History of Civilizations of Central Asia


Download 8.99 Mb.

bet1/63
Sana08.11.2017
Hajmi8.99 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   63
History of <a href="/history-of-civilizations-of-central-asia-v2.html">civilizations of Central Asia</a>, v. 6: Towards the contemporary period: from the mid-nineteenth to the end of the twentieth century; <a href="/what-is-it.html">Multiple history</a>; 2005

ISBN 92-3-103985-7

History of civilizations of Central Asia



History of Civilizations of Central Asia

Towards the contemporary period: from the

mid-nineteenth to the end of the twentieth

century


Volume VI

President: Chahryar Adle

Co-Editors: Madhavan K. Palat and Anara Tabyshalieva

Multiple History Series

UNESCO Publishing

1

Contents


           Copyrights

ISBN 92-3-103985-7

COPYRIGHT

The authors are responsible for the choice and the presentation of the facts contained in

this book and for the opinions expressed therein, which are not necessarily those of

UNESCO and do not commit the Organization.

The designations employed and the presentation of material throughout this publication

do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of UNESCO

concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or

concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries.

Coordinated by I . Iskender-Mochiri

English text edited by Jana Gough

Composed by Desk (France)

Printed by Estudios Gráficos ZURE, Bilbao (Spain)

Published in 2005 by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural

Organization 7 place de Fontenoy, 75352 Paris 07 SP

ISBN 92-3-103985-7

© UNESCO 2005

2

Contents



           Copyrights

ISBN 92-3-103985-7

CONTENTS


Contents

PREFACE OF THE DIRECTOR - GENERAL OF UNESCO

12

DESCRIPTION OF THE PROJECT

14

MEMBERS OF THE INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE

(from 1980 to 1993)

17

MEMBERS OF THE INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE

(since 1993)

18

LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS

19

INTRODUCTION

24

CONTINUITY AND CHANGE

28

1 THE STATES OF CENTRAL ASIA

29

Introduction

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

30

The new political and strategic situation



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

32

The emirate of Bukhara



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

36

The khanate of Khiva



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

37

The khanate of Kokand



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

37

The principalities



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

38

The parameters of Russian expansion



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

40

The fate of Tashkent



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

44

The end of the campaigns



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

44

The campaign against Khiva



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

46

British reactions to the Khiva expedition



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

46

3



Contents

           Copyrights



ISBN 92-3-103985-7

CONTENTS


The end of the Kokand protectorate

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

47

Campaigns against the Turkmens



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

47

The surrender of Merv and the Afghan question



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

48

2 TRADE AND THE ECONOMY(SECOND HALF OF NINETEENTH CEN-



TURY TO EARLY TWENTIETH CENTURY)

51

Introduction

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

51

The agrarian question



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

56

Infrastructure



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

61

Manufacturing and trade



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

68

Transforming societies



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

73

Conclusion



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

76

3 SOCIAL STRUCTURES IN CENTRAL ASIA



78

Settled populations in the oases

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

81

The nomadic population



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

84

Impact of Russian rule



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

88

The religious establishment



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

94

Water administrators



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

97

Artisans



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

97

Slaves



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

98

4 THE BRITISH IN CENTRAL ASIA



99

FROM THE MID-NINETEENTH CENTURY TO 1918

. . . . . . . . . . .

99

Iran



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

100


Afghanistan

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

103

Kashgharia



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

107


FROM 1918 TO THE MID-TWENTIETH CENTURY

. . . . . . . . . . . .

109

The strategic context



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

109


5 TSARIST RUSSIA AND CENTRAL ASIA

121

Administration

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

127


Economic development

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

136

Banking and foreign capital



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

140


Relations with Islam

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

142

Scientific interest in Central Asia



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

145


Jadidism

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

147

4

Contents



           Copyrights

ISBN 92-3-103985-7

CONTENTS


6 ESTABLISHMENT OF SOVIET POWER IN CENTRAL ASIA ( 1917 –

24)

149

7 INTELLECTUAL AND POLITICAL FERMENT

180

The role of religion

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

181


Intellectuals and poets among the nomadic peoples

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

182

Intellectuals and poets among the oasis peoples



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

185


The new generation of Jadids

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

190

Pan-Turkism



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

199


Impact of the Jadids

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

201

POLITICAL CHANGES AND STATE FORMATION

206

8 THE EVOLUTION OF NATION-STATES

207

From the 1850s to the 1920s

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

207


From the 1920s to the 1990s

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

212

Conclusion



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

218


9 UZBEKISTAN

219

Soviet Uzbekistan

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

219


Independent Uzbekistan

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

236

10 KAZAKHSTAN

241

The tsarist period

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

241


The Alash movement

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

247

Soviet history



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

250


Prior to independence

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

255

Independence



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

257


11 KYRGYZSTAN

258

The Kyrgyz under Russian colonial rule (1850–1917)

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

258


Soviet Kyrgyzstan (1917–91)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

265

Economic developments



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

271


Population and social developments

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

274

Afterword



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

280


12 TAJIKISTAN

282

Political history

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

282


5

Contents


           Copyrights

ISBN 92-3-103985-7

CONTENTS


Economic and social development

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

286

Culture and science



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

294


Independence

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

295

13 TURKMENISTAN

297

Political developments (1850–60)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

301


The Russian conquest

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

307

The Soviet era



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

310


14 THE SAYAN - ALTAI MOUNTAIN REGION AND SOUTH- EASTERN

SIBERIA

319

Khakassia

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

319


Tuva

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

323

Altai


. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

328


Buriatia

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

332

15 MONGOLIA

336

MONGOLIA FROM THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY TO 1919

. . . . . . .

337


The rise of the Qing empire and the dissolution of the world of Central Eurasia

337


Qing rule over the Mongols: organization and institutions

. . . . . . . . . . .

339

Mongol society in decline (from the mid-nineteenth century)



. . . . . . . . .

341


Mongolia in Russo-Qing relations (from the eighteenth to the early twentieth

century)


. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

343


Mongolia during the final years of the Qing

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

345

The 1911 Mongol declaration of independence and international relations



. .

348


THE MONGOLIAN PEOPLE’s REVOLUTION OF 1921 AND THE MON-

GOLIAN PEOPLE’s REPUBLIC (1924–46)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

353


The birth of the People’s Republic

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

353

The suppression of Buddhism



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

356


Soviet purges in Mongolia

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

358

The MPR during the Second World War



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

359


THE MONGOLIAN PEOPLE’s REPUBLIC

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

361

On the path to democratization and the free market



. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

366


16 WESTERN CHINA (XINJIANG)

368

From the mid-nineteenth century to 1911 revolution

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

369


The republican period (1912–49)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

376

6

Contents



           Copyrights

ISBN 92-3-103985-7

CONTENTS


A new chapter in Xinjiang’s history (October 1949 to 1990)

. . . . . . . . . .

388

17 NORTH INDIA (EXCLUDING PAKISTAN AFTER 1947)

394

Early colonial rule

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

394


The revolt of 1857

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

395

After 1857



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

396


Early nationalism

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

398

Nationalism and Indian capitalists



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

401


The coming of Gandhi

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

402

Mass mobilization, independence and partition



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

403


Independent India

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

407

18 PAKISTAN (SINCE 1947)

411

The Ayub Khan era

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

414


The Yahya Khan regime

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

416

The Bhutto era



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

418


The Zia era

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

420

The democratic era



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

423


19 AFGHANISTAN

426

AFGHANISTAN FROM 1850 TO 1919

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

426


FROM INDEPENDENCE TO THE RISE OF THE TALIBAN

. . . . . . . .

435

20 IRAN AND ITS EASTERN REGIONS (1848 – 1989)

449

The last Qajar kings (1848–1925)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

449


The Pahlavi dynasty (1925–79)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

467

The Islamic Republic under Ayatollah Khomeini (1979–89)



. . . . . . . . . .

476


ENVIRONMENT, SOCIETY AND CULTURE

479

21 THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT OF CENTRAL AND SOUTH ASIA

480

Overview


. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

480


South Asian landscapes

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

492

South-West Asia



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

494


22 THE STATUS OF WOMEN (1917–90)

515

THE STATUS OF WOMEN IN NORTHERN CENTRAL ASIA

. . . . . . .

515


7

Contents


           Copyrights

ISBN 92-3-103985-7

CONTENTS


WOMEN’s MOVEMENTS AND CHANGES IN THE LEGAL STATUS OF

WOMEN IN IRAN AND AFGHANISTAN

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

525


Iran and the Islamic Republic of Iran

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

525

Afghanistan and the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan



. . . . . . . . . . . . .

531


THE STATUS OF WOMEN IN INDIA AND PAKISTAN

. . . . . . . . . . .

535

India


. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

535


Pakistan

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

545

23 EDUCATION, THE PRESS AND PUBLIC HEALTH

548

Education

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

549


The press

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

557

Public health



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

562


Conclusion

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

567

Appendix


. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

569


24 SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

572

Afghanistan

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

575


Iran and the Islamic Republic of Iran

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

578

Kazakhstan



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

580


Kyrgyzstan

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

583

Mongolia


. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

585


North India

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

589

Pakistan


. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

593


Tajikistan

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

597

Turkmenistan



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

600


Uzbekistan

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

602

Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

604


25 THE ART OF THE NORTHERN REGIONS OF CENTRAL ASIA

608

The overall cultural situation

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

608


Pottery

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

610

Copper embossing



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

614


Jewellery

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

616

Felt products



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

624


Carpet-making

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

628

Artistic fabrics



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

637


Printed cloth

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

641

8

Contents



           Copyrights

ISBN 92-3-103985-7

CONTENTS


Embroidery

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

642

Leather goods



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

650


Bone carving

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

651

Wood painting



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

655


Miniatures and other arts

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

655

Modern fine arts: painting in the twentieth century



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

658


Conclusion

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

674

26 THE ARTS IN EASTERN CENTRAL ASIA

675

THE ART AND ARCHITECTURE OF XINJIANG

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

676


The late Qing period (1850–1912)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

676

The Republican period (1912–49)



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

689


The modern period (1949–90)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

692

UIGHUR VERNACULAR ARCHITECTURE



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

700


The Uighur house

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

702

THE ART AND ARCHITECTURE OF MONGOLIA



. . . . . . . . . . . . .

711


Introduction

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

711

Fine arts from the ‘second conversion’ to 1900



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

712


Buddhist architecture to 1900

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

716

Architecture and the fine arts in the early twentieth century



. . . . . . . . . .

719


Fine arts, 1921–90

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

724

Architecture, 1921–90



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

731


The contemporary art scene

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

732

27 THE ARTS IN WESTERN AND SOUTHERN CENTRAL ASIA

735

IRAN AND AFGHANISTAN

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

736


INDIA AND PAKISTAN

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

771

28 CINEMA AND THEATRE

785

The tsarist colonial period

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

785


The Soviet period

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

786

The post-Soviet era



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

792


29 ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING IN NORTHERN CENTRAL

ASIA FROM THE RUSSIAN CONQUEST TO THE SOVIET PERIOD

(1865–1990)

795

Introduction

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

795


9

Contents


           Copyrights

ISBN 92-3-103985-7

CONTENTS


Architecture and urban planning during the tsarist period (nineteenth and early

twentieth centuries)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

797


Architecture and urban planning during the Soviet period (1920s–90s)

. . . .


807

Conclusion

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

832


30 LITERATURE IN PERSIAN AND OTHER INDO - IRANIAN LANGUAGES

833

LITERATURE IN PERSIAN

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

834


Neoclassicism (the Bazgasht school)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

835

The dawn of enlightenment: the pre-constitutional period



. . . . . . . . . . .

837


The constitutional period: the outburst of social and political literature

. . . .


838

The reign of Reza Shah and the beginnings of modern poetry

. . . . . . . . .

841


Breaking traditions: new poetry ( she‘r-e now )

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

843

Fiction in modern Persian literature



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

846


LITERATURE IN DARI

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

851

Classical literature



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

851


Modern prose and journalism

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

852

Literature of resistance



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

854


Literary studies and novels

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

854

The post-communist period



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

856


LITERATURE IN TAJIK

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

859

LITERATURE IN OTHER INDO-IRANIAN LANGUAGES



. . . . . . . . .

863


Kashmiri

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

863

Punjabi


. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

867


Sindhi

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

874

Urdu


. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

879


31 LITERATURE IN TURKIC AND MONGOLIAN

888

LITERATURE IN TURKIC

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

888


Urban literature

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

889

The literature of the steppe and mountains



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

893


Conclusion

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

896

LITERATURE IN MONGOLIAN



. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

897


Inner Mongolia and Dzungaria

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

907

Kalmukia


. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

909


Buriatia

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

910

CONCLUSION

914

10

Contents



           Copyrights

ISBN 92-3-103985-7

CONTENTS


MAPS*

917

BIBLIOGRAPHY AND REFERENCES

927

INDEX

973

History of civilizations of Central Asia

992

11

Contents



           Copyrights

ISBN 92-3-103985-7

PREFACE


PREFACE OF THE DIRECTOR -

GENERAL OF UNESCO

The preparation of the History of Civilizations of Central Asia undertaken by the Interna-

tional Scientific Committee began in 1980. This scholarly team, composed of 19 members

until 1991 and just 16 members after the dissolution of the Soviet Union, comes from the

region of Central Asia (as defined by UNESCO) and from other parts of the world. They

are responsible for the preparation of this six-volume work, which covers the period from

the dawn of civilization to the present day.

More than three hundred scholars, mostly from the Central Asian region, have con-

tributed to this major work, which is now completed with the publication of the present

volume. For each scholar who has invested his or her knowledge and expertise in this great

undertaking, the work on this History has been a difficult task since Central Asia is a com-

plex region, composed of a variety of cultural entities and influences that have undergone

major changes over the centuries.

Today, in an era of rapid globalization, it is increasingly vital to find ways to respect the

world’s human values. The UNESCO Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity adopted

by the General Conference at its thirty-first session is a major step towards finding avenues

of dialogue between peoples living on our planet. We know that human beings forge their

identity through the cultures which have enriched them. Their sense of worth and personal

dignity very much lies in the recognition by the other of the special contribution that each

and all – women and men, majorities and minorities – have made to weaving the rich

tapestry of the world’s civilization. Indeed, civilizations are fertile mixtures and all bor-

rowed from one another well before the advent of our age of electronic communications.

The term ‘civilization’ must denote a universal, plural and non-hierarchical phenomenon,

since every civilization has been enriched by contact and exchange with others. History is

a shared experience.

The historical relationship existing between nomadic and sedentary peoples, living in

quite different environments – steppes and oases – played a key part in shaping the cultural

diversity of Central Asia and made an important contribution to its originality. To what

12

Contents



           Copyrights

ISBN 92-3-103985-7

PREFACE


extent and in what ways did the same influences affect different societies and fulfil differ-

ent functions in extremely varied environments? In this work, we find numerous examples

of diverse cultures living together, distinguishable but nevertheless sharing a common her-

itage. Therefore, this work strongly attests that each and every culture has made its own

distinct contribution to the common heritage of humankind, as recalled in the words of the

great Iranian poet and philosopher Saadi Shirazi several hundred years ago: ‘All human

beings are like organs of a body; when one organ is afflicted with pain, others cannot rest

in peace.’ The History of Civilizations of Central Asia illustrates perfectly the wealth of

diversity and the foundation it provides of a shared future. Today, we are faced with a new

challenge: to make of that diversity an instrument for dialogue and mutual understanding.

Koïchiro Matsuura

13

Contents



           Copyrights

ISBN 92-3-103985-7

DESCRIPTION OF THE PROJECT

DESCRIPTION OF THE PROJECT

M. S. Asimov

The General Conference of UNESCO, at its nineteenth session (Nairobi,October, Novem-

ber 1976), adopted the resolution which authorized the Director-General to undertake,

among other activities aimed at promoting appreciation and respect for cultural identity,

a new project on the preparation of a History of Civilizations of Central Asia. This project

was a natural consequence of a pilot project on the study of Central Asia which was

approved during the fourteenth session of the UNESCO General Conference in Novem-

ber 1966.

The purpose of this pilot project, as it was formulated in the UNESCO programme, was

to make better known the civilizations of the peoples living in the regions of Central Asia

through studies of their archaeology, history, languages and literature. At its initial stage,

the participating Member States included Afghanistan, India, Iran, Pakistan and the former

Soviet Union. Later, Mongolia and China joined the UNESCO Central Asian project, thus

enlarging the area to cover the cultures of Mongolia and the western regions of China.

In this work, Central Asia should be understood as a cultural entity developed in the

course of the long history of civilizations of peoples of the region and the above delimita-

tion should not be taken as rigid boundaries either now or in the future.

In the absence of any existing survey of such large scope which could have served as

a model, UNESCO has had to proceed by stages in this difficult task of presenting an

integrated narrative of complex historical events from earliest times to the present day.

The first stage was designed to obtain better knowledge of the civilizations of Central

Asia by encouraging archaeological and historical research and the study of literature and

the history of science. A new project was therefore launched to promote studies in five

major domains: the archaeology and the history of the Kushan empire, the history of the

arts of Central Asia, the contribution of the peoples of Central Asia to the development of

science, the history of ideas and philosophy, and the literatures of Central Asia.

An International Association for the Study of Cultures of Central Asia (IASCCA), a

non-governmental scholarly organization, was founded on the initiative of the Tajik scholar

14

Contents


           Copyrights

ISBN 92-3-103985-7

DESCRIPTION OF THE PROJECT

B. Gafurov in 1973, assembling scholars of the area for the coordination of interdiscipli-

nary studies of their own cultures and the promotion of regional and international cooper-

ation.

Created under the auspices of UNESCO, the new Association became, from the very



beginning of its activity, the principal consultative body of UNESCO in the implementation

of its programme on the study of Central Asian cultures and the preparation of a History



of Civilizations of Central Asia

.

The second stage concentrated on the modern aspects of Central Asian civilizations and



the eastward extension of the geographical boundaries of research in the new programme.

A series of international scholarly conferences and symposia were organized in the coun-

tries of the area to promote studies on Central Asian cultures.

Two meetings of experts, held in 1978 and 1979 at UNESCO Headquarters, concluded

that the project launched in 1967 for the study of cultures of Central Asia had led to con-

siderable progress in research and contributed to strengthening existing institutions in the

countries of the region. The experts consequently advised the Secretariat on the methodol-

ogy and the preparation of the History. On the basis of its recommendations it was decided

that this publication should consist of six volumes covering chronologically the whole his-

tory of Central Asian civilizations ranging from their very inception up to the present.

Furthermore, the experts recommended that the experience acquired by UNESCO during

the preparation of the History of the Scientific and Cultural Development of Mankind and

of the General History of Africa should also be taken into account by those responsible

for the drafting of the History. As to its presentation, they supported the opinion expressed

by the UNESCO Secretariat that the publication, while being a scholarly work, should be

accessible to a general readership.

Since history constitutes an uninterrupted sequence of events, it was decided not to give

undue emphasis to any specific date. Events preceding or subsequent to those indicated

here are dealt with in each volume whenever their inclusion is justified by the requirements

of scholarship.

The third and final stage consisted of setting up in August 1980 an International Scien-

tific Committee of nineteen members, who sat in a personal capacity, to take reponsibility

for the preparation of the History. The Committee thus created included two scholars from

each of the seven Central Asian countries – the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, China,

India, Islamic Republic of Iran, Pakistan, Mongolia and what was then the USSR – and

five experts from other countries – Hungary, Japan, Turkey, the United Kingdom and the

United States of America.

15

Contents



           Copyrights

ISBN 92-3-103985-7

DESCRIPTION OF THE PROJECT

The Committee’s first session was held at UNESCO Headquarters in December 1980.

Real work on the preparation of the publication of the History of Civilizations of Central



Asia

started, in fact, in 1981. It was decided that scholars selected by virtue of their quali-

fications and achievements relating to Central Asian history and culture should ensure the

objective presentation, and also the high scientific and intellectual standard, of this History.

Members of the International Scientific Committee decided that the new project should

correspond to the noble aims and principles of UNESCO and thereby should contribute

to the promotion of mutual understanding and peace between nations. The Committee

followed the recommendation of the experts delineating for the purpose of this work the

geographical area of Central Asia to reflect the common historical and cultural experience.

The first session of the International Committee decided most of the principal matters

concerning the implementation of this complex project, beginning with the drafting of

plans and defining the objectives and methods of work of the Committee itself.

The Bureau of the International Scientific Committee consists of a president, four vice-

presidents and a rapporteur. The Bureau’s task is to supervise the execution of the project

between the sessions of the International Scientific Committee. The reading committee,

consisting of four members, was created in 1986 to revise and finalize the manuscripts

after editing Volumes I and II. Another reading committee was constituted in 1989 for

Volumes III and IV.

The authors and editors are scholars from the present twelve countries of Central Asia

and experts from other regions. Thus, this work is the result of the regional and of the inter-

national collaboration of scholars within the framework of the programme of the United

Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

The International Scientific Committee and myself express particular gratitude to Mrs

Irene Iskender-Mochiri for her arduous and selfless work in preparing the volumes for the

press.

It is our sincere hope that the publication of this last volume (Volume VI) of the History



of Civilizations of Central Asia

will be a further step towards the promotion of the cultural

identity of the peoples of Central Asia, strengthening their common cultural heritage, and,

consequently, will foster a better understanding among the peoples of the world.

16

Contents


           Copyrights

ISBN 92-3-103985-7

MEMBERS OF THE COMMITTEE

MEMBERS OF THE INTERNATIONAL

SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE

(from 1980 to 1993)

Dr F. R. Allchin (United Kingdom)

† Professor M. S. Asimov (Tajikistan)

President

Editor of Volume IV (Parts One and Two)

Dr N. A. Baloch (Pakistan)

Professor M. Bastani Parizi

(Islamic Republic of Iran)

Professor Sh. Bira (Mongolia)

Professor A. H. Dani (Pakistan)

Editor of Volume I

† Professor K. Enoki (Japan)

Professor G. F. Etemadi (Afghanistan)

Co-editor of Volume II

Professor J. Harmatta (Hungary)

Editor of Volume II

Professor Liu Cunkuan

(People’s Republic of China)

Dr L. I. Miroshnikov

(Russian Federation)

Professor S. NATSAGDORJ (Mongolia)

† Professor B. N. Puri (India)

Co-editor of Volume II

Professor M. H. Z. Safi (Afghanistan)

Professor A. Sayili (Turkey)

Dr R. Shabani Samghabadi

(Islamic Republic of Iran)

Co-editor of Volume III

Professor D. Sinor

(United States of America)

† Professor B. K. Thapar (India)

Professor Zhang Guang-da

(People’s Republic of China)

Co-editor of Volume III

17

Contents


           Copyrights

ISBN 92-3-103985-7

MEMBERS OF THE COMMITTEE

MEMBERS OF THE INTERNATIONAL

SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE

(since 1993)

Professor C. Adle

(Islamic Republic of Iran)

President and Editor of Volume V

Professor D. A. Alimova (Uzbekistan)

Professor M. Annanepesov

(Turkmenistan)

Professor K. M. Baipakov (Kazakhstan)

Co-editor of Volume V

Professor Sh. Bira (Mongolia)

Professor A. H. Dani (Pakistan)

Editor of Volume I

Professor M. Dinorshoev (Tajikistan)

Professor R. Farhadi (Islamic Republic of

Afghanistan)

Professor H.-P. Francfort (France)

Professor Irfan Habib (India)

Editor of Volume V

Dr L. Miroshnikov (Russian Federation)

Professor D. Sinor (United States of

America)

Dr A. Tabyshalieva (Kyrgyzstan)

Co-Editor of Volume VI

Professor ˙I. Togan (Turkey)

Professor H. Umemura (Japan)

Professor Wu Yungui (People’s Republic

of China)

18

Contents



           Copyrights

ISBN 92-3-103985-7

LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS

LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS

N. A. Abdurakhimova

Professor

Department of Historical Sciences

College of History

National University

Tashkent

Uzbekistan

L. L. Adams

Research Fellow

Princeton Institute for International

and Regional Studies

013 Bendheim Hall

Princeton University

Princeton, N.J.

USA


C. Adle

Director of Research

Centre National de la Recherche

Scientifique (CNRS)

19, rue Cépré

75015 Paris

France

R. Afzal


Qaid-i Azam University

Department of History

Islamabad 44000

Pakistan


A. Alimardonov

Tajik Academy of Sciences

33 Rudaki Avenue

Dushanbe


Tajikistan

D. A. Alimova

Director

Institute of History

Academy of Sciences of Uzbekistan

Tashkent


Uzbekistan

M. Annanepesov

Professor of History

University of Turkmenistan

Ashgabat

Turkmenistan

G. Ashurov

Professor

Institute of Philosophy and Law

Tajik Academy of Sciences

33 Rudaki Avenue

Dushanbe


Tajikistan

19

Contents



           Copyrights

ISBN 92-3-103985-7

LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS

C. Atwood

Associate Professor

Central Eurasian Studies Department

Indiana University

Goodbody Hall 157

1011 East 3rd Street

Bloomington, Ind., 47405-7005

USA


M. Azzout

Architect

DPLG and Member of CRESPPA

(Research Centre in Sociology and Politics

of Paris), MR 7112 of CNRS/CSU

(Cultures and Urban Societies),

France

Ts. Batbayar



Ministry of Foreign Affairs

7A Enkh Taivny Gudami

Ulaanbaatar

Mongolia


J. Boldbaatar

Professor

2 Zaluuchudiin Gudami

Room No. 263, Num Building No. 2

Ulaanbataar

Mongolia


M. Dinorshoev

Director


Institute of Philosophy and Law

Tajik Academy of Sciences

33 Rudaki Avenue

Dushanbe


Tajikistan

R. Dor


Director

Institut Français d’Études sur

l’Asie Centrale (IFEAC)

18A, Rakatboshi Street

700031 Tashkent

Uzbekistan

W. FLOOR

6412 Dahlonega Road

Bethesda, MD 20816

USA


V. Fourniau

Professor

Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences

Sociales (EHESS)

54, Bd Raspail

75006 Paris

France

A. A. Golovanov



Professor

Department of Independent

Uzbekistan History

Institute of History

Academy of Sciences of Uzbekistan

Tashkent


Uzbekistan

I. Hasnain

Professor

Department of Linguistics

Aligarh Muslim University

Aligarh 202 002

India

20

Contents



           Copyrights

ISBN 92-3-103985-7

LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS

H. Javadi

5516 Westbard Avenue

Bethesda, MD 20816

USA


G. Kara

ELTE University of Budapest

1378 Budapest

Hungary


and

Indiana University

Goodbody Hall 142

Bloomington, IN 47405

USA

A. Khakimov



Vice-President

Academy of Fine Arts

Tashkent

Uzbekistan

Iqtidar A. Khan

Professor of History (retired)

Department of History

Aligarh Muslim University

Aligarh 202 002

India


A. Kian-Thiébaut

CNRS-Monde Iranien

27, rue Paul Bert

94204 Ivry-sur-Seine

France

Li Sheng


Chinese Academy of Social Sciences

5 Jianguomennei Street

100732 Beijing

China


W. Maley

Professor

Asia-Pacific College of Diplomacy

Australian National University

Canberra ACT 0200

Australia

S. Moosvi

Professor of History

Department of History

Aligarh Muslim University

Aligarh 202 002

India


M. Moshev

Professor of History

University of Turkmenistan

Ashgabat


Turkmenistan

T. Nakami

Professor

Research Institute for Languages and

Cultures of Asia and Africa

Tokyo University of Foreign Studies

11-1, Asahi-cho 1, Huchu-shi

Tokyo 183-8534

Japan

N. Nasiri-moghaddam



28, rue Vicq d’Azir

75010 Paris

France

21

Contents



           Copyrights

ISBN 92-3-103985-7

LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS

C. Noelle-Karimi

Professor

University of Bamberg

Lehrstuhl für Iranistik

Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg

96045 Bamberg

Germany

K. Nurpeis



Professor

Institute of History and Ethnology

Almaty

Kazakhstan



Madhavan K. Palat

Professor of History

Indira Gandhi National Centre for Arts

Panpath


110 001 New Delhi

India


A. K. Patnaik

Professor

Centre for Soviet and East European

Studies


School of International Studies

Jawaharlal Nehru University

New Delhi 110067

India


C. Poujol

Professor

History and Cultures of Central Asia

Institut National des Langues

et Civilisations Orientales

(INALCO)


2, rue de Lille

75007 Paris

France

Qin Huibin



Chinese Academy of Social Sciences

5 Jianguomennei Street

100732 Beijing

China


R. Y. Radjapova

Institute of History of Uzbekistan

Academy of Sciences of Uzbekistan

Tashkent


Uzbekistan

R. G. ROZI

5 Biran Court Reservoir

Victoria 3073

Australia

A. Saikal

Director

Centre for Arab & Islamic Studies

(The Middle East & Central Asia)

Faculty of Arts

Australian National University

Canberra ACT 0200

Australia

E. Shukurov

Professor of Ecology

137, Sovetskaia Street, apt. 7

Bishkek

Kyrgyz Republic, 720021



A. Tabyshalieva

Institute for Regional Studies

P.O. Box 1880

Bishkek


Kyrgyz Republic, 720000

22

Contents



           Copyrights

ISBN 92-3-103985-7

LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS

D. Vasilev

Vice-President

National Association of Russian

Orientalists



and

Professor

Oriental History Department

Institute of Oriental Studies

Russian Academy of Sciences

Rozhdestvenka Street 12

103753 Moscow

Russian Federation

S. P. Verma

Professor of History

Centre of Advanced Study

Department of History

Aligarh Muslim University

Aligarh 202 002

India

Xu Jianying



Chinese Academy of Social Sciences

5 Jianguomennei Street

100732 Beijing

China


Other collaborating specialists:

M. Anwar khan (Pakistan)

A. K. Auezkhan (Kazakhstan)

L. Batchuluun (Mongolia)

G. Krongardt (Kyrgyzstan)

L. I. Miroshnikov (Russian Federation)

D. Tsedev (Mongolia)

23

Contents



           Copyrights

ISBN 92-3-103985-7

INTRODUCTION

INTRODUCTION

C. Adle

President of the International Scientific Committee

This sixth and final volume of the History of Civilizations of Central Asia

1

successfully



brings the publication of this series to an end. The pioneers who undertook this immense

task wished to contribute to fulfilling one of the main goals proclaimed in UNESCO’s Con-

stitution, which aims ‘to develop and to increase the means of communication between

. . . peoples and to employ these means for the purposes of mutual understanding and a

truer and more perfect knowledge of each other’s lives’.

2

As a further means of achiev-



ing that goal, UNESCO had already published in 1968 the History of the Scientific and

Cultural Development of Mankind

. The Organization had also undertaken the publication

of a series of books on the history and civilizations of areas on which studies were non-

existent, scarce, outdated or biased. These series included, for instance, the General His-



tory of Africa

, the General History of Latin America, the present History of Civilizations



of Central Asia

, etc.


3

It is worth noticing that for the latter region, the only extant publica-

tion which roughly covered the Central Asian lands was about a century old and dealt only

with political history. Entitled History of the Mongols from the 9th to the 19th Century,

this valuable book was written by a single man, Henry H. Howorth, at a time when the

Russians and the British were playing the ‘Great Game’ in Central Asian lands.

4

The resolution authorizing the Director-General of UNESCO to launch the project of



the publication of the History of Civilizations of Central Asia was adopted by the General

1

The meaning of the term ‘Central Asia’ as it is defined in these volumes is explained in an appendix by



Dr L. I. Miroshnikov at the end of Vol. I, pp. 477–80.

2

Cited by Federico Mayor, then the Director-General of UNESCO, in his Preface to Vol. I of the History



of Civilizations of Central Asia

.

3



General History of Africa

, English ed., Paris, 1981–93, 8 vols.; General History ofLatin America,

Spanish ed., Paris, 1999–2004, 9 vols. (6 published). The other series include the General History of the

Caribbean

, English ed., Paris, 1997–2005, 6 vols. (5 published) and The Different Aspects of Islamic Cul-



ture

, English and French eds., Paris, 1994–2003, 6 vols. (3 published in each language).

4

First published in London from 1876 to 1888 with an additional part issued in 1927; reprinted in 4 vols.



in New York in 1970.

24

Contents



           Copyrights

ISBN 92-3-103985-7

INTRODUCTION

Conference of UNESCO held in Nairobi in October and November 1976. The scheme was

a consequence of a pilot project on the study of Central Asia approved ten years earlier

during the fourteenth session of UNESCO’s General Conference in November 1966. The

project aimed to make better known the civilizations of Central Asian peoples through

the study of their archaeology, history, languages and literature. The first meeting of the

International Scientific Committee in charge of planning the project in all its scientific

aspects was held in Paris in December 1980. In the initial stage, the countries involved

were Afghanistan, India, Iran, Pakistan and the Soviet Union. In spite of observations made

by some scholars, the geopolitical situation in the world at the time did not yet favour

the extension of the cultural area under consideration towards more eastern regions of

Asia. However, China and Mongolia were later included within the circle of countries

participating in the preparation of the publication. Other countries from different parts of

the world in which Central Asiatic studies were highly developed were also included in

the International Scientific Committee. The experts were from France, Hungary, Japan,

Turkey, the United Kingdom and the United States of America.

The Central Asian landscape had changed again by the end of 1991, this time dramat-

ically, with the transformation of the Soviet Union which gave birth to the Russian Fed-

eration, and in Asia to the republics of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan

and Uzbekistan. The event was so significant that it provided the terminus ad quem for

the volumes, which had the pre-historic period as their starting point. The end date was,

however, to be understood approximately as it did not have the same value everywhere: the

collapse of the imperial regime in Iran in 1979, for instance, or the fall of the Taliban in

Afghanistan in 2001 were far more important for these countries than the changes in the

former USSR.

The History, arranged chronologically in six volumes (all now published), was con-

ceived as follows:

Volume I: The Dawn of Civilization: Earliest Times to 700 B.C., eds. A. H. Dani and V.

M. Masson (Paris, 1992).

Volume II: The Development of Sedentary and Nomadic Civilizations: 700 B.C. to A.D.

250

, ed. János Harmatta, co-eds. B. N. Puri and G. F. Etemadi (Paris, 1994).

Volume III: The Crossroads of Civilizations: A.D. 250 to 750, ed. B. A. Litvinsky, co-

eds. Zhang Guang-da and R. Shabani Samghabadi (Paris, 1996).

Volume IV: The Age of Achievement: A.D. 750 to the End of the Fifteenth Century, 2

vols., eds. M. S. Asimov and C. E. Bosworth (Part One, Paris, 1998; Part Two, Paris,

2000).

25

Contents



           Copyrights

ISBN 92-3-103985-7

INTRODUCTION

Volume V: Development in Contrast: From the Sixteenth to the Mid-Nineteenth Century,

eds. Chahryar Adle and Irfan Habib, co-ed. Karl M. Baipakov (Paris, 2003).

Volume VI: Towards the Contemporary Period: From the Mid-Nineteenth to the End

of the Twentieth Century

, co-eds. Madhavan K. Palat and Anara Tabyshalieva (Paris,

2005).

Among these volumes, the most problematic and thorny to prepare was Volume VI,



which deals with the present time with all its geopolitical complexity. The difficulties in

preparing and publishing this study proved so insuperable that the Editor finally resigned.

Within the limited time left until the submission of the final manuscript, no satisfactory sub-

stitute could be found and the Co-Editors, the Assistant to the publication (Mrs Iskender-

Mochiri) and the President thus had to assume responsibility for compiling and editing the

volume. Shortcomings were often inevitable as, due to the strict publication deadline, the

competent scholars were sometimes not available. Significant weaknesses, such as the lack

of notices on contemporary architecture in the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, India, the

Islamic Republic of Iran or Pakistan, as well as on other subjects, are thus evident. In spite

of these lacunae, it is nevertheless hoped that readers will either find directly in this volume

some hints as to their desired subjects or that the references provided will lead them to the

relevant specialist publications.

To mention all of those who have taken part in the preparation and publication of these

volumes would be an impossible task, but it is essential to single out here the continuous

support of UNESCO, without which the series would never have been conceived, prepared

and published. It is also necessary to pay tribute to the late Professor and Academician B.

G. Gafurov, the President of the International Association for the Study of the Cultures

of Central Asia. With the assistance of Dr L. I. Miroshnikov as the Rapporteur to that

association, and the collaboration of other academics, these scholars indeed prepared the

way for the launching of the final project of the publication of this History. Among those

initiators were Professors Sh. Bira, A. H. Dani, J. Harmatta, and last but not least Profes-

sor D. Sinor. As Vice-Directors and Rapporteurs at the first gatherings of the International

Scientific Committee in charge of the project for the publication of the History of Civiliza-

tions of Central Asia

, they greatly contributed to its conception, its launching and later its

continuation. Their ground-breaking activities were supported and sustained by my pre-

decessor, the late Professor Mohammad S. Asimov, the first President of the International

Scientific Committee, who took up his responsibility in 1980 and kept it until his myste-

rious assassination in 1996. Equally vital to the success of this major collaborative enter-

prise has been the scientific and editorial work of the Directors and Co-Directors of this

26

Contents



           Copyrights

ISBN 92-3-103985-7

INTRODUCTION

series; their names are mentioned at the beginning of each volume and also in the list of

volumes given above. Some of these eminent scholars, such as Professors C. E. Bosworth

and Irfan Habib, not only undertook their own specific commitments, but also helped the

Committee as highly valued advisors.

The series also owes greatly to Mrs Irene Iskender-Mochiri, who has overseen the pub-

lishing project on behalf of UNESCO and acted as coordinator between the authors, the

translators and the Editors. In editorial matters, Mrs Mochiri has benefited from a close

and fruitful collaboration with Jana Gough. Thanks are also due to many in the UNESCO

English Translation Unit and the translators themselves, who have on several occasions

gone beyond their usual obligations in order to improve the quality of the translated texts.

Now the arduous task of the publication of this History of Civilizations of Central Asia

has reached completion. No doubt, the advance of knowledge and development in research

methods will impose sooner rather than later if not a rewriting then at least a substantial

revision of its contents, but all those who have collaborated to create this series will be

satisfied if their readers conclude that in some measure light has been thrown on a complex

and hitherto little-known subject.

27

Contents


           Copyrights

ISBN 92-3-103985-7

CONTINUITY AND CHANGE





Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   63


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling