International and Cultural Psychology For other titles published in this series, go to


Implications for Global Psychology


Download 3.52 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
bet18/31
Sana17.11.2017
Hajmi3.52 Kb.
1   ...   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   ...   31

Implications for Global Psychology
The ecology with which we interact includes both the physical and cultural envi-
ronment (Marsella, 1985), or the objective and subjective cultures (Triandis, 1972). 
Marsella (1985) presented an interactional model of behavior in which the person 
interacts  with  both  the  physical  environment  and  the  cultural  environment  with 
biological and psychological aspects of his or her self, and this interaction leads to 
normal or abnormal behaviors that are couched in the interactional space of person 
and situation. He argued that behavior is never free of context, even though people 
may show some predisposition to act in a certain way. The model presented here 
builds on Marsella’s interactional model by positioning desire as the mediator of 
behavior; and since desires do precede both normal and abnormal behaviors, the 
model enriches Marsella’s framework.
Except for the work of Gollowitzer, Bagozzi, and their colleagues, the Western 
psychological literature is quite sparse on desire. Psychologists have not studied the 
construct  of  desire.  One  plausible  explanation  lies  in  the  thrust  of  Western  psy-
chologists, particularly the American psychologists, to study only negative psycho-
logical  constructs,  namely,  depression,  aggression,  phobias,  absenteeism,  and  so 
forth. It is not surprising that the Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology was 
the most prestigious journal until more recently. Though desire has been viewed as 
a negative construct in the Indian literature, it is a part of the very foundation of the 
capitalist economy as market is driven by individual desires, and more desires, even 
fanned by greed, are considered a necessity for the market system to work, and even 
a virtue by most people. Thus, desire might not have drawn the attention of Western 
psychologists as a valuable construct, and after all people do put their effort in the 
area that their culture values (Bhawuk, 2003a).
The closest construct in the mainstream psychology would be “drive” in motiva-
tion literature or motivation in general. Interestingly, desire is something that can 
be easily measured by simply asking people to fill in 20 sentences starting with 
“I want ______.” Similarly, we can also ask people what they aspire for (I aspire … 
or One of my aspirations is …) to capture their desires. We can use the antecedents 
and consequents method (Triandis, 1972) to map other constructs and emotions that 
are related to desire. We can also study desire by using qualitative research methods. 
For  example,  we  can  ask  people  to  think  about  what  they  do  when  they  desire 
something (When you desire something, what do you do?), and by asking them to 
narrate  stories  about  their  desires  (Tell  us  a  story  about  when  you  got  a  desire, 
and how? When you knew what you desired, what did you do? What happened in 
the immediate future? In the long term?). The strength of desires can be measured 
by asking people to prioritize their desires or wants, and this may also provide some 

124
6 A Process Model of Desire
insights on what has been studied as achievement motivation (McClelland, 1961). 
Desire can also offer much to the burgeoning field of positive psychology, spiritual-
ity in the workplace, and management of work and personal stress.
There  has  been  some  interest  in  desire  from  researchers  who  study  AIDS 
(Lucey, 1996; Mischewski, 1996). These researchers have noted that the construct 
of desire has been rather marginalized in psychological research. They argued in 
the context of sexual behavior that being aware about safe sex or having the knowl-
edge of the risks involved in unsafe sex is not enough. People get overpowered by 
the desire for sex, which trumps consideration of risks and sometimes results in the 
contraction of AIDS. Though Mischewski (1996) only questioned the primacy of 
rationality in sexual behavior, it could be argued that desire clouds rational thinking 
in other domains of behavior also, which is what the bhagavadgItA clearly states – 
desire clouds all jnAna or knowledge (see footnote 5).
Desire is an important construct because it captures both emotion and cognition. 
It can add value to many of the current research streams in organizational psychol-
ogy and management. For example, there is much research on goal setting, but the 
way the literature has evolved (Locke, 1986), it is made to be a cognitive construct, 
as if no emotion is involved in setting goals. Students are taught about SMART goals 
or objectives, that they should set “Specific,” “Measurable,” “Achievable,” “Realistic,” 
and “Time-bound” goals because goals with such characteristics are self-motivating. 
Interestingly, emotion is nowhere to be found in this schema of goals. It is apparent 
that desire is the antecedent of all goal-setting processes, but instead of studying its 
role in goal setting, we study other less directly related constructs and processes like 
what  motivates  the  goal-setting  process  or  who  is  motivated  to  set  goals.  A  shift 
toward research on desire is likely to allow us to understand why people set the goals 
they  set,  why  they  invest  the  time  and  effort  that  they  do,  and  may  even  help  us 
understand how leaders and managers help subordinates visualize and realize their 
desires, thus also enriching the leadership literature.
Building on the work of Gollowitzer and colleagues (Gollowitzer, Heckhausen, 
& Steller, 1990), in the context of Fishbein’s theory of reasoned action (Fishbein & 
Ajzen,  1975),  Bagozzi  (1992)  proposed  that  desires  provide  the  missing  motiva-
tional link between behavioral intentions and its antecedents – attitudes and subjec-
tive  norms.  Bagozzi  and  colleagues  have  contributed  to  the  enrichment  of  the 
theory of reasoned action and the more recent adaptation of this theory, the theory 
of  planned  behavior  (Ajzen,  1991).  By  interjecting  desires  as  the  antecedent  of 
behavioral intentions, it was shown that the new model of goal-directed behavior 
explained significantly more variance compared to the theory of reasoned action or 
the theory of planned behavior (Perugini & Bagozzi, 2001).
These  researchers  (Perugini  &  Bagozzi,  2001)  also  proposed  the  addition  of 
anticipated emotion to attitudes and subjective norms as antecedents of desires to 
further broaden the theory of planned behavior. However, the relationship between 
desires and attitudes and anticipated emotions were not consistent across the two 
studies  (Perugini  &  Bagozzi,  2001),  raising  doubts  about  these  variables  being 
predictable  antecedents  of  desires;  whereas  subjective  norms  were  consistently 
found in the two studies to be antecedents of desires. The work of these researchers 

125
Implications for Global Psychology
has clearly made desires a critical variable in the study of planned behaviors, but 
also  limits  the  use  of  desires  to  a  great  extent  by  boxing  it  as  the  antecedent  of 
behavioral intent. The process model of how desires are formed and how they are 
related to cognition and emotion presented in this chapter offers a much broader 
and deeper role to desires as a psychological construct and may help us go beyond 
the Western perspectives of what desires are and how they operate.
The skeptics may find the idea of sthitaprajna far-fetched or only relevant for 
people who are pursuing a spiritual path. However, the Western concept of stoicism 
is akin to the notion of sthitaprajna. We also see a semblance of sthitaprajna in the 
field of sports captured in the spirit of “sportsmanship” where trying your best and 
playing a good game is more important than winning. Unlike most of us who do 
not face loss or gain in everyday life, sportspeople face defeat or victory in every 
game, and it is quite plausible that they develop a defense mechanism to loss by 
thinking about playing. Sthitaprajna generalizes this idea to every walk of life and 
thus is applicable not only to spiritually inclined people but also to other people. 
We may have an etic or universal waiting to be explored in this emic construct.
Another universal may be found in the idea that happiness may be related to the 
shrinking of the social self not only for people with the Indian concept of self (as 
shown in Figures 4.1–4.3) but also for people from other cultures. It is encouraging 
to note the recent finding, albeit in its nascent stage, which cautions that money and 
happiness should not be equated, and that materialistic goals may cause paranoia 
and dissatisfaction with life in general rather than giving happiness (Tricks, 2005). 
There is some evidence that spending money on experiences that put people closer 
to nature and themselves, like scuba diving, trekking in the wilderness, and so forth, 
is more satisfying than buying material possessions like a Ferrari. Though research-
ers think the explanation lies in the uniqueness of the experience contrasted to the 
material goods that anybody can buy,
35
 it is plausible that such experience in nature 
(see the fascinating work of Milton on nature loving and its emotional implications, 
2005)  allows  us  to  reflect  and  connect  with  our  own  self,  and  thus  we  start  the 
internal journey, whereas the purchase of the material goods leads to further expan-
sion of our social self, which is a source of unhappiness in the end.
The  model  presented  in  this  chapter  is  clearly  grounded  in  the  socially  con-
structed worldview of India and is necessarily an indigenous or a culture specific 
(or emic) model. The chapter raises some questions and suggests the value of study-
ing desires, which has been neglected in the mainstream psychology and organiza-
tional  literature  as  well  as  in  cross-cultural  research.  Clearly,  this  is  only  the 
beginning  and  much  more  research  is  needed  to  examine  the  significance  of  the 
model for global psychology.
35
 For this research to make the front page of The Financial Times is quite significant in itself. The 
article  is  based  on  the  work  of  Dresdner  Kleinwort  Wasserstrin,  which  was  quoted  by  James 
Montier, DrKW global equity strategist.

wwwwwwwwwwwwwwww

127
D.P.S. Bhawuk, Spirituality and Indian Psychology, International and Cultural Psychology, 
DOI 10.1007/978-1-4419-8110-3_7, © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011
The increasing general stress level in both the industrialized and developing worlds 
has made personal harmony and peace a survival issue for the global community. 
To serve this need, models of how personal harmony can be achieved are derived 
from the bhagavadgItA. It is hoped that insights provided by these models would 
serve practitioners and clinicians and also stimulate research for further examina-
tion of their relevance to universal psychology.
There are many models of happiness presented in the bhagavadgItA; sometimes 
happiness is implied, and at other times it is directly the subject of kRSNa’s sermon 
to arjunaarjuna never directly asks about how to be happy. However, as the dia-
logue starts with arjuna being extremely unnerved and distressed about  facing his 
relatives in the battlefield, and since he engages in the battle wholeheartedly at the 
end of the sermon, it is reasonable to expect some guidance in the bhagavadgItA 
about how one can deal with stressful situations and be happy. In this chapter, the 
content of the bhagavadgItA is analyzed looking for terms  associated with peace 
and  happiness.  The  term  peace  appears  in  Canto  2,  4,  5,  6,  9,  and  18.  A  closer 
examination revealed that peace appears in a context in each of these chapters and 
each of these contexts emerged as a unique path that can be pursued in search of 
happiness. When these paths are examined, it becomes transparent that they are all 
about  leading  a  spiritual  life.  The  bhagavadgItA  is  categorical   about  happiness 
being in the domain of spirituality rather than in the material world. Often, enjoy-
ment is stated to lead to unhappiness (verses 2.56, 4.10, 5.22, 5.28, and 8.11) and 
even called the portal to hell (verse 16.21). Following this content analysis, rela-
tionship between peace, happiness, and contentment is examined. Finally, the ideas 
are synthesized in a general model of peace and harmony.
Peace and Happiness in the bhagavadgItA
Concepts related to peace and happiness appear many times in the bhagavadgItA 
showing  the  importance  of  these  constructs  in  the  Indian  worldview.  The  term 
 zAntiM (2.70, 2.71, 4.39, 5.12, 5.29, 6.15, 6.23, 9.31, and 18.62), zAntiH (2.66, 12.12, 
Chapter 7
A General Model of Peace and Happiness
 

128
7 A General Model of Peace and Happiness 
and  16.2),  or  zAntaH  (18.53)  or  its  synonym  zarma  (11.25),  zamaH  (6.3,  10.4, 
18.42), and zamaM (11.24) are often used. An examination of the contexts in which 
these terms are used and a discussion of the meaning of these terms in these contexts 
show that there are four paths to peace. These are discussed below.
kAmasaMkalpavivarjana or the Path of Shedding Desires
In verse 2.70,
1
 the simile of ocean is used to map the notion of peace by stating that 
as water flowing into an ocean from many tributaries does not disturb the ocean, 
similarly  when  desires  enter  a  person  he  or  she  is  not  perturbed  by  them;  such  a 
person attains peace, not a person who is habitually chasing desires. This verse needs 
to be examined in the context of the preceding 15 verses (from 2.55 to 2.69), since 
the verse refers to a special person that is referred to as sthitaprajna (literally, sthita 
means standing or firm, and prajna means judgment or wisdom; thus meaning one 
who  has  calm  discriminating  judgment  and  wisdom).  In  verses  2.55–2.61,  the 
 concept  of  sthitaprajna  is  introduced,  and  then  in  the  later  verses,  the  ideas  are 
 further elaborated upon. In verse 2.55,
2
 it is stated that when a person gives up all 
desires  that  are  in  his  or  her  manas  or  mind  and  remains  contented  internally  by 
himself or herself, then the person is said to be sthitaprajnaAdi zankara explains 
this in his commentary as the state in which a person has given up the three desires 
of  family, wealth, and fame
3
 and remains in the service of people at large without 
any  expectation.  In  verse  2.56,
4
  such  a  person  is  described  as  one  whose  manas 
neither gets agitated when encountering sorrow nor enjoys or seeks pleasure associ-
ated  with  the  senses;  one  who  is  beyond  emotions  such  as  attachment,  fear,  and 
anger; or one for whom these emotions are completely destroyed. In verse 2.57,
5
 
such a person is described as one who is without affection or attachment in all situ-
ations and with all people; and one who neither gets delighted when facing positive 
outcomes nor is frustrated or annoyed when the outcomes are otherwise.
In verse 2.58,
6
 using the simile of a tortoise, it is said that such a person withdraws 
all the senses from their dwellings just as a tortoise withdraws its limbs under the 
1
 Verse  2.70:  ApUryamANamacalapratiSthaM  samudramApaH  pravizanti  yadvat;  tadvatkAmA 
yaM pravizanti sarve ZAntimApnoti na kAmakAmi.
2
 Verse  2.55:  prajahAti  yada  kAmAnsarvAnpArtha  manogatAn;  AtmnyevAtmanA  tuStaH 
sthitaprjnastadocyate.
3
  tyktaputravittalokaiSaNaH sannyAsI AtmArAMa AtmakrIDaH sthitaprjna ityarthaH.
4
 Verse  56:  duHkheSvanudvignamanAH  sukheSu  vigatasprihaH;  vItarAgabhayakrodhaH 
sthitadhIrmunirucyate.
5
 Verse 2.57: yaH sarvatAnabhisnehastattatprApya zubhAzubhamnAbhinandati na dveSti tasya 
prjna prathiSthita.
6
 Verse 2.58: yadA saMharate cAyaM kUrmo’GgAnIva sarvaZaHindRyANIndRyArthebhyastasya 
prajnA pratiSThitA.

129
kAmasaMkalpavivarjana
 or the Path of Shedding Desires
shell to protect itself. In verse 2.59,
7
 such a person is compared to one who controls 
his or her senses through austerity. Though people can withdraw their senses from 
the sense objects, the attachment to these objects persists. However, having realized 
brahman
,  the  person  with  stable  discriminating  wisdom  not  only  withdraws  the 
senses from their objects but does not have any trace of attachment for the same. In 
verse  2.60,
8
  the  senses  are  said  to  be  so  powerful  that  they  forcibly  kidnap  the 
manas
 of even wise people who are trying to tame the senses and applies them to 
the sense objects. In verse 2.61,
9
 the sthitaprajna person is said to be one who has 
his  or  her  senses  under  complete  control  and  who  dwells  on  brahman  with  the 
senses under control.
In the next two verses, a process model of how desires are created and how they 
lead to destruction is captured. Verse 2.62
10
 was used in Chapter 6 to develop a model 
showing how thinking about something generates attachment toward that object or 
idea, and attachment leads to desire, which leads to anger or greed (see Figure 6.1). 
In verse 2.63,
11
 it is stated that anger leads to clouding of discretion about what is 
right or wrong, which leads to loss of memory or what one has learned in the past. 
This  leads  to  loss  of  buddhi  or  wisdom,  and  it  ultimately  leads  one  to  his  or  her 
destruction. In contrast, in verse 2.64,
12
 it is stated that the person who has the senses 
under his or her control neither gets attached to pleasant outcomes nor gets frustrated 
with  negative  outcomes,  and  thus  interacting  with  the  environment  by  managing 
desires  finds  joy  (i.e.,  prasad),  which  according  to  Adi  zankara  is  happiness  and 
health. When one finds joy, all the sorrows are destroyed, and the person’s buddhi 
finds equanimity (verse 2.65
13
). In verse 2.66,
14
 the person without such a buddhi is 
said to be without the love for spirituality or motivation to strive for self-realization, 
and such a person is said to be without peace. It is further stated that one without 
peace  cannot  be  happy.  This  is  the  first  time  that  the  word  zAntiH  or  peace  and 
7
 Verse 2.59: viSayA vinivartante nirAhArasya dehinaHrasavarjaM raso’pyasya paraM dRStvA 
nivartate.
8
 Verse 2.60: yatato hyapi kaunteya puruSasya vipazcitaHindRyANi pramAthIni haranti prasab-
haM manaH.
9
 Verse  2.61:  tAni  sarvAN  saMya  yukta  Asita  matparaH;  vaze  hi  yasyendRyANi  tasya  prajnA 
pratiStThita
.
10
  Verse  2.62:  dhyAyato  viSayAnpuMsaH  sangasteSUpajAyate;  saGgAtsaJjAyate  kAmaH 
kAmAtkrodho’bhijAyate.
11
 Verse 2.63: krodhAdbhavati sammohaH sammohAtsmRitivibhramaHsmRtibhraMzAd buddhi-
nazo buddhinAzAtpraNazyati.
12
 Verse  2.64:  rAgadveSaviyuktaistu  viSayAnindRyaizcaran;  AtmavazyairvidheyAtmA 
prasAdamadhigacchti
.
13
 Verse  2.65:  prasade  sarva  duHkhAnAm  hAnirasyopajAyate;  prasannceteso  hyAzu  buddhiH 
paryavatiSThate
.
14
Verse 2.66: nAsti buddhirayuktasya n cAyuktasya bhAvanAna cAbhAvayataH zAntirazAntasya 
kutaH sukham
.

130
7 A General Model of Peace and Happiness 
sukhaM
15
 or happiness appear in the  bhagavadgItA, and in this verse the relationship 
between them is categorically stated – only those who have a balanced buddhi will 
be at peace and thus be happy.
In verse 2.67,
16
 another simile, that of a boat, is used to show the power of the 
senses. Just like a boat gets captured by wind, the manas, which follows the senses 
wherever they go, seizes the buddhi (or the ability to reason) of the person. In verse 
2.68, the person who is able to completely control the senses wherever they go is 
said to be sthitaprajna. In verse 2.68,
17
 the person with sthitaprajna is said to be 
completely opposite of regular people – when it is night for common people, this 
person  keeps  awake;  and  when  common  people  are  awake,  that  is  night  for  this 
person. An interpretation of this verse is that wakefulness is associated with being 
involved in some activity, whereas sleep is about being inactive. Therefore, what-
ever attracts one is like day because one is going to pursue that, and what does not 
interest one is like night, because one is not going to pursue it. Common people are 
attracted toward material life and activities, and so they constitute day for them, but 
for the aspirants of spirituality (mumu
kSa) or those who are advanced (sthitaprajna 
or yogArUDha) people that would be night. On the other hand, spiritually inclined 
people are attracted toward spiritual life and the activities that are a part of their 
practice  (or  sAdhanA),  which  often  does  not  appeal  to  common  people  (Swami 
Narayan, cited in Varma, 1975). Gandhi (2002) explained verse 2.69
18
 beautifully 
by giving the example of how a person leading a material life enjoys late night par-
ties and sleeps until late in the morning, whereas a person on a spiritual path goes 
to bed early and gets up in the wee hours of the morning to do his or her practice 
(or sAdhanA). Thus, we can see that the verse can be interpreted even literally – 
when a common person is awake, an aspirant is sleeping and when the common 
person is sleeping, the aspirant is awake.
In the context provided by the 15 verses preceding verse 2.70, we can appreciate 
the meaning of peace and happiness in their fullest depth. Peace is presented as the 
highest desideratum of human endeavor and can only be achieved by completely 
controlling the senses and achieving balance in the positive and negative outcomes 
of  all  human  efforts  and  activities,  thus  becoming  free  of  all  desires,  which  is 
referred to as kAmasaMkalpavivarjana. Peace does not lie in fulfilling desires or 
enjoying the goodies of the material world, and in fact it is said to be a source of 
misery as was shown in the models in Chapter 6. Happiness is presented as the 
15
 The word sukha first appeared in verse 2.38 as sukhaduHkha, which means happiness or sorrow – 
sukhaduHkhe same kritva lAbhAlAbhau jayAjyau
tato yuddhAya yjyasva naivaM pApamavApsyasi. 
You should engage in the battle by considering happiness and sorrow, gain and loss, and victory and 
defeat the same, and by doing so you will not earn demerit or sin.
16
 Verse  2.67:  indRiyANAM  hi  caratAM  yanmano’nuvidhIyate;  tadasya  harati  prajnAM 
vAyurnAvamivAmbhasi.
17
 Verse  2.68:  tasmAdyasya  mahAbAho  nigRhItAni  sarvazaH;  indRyANIndRyArthebhyastasya 
prajnA pratiSThita.
18
 Verse 2.69: yA nizA sarvabhutAnAM tasyAM jAgarti saMyamIyasyA jAgrati bhUtAni sA nizA 
pazyato muneH.

131
kAmasaMkalpavivarjana
 or the Path of Shedding Desires
consequent of peace, and just like a person pursuing desires is said to never achieve 
peace (verse 2.70), a person who is not at peace is said to be ever unhappy. Thus, 
the first path to peace presented in the bhagavadgItA is captured in the term kAma-
saMkalpavivarjana
 or shedding desires, which is the prerequisite of happiness.
In verse 2.71, it is further clarified that the person who gives up all desires (kAma
and leads a life without greed (lobha and spriha
19
 in the verse), attachment (moha), 
and egotism (ahaMkAra) is the one who attains peace. It could be argued that giving 
up these four leads to an absence of anger or krodha, thus, leading the person to 
peace. Thus, in the Indian worldview, kAmakrodhlobhamoha, and ahaMkAra are 
viewed as the five destabilizing forces
20
 that lead to personal disharmony or absence 
of peace, which is succinctly captured in this verse (see Figure 
7.1
). Further, in the 
16th Canto verse 16.21,
21
 kAmaHkrodhaH, and lobhaH are said to be the portals to 
hell that leads to the destruction of the self, and we are encouraged to give them up. 


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   ...   31


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2019
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling