Domaine le roc des anges, roussillon


Download 6.21 Mb.

bet14/87
Sana21.11.2017
Hajmi6.21 Mb.
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   87

MINERVOIS

 

Continued… 



 

 

 



Fashion is a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months.  

 

-



 

Oscar Wilde 



 

 

 



 

DOMAINE JEAN-BAPTISTE SENAT, Minervois – Organic 

Jean-Baptiste and Charlotte Sénat have been working this fifteen-hectare domaine in the heart of Minervois since 1996. They 

are located in Trausse Minervois in the foothills of the Montagne Noir. The soils here are limestone-clay and their mainly 

south-facing vineyards are set in the heart of the garrigue. 

 

They are certified organic and carry out all work by hand. Vinification takes place with minimal intervention in a mixture of 

large and small casks (stored underground): natural yeasts, no fining, no filtration and only a tiny bit of sulphur are the 

recipe for living and drinkable wines. Everything is done by gravity to avoid pumping. La Nine has a cuvaison of 16 days with 

pigeage and spends ten months in cuve and barrels before being bottled (by gravity) without filtration. 

 

 

The exact composition of the blends changes from year to year but La Nine generally features a mixture of around 50% 

Carignan (100 plus year old vines), 20% Grenache (including 60 year old + gnarled gobelet vines), 10% Syrah, 10% 

Mourvèdre and 10% Cinsault (40 year old vines), a delicious wine with notes of spice over black fruits. Lovely equilibrium, 

elegant tannins and mellow mouthfeel. 

 

Mais Ou Est Donc Ornicar is a blend of the energetic 50 year old Grenache (70%) 30 year old Syrah (20%) and 40 year old 

Cinsault (10%) vinified in whole bunches. Cuvaison last twelve days and then the wine goes into used barriques. A more 

powerful effort reminiscent of macerated fruits and dark spices and one that requires a haunch of meat or several. This wine 

spends six months in barrique. 

 

Mais Ou Est Donc Ornicar is a mnemonic phrase containing the French conjunctions (mais, ou, et, donc, or, ni, car). 

 

On many of their wines you can taste a familiar quality: blueberries, blackberries, grilled mushrooms, earth and always the 

garrigue aromas of wild thyme.  

 

“The terroir of Minervois is visually and functionally hardscrabble, and that probably doesn’t help in the elevation of spirits. 

Staring at a field of rocks from which gnarled vines struggle to emerge and plump up a few angry grapes isn’t like gazing over 

the verdant plains and hillsides of certain other regions, nor are many vines neatly trained into efficiently-pickable rows. One 

can see the work that will be necessary, and the heartbreak that sprouts from the earth, and the indifference that droops from 

the leaves, in every beaten-down vine. And yet the region is absolutely carpeted with vineyards. That’s a lot of despair to 

crush, press, and ferment. But it’s a way of life, and that’s not easily abandoned.” (Thor Iverson) 

 

2015 


MINERVOIS ROUGE “LA NINE” 

 



2015 

MINERVOIS ROUGE “MAIS OU EST DONC ORNICAR” 

 

2016  



MINERVOIS ROUGE « ARBALETE & COQUELICQUOTS » 

 



 

 

 



 

 - 59 - 


ST JEAN DE MINERVOIS

 

Continued… 



 

 

CLOS DU GRAVILLAS, NICOLE AND JOHN BOJANOWSKI, St Jean de Minervois – Organic 



From the cradle to the Gravillas... 

The key to Gravillas is the fantastic terroir in Saint-Jean de Minervois and every year that passes one sees a sympathetic 

progression in the winemaking. One of the essential elements of terroir is soil, and Nicole and John Bojanowski specifically 

wanted “blinding white rock like that found at Aupilhac and Vosne- Romanée.” (Two places where Nicole worked 

previously).  

The couple finally settled on the cute hamlet St. Jean de Minervois (population 44 and rising - or falling, as the case may be), 

in an area renowned for its delicious, grapey fortified Muscats. Gravillas means “gravel” in the local patois, and the white 

limestone gravel plateau that the Clos du Gravillas is located on has been used to grow grapes for hundreds if not thousands 

of years. The micro-climate assists the process of making great wines. Situated about 300 metres above sea level on slopes 

beneath the Montagne Noire the vineyards catch the cool evening breezes, allowing the grapes to retain more of their acidity. 

The high summer temperatures of this region during the day add the necessary alcohol to balance the acidity, creating the 

structural depth and maximum grape ripeness required to make excellent wine. 

  

Nicole and John started in 1996 by planting Syrah, Cabernet and Mourvèdre, but in 1999, the same year that they started 

making wine, when they discovered 2.5 ha (a little over 6 acres) of Carignan planted between 1911 and 1970 and a small 

parcel of old Grenache Gris vines. These were to form the basis of Lo Vielh and L’Inattendu respectively. Since then they have 

acquired a veritable mixed portfolio of grapes, so to speak, no fewer than thirteen, so we’re looking forward to the 

Languedoc’s premium Chateaneuf-style field blend.  

Comprising old-vine Grenache Gris and some Grenache Blanc (and perhaps some other varieties that have snuck in under my 

radar) and aptly named L’Inattendu, or the “Unexpected,” this dry white AOC Minervois has been called “a sort of rosé 

manqué” in that the vinification is similar to that of a rosé, but the result is a white wine. After a light pressing, the grape 

must is chilled and allowed to settle naturally. From there the juice goes into Allier oak barrels, where it stays for 12 months 

resting on the fine lees. Dry and rich, with a good balance of green apple and mineral flavours, and an elegant mouth feel, 

L’Inattendu is perfect for accompanying a fish dish or even a strong cheese (Comte is suggested). Early vintages revealed 

oxidation and distinct old woody quality that either charmed or puzzled, but now the wine unites richness with incisiveness. 

There is lovely custard apple fruit allied to dried apricot, vanilla, garrigue notes of herbs and all sorts of ginger and white 

pepper on the finish. The warmth of the alcohol does not detract but rounds the mouth; it is a textural wine with the 

reverberating minerality of terroir from those hot stones.  

 

Sous Les Cailloux des Grillons, a wine that proves that it can be definitely cricket and crickety-boo (and refers to the 

ubiquitous crickets/grillons that lurk under the gravels and the night sky), is a delicious, savoury dark-and-red-fruit-filled 

blend of Syrah, Carignan, Cabernet Sauvignon, Mourvèdre, Counoise, Grenache Noir and Terret Gris. This wine always puts 

a smile on my face and is friendly as a welcome from Nicole and John in the beautiful hamlet of St-Jean de Minervois. Can be 

drunk by the glassful with a plate of charcuterie. Rendez-Vous du Soleil was originally created to be a Carignan in a different 

style to Lo Vielh (qv) but has metamorphosed over the years into a Syrah, Cabernet and Carignan blend aged in barrel. The 

nose is pure cassis with the element of menthol and eucalyptus, the palate has notes of bitter fruits and pepper. This wine is 

perfect with lamb tagine or a roast vegetable couscous or stuffed peppers. Lo Vielh, aka the old one, comes from a couple of 

hectares of Carignan; the oldest vines should be receiving a telegram from the Queen next year. Aged in 400 litre Allier oak 

barrels, the wine combines power and purity, the fruit is dark and velvety and is truly delicious. Virtually no sulphur is used 

(the fermentation lasts around six months) and the wine seems to have soaked up a huge amount of minerals. The fruit is 

blueberry-ripe with liquorice swirls and hint of tobacco. There are also discernible meaty undertones. What wouldn’t you eat 

with this? A steak cooked in the embers of a fire in a Languedocian restaurant, a shoulder of pork slow roasted in the oven, or 

breast of duck with griottine cherries – the choice is endless. 

Muscat is what Saint-Jean de Minervois is renowned for. Douce Providence is as delightful as its name suggests being floral 

and fruity with whiffs of orange flower and honeysuckle combining with flavours of sweet pink grapefruit and mandarine. The 

finish has such a refreshing tang that you should drink à la mode as an aperitif, but it would take equally kindly to 

strawberries and fruit pastries. 

John is a Carignan evangelist and Clos du Gravillas are at the forefront of www.carigans.com a web-site devoted to reviving 

the reputation of this grape variety. If you’re jaded by the Merlot world (and we are, we are) and looking for a “vin d’ici” 

then Carignan is your man. We’ve chugged it in Chile, argle-gargled it in Argentina, sipped it in Spain and lapped it in the 

Languedoc-Roussillon, and we can say that the wines from these gnarled vines, in whatever country, deliver great terroir 

flavour and usually at fantastic value. 

  

 



2016 

EMMENEZ-MOI AU BOUT DE TERRET 

 

2015 



MINERVOIS BLANC “L’INATTENDU” 

 



2016 

“SOUS LES CAILLOUX DES GRILLONS” 

 

2015 



“RENDEZ VOUS SUR LA LUNE” 

 



2015 

“LO VIELH” 

 

2015 



MUSCAT DE SAINT JEAN DE MINERVOIS “DOUCE PROVIDENCE” – 50cl 

Sw 


 

 

 

 

 - 60 - 


SAINT-CHINIAN 

 

I know your lady does not love her husband. / I am sure of that, and at her late being here / She gave strange oeillades and most speaking 

looks / To noble Edmond.  

  



-

 

King Lear IV.iv 

 

 

DOMAINE THIERRY NAVARRE, Saint-Chinian – Biodynamic 

Thierry Navarre has a dozen hectares of vines planted on dark brown schist terraces around Roquebrun. The achingly 

beautiful countryside is an amphitheatre of small mountains clad in a sea of green, a forest of small trees and bushes and 

the familiar clumps of fragrant rosemary and thyme which captures the scented spirit of the high Languedoc. The culture 

in the vines revolves around the respect for the soil, the cycles, the seasons. No chemical products are used, simply 

composting, natural preparation, plant infusions and working the soil. The harvest is manual and carried out by a small 

team. The grape varieties are typical of Saint-Chinian, namely Grenache Noir, Carignan, Cinsault and Syrah with some 

other varieties thrown in such as Terret, Oeillades, Muscat, Clairette and Grenache Gris. Thierry also cultivates one of 

the truly forgotten ancient varieties of the Languedoc called Ribeyrenc (which I would love to try – calling Les Caves 

buyers of all things rare and wonderful). As Thierry would say each wine and each year is a lesson in humility. He speaks 

of pleasure and emotion of trying a bottle of wine after a period of time and tasting the sense of place. 

 

Any wine that barely judders the alcoholic richter scale sets my heart all of a flutter. An organic wine from an impossibly 

beautiful estate Languedoc from a grape variety that I have only just heard of and clocking in at 11.5% would have to be the 

rankest pair of pantaloons to garner my disapproval. As I surmised the Oeillades is the gnat’s spats. The Oeillades, however, 

is not to tarry over, but to surrender to its simple charms. Another traditional variety of the Languedoc it is a close cousin of 

the Cinsault grape. This is a vrai wine of the country, limber, fresh, all in the fruit, all in the glancing moment, naturally 

vibrant. 

 

La Laouzil (named after Les Laouzes, the local name for the schist/slate soils) is more structured animal although still 

very friendly and wags a value-alert tail. A tripartite blend of very old Carignan vines with Grenache and Syrah on 

the brown shales, destemmed it is fermented in cement before ageing in a 8,000-litre wooden foudre for twelve 

months. This St Chi displays red fruits, liquorice tones and plenty of herbs and spice, yet is unforced, supple and fresh. 

The wine sings lustily of hot fractured terroir- in each glass a geology of wild flavours. 

  

 

2015 


TERRET (GRIS) 

 



2016 

VIN D’OEILLADES 

 

2015 



RIBEYRENC  

 



2015 

SAINT-CHINIAN “LA LAOUZIL” 

 

 



 

 

 



SLOW FOOD FRANCE – Terroir and Environment 

Without wishing to delve too deeply into current breast-beating debates about appellation controllée it is worth looking at the manifesto of 

a group of French growers who are questioning the concepts and practices of the AOC and wish to contribute to a debate inaugurated by a 

steering committee set up by the French government a few years ago. Part of a proposed “new dynamic of French wine for 2010” was “to 



become leader in practices that are respectful of the environment”.  

 

The growers have a specific agenda beyond the vague accord of “respect”. The primary tenet is that each wine shall be the full expression 



of its terroir; that each wine “be good, healthy, great and structured when the conditions permit this… above all, that these wines give 

people a desire to drink them, wines simply and solely made from the grapes of our (sic) vineyards, wines which have the peculiar 

characteristics of our grape varieties, of our particular terroirs, of our special characters… our common will is to work our soil while 

respecting nature, as craftsmen seeking harmony between nature and man…” 

 

The expression “labouring the soil” recurs in the manifesto. Everyone has their different approaches and their own history as a 



winemaker, but all are linked by certain aims. Although the practices in the vines and the cellars could never be codified in a strict charter, 

there is a rational attempt to tie together essential common practice. The priorities are: the life of the soil; a search for terroir; selection 

massale; the attachment to historic grape varieties and the refusal of the increasing trend to plant standard varieties; the use of organic 

treatments; the search for good vine health through natural balance; the refusal of GMOs; the prudent use of chemical plant treatments; 

the search for full maturity; manual harvests; the respect for the variability of vintages; the refusal to chaptalize systematically; natural 

fermentations; a sparing or zero use of SO2; minimum or no filtration; the refusal of standard definition of taste of wines by certain 

enological or market trends; the possibility of experimenting and questioning different aspects of work; respect of history, of roots… 

 

Most of the growers in this list make wines in a specific context of geography, geology, climate, history and cultural specificity that 



leaves open the possibility for maximum expression of personality and individuality. Tasting, analytical and organoleptic examination, 

consumer acceptance panels, however, can stifle creativity and become a “guillotine to submit nature and the winemaker’s personality to 

a rule”. Instead of becoming an instrument for standardization, tastings must become an instrument to check the respect of diversity. This 

requires a massive philosophical shift on behalf of those arbiters of appellation controllée, as well as tasters, journalists and the public 

itself. By understanding and promoting typicity and by espousing natural or organic practices in the vineyard, the Slow Food growers are 

creating a sensible foundation for a renewed appellation controllée system, one that rewards richness of diversity and complexity.



 

 

 

 - 61 - 


FAUGERES 

 

Faugères is similar to other Languedoc appellations in many respects, but feels different in others. Firstly, the soil is almost entirely 



schist, hard and brittle, which flakes like pastry. The advantage for the wine grower is that it forces the vine-roots deep into the ground to 

search for moisture. The schist also retains and reflects back the heat of the sun. Secondly, Faugères has virtually no connection with the 

Church and, since the abbeys were the original location of the vineyards, it is a region without a long viticultural history. In fact, Faugères 

was originally known for Fines de Faugères, a marc distilled from cheap white grape varieties such as Terret and Carignan Blanc. 

Finally, Faugères has decided to become involved in environmental issues within its appellation. An ambitious charter has been drawn up 

under the slogan “Careful cultivation protects the environment”; those winemakers who sign the charter will qualify for a seal of 

approval. 

 

Soil Improvement and Use of Fertilisers: The winemaker agrees to improve his soil taking care to use possible natural products or those 

with slow degradability and weak solubility, so as to avoid polluting streams and underground water sources. He agrees also to carry out 

or to have carried out soil analyses in order to ensure that the fertility of the soil is maximized.  

 

Weedkilling – working the soil: The winemaker agrees to gradually stop the use of residuary weed-killers. The practice of natural, 

controlled grassing and the working of the soil between the rows of vines are encouraged. 

 

Phytosanitary Protection: The grower agrees to put into practice those viticultural methods which aim to decrease phytosanitary risks, 

such as moderate nitrate fertilisation, correction of soil deficiencies, aeration of the vine-trunks, pruning in accordance with the local 

rules. He also agrees to respect the treatment advice published by the Appellation offices, using those products least harmful to the 

environment. In certain instances of risk, or in circumstances beyond the individual’s control, he may on his own initiative proceed to 

such treatments which he judges indispensable. Whatever the circumstances, the winemaker agrees to abandon the principle and use of 

systematic chemical disease prevention.

 

 

 



 

DOMAINE DU METEORE, GENEVIEVE LIBES-COSTE, Faugères  

The vineyards of Faugères are planted on steep-sloped schist outcrops of the Cévennes. This particular estate owes its name 

to a 10,000-year-old meteor, which can be seen at the base of the crater. The Léonides, described by Paul Strang as “one of 

the bargains of the appellation”, is made from roughly equal quantities of Syrah, Mourvèdre, Carignan and Grenache. The 

wine itself is a traditional meaty Faugères with its gorgeous deep colour, heady aromas of flowering shrub, bay, balsam and 

serious quantities of dark smoked fruits on the palate. 

 

2014 


FAUGERES “LES LEONIDES” 

 



 

 

 



CLOS FANTINE, FAMILLE ANDRIEU, Faugères – Biodynamic 

 

Bargain bloodhounds lift up thy snouts and truffle this terroir. 

 

The estate is in the commune of Cabrerolles in Faugères. Two sisters and one brother run this vineyard, following the 

death of their parents. Whilst not holding a certificate for either organic or biodynamic farming, the vineyard is run with 

the utmost respect for nature. As Corinne Andrieu states: “We have always worked to respect what nature has to offer… 

Our pleasure is to listen to nature, to watch nature, and to allow her to have the energy and strength to express herself. 

For this reason their vines “grow like any other local plant, in a state that verges on the wild.”  

 

The red is 40% Mourvèdre with approximately 25% Carignan, 10% Syrah, and 25% Grenache. The Carignan is from 50-

80 years old, whilst the Mourvèdre and Syrah are from 30-year-old vines. Terroir is crumbly schist, harvests are manual. 

Fermentation (with wild yeasts) and maceration last for thirty days with no temperature control and take place in cement. 

There is no oak, no filtration, no fining and no sulphur.  

 

Drinking this Faugères will make you feel close, or even closer, to nature. This is a crawl on the wild side; the fruit is 

meaty with game-and-gravy flavours and lots of garrigue notes of bay and roasted thyme and there is pronounced bonfire 

smokiness on the finish. 

 

The Valcabrières is another Terret Gris from 80-year-old gobelet vines. In Occitan it means “the mountain of the goat”, 

which explains the striking image used for the label of a goat being milked of its wine into a wine glass. Unfiltered, unfined 

and unsulphured, ambient long temp wild yeast ferments, a wonderful burnished white wine with aromas of wild fennel and 

ripe citrus which also fill out a palate underscored by a certain mineral saltiness. This wine whilst enchanting those who 

speak in russet yeas and honest kersey noes, would probably be damned by the zoilist tendency - aka the crustifarians.

  


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   87


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling