Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


 Memorandum From Timothy Deal of the National Security


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet46/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   49   ...   95

131. Memorandum From Timothy Deal of the National Security

Council Staff to the President’s Assistant for National

Security Affairs (Brzezinski)

1

Washington, October 18, 1977.



SUBJECT

Oil Price Strategy

You are meeting today with Vance and Blumenthal to discuss oil

price strategy before Blumenthal leaves on his Middle East trip on

October 21.

State has prepared a sound strategy paper (Tab A)

2

which Vance



will use in the meeting. This is a vast improvement over earlier State

drafts; Bob Hormats’ hand is in evidence. In brief, this paper points out

that:

—There is some flexibility in OPEC’s position on oil prices. Saudi



Arabia, Iran and Venezuela are the key players and should be the focus

of our efforts to induce OPEC to take a moderate stance. Representa-

tions by the President, Vance, Blumenthal and Schlesinger both here

and in Riyadh and Tehran will help to underscore our deep concern

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Staff Material, Middle East File,



Box 65, Subject File, Oil. Confidential. Sent for information.

2

Attached but not printed.



365-608/428-S/80010

446 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

about the price issue. Presidential involvement will be particularly nec-

essary in Venezuela.

—Contacts with selected LDC’s and IEA members may also help

to build counterpressures against OPEC.

—The economic arguments for a price freeze are convincing in

view of the slow pace of world economic recovery, unsettled conditions

in exchange markets, protectionist tendencies in trade, and a tempo-

rary imbalance between supply and demand because of increased oil

production in the North Sea, Alaska, and Mexico.

Clearly, economic arguments should be the primary focus of Blu-

menthal’s presentations with Middle East Finance Ministers. Yet, there

is an important political element missing in the State strategy paper.

Political consideration must not be overlooked in our efforts to avert a

further round of price increases.

In that regard, the talking points for Saudi Arabia

3

should make



specific reference to the special US-Saudi relationship and stress:

(1) our deep involvement in achieving a lasting Middle East settlement;

(2) the real danger to political stability in Spain, Portugal, Turkey, Italy

and several key developing countries if economic conditions deterio-

rate further; (3) our assistance to the Saudis on the security front, in par-

ticular, efforts to help them modernize their armed forces. Domestic

support for these efforts would be jeopardized by a price increase.

The State talking points for Iran are adequate. The Shah has not in

the past been convinced by arguments about the effect of oil price in-

creases on the world economy. But we may be able to appeal to him by

referring to the effects of such increases on the strength of the dollar

and US world power. In any event, to be effective we must make our

arguments forcefully and not simply “for the record,” as has been the

case so often.

Finally, before agreeing to high profile Presidential involvement in

the oil price issue, we must weigh the political costs of failure. That is,

how will the President’s image as a world leader be affected if he makes

a strong presentation on oil prices during his trip and then one month

later OPEC turns around and announces a major price increase?

These are some of the issues that we will need to explore in greater

depth in the days ahead. I know that Treasury shares our concern that

many of these political considerations are inadequately covered in the

State strategy paper.

3

Talking points for Saudi Arabia and Iran are attached but not printed.



365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 447

One other tactical point. Dick Cooper mentioned in last week’s

PRC meeting on the Middle East

4

that Blumenthal might “play the



Heavy” on this trip by speaking out forcefully on the price issue. The

President could then follow up by stating that he fully supports those

views without his having to engage in an argumentative discussion on

oil prices. You might wish to encourage Blumenthal to play this role,

recognizing his reluctance to do so in his first meeting with many Mid-

dle East officials.

Gary Sick and Guy Erb concur.

4

The minutes of the October 13 Policy Review Committee meeting are in Carter Li-



brary, National Security Affairs, Brzezinski Material, Brzezinski Office File, Country

Chron File, Box 32, Middle East, 9–12/77.



132. Memorandum for the Record

1

Washington, October 18, 1977, 2:30 p.m.



SUBJECT

Meeting on Oil Price Strategy

PARTICIPANTS

State

Secretary Vance

Richard Cooper

Robert Hormats

Stephen Bosworth

Treasury

Secretary Blumenthal

Anthony Solomon

Fred Bergsten



NSC

Dr. Brzezinski

David Aaron

Timothy Deal

Blumenthal said he had asked for the meeting to consider several

questions: (1) Was the oil price issue a priority item in our relations

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Brzezinski Material, Subject File,



Box 48, Oil. Secret. The meeting was held in Brzezinski’s office.

365-608/428-S/80010

448 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

with the Middle Eastern countries? (2) To what extent should the Presi-

dent become involved in our efforts to avert a price hike? And (3)

should we attempt to handle the matter bilaterally or multilaterally?

Vance affirmed that the oil price issue should be near the top of the

agenda. On the other hand, if, for example, we would have to approve

the sale of F–15s to induce the Saudis to be moderate on oil prices, we

would have to give greater weight to political considerations since such

sales could affect overall Arab-Israeli relations.

Cooper stressed that political concerns were key in the Middle

East. In the case of Venezuela, the President has twice raised the oil

price issue with Perez.

2

We should push harder with Venezuela.



Brzezinski said that oil would be an important item on the Presi-

dent’s trip. We intend to stress the oil issue in Venezuela, but put less

emphasis on it in Nigeria, because of our ongoing initiatives in Africa,

and in Saudi Arabia, because of Arab-Israeli concerns. It would be an

important issue with the Shah.

Blumenthal asked for practical suggestions. Reportedly, many

OPEC members favor a 10–15% price hike. The Saudis, for tactical pur-

poses, may propose a price freeze but in the end support a moderate

(5%) increase. He said that, if we make only a low-key approach to

OPEC, the likely outcome will be a 6–8% increase. Would that be bad?

Or should we do more now? In his view, the outcome would be serious.

The US trade deficit would probably increase by $3–4 billion. Thus, we

might face a trade deficit of $40 billion in 1978. That would have serious

economic as well as political ramifications. Consequently, we may have

to exert greater pressure to prevent even a “moderate” price increase.

Solomon said that [less than 1 line not declassified] indicate that the

Saudis cannot increase production over the short-term. Iran, Vene-

zuela, and possibly Kuwait were thus the real movers at this time. If we

emphasize oil in our dealings with these countries and present our case

in terms of a special political relationship, we might have some success

in holding the line on prices.

Brzezinski said these suggestions fit well into the overall scheme.

Blumenthal pointed out that we need a series of talking points tai-

lored to each country. In some cases, we might want to emphasize bilat-

eral issues; in others, multilateral topics. He asked whether in view of

former Secretary Simon’s past difficulties with the Shah he should be

tough in Tehran.

Vance said Blumenthal should certainly raise the issue but not

press it.

2

See footnotes 2 and 4, Document 128.



365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 449

Brzezinski said a low-key approach would be odd considering the

importance of the issue to the US. A sotto voce presentation would

have little value. Blumenthal should base our argument against a price

rise on economic grounds. The President could then weave together the

political and economic considerations when he meets with foreign

leaders on his trip. Blumenthal’s meetings should lay the groundwork

for the President’s trip.

Blumenthal again reiterated that we needed an orchestrated ap-

proach to the OPEC countries.

Solomon said that the talking points proposed by State were inade-

quate and must be strengthened.

3

Vance said he would discuss oil prices with Saudi Foreign Minister



Saud and follow up later with Crown Prince Fahd.

Brzezinski noted that, in any event, the President should not “play

the heavy”. He should assume a statesman-like role pulling together a

compromise after some softening up by Blumenthal, Vance and others.

The President may, however, have to weigh in with Venezuela.

Vance added that Venezuela was the villain on oil.

Solomon said that our arguments will carry little weight if we only

talk in terms of price moderation. As he pointed out in a recent speech,

OPEC’s terms of trade have improved since 1974. The world monetary

system and the US dollar are under strain; our national interests are at

stake. Thus, the President cannot talk with OPEC leaders about modera-

tion;

on the contrary, we must stress the importance of a freeze on prices.

He then reviewed the positions of individual OPEC members on the

price issue.

Vance said the Iranians might propose some sort of barter arrange-

ment involving arms for oil.

Solomon said we should not reject that proposal out of hand. We

might be able to build up our petroleum reserve in this manner.

Vance noted that a barter arrangement with Iran would cause

problems with Saudi Arabia.

Blumenthal added that barter deals can lead to trouble. In any

case, they were phony arrangements.

Brzezinski asked what are our realistic objectives with respect to

prices? Do we want to hold the line or are we prepared to accept a mod-

erate increase? Is a freeze attainable?

Cooper said he thought a freeze was definitely in order in view of

weak oil demand. Of course, the Saudis must maintain current produc-

tion levels.

3

See Document 131 and footnote 3 thereto.



365-608/428-S/80010

450 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

Solomon said that technically this may be difficult because of re-

duced pressure in the oil fields. In any event, considering the demand/

supply picture and the present world economic situation, there was

really no valid reason for a price hike.

Blumenthal underscored the political effects in Italy and France of

another round of price increases.

Bergsten noted that in July the Saudis came out publicly for a

freeze; their position now was not clear.

Solomon stressed that we have moved towards the Arabs on a

number of issues, more so than in the case of Israel. Some effort on their

part was necessary. Perhaps we should try to link these issues more

explicitly.

Vance asked about Mexican oil production possibilities. Solomon

said they were limited; the prospects for natural gas are better.

Brzezinski said he had not focused on oil strategy previously but

agreed now that this issue was a crucial element in our Middle Eastern

relations.

Vance said we must get moving. We should let the Shah know that

we are serious about oil. He asked if we had given thought to an ap-

proach to non-oil producers. Perhaps, Mexico could take a leading role.

Jamaica, as head of the G–77, was also a candidate. We need a strategy

here.


Bosworth questioned whether these countries could take the lead

on price issues. In any event, we do intend to approach India, other key

consumers, IEA members, etc.

The group agreed that we should move now to get the message

across that the US favors a price freeze. A message from Vance to his

counterparts in IEA capitals should be sent. State will draft it.

4

We

could also try to work with third countries (e.g., Italy) to approach the



more radical OPEC states (e.g., Libya). In the meantime, Treasury

would rewrite the economic talking points on oil strategy; State would

supply political/security talking points.

4

Not found.



365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 451



133. Memorandum From the President’s Assistant for National

Security Affairs (Brzezinski) to Henry Owen and Samuel

Huntington of the National Security Council Staff

1

Washington, October 19, 1977.



SUBJECT

Oil Price Strategy

The President desires that very serious thought be given on an ur-

gent basis to an orchestrated strategy, designed to strengthen the sup-

port of other key nations, both developed and under-developed, for an

effort to hold OPEC prices down. It is the view of Mike Blumenthal and

others that any price increase right now, and certainly any above three

or so percent, would be potentially most damaging to a variety of our

national interests. We intend to use the trip

2

in part to exercise our



leverage against such a price hike, but much more needs to be

done. Could you please consult, develop some initial thoughts, and—if

necessary—form a highly confidential group to develop the needed

response.

3

Please consider this matter as urgent, although I am not setting a



particular deadline.

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Brzezinski Material, Subject File,



Box 48, Oil. Secret. Printed from a copy that indicates Brzezinski initialed the original.

2

Blumenthal’s trip to the Middle East; see Document 134.



3

On October 26, Huntington received a memorandum from Robert Bowie, Director

of the National Foreign Assessment Center, Central Intelligence Agency, informing him

that he would “produce an intelligence evaluation of the impact of an oil price increase

on industrial and underdeveloped countries and of the attitudes of these countries

toward such an increase.” Bowie attached a paper, prepared earlier at Cooper’s request,

on the impact of a 10 percent OPEC price rise and added that the new paper would pro-

vide “a more pessimistic scenario” for the impact of such an increase. He also hoped to

include an evaluation of the views and attitudes of the OPEC countries with regard to a

price increase. (Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Staff Material, Middle East File,

Box 65, Subject File, Oil) Neither paper has been found.


365-608/428-S/80010

452 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



134. Memorandum From the President’s Assistant for National

Security Affairs (Brzezinski) to the Cabinet

1

Washington, October 27, 1977.



SUBJECT

Energy Policy

Secretary Blumenthal has reported to the President that, in his con-

versations with Middle East leaders,

2

it has become clear to him that the



willingness of the oil exporting countries to cooperate with the U.S. in

their oil pricing policies will depend to an important degree on their

seeing evidence of our resolve to face up to this situation, specifically

by putting in place adequate energy legislation.

The President asked me to report the above to you. He further

asked that you make this point in your statements and speeches re-

garding our energy policy.

Zbigniew Brzezinski

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Brzezinski Material, Agency



File, Box 8, Energy Department, 5/77–5/78. Secret.

2

Blumenthal’s Middle East trip began on October 22 in Egypt and included visits to



Kuwait, Iran, and Saudi Arabia. He met on October 27 with the Shah, who “volunteered

that it had been decided that Iran should not take a strong position in OPEC at this time”

because, as the Shah phrased it, “We don’t want to be known as hawks.” (Telegram 9505

from Tehran, October 27; National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files,

P850106–2279) In an October 28 meeting with Fahd, the Crown Prince confirmed that it

was “Saudi policy to try to convince other OPEC members to freeze prices—say for an-

other year.” (Telegram 1286 from Dhahran, October 30; ibid., P840081–1893) Blumen-

thal’s October 26 meeting with Kuwaiti Emir Sabah was reported in telegram 6086 from

Kuwait, October 27. (Ibid., D770394–1088) His October 28 meeting with King Khalid was

reported in telegram 1285 from Dhahran, October 29. (Ibid., D770399–0384)



365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 453



135. Memorandum From the President’s Assistant for National

Security Affairs (Brzezinski) to President Carter

1

Washington, November 1, 1977.



SUBJECT

Oil Price Strategy

In response to your question about what we are doing to recruit

consumer nations to help us hold down oil prices, here is a brief recap

of our current oil strategy efforts:

1. State has prepared cables to OPEC nations not visited by Mike

Blumenthal,

2

to major industrialized states, and to a long list of selected



consumer nations. In each case, the US Ambassador will make a

de´marche to the Foreign Minister, the Finance Minister or both, making

the same case which Blumenthal made so effectively during his visits.

2. In the case of consumers, we will inform them of the efforts we

are making with OPEC states, give them the economic arguments, and

solicit their assistance, using their own judgment of how they can be

most effective. We are not asking them to make de´marches to the OPEC

states, since to do so would risk giving the appearance of a heavy-

handed operation coordinated by Washington. In view of Saudi and

Iranian moderation, we need to avoid arousing resentment among our

friends in addition to persuading the price “hawks.”

3. We will, however, ask the Italians to approach the Libyans, since

they are the only Western nation with sufficient access and credibility

to make an effective approach.

4. State is also considering the possibility of calling in each of the

ambassadors of key consuming states to give them the same message,

though this should probably await initial reactions to our de´marche in

each of their capitals.

5. In addition, the NSC staff is working with State on a consoli-

dated strategy for your trip, for the public remarks in advance of the

trip, and the approach to be taken with consumers and producers along

the way.


3

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Brzezinski Material, Subject File,



Box 48, Oil. Secret. Sent for information.

2

See footnote 2, Document 134. For the cable, see Document 136.



3

In the course of his trip to Europe, India, and the Middle East December 29–

January 6, Carter visited Tehran where he met with the Shah and King Hussein and Saudi

Arabia where he met with King Khalid and Crown Prince Fahd.



365-608/428-S/80010

454 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



136. Telegram From the Department of State to Selected

Diplomatic Posts

1

Washington, November 4, 1977, 0134Z.



264256. Subject: US De´marche on Oil Price Question; OPEC Meet-

ing December 20 in Caracas.

1. From now until a decision is made by OPEC, the highest objec-

tive of American international economic policy must be to obtain a

freeze on oil prices at least through 1978. In June, President Carter

stated his hope, shared by Crown Prince Fahd, that the end of the

two-tier system would be followed by such a price freeze.

2

Subsequent



economic and political developments have made price stability even

more critical. The world and the US economy would be damaged by

even a seemingly modest price increase such as 5 percent.

2. For the next two months, the primary concern in our relation-

ship with all OPEC countries, especially Venezuela and Iran, will be

their behavior on oil prices. (With Saudi Arabia, this concern will be

secondary only to the achievement of a durable Mideast peace.) We

will not hesitate to point out that the action OPEC members take on

prices affects their overall relationships with Congress and the Ameri-

can public as well as the executive branch. Secretary Blumenthal has

raised the oil price issue during his Middle East trip.

3

It was discussed



with Prince Saud in Washington on October 25.

4

The Shah’s visit to the



US in November

5

and the President’s visit to key OPEC countries later



in the month will provide additional opportunities to make our views

known. We are also informing key industrialized countries and LDCs

of our analysis of the impact of an oil price increase next year in an ef-

fort to encourage them to make approaches of their own to those OPEC

members with which they have especially close relationships.

6

1



Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D770406–0164. Se-

cret; Immediate; Limdis. Drafted by Milam, Hart, and Rosen; cleared by Katz and Bos-

worth and in NEA, EA, ARA, AF, and the Treasury and Energy Departments; and ap-

proved by Cooper. Sent to Abu Dhabi, Baghdad, Doha, Jakarta, Libreville, Quito, Tripoli,

Kuwait, Algiers, Caracas, Jidda, Tehran, Vienna, Lagos, and USUN.

2

Fahd’s visit was in May. See footnote 2, Document 124.



3

See Document 134.

4

Excerpts of the minutes of the meetings with Prince Saud are in telegram 258396 to



Dhahran, October 28. (National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, [no film

number])


5

See Document 139.

6

The message to the LDCs, to be conveyed by Chiefs of Mission to the “highest ap-



propriate level as soon as possible,” is in telegram 264258 to Buenos Aires and other

posts, November 4. (National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D770406–

0390) Vance sent a letter directly to the Foreign Ministers of the industrialized countries


365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 455

3. Chiefs of Mission of action addressees should, unless they in-

form the Department that it would be counterproductive, present the

US case against an oil price increase at the highest appropriate level as

soon as possible, drawing on the following paragraphs. Our estimates

of the effects of a 5 percent increase in oil prices in 1978 are included

primarily for your information. If in the course of discussion it should

appear appropriate to cite them, you should make clear that 5 percent

was chosen for analytical purposes only. We would not find any price

increase appropriate or acceptable.

4. The US would consider any oil price increase at the December

meeting as unwarranted by market conditions and harmful to the

world economy.

5. The world economy is fragile. While efforts to reduce them are

beginning to pay off, inflation rates remain unacceptably high at over

8.0 percent for the OECD as a whole and 6.5 percent in the US. Unem-

ployment in the OECD is now at 15 million and the prospect is dim for

any significant reduction soon. US growth, which was running at 5.5

percent earlier this year, has fallen to under 4 percent. In addition, we

are experiencing a very large current account deficit which restricts our

ability to engage in stimulative action.

6. Under these conditions, any oil price increase in 1978—however

small in percentage terms—would have a large adverse effect on the

growth of both the US and world economies and on world financial

stability.

7. An oil price increase would fuel inflation, increase unemploy-

ment, and add significantly to our balance of payments difficulties.

These effects would be magnified for the other OECD countries and

would severely constrain both the growth prospects of the developing

countries and our ability to assist them (FYI: We estimate that a 5 per-

cent increase in oil prices in 1978 would raise the collective trade deficit

of the seven major industrial countries by over $3.5 billion, add over

one-third of 1 percent to their average rate of inflation, and in the ab-

sence of offsetting fiscal and/or monetary policies, reduce their collec-

tive GNP by over $10 billion. By 1985 the cumulative GNP loss of this

one-time price rise would be almost $150 billion. Certain developed

and developing countries would bear a disproportionate share of these

effects. For the LDCs as a group, a 5 percent oil price rise would result

in a $1.2 billion increase in import costs in 1978.)

on November 9 outlining the major arguments in favor of freezing oil prices, most of

which are contained in this telegram, that the United States would make to the OPEC

countries before the December 20 meeting in Caracas. (Telegram 267884 to London and

other posts; ibid., D770413–0990)



365-608/428-S/80010

456 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

8. The US has accepted a large deterioration on trade and current

account, to which past oil price increases have heavily contributed.

This has significantly eased strains on the international payments

mechanism. However, the increased deficit resulting from an oil price

increase would make it considerably more difficult for the US and other

countries to resist public pressures for protectionist trade measures,

and could prejudice the stability of the international financial system.

9. If US ability to continue to lead world economic recovery and fi-

nancial stability is severely hampered by an oil price increase, there is

no other country capable of assuming this role.

10. The stake OPEC countries generally have in a stable world

economy is clear; increasing balance of payments imbalances and infla-

tionary pressures would threaten the future profitability of their cumu-

lated assets and reduce longer term demand for non-oil exports.

11. (If the argument is made that an oil price increase is justified by

world inflation rates and currency fluctuations, you should respond

along the following lines.) Arbitrary linkage of the prices of different

goods and services only serves to increase inflationary pressures and

misallocation of resources. Moreover, given the strong influence of oil

price increases on world economic health, it is clear that oil price deci-

sions must be made on much broader considerations than OPEC per-

ceptions of the current world inflation rate and recent currency fluctua-

tions. Even on narrow grounds, however, a price increase is not

justified. Our analysis indicates that the terms of trade of OPEC coun-

tries as a group have not deteriorated from the levels resulting from the

1974 oil price increases. Between the beginning of 1974 and mid-1977

export prices for US goods imported by OPEC countries rose by 22 per-

cent while the export price of OPEC oil, as measured by Saudi bench-

mark crude, rose by 27 percent, not counting the 5 percent increase last

July.


12. For Abu Dhabi: We assume you will wish to preface any com-

ments to UAE leaders with acknowledgment of their responsible stand

on oil prices. You should also stress that in preparation for Caracas, the

US is making strong representations for a price freeze in other OPEC

capitals.

13. For Jakarta (and Lagos pending receipt of further instructions):

Some key OPEC countries seem open to possibility of a freeze and

aware of the effect of a price rise on world economic recovery and thus

on their own well-being as well as that of the developing world. We

should make the case to these middle size OPEC producers that they

can exercise an independent and effective influence for restraint in

OPEC councils, and that we hope they will use this opportunity to act

in the common interest by supporting a freeze for 1978.


365-608/428-S/80010

February 1977–January 1979 457

14. For Caracas, Jidda, Tehran, Lagos and Algiers: No action

should be taken at this time. Instructions will follow when status of

Presidential visit clarified and, in case of Algeria, decision made on

possible approaches in Washington.



Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   49   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling