International and Cultural Psychology For other titles published in this series, go to


Download 3.52 Kb.

bet2/31
Sana17.11.2017
Hajmi3.52 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   31

Contents
  1  The Global Need for Indigenous Psychology  ....................................... 
1
Reasons for Pursuing Indigenous Research .............................................. 
1
Psychology in India ................................................................................... 
6
Scope for Indigenizing Psychology .......................................................... 
7
Cultural Variations in Group Dynamics ....................................................  10
Individualism and Collectivism: A Theoretical Framework .....................  10
A Group Dynamics Model ........................................................................  15
Exploring Cross-Cultural Validity of the Model .......................................  16
An Indian Typology of Leaders ................................................................  19
sannyAsi
 Leaders ......................................................................................  20
karmayogi
 Leaders ....................................................................................  21
Pragmatic Leaders .....................................................................................  22
Legitimate Nonleaders ..............................................................................  22
Implications for Global Psychology .........................................................  22
  2  Spirituality in India: The Ever Growing Banyan Tree  .......................  25
Historical Analysis ....................................................................................  26
Case Analyses ...........................................................................................  29
Ramakrishna: One God, Different Paths ...................................................  29
Maharishi Mahesh Yogi: Bridging Science and Spirituality  
with TM ....................................................................................................  34
Osho Rajneesh: Bridging Sex and samAdhi .............................................  37
Implications for Global Psychology .........................................................  40
  3  Model Building from Cultural Insights  ...............................................  47
Introduction ...............................................................................................  47
Culture of Science .....................................................................................  48
The Indian Worldview...............................................................................  52
Consequences of the Indian Worldview ....................................................  54
Transcendental Meditation and Science ...................................................  55
Implications for Global Psychology .........................................................  58

xviii
Contents
  4  Indian Concept of Self  ...........................................................................  65
Stages of Life and Concept of Self ...........................................................  65
Physical, Social, and Metaphysical Self ...................................................  67
Atman
 as Self in the bhagavadgItA ...........................................................  69
Concept of Physical Self in the vedic sandhyA .........................................  73
Concept of Self in the upaniSads ..............................................................  73
Concept of Self in yoga .............................................................................  74
Concept of Self in durgA saptazatI ...........................................................  75
Concept of Self and antaHkaraNa ............................................................  77
Concept of Self and manas .......................................................................  77
Concept of Self and buddhi .......................................................................  86
Concept of Self and ahaGkAra .................................................................  89
Regional Concept of Self ..........................................................................  89
Implications for Global Psychology .........................................................  91
  5  The Paths of Bondage and Liberation  .................................................  93
Toward Real Self Through Work: A Process Model .................................  93
Self and svadharma ...................................................................................  95
Performing or Not Performing One’s svadharma .....................................  99
Intention: sakAma (or with Desire) or niSkAma (or Without Desire)? .....  100
Path 1: Work as Bondage ..........................................................................  101
Path 2: Liberation Through Work .............................................................  102
The Superiority of Path 2 ..........................................................................  104
niSkAma
 karma and vedAntatridoza and Their Antidotes ......................  104
Implications for Global Psychology .........................................................  106
  6  A Process Model of Desire ......................................................................  111
Emotion in Anthropology and Psychology ...............................................  111
Anchoring Cognition, Emotion, and Behavior in Desire ..........................  113
A General Model of Psychological Processes and Desire ........................  115
Support for the Model in Other Indian Texts ............................................  118
Implications for Global Psychology .........................................................  123
  7  A General Model of Peace and Happiness  ...........................................  127
Peace and Happiness in the bhagavadgItA ...............................................  127
kAmasaMkalpavivarjana or
 the Path of Shedding Desires ......................  128
jnAnyoga or
 the Path of Knowledge .........................................................  132
karmayoga or
 the Path of Work ................................................................  134
dhyAnyoga or
 the Path of Meditation .......................................................  135
bhaktiyoga or
 the Path of Devotion ..........................................................  137
Path 2 and Synonyms of Peace and Happiness .........................................  138
Support for the Model in Other Indian Texts ............................................  140
Implications for Global Psychology .........................................................  141

xix
Contents
  8  karma: An Indian Theory of Work ........................................................  143
The Philosophy of karma ..........................................................................  145
yajna
karma, and Work ............................................................................  148
niSkAma karma
 or Work Without Desire ..................................................  153
Working for Social Good ..........................................................................  154
Working with Devotion .............................................................................  156
Why to Work .............................................................................................  157
How to Work .............................................................................................  159
Implications for Global Psychology .........................................................  160
  9  Epistemology and Ontology of Indian Psychology ..............................  163
Deriving Epistemology and Ontology of Indian Psychology ...................  165
Theory, Method, and Practice of Indian Psychology ................................  173
Theories in Indian Psychology ..................................................................  175
Methodology for Indian Psychology ........................................................  176
Practice of Indian Psychology ..................................................................  178
Characteristics of Indian Psychology ........................................................  179
Implications for Global Psychology .........................................................  183
10  Toward a New Paradigm of Psychology ................................................  185
Cultural Insight and Knowledge Creation ................................................  187
Building Models by Content Analysis of Scriptures ................................  189
Discovering or Mining Models from Scriptures .......................................  189
Recognition of What Works in Indigenous Cultures ................................  193
Questioning Western Concepts (Recognition of What  
Does Not Work) ........................................................................................  196
Implications for Global Psychology .........................................................  196
11  Summary and Implications ....................................................................  203
Methodological Contributions ..................................................................  203
Theoretical Contributions .........................................................................  206
Contribution to Practice ............................................................................  208
Implications for Future Research ..............................................................  209
References ........................................................................................................  211
Author Index....................................................................................................  227
Subject Index ...................................................................................................  231

wwwwwwwwwwwwwwww

xxi
Introduction
Psychology  as  a  discipline  has  been  dominated  by  western  psychology,  and  the 
psychology of 1% of the population of the world is imposed on the rest of the world 
(Triandis,  1994)  as  universal  knowledge.  This  needs  to  change.  The  demand  for 
change is inspired by what Triandis asked for in the late 1970s when he was editing 
the Handbook of Cross-Cultural Psychology:
I wrote to some 40 colleagues, all over the world, and asked them to send me psychological 
findings from their culture that are not totally in agreement with findings published in the 
West.  I  got  back  very  little.  I  was  frustrated  until  Terry  Prothro,  then  at  the  American 
University in Beirut, Lebanon, pointed out to me that our training and methods are also 
culture bound, and it is difficult to find new ideas without the theoretical and methodologi-
cal tools that can extract them from a culture. Most of the people I had written to had gotten 
their doctorates in Western universities and would not have been especially good at analyz-
ing their own cultures from a non-Western viewpoint. Examining one’s own culture takes 
a special effort. (Triandis, 1994, p. 3)
Though  cross-cultural  psychology  has  questioned  the  validity  of  many  western 
theories and even the methodology used, it limits itself by searching for universals 
or etics that have culture specific or emic representations. It is time to question the 
assumption that there are universals outside of cultural context. Indigenous psycho-
logical research can help do that, and hence this book is about indigenous psychol-
ogy, and specifically about a variety of indigenous psychology – Indian Psychology. 
I think what Triandis was searching for in the 1970s can only come from indige-
nous psychology, and hence the need for research in that area.
With  globalization  and  the  growth  of  multiculturalism  in  many  parts  of  the 
world,  spirituality  has  become  an  important  issue  for  the  global  village  and  our 
workplace everywhere. There is much support that the nonwestern countries have 
much to offer in the domain of spirituality (Kroeber, 1944), yet this field of research 
is far from receiving the attention it deserves. Comparative religion or research on 
psychology of religion or religiosity hardly does justice to this field that is subjec-
tive and applied, which runs against the grain of the positivist tradition that western 
psychological research has vigorously pursued. This book is about spirituality, and 
offers  perspectives  from  indigenous  perspectives,  which  should  offer  some  fresh 
ideas to this area of research.

xxii
Introduction
To meet both the above needs, this book uses the bhagavadgItA as its foundation, 
which is a sacred Hindu text. It is a popular source of knowledge and wisdom for the 
global community (Prabhupad, 1986). It has been studied by international scholars 
and has been translated in about 50 languages. This book provides examples of how 
psychological  models  can  be  distilled  from  such  texts.  However,  the  book  is  not 
about the bhagavadgItA, or a commentary on it. Figure 1 provides a schematic of the 
organization of the book. It is hoped that psychologists and other cultural and cross-
cultural researchers would pay attention to the insights provided by these models, and 
examine  its  relevance  in  light  of  existing  theories.  This  book  attempts  to  advance 
research in indigenous psychology by developing models in the domain of spiritual-
ity from Indian cultural insights presented in the bhagavadgItA.
This book makes three contributions. First, it presents a research methodology 
for building models in indigenous psychology that starts with indigenous insights. 
This approach calls for the nurturing of indigenous research agenda, which is necessary 
since the western world dominates research and knowledge creation that often leads 
to  starting  with  theoretical  positions  that  are  grounded  in  the  western  cultural 
mores. Thus, starting with such a theoretical position invariably leads to the pseudoetic 
approach in which theories are necessarily western emics. To avoid this Procrustean 
bed of western-theory-driven research it is necessary to start with insights offered 
by indigenous cultures, and this is where the research methodology presented in 
the  book  is  both  novel  and  useful  as  it  could  help  us  avoid  the  pseudoetic  trap.  
Spirituality 
Indigenous 
Psychology 
bhagavadgItA 
CONTRIBUTIONS 
1. METHODOLOGY 
INDIGENOUS MODELS 
THEORY OF SPIRITUALITY 
2.
3.
Figure 1
 
Foundations and outcomes of this book

xxiii
Introduction
This approach proposes that we start with insights from folk wisdom and classical 
texts in indigenous nonwestern cultures. We should enrich these insights with anec-
dotal evidence, qualitative analyses, and observational data from the target indige-
nous culture. This approach necessarily has to be not only multiparadigmatic but 
also driven by multiple methods.
Second, the proposed research methodology is applied to develop many indig-
enous  models  from  the  bhagavadgItA.  This  validates  both  the  practicality  and 
usefulness  of  the  methodology.  The  models  span  a  broad  range  of  topics,  from 
concept of self to basic processes like cognition, emotion, and behavior. The mod-
els  show  that  psychology  needs  to  be  grounded  in  the  cultural  worldview  of  the 
society and people being investigated, and without making such effort we cannot 
begin to understand human psychology. The models also raise many questions for 
global psychology, questioning the validity of the dominant western psychology. 
The intention is not to call to question the existing western psychological knowl-
edge, but to inspire a dialogue among various indigenous psychologies, including 
the western psychology. The implications of these models, and in general indige-
nous psychological models, for cross-cultural psychology are also discussed.
Finally, since the models presented in the book deal with spirituality from the 
Indian  perspective,  the  book  contributes  to  the  emerging  field  of  psychology  of 
spirituality. With globalization and the growth of multiculturalism in many parts of 
the world, spirituality has become an important issue for the workplace, and the 
book  contributes  to  this  new  area  of  research  and  practice  by  presenting  models 
from  an  indigenous  worldview  that  would  help  expand  the  perspectives  of  psy-
chologists and managers.
The book starts by making a case for indigenous psychology in Chapter 1. Our 
global village is fast changing with astronomical growth in virtual communication 
and  physical  movement  of  millions  of  people  for  leisure  as  well  as  work.  The 
shrinking of the globe calls for a better understanding of each other, and we can do 
this by learning how each of us operates in our unique cultural space. This can be 
done meaningfully through the study of indigenous psychologies in large populous 
countries like China, India, Indonesia, Brazil, Nigeria, Mexico, and so forth in two 
ways. First, we can start with the cross-cultural theories and test them in the context 
of these countries. This approach is better than the pseudoetic approach in which 
people invariably start with western models developed in USA, Canada, and other 
European countries. Second, we can start with indigenous ideas to develop models, 
and  then  examine  the  cross-cultural  theories  and  western  ideas  in  light  of  these 
indigenous models. In Chapter 1, I present examples of both these approaches, and 
discuss the need to follow them in light of globalization. It is hoped that researchers 
will put a moratorium on pseudoetic research that leads to the mindless copying of 
western ideas, and start paying attention to indigenous ideas in psychology that can 
be found in many of these nonwestern countries. Psychological research in India is 
used to exemplify the general ideas presented in the chapter.
In Chapter 2, I posit that spirituality has been valued in the Indian culture from 
time immemorial, and it is no surprise that many innovations in the field of spirituality 
originated in India. Since people strive to excel in areas that are compatible with 

xxiv
Introduction
their cultural values, India has seen the emergence of many geniuses in the field of 
spirituality even in the modern time. I combine two qualitative methods, historical 
analysis  and  case-analysis,  to  document  how  spirituality  is  valued  in  India,  and 
much like a banyan tree, how it continues to grow even today. The chapter ends 
with a theoretical discussion of how culture shapes creativity, and its implications 
for global psychology.
Worldview is shaped by culture, and worldview directs the choice of conceptual 
models,  research  questions,  and  what  we  do  professionally  as  a  social  scientist. 
Researchers  interested  in  culture,  by  virtue  of  being  both  scientists  and  cultural 
scholars, are well suited to examine the interaction between the culture of science 
and other indigenous cultures, and examine the human value system in the context 
of this dynamic interaction. In Chapter 3, the Indian cultural worldview is contrasted 
against the culture of science to demonstrate how conflict exists between many tra-
ditional  cultures  and  the  culture  of  science.  Further,  research  on  Transcendental 
Meditation (TM) is presented as a vehicle to examine the interaction between Indian 
cultural worldview and what is called scientific thinking. This discussion leads to the 
development of a methodology – model building from cultural insights, which is 
one of the major contributions of this book. The chapter is concluded with a discus-
sion of the implications of this approach to cultural research for global psychology.
Concept of self has been studied from multiple perspectives in India. A review 
of the study of self in India reveals that indeed the core of Indian self is metaphysi-
cal, and it has been the focus of study by philosophers as well as psychologists. 
There is general agreement about this self, the Atman, as being the real self. This 
metaphysical  self  is  embodied  in  a  biological  self,  and  through  the  caste  system 
right at birth, the biological self acquires a social self. In Chapter 4, I present material 
from  ancient  and  medieval  texts  that  describe  the  indigenous  concept  of  self  in 
India.  I  then  discuss  it  in  light  of  the  contemporary  psychological  research,  and 
employ this concept of self in the later chapters to build psychological models. This 
chapter  also  presents  many  indigenous  psychological  constructs  like  manas
buddhi
ahaGkAraantaHkaraNa, and so forth.
In Chapter 5, a model is drawn from the bhagavadgItA that shows how our physical 
self is related to work. The model shows how doing the work with the intention to 
achieve the fruits of our labor leads to an entrenched development of social self, but 
letting go of the passion for the reward for our actions leads us toward the real self. 
These two distinct paths are discussed in detail. The neglect of the second path in 
western psychology leads us to miss out on the immense possibility of leading a 
spiritual life. Considering that spirituality is a defining aspect of human existence 
and experience, this is not a small loss, and the chapter contributes by presenting a 
psychological model capturing the paths of bondage and liberation as processes.
Psychologists  have  argued  about  the  primacy  of  cognition  and  emotion  for 
decades  without  any  resolution.  Deriving  ideas  from  the  bhagavadgItA,  in 
Chapter 6, cognition, emotion, and behavior are examined by anchoring them in 
desire.  The  model  presented  here  posits  that  cognition,  emotion,  and  behavior 
derive significance when examined in the context of human desires, and starting 
with perception and volition, cognition emerges when a desire crystallizes. Desires 

xxv
Introduction
lead  to  behaviors,  and  the  achievement  or  nonachievement  of  a  desire  causes 
positive or negative emotions. Through self-reflection, contemplation, and the prac-
tice of karmayoga desires can be better managed, which can help facilitate healthy 
management of emotions. It is hoped that insights provided by this model would 
stimulate research for further examination of the role of desire in understanding and 
predicting cognition, emotion, and behavior.
The  increasing  general  stress  level  in  both  the  industrialized  and  developing 
worlds has made personal harmony and peace a survival issue for the global com-
munity. To serve this need, a model of how personal harmony can be achieved is 
derived from the bhagavadgItA in Chapter 7. The model presented in this chapter 
provides  yet  another  example  of  how  indigenous  psychologies  can  contribute  to 
universal psychology. It is hoped that insights provided by this model would stimu-
late research for further examination of the relevance of indigenous psychology to 
universal psychology.
Work is central to human identity, a topic that is discussed in a wide variety of 
literature covering psychology, sociology, political science, and literary studies. Work 
leads to social stratification, which has interested sociologists from the early days of 
the discipline. Psychologists, particularly industrial and organizational psychologists 
have also been interested in studying work values and cultural differences in them. 
Despite the emergence of a large volume of psychological literature related to work 
and work values, little is known about indigenous perspectives on work and work 
values. In Chapter 8, the concept of karma is examined to present an Indian Theory 
of Work, and implications of this theory for global psychology are discussed.
In  Chapter  9,  the  epistemological  and  ontological  foundations  of  Indian 
Psychology (IP) are derived from the IzopaniSad and corroborated by verses from 
the bhagavadgItA. In doing so, epistemological questions like what is knowledge in 
IP or what knowledge (or theories) should IP develop and how (the methodology) 
are  answered.  Similarly,  ontological  questions  like  what  is  the  being  that  is  the 
focus of IP research or are biomechanical or spiritual–social–biological beings of 
interest to IP are addressed. The chapter is concluded with a discussion of the role 
of epistemology and ontology in constructing cultural meaning for theory, method, 
and practice of Indian Psychology.
In Chapter 10, approaches to model building presented in the first nine chapters are 
formalized into five approaches. First, a content analysis of the text(s) by using key 
words can lead to the development of models about constructs such as peace, spiri-
tuality, karmadharma, identity, and so forth. Second, a process of model building 
from indigenous insights is discussed. Third, the process of discovering and polishing 
models that already exist in the scriptures to fit with the relevant literature is presented. 
Fourth, an approach of developing practical and useful theories and models by recog-
nizing what works in the indigenous cultures is discussed. And finally, how one can 
develop indigenous models by questioning western concepts and models in the light 
of indigenous wisdom, knowledge, insights, and facts is presented. These approaches 
steer away from the pseudoetic approach, and allow theory building that is grounded 
in cultural contexts. The chapter also presents LCM and GCF models of etic, which 
moves the field of cultural research beyond the emic-etic framework.

xxvi
Introduction
In Chapter 11, the major methodological, theoretical, and practical contributions 
of the book are summarized, and future research directions are noted. This book has 
proposed  a  methodology  for  developing  models  from  indigenous  ideas,  and 
has demonstrated that this methodology is useful by presenting a number of models 
employing  it.  Methodologically,  the  book  advances  cultural  research  beyond  the 
etic-emic  framework  by  presenting  the  concept  of  LCM-etic  and  GCF-etic. 
Theoretical contributions of the book can be found in the models presented in each 
of the chapters in the book. These models also serve as self-help frameworks for 
practitioners, thus contributing to the world of practice.

wwwwwwwwwwwwwwww

1
D.P.S. Bhawuk, Spirituality and Indian Psychology, International and Cultural Psychology, 
DOI 10.1007/978-1-4419-8110-3_1, © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011
Our global village is fast changing with astronomical growth in virtual communication 
and  physical  movement  of  millions  of  people  for  leisure  as  well  as  work.  The 
shrinking of the globe calls for a better understanding of each other, and we can 
do this by learning how each of us operates in our unique cultural space. In this 
chapter, I present three reasons for, or imperatives of, doing indigenous research. 
I  posit  that  there  are  two  ways  of  doing  meaningful  cultural  research  in  large 
populous countries such as China, India, Indonesia, Brazil, Nigeria, Mexico, and 
so forth. First, we can start with the cross-cultural theories and test them in the 
context of these countries. This approach is better than the pseudoetic approach in 
which  people  invariably  start  with  Western  models  developed  in  USA,  Canada, 
and  other  European  countries.  Second,  we  can  start  with  indigenous  ideas  to 
develop models and then examine the cross-cultural theories and Western ideas in 
light of these indigenous models (Bhawuk, 2008a, b). I present examples of both 
these approaches. It is hoped that researchers will pause to reflect on the mindless 
copying of Western ideas and start paying attention to indigenous ideas in psychology, 
for at best, the borrowed Western models of psychology can confuse rather than 
help in understanding social and organizational behavior in these populous countries. 
I propose that researchers put a moratorium on pseudoetic research that leads to 
the  mindless  copying  of  Western  ideas  and  start  paying  attention  to  indigenous 
ideas  in  psychology  that  can  be  found  in  many  of  these  non-Western  countries. 
Psychological research in India is used to exemplify the general ideas presented in 
the chapter.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   31


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling