Marshall’s water comes from ten wells that draw water from the Missouri River alluvium in the


Download 97.85 Kb.

Sana06.02.2018
Hajmi97.85 Kb.

Marshall’s water comes from ten wells that draw 

water from the Missouri River alluvium in the 

Malta Bend area.  The wells range in depth from 

120 to 147 feet.  The water quality is very good;  

however, it does contain calcium and magnesium, 

which cause “hard” or soap-consuming water.  

Iron also is present in levels that could cause 

laundry staining.  The first treatment step aerates 

the water to remove the iron, and the second adds 

lime to soften the water.  Fluoride is added to help 

prevent dental cavities, and chlorine is added to 

disinfect and to protect against contamination in 

the distribution system. 

 

A Department of Natural Resources-conducted 



source water assessment for the MMU water sys-

tem looked at the potential for contamination of 

MMU’s wells.  The assessment shows no known 

source of contamination within one mile of the 

well field.  A copy of the assessment is available 

from MMU.  Contact the MMU office at 660-886-

6966. 

Published May 2016 

Water Quality Report 2016 

M

ARSHALL

 M

UNICIPAL

 

U

TILITIES

 

MMU Customers: 

Water Source and Treatment 

 

Informe contiene 



informacion 

importante sobre la 

calidad del agua en 

su communidad.  

Traduzcalo o hable 

con alguien que lo 

entienda bien. 

Inside: 

Analyses Results 



Abbreviations 



Health Information  3 

TTHM Violation 



Unregulated Con-

taminant Monitoring 



Lead and Copper 

Monitoring 

Water Quality Report 

2016 

 

“Filthy water cannot 



be washed.” 

 

African Proverb 



 

Board of Public Works members are: 

 

Chuck Hird, President 



 

Ken Bryant, Vice President 

 

Steve Mills, Secretary 



 

Spencer Fricke, Member 

 

We are pleased to provide you with information on your drinking water supply. 



We encourage public interest and participation in our community’s decisions 

affecting your drinking water.  Informed customers are our best allies in 

providing safe and sufficient drinking water.  Regular Board of Public Works 

(BPW) meetings are held at 8:30 a.m. 

in the MMU office, 75 E. Morgan. 

 

 



 

 

Upcoming dates for 2017 BPW 



meetings: 

 

April 13 



April 27 

 

May 11 



June 1 

 

 



June 15 

June 29 


 

July 13 


August 3  

 

August 17 



August 31 

 

September 14  September 28 



 

October 12 

November 2 

 

November 16  November 30 



 

December 14  December 28 

Marshall’s water comes from ten wells that 

draw water from the Missouri River 

alluvium in the Malta 

Bend area.  The wells 

range in depth from 

120 to 147 feet.  The 

water quality is very 

good;  however, 

it does contain 

calcium and 

magnesium, which 

cause “hard” or soap-

consuming water.  

Iron also is present in 

levels that could cause 

laundry staining.  The 

first treatment step 

aerates the water to 

remove the iron, and the second adds lime 

to soften the water.  Fluoride is added to 

help prevent dental cavities, and chlorine 

is added to disinfect and to protect against 

contamination in the 

distribution system. 

A Department of 

Natural Resources-

conducted source 

water assessment for 

the MMU water sys-

tem looked at the 

potential for contami-

nation of MMU’s 

wells.  The assess-

ment shows no 

known source of con-

tamination within 

one mile of the well 

field.  A copy of the 

assessment is available from MMU.  Con-

tact the MMU office at 660-886-6966. 

MMU Office 

Photo of office to go here 



Substance 

MCLG 

MCL 

Unit 

Date 

Result/ 

Average 

Range 

Major Source 

Regulated at the Treatment Plant  

Barium 


ppm 



6/11/14 

0.0569 


NA 

Erosion of natural deposits. 

Chromium 

100 


100 

ppb 


6/11/14 

1.93 


NA 

Erosion of natural deposits 

Fluoride 



ppm 

 

0.32 



0.29 - 0.42 

Erosion of natural deposits; water additive 

which promotes strong teeth. 

Nitrate +  nitrite 

10 

10 


ppm 

 

0.14 



NA 

Erosion of  natural deposits. 



Regulated in the Distribution System  

Total trihalomethanes 

NA 

80 


ppb 

 

 



 

By-product of drinking water disinfection. 

System-wide 

 

 



 

 

81.6 



66.3—99.1   

Location 1 

 

 

 



 

83.6 


81.2 - 85.9   

Location 2 

 

 

 



 

87.2 


75.6 - 99.1   

Location 3 

 

 

 



 

74.6 


66.3 - 83.0   

Location 4 

 

 

 



 

80.9 


68.3 - 98.3   

Haloacetic acids 

NA 

60 


ppb 

 

 



 

By-product of drinking water disinfection. 

System-wide 

 

 



 

 

34.7 



22.6 - 50.5   

Location 1 

 

 

 



 

35.7 


30.3 - 46.5   

Location 2 

 

 

 



 

39.1 


32.3 - 50.5   

Location 3 

 

 

 



 

33.7 


22.6 - 48.9   

Location 4 

 

 

 



 

30.3 


23.4 - 33.4   

 

MRDLG 



MRDL  Unit 

Date 

Average 

Range 

Major Source 

Chlorine 

4.0 


ppm   

1.83 


0.61 - 2.92  Water additive used to control microbes. 

Regulated at the Customer’s Tap  

 

MCLG 



MCL 

Unit 

Date 

90th 

Percen-

tile 

Number ex-

ceeding the 

AL 

Major Source 

Copper 


1.3 

AL= 1.3  ppb 

 

0.154 


Corrosion of household plumbing systems; 

erosion of natural deposits. 

Lead 


AL= 15 


ppb 

 

6.67 



Corrosion of household plumbing systems;  

erosion of natural deposits. 

Unregulated Contaminants 

 

MCLG 



MCL 

Unit 

Date 

Result/ 

Average 

Range 

 

Potassium 



NA 

NA 


ppm 

6/11/14 


3.44 

NA 


 

Sodium 


NA 

NA 


ppm 

6/11/14 


39.5 

NA 


 

Page 2 

Water Quality Report 2016 

All samples, except chlorine, were analyzed by the Department of Natural Resources’ laboratory or by a certified laboratory 

under contract to DNR.  Chlorine is analyzed onsite by MMU personnel. 

The following table shows the results of our water-quality analyses.  Every regulated contaminant that the laboratories 

detected in the drinking water, even in the very smallest amounts, is listed.  The table lists the name of each substance, 

the highest level allowed by regulation, the ideal goal for public health, the amount detected (average and range), the 

possible sources of the substance, and a key to units of measure. 



Page 3 

Water Quality Report 2016 



Abbreviations:    

AL - Action level  - The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements that a 

water system must follow. 



MCL - Maximum contaminant level - The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.  MCLs are set as 

close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available technology. 



MCLG - Maximum contaminant level goal - The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or 

expected risk to health.  MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. 



MRDL - Maximum residual disinfection level - The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water.  There is con-

vincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants. 



MRDLG - Maximum residual disinfection level goal - The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no 

known or expected risk to health.  MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial con-

taminants. 

NA - Not applicable 

ND - No detect - The contaminant was below the laboratory’s detection limit. 

ppb - Parts per billion - Concentration, also referred to as micrograms per liter (µg/l). 

ppm - Parts per million - Concentration, also referred to as milligrams per liter (mg/l). 

TTHM - Total trihalomethanes - Group of four trihalomethanes:  chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloro-

methane, bromoform 



Health Information 

The sources of drinking water (both tap 

water and bottled water) include rivers, 

lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs

springs, and wells.  As water travels 

over the surface of the land or through 

the ground, it dissolves naturally-

occurring minerals and, in some cases, 

radioactive material, and can pick up 

substances resulting from the presence 

of animals or from human activity.  

Contaminants that may be present in 

source water include: 

Microbial contaminants, such as 

viruses and bacteria, which may 

come from sewage treatment plants, 

septic systems, agricultural livestock 

operations, and wildlife. 

Inorganic contaminants, such as salts 

and metals, which can be naturally-

occurring or result from urban storm 

water runoff, industrial or domestic 

wastewater discharges, oil and gas 

production, mining, or farming. 



Pesticides and herbicides, which may 

come from a variety of sources such 

as agriculture, urban storm water 

runoff, and residential uses. 



Organic chemical contaminants

including synthetic and volatile 

organic chemicals, which are by-

products of industrial processes and 

petroleum production, and also can 

come from gas stations, urban storm 

water runoff, and septic systems. 

Radioactive contaminants, which can 

be naturally-occurring or be the 

result of oil and gas production and 

mining activities. 

 

In order to ensure that tap water is safe 



to drink, the Environmental Protection 

Agency (EPA) prescribes regulations 

which limit the amount of certain 

contaminants in water provided by 

public water systems.  Food and Drug 

Administration (FDA) regulations 

establish limits for contaminants in 

bottled water which must provide the 

same protection for public health. 

 

Drinking water, including bottled 



water, reasonably may be expected to 

contain at least small amounts of some 

contaminants.  The presence of 

contaminants does not indicate that 

water poses a health risk.  More 

information about contaminants can be 

obtained by calling EPA’s Safe 

Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-

4791). 

Some people may be more vulnerable 



to contaminants in drinking water than 

the general population.  Immuno-

compromised persons such as persons 

with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, 

persons who have undergone organ 

transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or 

other immune system disorders, some 

elderly, and infants can be particularly 

at risk from infections.  These people 

should seek advice about drinking 

water from their health care providers.  

EPA/CDC (Centers for Disease Control) 

guidelines on appropriate means to 

lessen the risk of infection by 



Cryptosporidium and other microbial 

contaminants are available from the 

Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-

426-4791). 

 

We will be happy to answer any 



questions about MMU and your water 

quality.  Call Ginny Ismay at 660-886-

6966.  For additional information on 

MMU, please visit our web site at  

www.mmumo.net.  Water quality data 

for community water systems in the 

United States is available on the 

Internet at www.waterdata.com. 



Page 4 

Health effects of total trihalomethanes 

Some people who drink water containing trihalomethanes in excess of 

the MCL over many years may experience problems with their liver, kid-

neys, or central nervous system and may have an increased risk of getting 

cancer. 

In 2016, MMU had a violation of the following drinking water regulation: 

Total trihalomethanes (TTHMs) 

 

Compliance periods 



 

July 1 through September 30 

 

October 1 through December 31 



 

Type of violation — exceeding the MCL for TTHMs 

 

Additional information on the levels of TTHMs found in the Marshall wa-



ter supply is on page 2.  You can find the full copy of the public notices 

provided by going to www.mmumo.net/notice.pdf. 



Special Notice 

Water Quality Report 2016 



Page 4 

Water Quality Report 2016 



What is Being Done to Reduce Trihalomethane Levels? 

MMU has undertaken a $5,000,000 project to reduce the level of total triha-

lomethanes as well as haloacetic acids.  The project includes: 

 

Switching to chloramines as the disinfectant used to protect the water qual-



ity, 

 

Inserting mixers in MMU’s storage facilities in town, 



 

Constructing a 500,000 gallon storage facility at the Water Treatment Plant, 

 

Replacing the existing pumps used to pump water to town, 



 

Inserting baffles in the existing clearwells (in-plant 

storage), 

 

Replacing flow meters at the Water Treatment 



Plant, 

 

Upgrading controls at the Water Treatment Plant, 



and 

 

Constructing a new laboratory and office facility. 



Construction started in January 2017 and will con-

tinue for about a year. 



Substance 

Unit 

Result/ Average 

Range 

Source 

Chlorate 

ppb 

794 


298 — 1860 

By-product of drinking water 

disinfection 

Chromium — 

total 

ppb 


1.16 

0.89 — 1.38 

 

Naturally-occurring element. 



Used in making steel and other 

alloys. 


Chromium-6 

ppb 


1.5 

1.1 —1.9 

Naturally-occurring element. 

Used in making steel and other 

alloys. 

Strontium 

ppb 

121 


114 — 134 

Naturally-occurring element.  

Used in manufacturing. 

Vanadium 

ppb 

1.01 


0.81 — 1.32 

Naturally-occurring elemental 

metal.  Used in manufacturing 

Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring

 

tion is warranted. 



 

Contaminant monitoring is 

part of process used to pro-

tect drinking water.  Health 

information is necessary to 

know whether these contami-

nants pose a health risk, but it 

is often incomplete for un-

regulated contaminants.  This 

monitoring examines what 

may be in drinking water, but 

additional health information 

is needed to know whether 

these contaminants pose a 

risk. 

 

Every five years, EPA issues a 



list of no more than 30 un-

regulated contaminants that 

public water systems must 

monitor for. 

 

Unregulated contaminants 



are those for which EPA has 

not established drinking wa-

ter standards. 

 

The purpose of unregulated 



contaminant monitoring is to 

assist EPA in determining the 

occurrence of unregulated 

contaminants in drinking wa-

ter and whether future regula-

 

Information on all the un-



regulated contaminants that 

were monitored for can be 

obtained from this water sys-

tem or the Department of 

Natural Resources. 

 

Below are those contami-



nants that were detected in 

Marshall’s water supply in 

2013 and 2014. 

 

Another round of monitoring 



for unregulated contaminants 

will occur in 2018—2020. 



Page 5 

Water Quality Report 2016 

Using too much water?  Check that toilet!  A 

running toilet can waste hundreds of gallons of 

water per day.  One simple way to do so is to 

add food coloring to the toilet tank and let it 

sit without flushing overnight or during the day 

when no one is home.  If there 

is red color in the bowl after 

letting it sit, you have a leaking 

toilet tank.  Get it fixed; don’t 

flush money down the drain! 

MMU allowed the Division of Geology and Land Survey 

(DGLS) to place water level monitoring equipment in one 

of its monitoring wells.  The monitoring equipment relays 

information to DGLS on a daily 

basis on how far down it is to the 

water level .  This well is one of a 

number in the state that allows 

DGLS to track groundwater levels  

in the various aquifers in the state, 

helpful information during 

droughts. 


 

Community water sys-

tems, such as MMU, con-

duct routine monitoring 

at selected houses.  The 

results of  the most re-

cent monitoring are on 

page 2. 


 

If present, elevated levels 

of lead can cause serious 

health problems, espe-

cially for pregnant 

women and young chil-

dren.  Lead in drinking 

water is primarily from 

materials and compo-

nents associated with 

service lines and home 

plumbing.  MMU is re-

sponsible for providing 

high quality drinking wa-

ter but cannot control the 

variety of materials used 

in plumbing compo-

nents. 


 

When your water has 

been sitting for several 

hours, you can minimize 

the potential for lead ex-

posure by flushing your 

tap for 30 seconds to 2 

minutes before using wa-

ter for drinking or cook-

ing. 


 

If you are concerned 

about lead in your water, 

you may wish to have 

your water tested.  Infor-

mation on lead in drink-

ing water, testing meth-

ods, and steps you can 

take to minimize expo-

sure is available from the 

Safe Drinking Water Hot-

line or at www.epa.gov/ 



safewater/lead

 

Lead is a naturally-



occurring metal that for 

most of the 20th century 

was used regularly as a 

component of paint, piping 

(including water service 

lines), solder, brass, and 

until the 1980s, as a gaso-

line additive.  Lead is no 

longer used in many of 

these products, but older 

products - such as paints 

and plumbing fixtures in 

older houses - that contain 

lead remain.  EPA and 

CDC report that lead paint 

(and the contaminated dust 

and soil that it generates) is 

the leading source of lead 

exposure in older housing. 

 

While lead is rarely present 



in water coming from a 

water treatment plant, it 

can enter tap water 

through corrosion of some 

plumbing materials. 

 

A number of aggressive 



and successful steps have 

been taken in recent years 

to reduce the occurrence 

of lead in drinking water: 

 

In 1986, Congress 



amended the national Safe 

Drinking Water Act to pro-

hibit the use of pipe, sol-

der, or flux containing high 

lead levels. 

 

The Lead Contamination 



Control Act of 1988 led 

schools and daycare cen-

ters to repair or remove 

water coolers with lead-

lined tanks.  EPA provided 

guidance to inform and 

facilitate their  action. 

Lead and Copper Monitoring

 

Kyle Gibbs, General Manager 



75 E. Morgan 

Marshall, Missouri  65340 

Phone:  660.886.6966 

Fax:  660.886.6724 

E-mail:  mmumo.net 

www.mmumo.net 



Page 6 

F

UN

 W

ATER

 F

ACTS

 

 

Much more fresh water is stored 



under the ground in aquifers than 

on the earth’s surface.

 

 

If the world’s entire water supply  



could fit in a 1 gallon jug, the 

fresh water available for use 

would equal only about one table-

spoon.

  

  Water expands by 9% when it 



freezes making ice lighter than  

water. This is why ice floats in  

water. 


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling