Domaine le roc des anges, roussillon


Download 6.21 Mb.

bet81/87
Sana21.11.2017
Hajmi6.21 Mb.
1   ...   77   78   79   80   81   82   83   84   ...   87

OVUM WINES, JOHN HOUSE & KSENIJA KOSTIC, Newburg  

John House and Ksenija Kostic both have day jobs so they're able to take risks with Ovum. For example, they focus solely on 

whites rather than more lucrative reds. "They are unveiled, so raw," explains House. "You can't hide anything. I think whites 

are a better conduit for terroir (the expression of a vineyard site) than red wines." 

Where a larger winery might ferment whites quickly in large, temperature-controlled steel tanks for a consistency of style 

from year to year, the goal at Ovum is to reflect the vintage, no matter what it brings. So the techniques are old-school: House 

and Kostic allow fermentation to happen spontaneously and linger for months, in neutral (old) oak barrels. The resulting 

wines are richly textured and deeply layered. 

 

The name "Ovum" is a reference to the perfect natural shape of the egg, and the life cycle a wine takes, from grape to bottle. 

And, yes, for all you wine geeks out there, these guys do have one of those au courant egg-shaped concrete fermenters. "There 

is a special convection that occurs in the concrete egg during fermentation that constantly stirs the lees," House explains. 

"The natural energy and heat generated by the yeasts make the sediment move in a circular fashion, making, in my 

experience, wines on the most mineral end of the spectrum." 

  

House and Kostic have made it their mission to find the state's best old plantings of overlooked varieties like Muscat and 

Gewurztraminer. Their explorations have led them to highlight different vineyards, often in unexpected regions, with each 

vintage. "There are parts of southern Oregon we find very compelling," says House. "I just got an e-mail from someone who 

has plantings of Riesling, farmed organically in the Umpqua Valley since 1979. Where has this fruit been going until now? It 

has been blended." 

 

 

2016 



BIG SALT ~ Riesling, Gewurztraminer, Muscat 

 



2015 

GEWURZTRAMINER LOVE ME OR LEAVE ME 

 

2015 



RIESLING OFF THE GRID 

 



2015 

RIESLING WHALE MEMORISTA 

 

 



 

 

STATERA CELLARS, LUKE MATTHEWS & MEREDITH BELL, Carlton - Organic 

Luke Matthews and Meredith Bell are the co-vignerons at Statera Cellars (Statera means balance) 

Meredith has made wine at the legendary Bass Phillip in Australia and also worked in Burgundy at Domaine de la Pousse 

d’Or. Their project (funded by Kickstarter) was to make authentic terroir-driven Chardonnay in the Willamette Valley. 

The winery itself is in Carlton, but the three vineyards are on different terroirs in the Willamette Valley. Meredith and Luke 

only work with organically farmed fruit and have selected three single vineyards in Willamette. Each of the wines is a entirely 

different expression of Charonnay – yet the winemaking is the same in each cse. 

The Johan Vineyard Chardonnay is from a Demeter certified vineyard - the whole farm is a living organism. 

This, one of the coldest sites in the Willamette benefitting from the cooling winds of the Van Duzer corridor, produces wines 

with extraordinary acid and freshness.  

The winemaking is sympathetic to the origins of the wine. The Chardonnays are always fermented with indigenous yeasts in 

used barrels with just a little stirring at the beginning before letting the ferment go. No sulphur is added nor adjustments 

during ferment. No filtration or fining and only a small amount of SO2 at bottling. 

 

Note: I was not looking for an Oregon Chardonnay but was intrigued that a winery should only make Chardonnay. I tried the 

other two cuvees which were very good, but this blew me away with its sheer verve and minerality. It reminded me a 1er cru 

Chablis and then some. The quality of the farming allied to low-intervention winemaking brings out the full potential of the 

grapes. 

 

2014 


“JOHAN VINEYARD” CHARDONNAY 

 



 

 

 

 - 371 - 

 

 

VERMONT 



 

LA GARAGISTA, DEIRDRE HEEKIN & CALEB BARBER, BARNARD, Vermont - Biodynamic  

La Garagista Farm + Winery began in 2010. Deirdre and Caleb farm three parcels of co-planted, alpine varietals that are 

horticultural crosses of vinifera and native riparia and labrusca vines. The family trees of these varietals are quite baroque 

and uniquely American. They practice biodynamic and also pull from organic and permacullture concepts. Firstly, in the 

home farm and vineyard in the Chateauguay, a protected forest in Barnard, Vermont (1600 feet) where they also grow 

vegetables and fruit and raise some livestock for their restaurant Osteria Pane e Salute. The farm is a polyculture project with 

vegetables, orchards, flower gardens, vines, and chickens all interplanted. The chickens are particularly interplanted They 

also raise pigs on farm, utilizing them to naturally till new ground and to be the source of their farm-cured charcuterie. In the 

vineyard, they co-plant vegetables between the vines focusing on root vegetables, escaroles and chicories, and flowers, all 

things that aid the soils in this parcel. The two other parcels are in the Champlain Valley (184/194 feet) and are close to Lake 

Champlain. No-till and natural field cover crops are part of the farming at these two vineyards, encouraging the flora and 

fauna particular to each microclimate.  

 

The name Grace & Favour is inspired by Hampton Court. La Crescent is descendent from Muscat d’Ambourg, also known as 

Black Hambourg. The Great Vine at Hampton Court is Black Hambourg. Caleb and I made a pilgrimage to pay our respects 

to the Vine and while there read some of the history of Hampton Court. After Richelieu took over the palace from Henry the 

8

th

, the apartments in the palace were given to ladies in waiting and chevaliers in “grace and favour”. We thought this was a 

perfect nod to La Crescent’s parentage”. Currently, this wine is only available in the London market. 

 

Vimu Jancu and Harlots and Ruffians each have their stories. The former is homage to Salvo Foti’s Vinu Jancu in Sicily. Vinu 

Jancu means white wine in Sicilian dialect, but also an old~style white wine that was always fermented on skins



The Vinu Jancu vineyard is right on Lake Champlain with only a tree-lined hedgerow between vineyards and water, an 



intimate vineyard with essentially a natural clos. This vineyard works in a way, defying probability, one that allows Deirdre 

and Caleb to keep it fairly wild. Three primary flora grow up into the canopy of the vines: purple aster, daisy fleabane, and 

wild mint. It is composted naturally with coyote and deer scat which roam through the vineyard in the winter months. This 

wine has five weeks on skins in the glass demi-johns. 

 

Harlots is 50% La Crescent (descendent from Muscat d’Ambourg) + 50 % Frontenac Gris (descendent from Aramon and 

Muscat d’Alexandria) from the Vergennes vineyard in Champlain, a broad open field five miles from the lake. The grapes are 

harvested by hand, destemmed into open fibreglass vats, then five weeks on skins before press. Indigenous yeasts, ambient 

ferment, malo for the La Crescent before bottling with a minmum amount of added sulphur. “An Orange Omelet for Harlots 

and Ruffians is a medieval Italian dish that we make at our restaurant, the orange ingredient used believed to inspire the 

debauched to purity. The citrus and creamy notes are reminiscent of this dish for us”. (writes Deirdre)  

 

Damejeanne

 is 90% Marquette (descendent from Pinot Noir), 10% La Crescent (descendent from Muscat d’Ambourg) from 

the same vineyard as the Harlots. Yields are a mere 8.5hl/ha. The wine takes its name from the glass demi-johns in which it is 

fermented and aged.  

 

Loups-Garoux speaks of the woodland and is mercurial in nature. Deirdre and Caleb use typical biodynamic preps of horn 

manure, silica, horsetail, stinging nettle, kaolin clay, and small amounts of minerals copper and sulphur due to intense 

humidity and also experiment with plant medicines provided by the vineyard floor when needed. Loups is 100% Frontenac 

Noir destemmed into small open fibreglass vats for wild ferment and then into 59 gallon seven year old Burgundian casks for 

ageing. No sulphur is used in the making of this wine.

 

 

This wine is made essentially like a ripasso on the vine. Because of its naturally high acidity, they wait until about half of 

each bunch is raisined then pick the whole bunches, seeking the tension between the raisined fruit and the fresh. 

This Valpol-style approach yields aromas of blood sausage, bruised sour black plums and notes of bitter chocolate and 

roasted herbs. This would be great with venison or meat cooked with wild berry fruit

.

 



 

The wines are stunning – the whites (which are amber-hued) wildly floral with flavours of orange marmalade, cloves, wild 

mint and strawberry leaf. They are nourishing. La Crescent expresses the different terroirs of the vineyards in the most 

eloquent way imaginable. The reds are very different. All share this Alpine meadow character; Deirdre has captured 

something unique here.

 

 

 



2015/16 

GRACE AND FAVOUR PET NAT 

Sp/W 

 

2015 



SI CONFONDE WHITE 

Sp/W 


 

2015 


HARLOTS AND RUFFIANS WHITE 

 



2015 

LOUPS D’OR 

 

2015 



VINU JANCU WHITE 

 



2014 

LOUPS-GAROUX RED 

 

 



 

 - 372 - 



SOUTH AFRICA

 

The widest land Doom takes to part us, leaves thy hand in mine With pulses that beat double. What I do and what I dream 

include thee, as the wine Must taste of its own grapes. Elizabeth Barrett Browning – Sonnets 

 

Several years ago I wrote: “If you had to hold up a country 



as an example of how not to do it, vis-à-vis wine, then South 

Africa would be in pole position.” Most of the reasons were 

historical. During the eighties, before apartheid came to an 

end, other countries were able to invest heavily in vines and 

technology,  whilst  South  African  growers  were  left  out  of 

the  loop.  Secondly,  the  co-operative  system  which  for  so 

long  determined  prices  and  production,  although  it 

established  security  for  the  industry,  neither  promoted 

quality nor encouraged innovation. There had to be a major 

undertaking  to  abandon  the  age-old  habit  of  growing  as 

many  vines  as  possible  on  the  same  estate  on  easy-to-

cultivate land. Sensible measures, such as planting higher up 

on  hillsides  in  search  of  cooler  climates,  are  only  a 

comparatively recent phenomenon. Having said all that there 

are  encouraging  signs:  the  Coastal  Region  has  an  ideal 

climate  to  produce  quality  grapes  and  there  are  some 

fascinating examples of Pinotage. And the IPW (Integrated 

Production of Wine) system officially launched in 1998 has 

set  benchmarks  for  quality  that  are  beginning  to  bite.  My 

sneaky feeling is that more growers should experiment with 

Rhône and Italian grape varieties rather than adding to the 

world’s brimming reservoirs of Chardonnay and Cabernet. 

 

And so to the present day. That chomping noise you hear is 



me  eating  my  air-dried  words  liberally  barbecued  with 

humble  grape  pie.  Within  the  past  couple  of  years  strong 

identification of terroir allied to a sensitive organic approach 

to  winemaking  has  driven  quality  of  South  African  wines 

remorselessly  forward.  I’ve  tasted  great  Cabernet,  Merlot 

(and  blends  thereof),  Shiraz  is  improving  and  Grenache, 

especially  where  there  are  old  vines,  is  a  star.  Synergistic 

(yes, it’s the revival of that buzzword) blends are in fashion, 

oak is being used to highlight rather than obliterate the fruit, 

the approach to winemaking is certainly more considered at 

every stage of the process. 

 

The  (Fun)  Winery  team  encompasses  everything 



characteristic about the ‘New South Africa’. A diverse 

cultural  and  racial  mosaic,  combining  indigenous 

South Africans with Northern Hemisphere adoptees - 

a blending of ideas, of values and of purpose, creating 

a  natural  dynamic  for  innovation  and  success.  The 

Winery's  distinctive  range  reflects  entirely  separate 

styles.  Each  range  has  its  own  raison  d'etre, 

independent  of  the  others,  though  complementary  to 

the bigger picture. The wines have a pleasing restraint 

from the Burgundian Radford Dale Chardonnay to the 

very  mineral  wines  from  Black  Rock  and  Vinum. 

Working organically across all their ranges, with very 

low  yields  in  the  vineyard,  making  wines  with  less 

extraction  and  oak  flavouring  The  Winery  has 

embraced change with relish. 

 

The  Winery  is  definitely  a  winery  to  watch,  so  to 



speak.  This  year  they  have  been  recognised  by  the 

respected John Platter which garnishes virtually all the 

offerings with plentiful stars – and quite right. 

 

If  The Winery covers  many bases extremely capably 



then Niels Verburg’s Luddite is a one off speciality. 

This  is  a  knock-your-socks-off-and-marinate-your-

toes-in-it-Shiraz, a wine so generous you’ll be smiling 

for  days.  This  year  we  have  brought  on  board  even 

more wines from. Craig Hawkins in the Swartland. He 

is pushing the natural boundaries, making natural (& 

skin contact!) Chenin with fantastic energy. And now 

Intellego. 

 

With  the  rise  of  the  Australian  and  New  Zealand 



dollar,  South  Africa  is  where  the  “bang-for-spring-

buck” is. Now all they have to do is to learn how to 

play rugby again. 

 

 



LUDDITE, NIELS & PENNY VERBURG, Bot River 

Niels Verburg founded Luddite wines in 1999 with the express intention of making world-class Shiraz. He has recently 

purchased a 10-hectare hillside vineyard in cool Walker Bay and we await the fruits of these grapes with keen interest. This 

entirely creditable effort is made from bought in grapes from unirrigated vineyards in the warmish regions of Malmesbury 

and Bottelary.

 

Grapes are crushed and destalked the next day into open cement fermentation tanks. Once fermented dry, the 



wine was pressed with the horizontal basket press into tank where it underwent malolactic fermentation. Barrels were 30 per 

cent new, 50 per cent second fill and 20 per cent fourth fill. 75 per cent French Allier and 25 per cent American barrels were 

used. Total of 12 months in barrel. Wine was racked and given a light filtration before bottling. The Luddite Chenin expresses 

the nature of this grape in the Bot River. Batches of free run juice and pressed juice were put in barrel without settling and 

allowed to ferment naturally. This was combined with a skin ferment component regular punch downs. The wine was left on 

lees for 12 months with regular batonnage (all old barrels) – no sulphur was added to allow the wine to develop its own 

characteristics without any intervention. The fruit is all Bot River from a couple of vineyards including some very old vines at 

Avontzon Farm. Peachy apricot with hints of honey and spice come to the fore, rich, mouth filling entry with yellow peach, 

melons, raisins and spice. Good fruit sweetness balanced by clean, citrus tones create a beautifully balanced wine with a 

refreshing finish. 

  

 

2014 


LUDDITE CHENIN 

 



2013 

LUDDITE SHIRAZ 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 


 

 - 373 - 



SOUTH AFRICA 

Continued… 



 

 

 



 

I look at a stream and I see myself: a native South African, flowing irresistibly over hard obstacles until they become smooth and, one day, 

disappear - flowing from an origin that has been forgotten toward an end that will never be. 

 

-



 

Miriam Makeba  

 

 

VINUM, Stellenbosch  



These mature, prime vineyards are located on the slopes of the magnificent Helderberg Mountain, facing the ocean, in a 

south-westerly and south-easterly orientation. They consistently produce some of the finest Chenin grapes in the 

Stellenbosch Region, where the great Chenins of South Africa are produced. All picking and sorting was by hand. The 

bunches were then de-stemmed, very gently pressed in a pneumatic bag press, and the juice settled in chilled stainless steel 

tanks prior to fermentation. This took place mainly in tank, on the lees, with less than 5% being transferred into small, new 

Burgundian barrels. Kept on the lees for six months, with regular batonnage, both in tank and in barrel, ultimate freshness 

was preserved, whilst developing considerable fruit complexity and depth in the wine; achieving a wonderful minerality on 

the palate. Bottled young, after seven months maturation, the wine retains lively fruit, steely acidity and abundant 

aromatic concentration: the exact qualities you’d expect from beautiful old vines. The nose hints at the wonderful elegance 

of this wine. White petals, citrus crispness, gentle vanilla, spicy cinnamon. The palate unfolds layers of fresh lime, deep, 

opulent fruitiness, and tingling spices -all wrapped in very subtle and harmonious notes of French oak, hanging on the 

palate with a mineral resonance. In essence, it has immense personality. A wonderfully balanced combination of the finer 

attributes of good Cape Chenin. For best results decant and serve not too cold alongside some grilled wild salmon (if 

you’re paying). 

 

The Cabernet Sauvignon is fermented in tank and then matured in a mixture of tank and barrel (80% French oak, 20% 

American, one third new). The deep, shiny cherry hue and smooth, rich spicy nose beget individual flavours, a layered 

structure & generous fruit. The aim is to combine the classic structure of Old World Cabs, with a nod to the warmth of the 

New World’s accessible fruit. Intelligent oaking complements rather than dominates the wine, allowing it to reflect its 

origin’s natural flavours. Cigar box, blueberry, cherry and mocha mingle seamlessly – quite a mouthful. The wine also 

shows some secondary development of leather, truffle and tobacco.  

 

2016 


VINUM CHENIN BLANC – stelvin 

 



2014 

VINUM CABERNET SAUVIGNON  

 

 



 

 

 



 

RADFORD DALE “THIRST” - Organic 

This unconventional Gamay is grown in the warm region of Wellington. The old vines from which the fruit for this 

wine is harvested grow in deep alluvial soils and have never been irrigated. Planted on the lower slopes of the on 

the Eastern bank of the Berg River with a West facing aspect, the grapes ripen in the warm conditions of the region. 

Low, single wire trellising and the sprawling growth pattern of the variety mean that grapes are carried within the 

canopy, which shelters the thin-skinned bunches from too much direct sunlight, thus conserving natural acidity and 

freshness. Yields are small, as can be expected from a vineyard of this age.  

Following a pre-selection process in the vineyards, the grapes are picked by hand at sunrise into 15kg lug-boxes. They are 

then ferried to the winery on the Helderberg Mountain in Stellenbosch. The hour long journey is carried-out early in the 

morning, before the sun has time to raise temperatures. Here, thebunches are hand sorted over a rolling sorting table whole 

clusters are then placed in stainless steel fermentation tanks. Dry ice is employed to ensure the tanks are saturated with 

Co2 before any fermentation starts, thus encouraging the carbonic maceration that gives this wine is unique character. 

While this intracellular, enzymatic process takes place over the course of 10 to 12 days, the wine is only pumped over once 

or twice. The focus being on the gentlest extraction possible while also allowing a homogeneous medium. The whole 

bunches are then basket pressed and the wine then transferred to tank, to complete its alcoholic fermentation. By this time 

the malolactic fermentation is mostly complete as a result of the carbonic maceration. The wine is matured for a short while 

(3 months) on lees and then racked. The wine is not fined or filtered. Nothing has been taken away or added, except for a 

small amount of SO2 before bottling. From the vibrant, pink hue with purple tinge on the rim to the soft, yet striking 

strawberry and cranberry aromas of the nose, this wine refuses to be defined by the rules of modern conventional 

winemaking. The palate shows a range of red fruits and a touch of tomato leaf, before a bracing acidity brings the wine to a 

long, clean finish. Light, supple tannins provide texture and a lift in the finish which refreshes and rewards at the same 

time. Utterly moreish, this wine seems to disappear out of the glass on its own. The wine is lean and fine but my no means 

simple. It intrigues with its subtle vivacity and nonconfomist attitude. 

The Cinsault comes from youngish vines on sandy soils of the Moddergat River. Whole bunch ferment in stainless steel with 

native yeats, 14 days on stems with occasional pump-overs. No filtration or fining and sulphur added only at bottling. 

 

2017 


THIRST GAMAY 

 



2017 

THIRST CINSAULT 

 

 



 

 


 

 - 374 - 

 



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   77   78   79   80   81   82   83   84   ...   87


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling