Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


 Telegram From the Mission to the Organization for


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet39/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   ...   95

107. Telegram From the Mission to the Organization for

Economic Cooperation and Development to the Department

of State

1

Paris, October 29, 1976, 1940Z.



32138. Subject: CIEC: Text of G–8 Paper on Energy Investment Ta-

bled by U.S. in ENC.

2

Begin text:

Proposal for Cooperation in Energy Investment

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D760404–0665.



Unclassified; Priority. Repeated to all OECD capitals, Algiers, Jidda, Buenos Aires, Brasi-

lia, Yaounde, New Delhi, Jakarta, Baghdad, Tehran, Kingston, Mexico City, Lagos, Islam-

abad, Lima, Cairo, Caracas, Belgrade, Lusaka, Kinshasa, and USUN.

2

The seventh round of the CIEC commissions was held in Paris October 20–28. Dis-



cussion on the first day was devoted to an EC working paper on “Energy Cooperation”

that had been introduced on the last day of the September round. The Saudi co-chairman

described the paper as an “attempt to establish a mechanism which could be used to de-

prive producer countries of their ‘sovereign right’ to dispose of their resources as they

saw fit.” (Telegram 31366 from USOECD Paris, October 22; ibid., D760397–0268) The Oc-

tober 22 and 23 sessions are summarized in telegram 31467 from USOECD Paris, October

25; the October 25 and 26 sessions in telegram 31793 from USOECD Paris, October 27;

and the October 27 and 28 sessions in telegram 32132 from USOECD Paris, October 29.

(All ibid., D760399–0139, D760401–0556, D760404–0652)


365-608/428-S/80010

376 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

1. Participating countries recognize that the establishment and

maintenance of a satisfactory global balance of energy supply and de-

mand during and beyond the transition period will require major capi-

tal investment in the exploration, development, and utilization of new

energy, both conventional and non-conventional. It is recognized that

in order to create a climate more conducive to investment under mutu-

ally satisfactory conditions, international cooperation on a continuing

basis should be intensified.

2. The industrialized countries recognize the need to facilitate in-

vestment in the development of energy resources, conventional and

non-conventional, in their own territories and in the developing coun-

tries commensurate with the urgent need to assure adequate world en-

ergy supplies. In this regard, they recognize the need to maintain and

improve access to capital markets by the developing countries.

3. The oil exporting countries recognize the need to take account of

the world’s requirements for energy, and in particular requirements for

oil and gas, during the transition period in formulating their plans for

investment in new production capacity and supporting infrastructure.

4. The participating countries recognize that the accelerated devel-

opment of the indigenous energy resources, conventional and non-

conventional, of the energy deficient developing countries is essential

to the economic progress of these countries. This development will re-

quire major amounts of capital. The industrialized and oil exporting

countries, to a greater or lesser extent, are the primary sources of such

capital.

5. Participating countries recognize the important role the private

sector plays in providing much of the capital, as well as much of the

technology and know-how, for the exploration and development of the

energy resources of the energy deficient developing countries. It is also

recognized that, in order to facilitate the flow of such capital into en-

ergy resource development in the EDDCs, unnecessary constraints

should be reduced. In this respect, cooperation agreements between in-

vesting and host countries could be appropriate in some cases. Foreign

investment should be consistent with the needs of the host countries

and make an optimum contribution to the fulfillment of their economic

development plans.

6. The Energy Commission conducted a preliminary examination

of the proposal to establish an International Resources Bank to facilitate

investment in raw materials, including energy, in developing coun-

tries, with particular attention to its potential to facilitate increased in-

vestment in energy development in the energy deficient developing

countries. The participating countries welcome the recent decision by

the IBRD/IMF Development Committee to study the International Re-

sources Bank proposal and suggest that the Development Committee’s



365-608/428-S/80010

October 1975–January 1977 377

examination of the proposal take account of the urgent need of many

developing countries to reduce their dependence on imported energy.

7. It is also recognized that the official international lending institu-

tions have played and will continue to play an important role in the de-

velopment of indigenous energy resources in the energy deficient de-

veloping countries. Participating countries recommend that these

institutions, in the context of their overall development lending activ-

ities, recognize the urgency of the energy investment requirements, in-

cluding infrastructure, of such countries.

End text.

Katz

108. Memorandum of Conversation

1

Washington, October 30, 1976.



PARTICIPANTS

Secretary Kissinger

Mr. Robinson, Deputy Secretary

Mr. Rogers, Under Secretary for Economic Affairs

Mr. Katz, Assistant Secretary for Economic & Business Affairs

Mr. Atherton, Assistant Secretary for Near East and South Asian Affairs

Jock Covey, notetaker

SUBJECT


OPEC Price Increase

Robinson: There are two reasons for this meeting. One, to make it

clear that an OPEC price increase would have a crucial effect on Euro-

pean economies and, secondly, that the only strategic thinking that

anyone has shown so far is contained in the Presidential letters

2

that



you saw a couple of days ago—and nobody feels that these letters will

be a breakthrough.

Kissinger: No, the only thing the Arabs understand is threats and

promises.

1

Source: Library of Congress, Manuscript Division, Kissinger Papers, Box CL 180,



Geopolitical File, Middle East. Secret; Sensitive; Nodis.

2

See Document 110.



365-608/428-S/80010

378 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

Katz: They know that they will bear the burden of the

consequences.

Kissinger: That is crap! They know no such thing.

Atherton: The Saudis do.

Kissinger: But you know the Shah does not understand.

Rogers: He thinks in terms of the myth. He just doesn’t understand

how rickety the UK and Italian economies are. We can propose an ac-

tion program right now, but we probably should wait until Tuesday to

decide who we should send out there.

Kissinger: Who did you have in mind?

Rogers: Any of us or maybe Alan Greenspan.

Kissinger: Absolutely not! The present state of our own economy is

proof that it would be stupid to send him. He is a slightly more pol-

ished version of Zarb, who did such a great job on the Iran oil deal. The

Shah will not listen to another amateur in business for himself.

Katz: You think it would be better to send someone from outside

the government?

Kissinger: Sure.

Atherton: What about David Rockefeller?

Kissinger: Too soft.

Robinson: If production limits do not go up, then the prices will go

up. The Saudis are expecting us to be responsible and by that they

mean they expect us to show responsibility in arms sales and in our

handling of the boycott and in our behavior in CIEC.

Kissinger: CIEC! Bullshit! They have nothing to gain in CIEC.

Robinson: You are absolutely right, but that is what they are

saying. The oil companies are accelerating the whole process by paying

up to a 50¢ premium on the oil they are buying now. They are laying in

their stocks before the price goes up and they expect to make a large

profit on it and they have clearly signalled that they expect a price in-

crease. Now we have got to make it clear to these guys how disastrous a

price increase would be for the situation in the UK and Italy. These

guys are not naive. They are among the most sophisticated economists

in the world, but they must be motivated. We have to get to them but

we cannot do it ourselves. We have to coordinate this with the British

and with the Italians.

Kissinger: Bullshit!

Robinson: We should not be in the position of pleading for Europe.

Kissinger: I want Porter to get back there. There is no sense not

having our Ambassador in place there. He is doing us no good on that

promotion board. Do you think you need him there?

Atherton: It’s not all that busy.



365-608/428-S/80010

October 1975–January 1977 379

Rogers: The OPEC price increase is the biggest financial event in

years.


Robinson: It does not look as if we are concerned.

Kissinger: Just get him back there and I need by Monday a strategy

paper.

3

For the Saudis we have to consider arms, discriminatory legis-



lation . . . but I do not think we can get the UK and the Italians to go

along.


Robinson: I just don’t think we should be in the position of

pleading for the Europeans.

Kissinger: They will not get out in front. They will try to show that

they are all good boys and after all, we are pleading for the world

economy. But we will never get anybody—not the French, maybe the

Germans.


Let’s have a talk with the French, British and Germans. See what

they think about the price increases and what they will be doing to deal

with it. What penalties do they suggest to try to avoid it?

Robinson: What about the Japanese?

Katz: They will run.

Kissinger: They are all terrified. The Japanese will not join any-

thing. Let’s do this on an informal basis. Ask the Ambassadors in

Washington to get papers. Can you (Robinson) follow that?

Robinson: Yes. Just a word on Mexico. They need capital to de-

velop the Gulf oil field. The idea is to get U.S. oil companies to partici-

pate—to be paid out of future proceeds.

Kissinger: How would you do that?

Robinson: Jova discussed the plan with Lopez-Portillo. He says

that he is receptive to the idea. We ought to have someone go down

there, though . . .

Kissinger: Who do you have in mind?

Robinson: Bill Rogers would be good.

Kissinger: Fine.

3

Not found.



365-608/428-S/80010

380 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



109. Memorandum of Conversation

1

Washington, November 8, 1976, 2:30 p.m.



SUBJECT

OPEC Meeting on Oil Price and CIEC Ministerial

PARTICIPANTS

The Secretary

The Deputy Secretary

Under Secretary Rogers

Assistant Secretary Atherton

Paul Boeker, EB

Richard Vine, EUR

Robert Hormats, NSC

Stephen Bosworth, EB/ORF (Notetaker)

[Omitted here is discussion unrelated to energy issues.]

The Secretary: All right, on OPEC . . . what are we trying to

accomplish?

Rogers: We want at a minimum to eliminate any OPEC price in-

crease or even to have the current freeze extended. The issue has enor-

mous significance. A 15 percent price increase will reduce the GNP of

the seven largest industrialized countries by $32 billion.

The Secretary: Why?

Rogers: That is assuming no offsetting policy measures. It will

happen because . . .

The Secretary: How did we keep Joan Braden

2

out of this meeting?



Rogers: I am having another meeting on this subject. She will be in-

cluded. Do you want her here?

The Secretary: No.

Rogers: A 15 percent increase for the US will impact on our trade

balance by $11 billion. It will reduce GNP growth from 5½ to 4½

percent.


The Secretary: How do we answer the Shah’s point when he asks

why he should pay the price of our lousy policy?

Rogers: In fact, the increase of his import costs is only 4 percent. He

has no case for price increase.

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, P820118–1904. Se-



cret; Nodis. Drafted by Bosworth on November 19. The meeting was held in the Secre-

tary’s office.

2

Consumer Affairs Coordinator and Special Assistant, Bureau of Economic and



Business Affairs.

365-608/428-S/80010

October 1975–January 1977 381

Robinson: This is basically correct. But the Shah and the rest of

OPEC feel that the best [last?] price adjustments were not adequate. The

LDCs will be the hardest hit. A 15 percent increase would raise the oil

bill by $3.2 billion. And exports would also be hit, but in effect, the total

cost would be perhaps $5 billion. The LDCs’, of course, strongest argu-

ment is for holding down prices. But the OPEC also claim that we are

not reducing oil consumption and that they will be helping us to do

that by raising prices.

The Secretary: This is just an elegant way of saying that market

conditions are favorable to an increase.

Robinson: We must bring every effort to bear on this.

The Secretary: Another round of bleeding argument won’t work.

What does Porter say about this?

Robinson: Saudi Arabia has already said it won’t support an

increase.

The Secretary: But that is what the Saudis always say.

Hormats: We must also pressure Iran and Venezuela.

The Secretary: What is our pressure?

Rogers: We have the arms supply point, the bids to fill the strategic

oil reserve, and our imports of the LNG.

The Secretary: The SOR is no longer of interest to them. They are

now selling as much as they can produce. The SOR is now bidding up

the oil price. This is a classic example of why we are in this mess. We

had a 15-month window in which we could have had a $1 price cut. The

geniuses wanted $3. It is a classic horror story of what happens when

we subordinate strategy to bureaucracy.

Atherton: It is not typical of the Shah to react favorably to a threat

on the arms issue. It would be more likely that he would call our bluff

and go elsewhere.

The Secretary: It is not viable unless we get French cooperation. I

am more inclined to get the IEA together and say what we are going to

do.


Rogers: That is important, but it doesn’t impact on the decision.

The Secretary: I think we ought to meet with the IEA at as high a

level as possible.

Rogers: Why not at your level? We could call urgently for a

meeting to discuss the price increase.

Robinson: Some of these things are better pursued bilaterally.

The Secretary: We can arrange that in the context of an IEA

meeting.


Hormats: The IEA might be somewhat too public. Bilaterals with

key Europeans followed by emissaries to key OPEC countries might be

more suitable.


365-608/428-S/80010

382 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

The Secretary: Who would we send?

Hormats: It could be Bill or yourself.

(Secretary leaves briefly and then returns.)

Rogers: Mr. Secretary, I think we have an idea to propose. First, we

will have Jules Katz make a statement in the IEA meeting, which is go-

ing on today and tomorrow, about the OPEC price issue saying that we

want to consult.

3

We will then get the Ambassadors of four major coun-



tries (UK, Germany, France, and Japan) in here and say we want to be-

gin urgent consultations. We will stress that we should make coordi-

nated de´marches to the OPEC countries on arms. We will need to know

whether we can talk from a common front.

The Secretary: You can’t have the Japanese. They will go immedi-

ately to the Arabs and tell them everything.

Robinson: Do we know for sure that the UK doesn’t favor a price

increase?

Vine: Yes, they are sweating a possible increase.

The Secretary: OK, so we have a statement by Jules Katz.

Rogers: We will try to draft something right after this meeting.

Robinson: Shouldn’t we also have a public statement?

The Secretary: Yes, we have to do something publicly.

Rogers: First, we have to level with the public on the impact of a

price increase. We have the CIA analysis.

4

The Secretary: We can’t talk tough unless we say what we are



willing to do.

Rogers: We can then say we are consulting with the Europeans and

make de´marches to OPEC on possible consequences of price increase.

Would it be appropriate for you to say that?

The Secretary: When?

Rogers: As soon as possible.

The Secretary: Who will talk to the Ambassadors?

Rogers: You could do it, or I could do it.

The Secretary: You do it. Let’s get the Saudi Ambassador in here. I

want him to understand that this is not a minor matter. It could affect

the whole US attitude toward the Mid East.

3

Katz’s statement in the November 8–9 IEA meeting is in telegram 33245 from



USOECD Paris, November 9. (National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files,

D760417–0660) A summary of the meeting is in telegram 33428 from USOECD Paris, No-

vember 10. (Ibid., D760419–0298)

4

Not further identified. On November 12, The New York Times reported that a De-



partment of State spokesman said that the Department had told OPEC of U.S. opposition

to a price rise.



365-608/428-S/80010

October 1975–January 1977 383

Robinson: We should also do the Iranian.

The Secretary: Let’s get them both in here.

Atherton: I think a good argument is the one about getting off to a

good start with the new US Administration.

The Secretary: But the problem is that they would like to stick the

old Administration rather than the new one. I want to tell them that

if they increase the price, I’ll make sure they pay a heavy price

themselves.

Hormats: Another point is the international financial system. A

price increase could topple it. We have already massive LDC debt.

The Secretary: That is how we got Downey released from China.

We said his Mother was dying. They let him go and his Mother has

never looked better. We can try that argument, but I don’t think it’s too

strong. OK, within 48 hours I want the French, German, and British

Ambassadors in here. We want to talk about what coordination meas-

ures they would be willing to take. We will send letters from me to their

foreign ministers setting out the problem, indicating what might be

done, and asking for urgent consultations.

5

We want to know their atti-



tude toward particular items. In the meantime, I’ll see the Iranian and

Saudi Ambassadors.

Hormats: I think you should also include the Venezuelans.

The Secretary: OK. I don’t think anyone should visit these coun-

tries until we get some answer on the consultations with the

Europeans.

Rogers: I don’t see what Simon can do.

Robinson: He is PNG in Saudi Arabia from his last visit.

The Secretary: Why?

Robinson: He threw his weight around and aroused a lot of

antagonism.

Boeker: The political argument might be more effective. The Vice

President might be a more appropriate emissary.

The Secretary: You go and then have them turn us down; that will

cost us.

Hormats: But the only way to make these points is with a personal

visit.

Robinson: There is a problem in the Saudi Government on this



issue. With Yamani on one side and the King and others opposed.

5

Telegram 280066 to Londaon, Bonn, and Paris, November 13, transmitted the text



of Kissinger’s letter that Rogers gave to U.K., West German, and French Embassy officials

in Washington. The letter to the Foreign Ministers proposed “consultations on possible

common elements of approaches to the oil producers.” (National Archives, RG 59, Cen-

tral Foreign Policy Files, D760425–0190)



365-608/428-S/80010

384 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

Hormats: Fahd is the key.

The Secretary: There are two reasons to send someone—to see that

they are doing something and to see what, if anything, we can achieve.

Atherton: I like the idea of the Vice President.

The Secretary: That is out of the question.

Atherton: But they will listen to . . .

The Secretary: What about Ford?

Rogers: It won’t hurt his political future.

The Secretary: I have no problem with the Vice President, but let

that issue wait until we do the other things.

Boeker: There is one other issue which is related to this. The Euro-

peans are having trouble getting themselves together on CIEC, and

they may try to get it postponed and blame it on us.

The Secretary: I’m strongly in favor of postponing the CIEC Minis-

terial. Who’s been saying it should not be postponed?

Boeker: It may well happen, but that does not fit well with our plan

with oil price increase. If it is possible, OPEC will raise prices in Decem-

ber and then face us with a second price decision after a postponed

Ministerial. They will set us up for a double dip.

The Secretary: I don’t understand how anyone cannot favor a post-

ponement. I don’t understand what this Administration could produce

with only four months to go.

Robinson: That is right. The G–77 has asked Perez Guerrero

6

to go



to Carter. We also have a report that Kuwait wants a postponement.

The Secretary: That is fine.

Boeker: But can we accept the possibility that it is postponed be-

cause of us?

The Secretary: CIEC would be a disaster. We have no Administra-

tion that can take any decisions. Who is talking about our wanting a

December Ministerial?

Rogers: All we are saying is that we not take the initiative for

postponement.

The Secretary: Why don’t we take the initiative?

Robinson: I have already discussed with the French, the Dutch and

Australians.

Rogers: The problem is the Europeans would like to postpone it

and blame it on us. We should maintain our current position through

the November session.

6

Manuel Pe´rez Guerrero of Venezuela and Canadian Foreign Secretary Allan



MacEachen were co-chairmen of the CIEC.

365-608/428-S/80010

October 1975–January 1977 385

The Secretary: I don’t see what the advantage is of having it. If, by

the end of November, it is not postponed, then we should take the initi-

ative. We won’t deal and we shouldn’t give the impression that we can.

Boeker: But we have to be careful that we do not pay a price for

postponement. We don’t want to raise LDC expectations.

The Secretary: But what can we possibly produce. If the election

had gone the other way, I was willing to use CIEC to make a step for-

ward. But now it is senseless to try and do that. It would be irresponsi-

ble for us to try to take a major step in December. Nothing can come out

of the meeting four weeks before a change in Administration.

Robinson: A December CIEC meeting certainly won’t satisfy the

LDCs.


The Secretary: If it hasn’t been postponed by November 20, we

should take the initiative. I don’t know what I would do at the De-

cember Ministerial.

Rogers: We can wait through the November commission session.

The Secretary: We can’t possibly get a good package by De-

cember—only a bureaucratic deal.

Boeker: If we take the initiative on postponement we may have to

pay.


The Secretary: Why should we pay? Just tell them. Tell the Euro-

peans that on the whole we think postponement is in the interest of the

dialogue.

Hormats: It gives the LDCs a pretext. They can say we are drag-

ging our feet.

The Secretary: But we can’t go forward now and should just tell

them. They are not children.

Rogers: It is really their problem. That is, to decide whether to ter-

minate CIEC to take the chance of going forward.

The Secretary: They’d be nuts to break it off. Carter is likely to be

more forward. CIEC is not a way out of an oil price increase. If the Ad-

ministration were not changing we could have used the CIEC to head

off a price increase. Our position on the whole is that we prefer to defer

the Ministerial. If it is not deferred by the twentieth, then we must ac-

tively work to defer it. If we have it, I’ll send you (Robinson). There is

no function that I would have, and I could play games and make a great

speech, but so what? Tell MacEachen that this is our view. We won’t

say anything useful there. What can we possibly get out of Treasury

now?

Rogers: They will go for increasing ODA. We have a proposal on



your desk.

The Secretary: Fine.



365-608/428-S/80010

386 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

Hormats: We also need strategy for the LDCs.

The Secretary: Who do we approach?

Rogers: The moderate LDCs.

The Secretary: OK. We want letters to the Germans, French, and

British Foreign Ministers. Call in their Ambassadors and give them to

them. Get the Saudi and Iranian in for me, and the Venezuelan.

Robinson: Do we try to contact MacEachen before he meets with

Perez Guerrero?

The Secretary: Yes, tell him our views.

7

7



Telegram Tosec 320162/299942, December 10, informed Kissinger that Mac-

Eachen and Pe´rez Guerrero announced the postponement of the CIEC Ministerial until

the “first part” of 1977. (National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files,

D760455–1196)



Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling