 

Mas Montel, Pays du Gard   

 

 

50 

Domaine de Moulines, Pays de l’Hérault 

 

50 

 

 



 

 

 

LANGUEDOC-ROUSSILLON cont… 

 

Terroir d’Aniane 



Mas de Daumas Gassac, Pays de l’Hérault* 

 

52-3 

 

Languedoc-Roussillon AOCS 



Toques et Clochers, Les Caves du Sieur d’Arques, Limoux 

54 

Domaine Les Hautes Terres, Limoux – NEW !/* 

 

54 

Domaine de Roudène, Fitou 

 

 

 

55 

Château Ollieux-Romanis, Corbières* 

 

 

56 

Clos de l’Azerolle, Minervois   

 

 

57 

Domaine Pierre Cros, Minervois 

 

 

57 

Domaine Jean-Baptiste Sénat, Minervois*/ ! 

 

58 

Clos du Gravillas, St Jean de Minervois*   

 

59 

Domaine Thierry Navarre, Saint-Chinian*/ ! 

 

60 

Domaine du Metéore, Faugères  

 

 

61 

Clos Fantine, Faugères**/ ! 

 

 

 

61 

Domaine Didier Barral, Faugères**/ ! 

 

 

62 

Château de la Mirande, Picpoul de Pinet   

 

63 

Mas Foulaquier, Pic Saint Loup**/ ! 

 

 

64 

Domaine d’Aupilhac, Montpeyroux*/ ! 

 

 

66 

Domaine Le Roc des Anges, Côtes du Roussillon*/** 

67 

Domaine des Foulards Rouge, Côtes du Roussillon*/ ! 

68 

Domaine Yoyo, Côtes du Roussillon*/ !    

 

69 

Domaine de Majas, Côtes du Roussillon*   

 

69 

Domaine Matassa, Côtes du Roussillon**/ ! 

 

70 

Les Clos de Paulilles, Collioure & Banyuls** 

 

71 

Château de Jau, Rivesaltes 

 

 

 

71 

Domaine Bruno Duchene, Collioure & Banyuls*/ !   

71 

Domaine Les Terres des Fagayra, Maury* 

 

72 

Mas Amiel, Maury*   

 

 

 

73 

 

RHONE 



Domaine Stéphane Othéguy, Côte-Rôtie*/ ! 

 

76 

Domaine du Monteillet, Saint-Joseph 

 

 

76 

Domaine Romaneaux-Destezet, Saint-Joseph*/ ! 

 

77 

Domaine Albert Belle, Crozes-Hermitage   

 

77 

Dard et Ribo, Crozes-Hermitage*/ ! 

 

 

78 

Domaine Franck Balthazar, Cornas*/ ! 

 

 

78 

Domaine des Miquettes, Saint-Joseph*/ !   

 

79 

Domaine de la Grande Colline, Saint-Peray*/ ! 

 

79 

Les Champs Libres, Ardèche*/ !  

 

 

80 

Les Vignerons d’Estézargues, Gard */ !   

 

80 

Château Saint-Cyrgues, Costières de Nîmes* 

 

80 

Château Mourgues du Grès, Costières de Nîmes*   

81 

Domaine Gramenon, Côtes-du-Rhône**/ ! 

 

82 

Domaine de Chapoton, Côtes-du-Rhône   

 

83 

Domaine La Ferme Saint-Martin, Beaumes-de-Venise*/ ! 

83 

Domaine Didier Charavin, Rasteau 

 

 

83 

Domaine La Garrigue, Vacqueyras 

 

 

83 

Domaine de la Charité* 

 

 

 

84 

Domaine Montirius, Vacqueyras** 

 

 

84 

Domaine Les Maou, Ventoux*/ ! 

 

 

84 

Château Valcombe, Ventoux* -   

 

 

85 

Clos du Joncuas, Gigondas* 

 

 

 

86 

Domaine Mestre, Châteauneuf-du-Pape   

 

86 

Clos Saint-Michel, Châteauneuf-du-Pape   

 

86 

Domaine La Barroche, Châteauneuf-du-Pape 

 

87 

Domaine des Vigneaux, Coteaux de l’Ardèche** 

 

87 

Mas de Libian, Ardèche**/ ! 

 

 

 

88 

Le Vendanger Masqué, de Moor, Ardèche*/ ! 

 

88 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 - 5 - 


 

 

PROVENCE 



Thomas & Cécile Carteron, Côtes de Provence    

89 

Château d’Ollières, Coteaux Varois 

 

 

89 

Domaines Les Terres Promises, Coteaux Varois*/ ! 

89 

Château Hermitage Saint-Martin, Côtes de Provence* 

90 

Domaine Hauvette, Les Baux de Provence**/ ! 

 

91 

Château de Pibarnon, Bandol* 

 

 

91 

Domaine La Suffrène, Bandol  

 

 

92 

Domaine de la Tour du Bon, Bandol*   

 

93 

 



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   87


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling