Ameren reached out to the school as a workforce planning initiative to fill Lineman positions


Download 594 b.
Sana04.09.2017
Hajmi594 b.



Why?

  • Why?

    • Ameren reached out to the school as a workforce planning initiative to fill Lineman positions.
      • Significant retention issues with the apprentices we have brought on—many wash out before finishing our post test, pre-hire evaluation program.
      • Our retention of Linemen in the metro St. Louis area is challenging as many hire into St. Louis then bid to positions located in our outlying districts.
      • Difficulty finding Journeyman Lineman.
        • Currently pay a signing bonus and retention bonus, provide time off incentives in first 2 years, and offer relocation benefits.


Who?

  • Who?

    • St. Louis Community College has 4 campuses in the St. Louis metropolitan area, serving 100,000 students. The college offers 11 university transfer programs and 90 career programs.
    • Ameren currently partners with Flo Valley and offers a scholarship in Electrical Engineering Technology for $130,000.
    • Discussions with the college started in 2007, program was implemented in November 2008.


Initial investment

  • Initial investment

  • Ongoing investment

    • Ameren pays approximately $2,000 per student to cover tuition.
  • Communication to candidates

    • Full-time program with no pay or stipend to attend.
    • Program offers a realistic job preview; graduates will not have a degree or certificate, but will know if Linework is right for them.
    • No guarantee of future employment; future employment will only be for Apprentice Lineman vacancies.
    • Those who complete the program will be administered EEI’s Construction and Skilled Trades test.
    • Attendance and engagement, as well as testing disposition, will determine who is invited in for interviews.


Student selection

  • Student selection

    • Candidates apply to the college for consideration.
    • College screens students based upon background and experience in construction trades.
    • Top candidates are invited in for informational presentations and interviews with college staff.
    • Class is capped at 30 students.
    • Expected volume of applicants supported using an aptitude test as a screening instrument.
      • College administered the WorkKeys assessment and focused on Math, Reading, and Locating Information. Level 5 was used as an initial cut-off value—lowered the cutoff due to low number of candidates at Level 5.


Five week session from November 10 through December 22, 2008.

  • Five week session from November 10 through December 22, 2008.

  • Started with 27 students, ended with 21.

    • Class was racially diverse, one female participant.
    • Five students withdrew during the first week alone due to climbing requirement.
  • Three retired Ameren employees were Instructors.

  • First two weeks of climbing, three weeks of foundational skills, and one week of basic electricity.

  • All 21 students who completed the program were administered the CAST, 2/3 passed.



13 of the 14 students went through Evaluations.

  • 13 of the 14 students went through Evaluations.

    • One student was dropped because of attendance issues; one later withdrew with an unfavorable recommendation from the Instructors.
    • Three withdrew with favorable recommendations from the Instructors; two successfully made it through evaluations but self-selected out.
      • All five were placed into Janitor pool (direct line of promotion to apprentice).
    • Seven participants passed evaluations, four were hired into Apprentice Lineman program, the remaining three were placed in the Janitor pool (they passed evaluations but not at an adequate level).


Need a greater emphasis on climbing during program.

  • Need a greater emphasis on climbing during program.

  • Add additional performance activities (transformers, crossarms).

  • Plan for impromptu rainy day activities (rope tying, etc..).

  • Adjust foundational skills instruction to more closely align with relevant components of position and selection processes (to enhance success on test).

  • Drop sixth and final week—basic electricity--and move to a five week curriculum.

    • Redundant because basic electricity will be in the Apprenticeship program.
    • Did not add enough value for the pre-apprentice program.
    • By eliminating the last week the candidates have one less unpaid week.




College climbing instructors will spend observational time at Ameren’s training facility.

  • College climbing instructors will spend observational time at Ameren’s training facility.

  • Program’s focus will continue to emphasize basic elements of climbing and not on additional activities (transformers, crossarms).

  • Restructure the climbing instruction to allow students to gain more experience.

    • Outfit remaining five poles (estimated cost $15,000).
    • Split class (half at poles, half in classroom).
    • Move to one full week of climbing, followed by one day of climbing per week for remaining weeks.
    • Institute specific performance benchmarks to be met during climbing instruction.


Adjust curriculum to more closely align with relevant components of position and selection processes.

  • Adjust curriculum to more closely align with relevant components of position and selection processes.

  • Explore use of EEI’s Career Assessment and Diagnostic Instrument (CADI).

    • Map CADI profiles to CAST test to see what skills need to be supplemented with more education.
    • Requires Ameren staff resources to administer CADI and provide one-on-one feedback.
  • Increase focus on test-taking strategies (.e.g., speed).

  • Asked first session’s participants how well prepared they were for the selection process (math skill deficits were most common report).

  • Further adjust curriculum based on the participants’ collective performance on the CAST (e.g., where were they particularly strong or weak?).



Program Recruitment and Selection

  • Program Recruitment and Selection

    • Over 1,200 applications were received with very little promotion.
      • Reached out to local public workforce system to help recruit.
      • Word spread very fast, at no cost to Ameren or the college (newspaper article helped exposure).
    • 250 applicants (2 were female) were invited in for informational presentations and interviews.
    • All things being equal, preference was given to St. Louis City and County residents to increase retention rates of employees in St. Louis metropolitan area.
    • Final selected class was racially diverse, no females.
  • Admission Process

    • Continued to use Work Keys.
    • Greater emphasis was placed on the physical nature of the job during the assessment phase.


The community college network is your friend

  • The community college network is your friend

    • They will jump through hoops for you.
    • Their mission is to partner with industry.
    • They are plugged into the workforce investment system so have access to funding opportunities.
    • Caveat: They might envision a larger program than you can handle/want.
  • Be very clear with all business partners about criteria for selection

    • Everyone wants a success (a hire), but in this economy need to ensure quality candidates.
  • Consider all available options for funding.

    • 100% employer funded (Our current choice).
    • Tuition-based (with scholarships from the company or without scholarships).
    • Workforce Investment Act funds.
  • Obtain Senior Leadership’s expectations and definition of success early on, and plan the program accordingly.



For questions about the Flo Valley Pre-apprentice Program, contact Betsy Finnegan at bfinnegan@ameren.com or 314-554-3829.

  • For questions about the Flo Valley Pre-apprentice Program, contact Betsy Finnegan at bfinnegan@ameren.com or 314-554-3829.






Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling