Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet19/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   ...   95

48.

Editorial Note

On March 6, 1975, OPEC capped a 3-day summit in Algiers by is-

suing a 14-point “Solemn Declaration.” The points most relevant to the

industrialized oil-consuming nations included: the agreement “in prin-

ciple to holding an international conference bringing together the de-

veloped and developing countries,” but one that “can in no case be con-

fined to an examination of the question of energy” and “includes the

questions of raw materials of the developing countries”; the declaration

that “their countries are willing to continue to make positive contribu-

tions towards the solution of the major problems affecting the world

economy, and to promote genuine cooperation which is the key to the

establishment of a new international economic order”; the recognition

of “the present disorder in the international monetary system and the

absence of rules and instruments essential to safeguard the terms of

trade and the value of financial assets of developing countries”; and an

expression of the belief that “an artificially low price for petroleum in

the past has prompted over exploitation of this limited and depletable

resource and that continuation of such policy would have proved to be

disastrous from the point of view of conservation and world economy.”


365-608/428-S/80010

164 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

(Telegram 630 from Algiers, March 7; National Archives, RG 59, Cen-

tral Foreign Policy Files, D750080–0645)

The next day, March 7, the International Energy Agency Gov-

erning Board addressed the last point by reaching an agreement on a

“minimum price concept” and “other elements” from Secretary of State

Henry Kissinger’s February 3 speech (see footnote 4, Document 39).

The Board also recommended to the European Community, Japan, and

the United States that they accept France’s invitation to a preparatory

producer/consumer conference, referred to as “Prepcon.” (Telegram

5952 from USOECD Paris, March 7; Ford Library, National Security

Adviser, Presidential Country Files for Europe and Canada, Box 4,

France—State Department Telegrams to SECSTATE–NODIS (3))

At its March 20 meeting, the Board formally adopted a

“three-tiered alternative sources policy” that included the “establish-

ment of agreed common minimum price level below which imported

oil will not be sold in domestic economies” and the “identification of

price level by July 1, 1975.” Furthermore, because the Board felt that

“satisfactory progress in the three areas of consumer solidarity” had

been made, it formally recommended that the IEA membership accept

France’s invitation to the Prepcon, which Assistant Secretary of State

Thomas Enders believed appeared “more and more likely to result in

little precise agreement.” (Telegram 7179 from USOECD Paris, March

20; ibid.)


365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 165



49.

Memorandum of Conversation

1

Washington, March 25, 1975, 3:45–4:05 p.m.



SUBJECT

Tactics for Producer/Consumer PrepCon

PARTICIPANTS

The Honorable Henry A. Kissinger, Secretary of State

The Honorable Robert S. Ingersoll, Deputy Secretary of State

The Honorable Charles W. Robinson, Under Secretary for Economic Affairs

The Honorable Winston Lord, Director, Policy Planning Staff

The Honorable Thomas O. Enders, Assistant Secretary of State

Mr. Robert Hormats, NSC Senior Staff Member

Mr. Samuel W. Lewis, Deputy Director, S/P

Mr. Lawrence R. Raicht, Deputy Director, EB/ORF/FSE

Robinson: Rather than sending you four cables, we have put to-

gether a single paper to go over with you.

2

We have four additional



questions requiring your decision. The issues are:

— How much we should aim to settle at the Prepcon, and whether

we should go along with a request for a second preparatory meeting;

— How to play the representation issue with the Algerians and

Europeans;

— What kind of press play we should aim for; and

— Our representation.

Kissinger: I think the more Prepcons we have, the better. As you

know, I have never been eager for a conference with the producers.

Enders: We are concerned about having more than one Prepcon. It

could become a continuing meeting which would eclipse the IEA and

slide into substantive matters. We want to avoid this, but if we can’t set-

tle everything at this meeting there may be a push for a second

prepcon.


Kissinger: Who wants another meeting?

Enders: The Europeans do to settle whether they will come as one

or nine after the UK referendum on the EC.

Robinson: I believe that’s scheduled for May.

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Records of Henry Kissinger, Lot 91D414, Box



10, Classified External Memoranda of Conversations, January–April 1975. Secret; Nodis.

Drafted by Raicht on March 26. The meeting was held in the Secretary’s Conference

Room.

2

The paper, “Producer/Consumer Prepcon—Tactics,” is actually an action memo-



randum that required decisions from Kissinger. (Ibid., Box 1, Nodis—Miscellaneous Doc-

uments and Telegrams)



365-608/428-S/80010

166 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

Enders: The EC can not make up its mind whether they will be rep-

resented as one or separately. The smaller countries don’t want to be

left out and the UK has made clear that it expects to have its own seat.

The other EC countries hope that after the British referendum, the UK

will be able to agree to a single EC representative.

Kissinger: We certainly don’t need a meeting just for that.

Robinson: Yes, but we should be aware of this problem.

Enders: On the first issue, the question is how much we want to

close out at this meeting.

Kissinger: Before we get to that, who the hell represents us at the

conference?

Robinson: That’s covered in the 4th question. You have agreed we

should avoid substantive issues. We’ve outlined 3 alternatives on rep-

resentation on page 6. Myself, initially, with Tom to replace me, or

Tom, or Jules Katz as the representative, to emphasize our intention to

keep the prepcon strictly on procedural issues.

Kissinger: How long is this meeting going to last?

Robinson: There has been talk of a 2 week meeting.

Enders: I would guess about 1 week.

Kissinger: Well, I already told the Saudis that you (to Robinson)

would be our representative, so I think you will have to do it. Who are

the Saudis sending?

Robinson: It could be Prince Saud, or possibly Yamani after the

King’s death this morning.

3

Kissinger: I think Saud was scheduled to be there, not Yamani.



Robinson: That’s true, but there may be a change as a result of this

morning’s events.

Kissinger: Well, I think you (to Robinson) should be there.

Robinson: I agree, I think it would give me some continuity in my

dealings with producer countries. I talked to Shultz about this and he

agrees too.

Kissinger: What is this question you have raised in here about the

US commitment to the IEA?

Enders: It’s essentially playback I got at the last Governing Board

meeting


4

from several European delegations, from events in the Middle

East.

Kissinger: From whom?



3

King Faisal was assassinated on March 25. Faisal’s brother, Khalid, succeeded him

as King of Saudi Arabia.

4

See Document 48.



365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 167

Enders: I don’t know from whom in the Middle East, but several

delegations asked me if we had flipped our strategy.

Kissinger: Who?

Enders: The German delegation, the British, and Davignon all

raised it.

Kissinger: Yes, and each of them are dealing separately with the

producers on this.

Enders: Yes, that’s true.

Kissinger: We are the only IEA virgins.

Enders: Well, we have to stick with them in the IEA.

Kissinger: First, we must protect ourselves against their treachery.

I am convinced that we can expect the same kind of thing to develop in

the conference with the producers as occurred during the European Se-

curity Conference.

5

However, the IEA is a major effort to achieve consumer solidarity



and we are not going to jettison it now.

Enders: I made that clear at the Governing Board meeting. I see my

role at the prepcon basically as keeping the Europeans under control.

Kissinger: OK, but I want to maintain the option of going the bilat-

eral route if they get unruly. We must not be the last to do bilaterals.

When is the conference?

Robinson: It’s scheduled to start April 7.

Kissinger: When are you going to Moscow?

Robinson: Tonight.

Kissinger: You’re coming back before the conference, aren’t you?

Robinson: Yes, I’ll be back at the end of the week.

Kissinger: Then we can meet again before the conference.

Were you planning to go to Jordan during your Middle East trip?

Robinson: No, I wasn’t.

Kissinger: Well, I may want you to go there and to Saudi Arabia. I

think in light of today’s events we should show the flag there.

Enders: The next issue is, should we leave any of the procedural

questions open at the prepcon?

Kissinger: I want the IEA to have the same status at the meeting as

OPEC.


Enders: It does, in fact IEA is better positioned. It has been invited,

OPEC has not.

5

The Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe, the last meeting of which



took place in December 1974.

365-608/428-S/80010

168 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

Kissinger: What about a rotating chairmanship? I am attracted to

that idea.

Enders: I think it’s fine; it is not effective, but it would solve a lot of

the political problems.

Hormats: But how do we solve who chairs within each of the 3

groups: LDCs, Producers, and Consumers?

Kissinger: I think we stick strictly to the Martinique formula.

Enders: That’s exactly what I told the French. They agreed.

Kissinger: Don’t the French think the formal conference is going to

be in Paris?

Enders: Yes.

Kissinger: Well, I assumed it would be in Paris from the beginning

but I would prefer Vienna.

How about Geneva?

Enders: That would be better; it might also enable you to do both

the Producer/Consumer conference and the Arab/Israeli meeting.

Robinson: The French would never accept New York.

Kissinger: OK, I think we should go for Geneva.

Hormats: I wonder whether we should insist on unanimity.

Kissinger: What other options are there?

Enders: The other option is a UN-type of consensus. You recall the

problems we had with that at the General Assembly Special Session.

Kissinger: The problem with unanimity is that it would give every-

body a veto.

You know, I never felt this conference was needed. If everyone has

a veto, I don’t see what can come out of it.

Enders: I agree the unanimity approach would give everyone a

veto, but I think we need this. Essentially, this means that either the Al-

gerians or we could block decisions.

Kissinger: I don’t believe the Algerians are looking for a

confrontation.

Enders: Yes, but the Algerians don’t want the conference to suc-

ceed. They are using it for the same reason we are, to build LDC

solidarity.

Kissinger: Do we want it to succeed?

Enders: The Algerian objective is really to expand the dialogue to

include all raw materials. We must avoid that.

Kissinger: What about the press play? What are you talking about

here?

Enders: The Algerians will have all of their speeches in the press



immediately. They will try to dominate the producer/LDC side. How

do you want us to play it; should we deadpan?



365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 169

Kissinger: I think you should give a briefing every day, but be

matter of fact and cool with the press. Make it clear that we are not

there to discuss substance, only procedure.

Robinson: I think that gives us the guidance we need on that. The

rest of the recommendations are in line with the ones I got in my con-

versations with George Shultz.

Kissinger: I would give a thoughtful procedural speech. Let the Al-

gerians dominate the substance but don’t debate them. The art here is

to look positive without getting carried away by your rhetoric.

Robinson: That’s pretty much in line with our thoughts.

Lord: Are you clear on the representation issue? The 12/6/6

6

formula?



Robinson: 12 consumers gets hung up with the UK representation

issue.


Kissinger: Suppose all 9 of the EC come.

Enders: That means the conference will get substantially larger,

but we may want that to happen.

Kissinger: I’m convinced that the French will do the same thing at

this conference as they did at the European Security Conference, and I

want to take out some insurance against that.

Robinson: Where do you want me to go on my trip to the Middle

East?


Kissinger: I think you should visit Iran, Jordan, and Saudi Arabia.

Robinson: OK, we can talk about that later.

The meeting ended at 4:05 P.M.

6

Twelve oil-consuming countries, six oil-producing countries, and six LDCs.



365-608/428-S/80010

170 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



50.

Telegram From the Department of State to the Embassy in

France

1

Washington, March 29, 1975, 2003Z.



71725. Subject: Letter From Secretary Kissinger to Minister

Sauvagnargues.

1. Please pass the following message from Secretary Kissinger to

Minister Sauvagnargues.

2. Begin text. Dear Mr. Minister: In President Giscard d’Estaing’s

letter to President Ford of February 28, 1975,

2

France extended an invi-



tation to the United States to attend a preparatory meeting in Paris be-

ginning on April 7 to organize an international conference on energy.

During our meeting at Martinique in December, we agreed that a

formal conference with the oil producing nations and developing coun-

tries will be necessary and that it should be carefully prepared. In this

regard, we were in agreement that a preparatory meeting should take

place only after the oil consuming industrialized countries had made

substantial progress toward cooperation in energy related financial

matters, energy conservation and the development of new energy

supplies.

Satisfactory progress in the first two of these three areas was

achieved in January and February. At its meeting of March 20, 1975 the

Governing Board of the International Energy Agency agreed on the

principles and elements of a coordinated system of cooperation in the

development of new supplies.

3

Certain elements of that system—notably a minimum protected



price for imported oil—may fall within the competence of the Euro-

pean Community, and I understand that their application will be dis-

cussed between France and the other members of the Community, par-

ticipants in the IEA, in the near future.

As you know, Mr. Minister, our representatives have held several

discussions of the concepts of the new IEA alternative supplies policies.

From these discussions, we have formed the hypothesis that France is

not hostile in principle to these concepts. On the basis of that hypothe-

sis the United States is of the opinion that the first stage of the sequence

agreed at Martinique has now been completed.

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D750111–0616.



Confidential; Priority. Drafted by Enders, cleared by Preeg and Sonnenfeldt, and ap-

proved by Kissinger.

2

See footnote 3, Document 45.



3

See Document 48.



365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 171

Therefore, Mr. Minister, I am pleased to accept your invitation to

attend the preparatory meeting beginning on April 7. I understand that

you intend the meeting to confine itself rigorously to procedural

matters. That is a correct approach, in my view, which US repre-

sentatives are instructed strongly to support. We very much desire a

successful meeting, and the United States delegation will be prepared

to work actively to that end. I agree that the problems which the inter-

national community now faces in the area of energy require our most

urgent attention and close cooperation.

After the preparatory meeting, we can use Martinique’s Phase

III—intensive consultation on consumer positions—to determine the

way in which alternative sources policy and other consumer positions

should be implemented.

With warm regards, Henry A. Kissinger. End text.



Kissinger

51.

Telegram From the Department of State to the Embassy in

Saudi Arabia

1

Washington, April 1, 1975, 0035Z.



72746. Subject: Tactics for Forthcoming Prepcon and Consumer/

Producer Conference.

1. At earliest opportunity and prior to departure Saudi delegation

for Prepcon, you should meet with Oil Minister Yamani to convey

our views and to discuss what we see as contributing to a successful

conference.

2

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D750111–0881. Se-



cret; Immediate. Drafted by Dickman, cleared in EB and S/P and by Robinson and Hor-

mats, and approved by Sidney Sober (NEA).

2

On April 2, Akins reported that he had met with Yamani before receiving the in-



structions contained in this telegram, but that “many of the points were, however, dis-

cussed with the Minister.” Yamani informed him that Prince Saud would not attend

Prepcon and had not yet decided who would go to the meeting. Yamani stated that Saudi

Arabia “would like to cooperate with the United States,” but was “not sure how close or

overt this cooperation should be.” Regardless, he assured Akins that Saudi Arabia would

“oppose any dramatic moves on the part of the OPEC radicals,” and that “above all Saudi

Arabia wishes to avoid confrontation” between the producers and the consumers. Be-

cause Akins had met with Yamani before the latter left for Beirut and Europe, he pre-

pared a paper summarizing this telegram and left it with Yamani’s office, which assured

the Ambassador that Yamani would receive it before his departure. (Telegram 2391 from

Jidda, April 2; ibid., D750115–0559)


365-608/428-S/80010

172 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

2. First express our pleasure that Yamani will continue as Minister

of Petroleum under King Khalid and ask if Prince Saud is still sched-

uled to represent SAG at the Prepcon. Because of the very special rela-

tionship between our two countries, our position as the world’s largest

oil importer, and Saudi Arabia’s position as a producer with consider-

able discretional ability to swing its production up or down, we believe

we will jointly benefit through close consultation and cooperation. We

are well aware that Saudi Arabia will play a very significant role and

we want to maintain close contact with the Saudi delegation in Paris.

3. You should mention to Yamani that we are also well aware of

Saudi interest in making a producer/consumer conference a success.

We assume the Saudis (like ourselves) do not want to see the confer-

ence degenerate into polemics or end up in a producer-consumer con-

frontation. We feel this is even more important now with the new lead-

ership in the Kingdom following Faisal’s assassination. As Yamani

knows, we have been reluctant to go along with any producer/

consumer conference until both sides were very well prepared because

we thought it would fail otherwise. If the Prepcon and a future confer-

ence are to succeed, much will depend on whether we can agree on an

agenda both sides can live with.

4. As Yamani knows from his last meetings with the Secretary in

Riyadh,


3

we intend the American approach to be cooperative. The Sec-

retary in his latest press conference on March 26 said: “We believe that

the consumer-producer conference is being conducted in the interests

of both sides for the common benefit, for the interest of a developing

and thriving world economy, which is in the interest of producers as

well as consumers and should not be tied to the situation in the Middle

East. Therefore, we are proceeding with our preparations for the

consumer-producer conference, and progress is being made in that di-

rection, and we find it essentially on schedule.”

4

5. You should tell Yamani that we think we are close on basic ap-



proaches to the conference: We agree that (A) we should keep the rep-

resentation limited to a relatively few key countries; (B) we both have

obligations toward the MSAs, including promotion of the production

of fertilizers; (C) stable economic conditions in the Western world are

needed to allow Saudi Arabia to pursue its goal of rapid economic de-

velopment in the next decades and for the West to fend off Commu-

nism/radicalism; (D) measures for conservation and the search for al-

ternative sources of petroleum must be accelerated; (E) we must work

within and not outside of existing international monetary mechanisms;

3

See Document 41.



4

The text of Kissinger’s press conference is in Department of State Bulletin, April 14,

1975, pp. 461–470.


365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 173

and (F) whatever the causes of the present energy problem it can be

turned into an opportunity for producer/consumer collaboration. We

do not want to use a conference to assess blame on any particular par-

ties because this would be unproductive and could lead to a confronta-

tion. Rather, we want to look to the future on how, through close bilat-

eral cooperation, we can bring about general cooperation between

producers and consumers.

6. As we see it, Prepcon is beginning of a process which will give

us a better basis for relating to each other on issues of mutual concern.

To avoid misunderstandings, we would like to set forth to Yamani our

hopes for the Prepcon which we hope Saudis could support: (A) an

agenda which covers recycling, industrialization of producer econ-

omies, aid to LDCs, inward investment, and pricing and security of

supply; (B) recognition of need for dialogue on other raw materials but

maintaining focus of this conference on energy and leaving other com-

modities for discussion in more appropriate forums such as forthcom-

ing UNGA Special Session; (C) holding participation in producer/

consumer conference to manageable proportions so that it does not de-

teriorate into a circus; (D) a neutral site for future conference; and (E)

agreeing in principle that conference should be held as soon as practi-

cable but leaving actual date open to ensure that we are all adequately

prepared.



Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling