Superconductivity, including high-temperature superconductivity


Download 2.75 Mb.

bet1/21
Sana22.02.2017
Hajmi2.75 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   21

SUPERCONDUCTIVITY, INCLUDING HIGH-TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTIVITY

Manifestation of Hubbard and covalent correlations in the absorption spectra

of YBa

2

Cu

3

O

6

¿

x

films

V. V. Eremenko,

a)

V. N. Samovarov, V. N. Svishchev, V. L. Vakula, M. Yu. Libin,



and S. A. Uyutnov

B. Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering, National Academy of Sciences

of Ukraine, pr. Lenina 47, 61164 Kharkov, Ukraine

͑Submitted February 28, 2000; revised April 13, 2000͒

Fiz. Nizk. Temp. 26, 739–754

͑August 2000͒

The absorption spectra of single-crystal YBa

2

Cu



3

O

6



ϩx

films with various doping levels in the

range from x

Ϸ0.35 to xϷ0.9 are measured in the energy region 0.3–3 eV. An analysis

of the spectral composition of the absorption is made with allowance for intraband and interband

transitions and the local dd transitions in the Cu

2

ϩ

ion. It is concluded that the dd band



͑the transition d

xy

d



x

2

Ϫy



2

at 1.5 eV

͒ reflects the enhancement of the covalent bonding (pd

hybridization

͒ upon metallization and that the spectral feature at Ϸ1.8 eV carries

information about the contribution of electronic correlations, since it is sensitive to the opening

of a spin gap in the insulator and to antiferromagnetic fluctuations in the metal. Although

the covalent (

Ϸ1.5 eV͒ and correlation (Ϸ1.8 eV͒ absorption peaks compete with each other, the

coexistence of these bands in the metal supports the validity of a model based on the

correlation polaron — a charge carrier which creates a region of covalent bonding in a Hubbard

matrix of antiferromagnetic fluctuations.

© 2000 American Institute of Physics.

͓S1063-777X͑00͒00108-0͔



1. INTRODUCTION

Copper oxide high-T



c

superconductors

͑HTSCs͒ are sys-

tems with strong electronic

͑Hubbard͒ correlations. In these

materials the Wilson parameter, which characterizes the re-

sponse of a system to the turning on of correlations, has a

value R



W

ϭ͓



2

k

B

2

/(3





B

2

)



͔(

0



/

)



Ϸ2, where

0



and

are



the magnetic susceptibility and the coefficient in front of the

electronic part of the specific heat

͑in the absence of corre-

lations R



W

ϭ1). A number of other materials with high val-

ues R

W

Ϸ2 are known, but they are either nonsuperconduct-

ing or have low superconducting transition temperatures.

These include various pd compounds of metals and p

ligands, heavy-fermion compounds based on rare-earth f

metals, and the layered material Sr

2

RuO


4

, which is isostruc-

tural with La

2

Ϫx



Sr

x

CuO


4

͑Refs. 1–3͒. Some specific ex-

amples are the nonsuperconducting metallic phase of

NiSe


1

Ϫx

S

x

, with R



W

Ϸ2, and the superconducting phases

UPt

3

(T



c

Ϸ0.5 K͒ and Sr

2

RuO


4

(T



c

Ϸ1 K͒, with R



W

ϭ1.7–


1.9. Therefore the Coulomb correlations in themselves are

insufficient for the onset of high-temperature superconduc-

tivity.

For HTSCs an important factor, besides the electronic



correlations, is the dimensionality of the system. As a rule,

low-temperature superconducting materials with strong elec-

tronic correlations are three-dimensional metals at room tem-

perature or rapidly become three-dimensional as the tem-

perature is lowered

͑e.g., Sr

2

RuO


4

).

3



HTSCs with a CuO

2

active plane remain quasi-two-dimensional over a wide



range of temperature and doping: in the antiferromagnetic

͑AFM͒ phase the ratio of the longitudinal to the transverse

exchange integral is J

ʈ

/J



Ќ

Ϸ10


4

, and in the metallic phase

the ratio of the conductivities is

ʈ



/

Ќ



Ϸ10

3

–10



4

. Pro-


nounced metallic behavior of the resistance along the axis

and dominance of the Drude component of the optical con-

ductivity for the transverse direction in the Y and La com-

pounds are observed in the region above the optimal doping,

where the samples begin to lose their superconducting

properties.

1,4

The importance of two-dimensional



͑2D͒ electronic cor-

relations for high-temperature superconductivity is not in

doubt. They must be taken into account in constructing the

phase diagrams and for explaining the transition to an AFM

insulator state having strong electronic correlations, for de-

scribing the density of states in the AFM phase and the ex-

istence of an insulator gap with charge transfer in that phase,

and for understanding the role of the magnetic degrees of

freedom with highly developed AFM fluctuations of the

short-range order at temperatures considerably above the

Ne´el point T

N

. In the metallic 2D phase the contribution of

the Coulomb interactions, even if they are weak, has been

considered as the cause responsible for the persistence of

magnetic fluctuations

͑which are possible vehicles for the

pairing of carriers

͒ and for the spin pseudogap and Hubbard

gap with charge transfer from the oxygen to the copper.

These features of the metallic 2D phase give rise to a number

of unusual electrical, optical, and magnetic properties,

which, taken together, have caused the metallic phase of

HTSCs to be called a ‘‘strange metal’’ or an ‘‘almost anti-

ferromagnetic Fermi liquid.’’

5–7

The majority of the theoret-



ical approaches to the study of this state are based on the 

LOW TEMPERATURE PHYSICS

VOLUME 26, NUMBER 8

AUGUST 2000

541

1063-777X/2000/26(8)/12/$20.00



© 2000 American Institute of Physics

model, and various aspects of these studies from the stand-

point of providing an adequate description of the experimen-

tal data are discussed in Refs. 5–9, for example.

The covalent contribution to the electronic properties is

of the opposite nature, with the electrons tending toward col-

lectivization. Superconductors based on covalent bonding in-

clude the quasi-2D

͑layered͒ transition-metal dichalco-

genides with T

c

р10 K, for which the electronic correlations

are unimportant.

10

With intercalation of organic molecules



the distance between the metallic layers with covalent bond-

ing can be increased to 50 Å with hardly any affect on T



c

.

The pyridine-containing compound TaS



2

͑Py͒


0.5

even under-

goes a transition to a regime of ‘‘quasi-2D superconductiv-

ity’’ with a classical phonon pairing mechanism.

10

In the formation of the spectrum of carriers in HTSCs



the pd covalence factor is also extremely important and,

generally speaking, coexists with the Coulomb correlation

factor. The situation is best demonstrated by the correlation

polaron model proposed in Ref. 11. A correlation polaron is

a charge carrier that creates around itself a region of covalent

bonding with weak electronic correlations, while outside this

region the matrix of strong Hubbard interactions is pre-

served. Upon magnetic ordering the correlation polaron is

dressed by a ‘‘fur coat’’ of antiferromagnetic fluctuations.

11

It is now clear that the mutual competition and coexistence



of pd mixing and Hubbard interactions must be taken into

account in any model of cuprate HTSCs.

In view of all we have said, it is an important experi-

mental problem to investigate the balance between the cor-

relation

͑AFM-fluctuation͒ and covalent contributions as the

doping level and temperature of a HTSC are varied, includ-

ing at the superconducting transition.

In this paper we set out to find optical ‘‘markers’’ for

diagnostics of the balance between these interactions. De-

tailed

measurements



of

the


absorption

spectra


of

YBa


2

Cu

3



O

6

ϩx



single-crystal films of various compositions

were made in the near-IR and visible regions of the spectrum

͑0.3–3 eV͒. The data suggest that the correlation contribu-

tion


͑the influence of AFM fluctuations͒ is reflected in the

absorption band around 1.8 eV and the covalent contribution

in the two dd bands around 1.5 and 2.3 eV. Upon doping

these spectral features, in competition with each other, coex-

ist in the metal with T

c

ϭ73.5 K. We interpret this picture as

additional evidence for the existence of the correlation po-

laron.


2. DESIGN OF OPTICAL EXPERIMENTS

The frequency range of interest for studying the elec-

tronic system of HTSCs as a function of doping and tem-

perature extends all the way from the far-infrared to the ul-

traviolet. One need only point out that optical sensitivity to

superconductivity has been detected at photon energies much

greater than the width of the superconducting gap in

HTSCs.


12,13

This effect has no analog in classical supercon-

ductors.

In the high-frequency region



Ͼ10



Ϫ1

eV the optical

spectrum of cuprate HTSCs is of a multicomponent nature,

containing intraband

͑MIR͒ transitions (ប

Ͻ1 eV͒, inter-



band charge-transfer

͑CT͒ transitions (ប

Ͼ1.7 eV͒, and



transitions to Cu

2

ϩ



and Cu

ϩ

local centers



͑0.5–4 eV͒. For

investigating the covalent bonding the transitions in the

Cu

2

ϩ



ion are of particular interest, since this ion is located in

the field of the oxygen ligands. In YBa

2

Cu

3



O

6

ϩx



the Cu

2

ϩ



ion of the CuO

2

plane is found in a fivefold-coordination



environment, with the apical oxygen O

͑4͒ at the apex of the

pyramid. In a field of cubic symmetry the O

h

orbitals of

Cu

2

ϩ



(3d

9

) are split, as we know, into a twofold degenerate



state e

g

and a threefold degenerate state t

2g

͑see Fig. 1͒. The

axial elongation of the pyramid lifts the degeneracy, and the

following dd transitions occurs to the unoccupied

͑hole͒ or-

bital d



x

2

Ϫy



2

͑see Fig. 1͒: d



z

2

d



x

2

Ϫy



2

(a

1g

b

1g

), d



xy

d



x

2

Ϫy



2

(b

2g

b

1g

), and d



xz,y z

d



x

2

Ϫy



2

(e



g

b

1g

). Al-


though the transition energies vary, depending on the type of

ligand atom and the degree of tetragonal (D

4h

) distortion,

they lie, on the whole, in the region 0.5–2.5 eV.

14

For



HTSCs the experimental data and theoretical estimates for

the lowest transition d



z

2

d



x

2

Ϫy



2

give a value

Ϸ0.5 eV.

8,15


For our present purposes the transition d

xy

d



x

2

Ϫy



2

is of


interest. Like all of the other even–even dd transitions, it is

forbidden in absorption, but it has been observed

15

in absorp-



tion in the form of a weak spectral feature around 1.5 eV

in the insulator phase of the cuprates La

2

CuO


4

and


Sr

2

CuO



2

Cl

2



. The absorption coefficient is small (

Ϸ10



3

cm

Ϫ1



).

FIG. 1. Schematic illustration of the splitting of the orbitals of Cu

2

ϩ

and



the spectral dependence of the density of states for different doping levels:

underdoping

͑a͒, optimal doping ͑b͒, and overdoping ͑c͒. The arrows indi-

cate the possible optical transitions; LHB and UHB are the lower and upper

Hubbard bands, respectively.

542


Low Temp. Phys. 26 (8), August 2000

Eremenko


et al.

Meanwhile, by virtue of the dd forbiddenness, this tran-

sition is well expressed in the Raman scattering

͑RS͒ spectra

of the insulator phase of YBa

2

Cu

3



O

6

ϩx



with x

Ͻ0.4 at 1.5

eV

16

and 1.56 eV.



17

When the doping is increased above x

Ϸ0.4 this transition in the RS spectra is strongly

attenuated.

16

This behavior of the RS spectra indicates that



the lifting of the dd forbiddenness is due to enhancement of

the pd mixing on doping. Therefore, the degree to which this

transition is manifested in the absorption spectra can serve as

a measure of the pd covalence. We note that the covalence

enhances the absorption most strongly for the dd transitions,

increasing the absorption coefficient to values typical for the

allowed charge-transfer transitions,

Ϸ10



5

cm

Ϫ1



͑Ref. 14͒.

The importance of pd hybridization for the enhancement of

spin-allowed dd transitions in copper oxides is given a the-

oretical justification in Ref. 18.

Let us now turn to the possibility of using the absorption

spectra to study the correlation contribution. The electronic

correlations in Hubbard systems generally give rise to a peak

in the density of states for quasiparticles near the top of the

lower Hubbard band

͑HB͒, which is separated from the upper

HB by the Hubbard gap

͑see Fig. 1͒. This feature arises

independently of the approach chosen for obtaining the spec-

tral dependence of the density of states, N(

): the single-



band Hubbard model with

1,7


and without

19

allowance for



AFM fluctuations, the polaron model of copper–oxygen

Zhang–Rice singlets,

20

and the model of infinite spatial



dimensionality.

21

In particular, in the ‘‘magnetic’’ approach



the appearance of the peak in the N(

) structure is a conse-



quence of the interaction of charge carriers with AFM fluc-

tuations, which develop intensively at temperatures below

the characteristic energy of the exchange interaction, J

Ϸ4t

2

/U



Ϸ10

3

K, where t



Ϸ0.2–0.3 eV is the amplitude of

the intersite transfer, and U

Ϸ2 –3 eV is the effective Hub-

bard energy in cuprate oxides. For a model with an infinite

spatial dimensionality the onset of a peak in the density of

states is considered to be a manifestation of a collective

Kondo resonance.

21

In any case the peak is is a consequence



of the formation of coherent states for quasiparticles. The

width of this coherent peak is determined by the creation and

disappearance of magnons in the motion of current carriers

and is approximately equal to 3in the metallic phase.

9

The


peak appears against the background of a broad continuum

of incoherent hole states of the upper and lower HBs. The

width of the lower HB is approximately 8t

Ϸ2 eV. As the

doping is increased and the system approaches an ordinary

metal with Fermi degeneracy, the spectral weight of the co-

herent component increases on account of a decrease in the

weight of the incoherent component

͑primarily owing to a

redistribution of the states of the upper HB in the near-Fermi

and optical-gap regions

͒. A decrease in the states of the up-

per HB should lead to a substantial lowering of the intensity

of interband CT transitions across the optical gap E



g

upon


metallization

͑see Fig. 1͒. Simultaneously there should be an

increase in the intraband transitions from the lower HB to the

region of coherent hole states, which expands with doping.

These transitions mainly lie at



ϽE

g

in the near- and mid-

infrared regions

͑for brevity, mid-IR͒. This redistribution of

the states has been considered in different models incorpo-

rating electronic correlations.

1,7,19,21

Therefore, the integral

redistribution of the absorption spectra between the interband

and intraband transitions

͑and also the optical conductivity

spectra


͒ reflect the evolution of the correlation contribution.

Another approach to studying the correlation effects that

are the focus of our attention in this paper is based on sepa-

rating out from the absorption spectra those spectral features

that carry information about the coherent peak of the density

of states. For the coherent peak the character of the disper-

sion for charge carriers depends on the direction of the qua-

simomentum. For example, along the

⌫ –M direction of the

Brillouin zone the carriers interact intensely with AFM fluc-

tuations and, as a consequence, have a large mass

͑hot qua-

siparticles

͒, but for other directions of the 2D Brillouin zone

the interaction is strongly attenuated

͑cold quasiparticles͒;

see Ref. 22 and the references cited therein. We note that,

according to the common belief, for interband optical transi-

tions the absorption involving transitions from the heavy-

hole band is dominant over the absorption involving transi-

tions from the light-hole band. For heavy enough holes an

‘‘excitonlike’’ absorption peak can form at the long-

wavelength edge of the interband transitions, even in a

metal.


23

In this connection we mention the well-known phe-

nomenological model of Hirsch,

24

according to which the



spectra of a HTSC should contain a narrow band due to

transitions from strongly correlated

͑localized͒ states against

the background of a broader band due to transitions from

unlocalized

͑itinerant͒ states. We note that the heavy carriers

can be regarded as copper holes, for which the correlation

contribution is appreciable on account of the possibility of

formation of Cu

3

ϩ



, and the light carriers as due to the motion

of oxygen holes O

Ϫ

. It is clear that the spectral feature for



the heavy holes must lie near the charge-transfer gap E

g

Ϸ1.5–2 eV or is contained in the ‘‘excitonlike’’ edge

maxima. In the experimental paper of Ref. 25, following the

theoretical conclusions of Ref. 20, the absorption band with

maximum at



Ϸ2 eV at the edge of the charge-transfer

optical gap in Sr

2

CuO


2

Cl

2



was attributed to the density of

states peak of Zhang–Rice singlets.

With allowance for the magnetic ordering, proof of the

‘‘correlation’’ nature of the narrow spectral feature should be

provided by its interrelationship with the magnetic degrees

of freedom that form the coherent maximum. Of particular

interest in this regard are studies of lightly doped

YBa


2

Cu

3



O

6

ϩx



films with x

ϭ0.3–0.4 at the boundary of the

transition to a well-conducting metal, where the correlation

effects for the heavy itinerant charge carriers are most

strongly expressed. In this boundary state the long-range

AFM order is already quite strongly disrupted and at T

Ϸ300 K a spin liquid is formed, with AFM correlation

lengths


Ϸ100–150 Å. ͑In layered cuprates T



N

ϷJ

Ќ

(



/a)

2

͑Ref. 1͒, where J



Ќ

Ϸ0.2 K is the value of the exchange in-

teraction between CuO

2

bilayers, and a



Ϸ4 Å is the distance

between copper centers. In YBa

2

Cu

3



O

6

ϩx



with x

ϭ0.3–0.4


we have T

N

Ͻ250 K͒. According to Ref. 7, in the spin-

fluctuation model for the formation of the coherent peak the

quasiparticle density of states at the Fermi level is close to

maximum

͑for T→0) in a metal far from the boundary of the



metal–insulator transition. For YBa

2

Cu



3

O

6



ϩx

this situation

corresponds to the ortho-II phase with x

Ͻ0.6 (T



c

Ͻ60 K͒.


543

Low Temp. Phys. 26 (8), August 2000

Eremenko

et al.



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   21


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling