Domaine le roc des anges, roussillon


Download 6.21 Mb.

bet34/87
Sana21.11.2017
Hajmi6.21 Mb.
1   ...   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   ...   87

DOMAINE GENOUX, YANN PERNUIT, ARBIN, Savoie – Biodynamic  

Arbin was once located on the Roman road linking Vienne to Rome. In the second century, Arbin was already surrounded by 

vineyards, as shown on one of the frescoes found in 1870 on the site of a luxurious gallo-roman villa discovered in the subsoil 

of our estate. The name “Arbin” seems to come from Albinus, a famous character, a former vice-procurator of Lusitania. At 

that time the vineyard was cultivated by the monks of the Arbin priory related to Cluny, and later by the Chartreux monks. It 

spread over more than 400 acres before the phylloxera crisis. Nowadays only the slopes between 250 and 350 metres high are 

used for vines. The upper slopes have been returned to wild and, in the distance, one can still see their terraces hidden behind 

wild red dogwoods. 

 

Fifteen acres are given over to the Mondeuse grape. Some of the old vines of this domaine are more than fifty years old and 

produce small quantities of wine which express all the fullness and uniqueness of the Arbin vineyards. 

Four acres are planted with Roussane, at the foot of the “Grand Blanc” rock, the other great area of Bergeron, 

Three acres, on the glacial moraine of Mérande, are planted with Altesse and give Roussette de Savoie, the great Savoie white 

wine, with Gamay and Jacquère sharing the remaining patches of land. 

Since 2000, the estate has been extended thanks to the re-cultivation of former vineyards. Among the most prestigious in the 

area, are “Paradis” and “Terrasses de Lourden”, which over only a few years have become the leading producers of the 

label of origin. 

Since 2001, renovated cellars have been installed in the Château de Mérande, an exceptional place and the most 

representative emblem of local history. Through continuous observation the family has nurtured the environment (terraces, 

hedges and groves) and developed a regime of protection and care without weed-killers and other pesticides. They don’t claim 

to be “biodynamic”, but devise treatments for the soil viewing it as a living entity linked to the cosmos. 

This development of the soil and the vine is achieved through vegetable, mineral or animal preparations, with application of 

these preparations at precise moments, according to the cycle of the vine and connected to the lunar and planetary calendar. 

They also use animal traction – horses to plough the soils. 

 

The Mondeuse Noire, a fascinating variety, originated in the Rhône forests, and was cultivated by the ancient Gauls. It was 

mentioned by Columelle and Pliny the Elder: “Allobrigica frigidis locis gelu maturescens et colore nigra”. It is similar to 

Syrah from the northern Rhône. 

Appreciated in its youth, it will improve after five to ten years, or even more for some vintages, once its tannins have become 

more rounded. 

Arbin La Belle Romaine is truly authentic Mondeuse. Traditional wine-making on full or half-skinned grapes. This version has 

a relatively short time in vat and is then matured for 10 to 12 months- also in vat. It is a lovely lucid wine, somewhere between 

Syrah and Gamay on the flavour spectrum with lifted red and blueberry fruit aromas and flavours. 

Roussette de Savoie Son Altesse reveals the fragrances and delight of Altesse. Traditional wine-making at low temperature. 

Matured in vats with partial malolactic fermentation. 

 

 

2014 


ROUSSETTE DE SAVOIE SON ALTESSE 

 



2014  

MONDEUSE ARBIN LA BELLLE ROMAINE 

 

2013 



MONDEUSE ARBIN 45.30.506 

 



 

 


 

 - 151 - 

 

 

 



 

 

 



DOMAINE BELLUARD, DOMINIQUE BELLUARD, Savoie – Biodynamic 

The village of Ayze is a little commune in the Haute–Savoie situated in the heart of the valley of the Arve between Geneva and 

Chamonix Mont-Blanc. Vineyards have been established here since the 13

th

 century. The vines are 450m high on exposed 

south-facing slopes where the soil is composed of glacial sediments, moraines (continuous linear deposits of rock and gravel). 

The Alpine climate ensures a big temperature difference between day and night, ensuring both physiological maturity in the 

grapes as well as good acidity. Patrick and Dominique Belluard make use of the virtually unique ancient grape Gringet said 

to be related to the Savagnin grape of Jura. Also called Petite Roussette and said to be part of the Traminer family, other 

research suggests that it was brought back by monks, returning from Cyprus in the 13

th

 century. Wilful obscurantism apart 

this is a wine that expresses a lungful of mountain air, heck, it’s as glacial as a Hitchcock heroine, with exuberant acidity that 

skates across the tongue and performs a triple salchow on your gums. No malolactic fermentation – the fruit is beacon-bright, 

crystalline and the acidity sings. Aromas of white flowers and jasmine, citrus-edged with a hint of white peach, violet and a 

twist of aniseed to finish. The brilliance of the acidity provides a profound palatal expergefaction (you heard it here first). 

These are wines sans maquillage. In 2001 the vineyards started undergoing a total conversion to biodynamic viticulture. Now 

the wines are natural. Belluard have run through the gamut of fermentation vessels. Now all wines other than amphora 

Gringet are fermented and aged in cement ovoid betons, the liquid inside in biodynamic suspension. Le Feu is from late 

maturing old vine Gringet grapes on steep slopes – the “hot spot” of the vineyard. White peaches, wild mint, minerals... The 

wine’s opulence is balanced by lightness of alcohol and incredibly relaxed leesy spiciness. The Mondeuse is fermented in 

amphora and is as thrillingly pure as the whites.  

 

 

2015 


VIN DE SAVOIE-AYZE GRINGET “LES ALPES” 

 



2015 

VIN DE SAVOIE-AYZE GRINGET “LE FEU” 

 

2014 



VIN DE SAVOIE-AYZE « LES GRANDES JORASSES » 

 



2014 

VIN DE SAVOIE-AYZE MONDEUSE – amphora 

 

 



 

 

 



Ovoid the obvious eggsexcrable puns

 

 



 

 - 152 - 



 

FOOD & WINE IN JURA & SAVOIE 

 

The wines of Jura and Savoie are not for the faint hearted, but their peculiar angularity vitally accords with the food of the region. It may 



not be all cheese and pork – actually that’s what it virtually all is! 

 

As is customary in rural France in the Jura region there is plenty of pig to poke about. Jambon de Luxeuil, a cured ham from the town of 



Luxeuil, is smoked according to an ancestral recipe. It is initially marinated in a bath of salt and juniper berries then slightly smoked with 

fir tree sawdust. Saucisse de Morteau, a sausage made exclusively with pork meat, originates from Morteau, located in the heart of the 

traditional “tué” region. The sausage is hung in a “tué”, enveloped by the smoke from coniferous trees for a minimum of 48 hours to 

achieve its unique taste and full flavour. It needs to be carefully poached in simmering water to prevent it from bursting and can be eaten 

hot or cold. Saucisse de Montbéliard comprises high quality pork, spiced with cumin, nutmeg, garlic and white wine and is smoked in 

accordance with the regional tradition. The sausage should be cooked for twenty minutes in simmering water or wrapped in foil paper and 

baked in the oven. It goes well with most vegetables and is traditionally served with warm cancoillote cheese. A rustic spiced berry 

Trousseau or Trousseau blend would serve admirably. Coq au vin jaune benefits from the unique flavour of the famous “vin jaune” 

(yellow wine). Other French regions prepare a similar dish with red or white wine. This recipe uses a rooster or a large hen. The wine of 

choice to accompany the dish is naturally vin jaune, although a straight Savagnin will suffice. Poularde aux morilles is a variation of the 

“Coq au Vin Jaune”, and also a local speciality popular in many Jura restaurants. It is prepared with a hen (16 to 20 weeks old, ready to 

lay eggs but not laying yet), yellow wine and morels (morilles). Used fresh in season (spring) or freeze-dried, morel is a delicate 

mushroom imparting distinctive perfume to the sauce. Truite au vin jaune, another classic Franche-Comté recipe, the delicate flesh of this 

freshwater fish is perfectly complemented by the exotic flavour of the unctuous sauce made with the typical Jura wine. One might try a 

Chardonnay with this, especially one where the wine has been aged in previously used Savagnin barrels. 

 

Other local favourites include Escalope de veau Comtoise – first glazed in a pan, then topped with cured ham and grated 152eper cheese, 



the veal cutlet is coated with a rich and creamy mushroom sauce and Potée Comtoise, which, unlike other country “potées”, includes 

smoked meats. Palette, sausages and lard enrich this complete meal of potatoes, cabbage, carrots, celeriac and green beans, slowly 

simmered. A Poulsard with its high acidity would cut through this hale heartiness. Chèvre sale (salted goat) is a traditional dish of the 

Haut-Jura, served in winter, from October 15

th

 to March 15



th

. It used to be the staple country food and is now becoming fashionable again. 

The number of “salt goat nights” is increasing in the city of Saint-Claude; restaurants have it on their menu or it can be cooked at home. 

Its meat is an attractive pink and is prepared as a pot-au-feu served with boiled potatoes. 

 

Fondue-making consists of melting Comté cheese into a pot of warm, garlic-infused white wine. The pot called “poêlon” is centred on the 



table where guests (this is truly communal eating) dip pieces of crusty bread on long-handled forks to coat them with the cheese mixture. 

Raclette Jurassienne is made with “Bleu de Gex”, instead of the traditional Raclette cheese. An electric grill is centred on the table and 

each diner is given a stack of sliced cheese and places each slice into his assigned individual square dish under the grill till it melts. It is 

then spread over boiled potatoes, served with pickles and “charcuteries”. Still on a cheesy theme, Morbier cheese gave its name to the 

morbiflette (a cousin of famous tartiflettes), wherein cooked potatoes and onions are covered with slices of morbier cheese, the whole dish 

being baked until the cheese melts. This hearty dish needs a spiky local Jura or Savoie white wine and a green salad to cleanse the palate. 



Poulet à la Comtoise is another gratin-style dish involving poaching chicken then covering in creamy cheese sauce and mushrooms and 

finally grilling it in the oven. Comté cheese goes a long way in the Jura! 

 

The region of Savoie, divided today into the departments of Savoie and Haute-Savoie, lies at the heart of the French Alps—the remnants 



of a kingdom that ruled much of this part of Europe for eight centuries, until the mid-1800s—and it is here that French mountain cooking 

thrives most vigorously. The raw materials are rich and varied—cheese and other dairy products; apples, pears, plums, and cherries; 

mountain berries and wild mushrooms; wild game; fresh fish from local lakes—not just trout but perch, pike, and the sublime omble-

chevalier. Fondue Savoyarde is the region’s most famous dish, but hearty soups and stews (among them the famous potée), civets of 

game, potato dishes, and glorious fruit tarts all appear on the Savoyard table as well. 

 

Historically, during the long winter months, the people of Chamonix subsisted on a diet of potatoes, cheese, onions, and ham or pork. 



Today, these same ingredients are still fundamental to the local cuisine. One of the most popular offerings is an ancient speciality called 

reblochonnade (also known as tartiflette), a sturdy cousin of the classic gratin Savoyarde. The dish is made of thinly sliced potatoes 

sautéed with bacon and onions, moistened with cream, and then baked in the oven. Finally, generous slices of creamy reblochon (a cow’s-

milk cheese made in the Haute-Savoie) are melted on top. 

 

The restaurants in and around Courchevel (and there are many) serve authentic Savoyard dishes such as warm Beaufort tart, cured country 



ham, wonderful cheeses, and desserts. In the evening, the mountains still reflect light from the horizon, tingeing white peaks with pink. At 

this hour, when the day’s play is done and the broken limbs and bruises totted up, skiers sip mulled wine before heading off to the table. 

Then they sit down to a sumptuous array of dishes, from Mediterranean seafood to such unmistakably local offerings as raclette (melted 

raclette cheese served with potatoes, ham, and cornichons) or a classic fondue. Dishes such as trout or char cooked in white wine from 

nearby streams, roast kid with morels, lambs’ brains fritters, and local cheeses, followed by mountain berries beaten with cream or by 

honeyed matefaim—literally “hunger-killer”, a dessert of thick risen pancakes and apples cooked in butter—all washed down with a crisp, 

pétillant Savoyard white wine (Gringet or Abymes), have been a feature of Savoyard cooking for centuries. Things change slowly in the 

mountains of France.  

 

The wines are unique. In Jura the whites are characterised by their rich nuttiness: Vin Jaune, Château-Chalon and even straight Savagnin 



are magnificently aromatic with texture and flavour in abundance. Notes of apple, straw and almond for the lighter wines moving 

towards flor, marzipan and hazelnut and grilled walnut and oloroso in the great vins des gardes. Savoie whites are as crisp as mountain 

air. The reds from both regions are pale yet robust with plenty of acidity, bitter fruit and tannin. 

 

 



 

 - 153 - 

 

Notes From The Undersoil 

 

“I had that Bertrand Russell in the back of my cab once. So I asked him, “Well, Mr Russell, what’s it all about?” And do you know – he 



couldn’t tell me!” 

 

A cab driver funnily enough asked me what I thought about wine, and, lacking a pat ontological response, I went puffing in many 



directions simultaneously. Wine as a subject is out there; it is part of mass culture now, yet equally it is about formulating individual 

opinions and developing a personal sense of taste. Wine elicits in some a strong philosophical inclination; in others, conversely, it exposes 

an anti-philosophical, pontifical side; it seems that many must hold deep opinions even if they are about shallow subjects. Meanwhile, the 

omphalic wine press focuses increasingly on the folderol and gimmickry of a trade fascinated by the tarnished lustre of PR campaigns, 

endlessly regurgitated surveys, the fripperies of branding, trite packaging, the meagre frivolity of awards, and, most of all, the deadly buzz 

of what’s considered new and groovy. The wine trade reinvents itself constantly in order to track trends, but, in reality, it’s just changing 

one set of the emperor’s new clothes for another. Novelty, as Pierre Brasseur observes in Les Enfants du Paradis, is as old as the world 

itself.  

 

The quality of debate is not much better at a supposedly more exalted level. I read recently a forum on biodynamics and was surprised 



how many contributions were couched in the contrarian language of pseudo-academia. Man, proud man, drest in a little brief authority 

most ignorant of what he is most assur’d etc. There was an extraordinary amount of hobbyhorse-riding, posturing, quoting out of context, 

intellectual absolutism and second guessing. It reminded me of those conferences where carefully researched papers are given, many 

opinions are vehemently ventilated and no-one ends up any the wiser.

 

The love that many of us have for us for wine is gradually being 



eroded by a welter of spurious scientific evidence thrown into our faces. Do you believe that you taste terroir in a wine? A scientist will 

be on hand to assert contentiously that there is no evidence for terroir and that it is a fanciful invention of the French. (In fact that 

argument is a fanciful invention of scientists on an ego trip. They can’t disprove its existence but they can create false arguments to knock 

down). Do you love a particular wine? Then it may shake your confidence to know that many so called authoritative wine writers 

(supertasters) will mark it out of a hundred and perhaps completely disagree with you. Romance? Magic? Pleasure. Forget ‘em. Wine 

tasting has become over-evaluative; it bears less and less relation to the wine itself and to the way we respond as human beings.

 

 

The poem was probably 



a poem about itself  

as a pearl speaks of pearls 

and a butterfly of butterflies 

 

that poem  



which eludes me in daylight 

has hidden itself in itself 

only sometimes 

I feel its bitterness 

and internal warmth 

but I don’t pull it out of 

the dark hollow depth 

on to the flat bank 

of reality 

 

unborn  



it fills the emptiness 

of a disintegrating world 

with unknown speech 

 

Tadeusz Różewicz – Translated by Adam Czerniawski 



 

For me the pleasure of wine is pleasure: occasionally we should resist analysing our experience in the same way as when we read a poem 

or listen to music we do not have to clinically dissect its beauty and rearrange it (what is this but translating one language into another). 

Too often we strain for definitive answers, we want to consciously validate our experiences rather than to feel them on the pulses. Yet 

pleasure may consist of denying the final moment of critical appreciation. In his Ode to Melancholy Keats depicts the tightly-bound 

unresolved relationship between pleasure and melancholy with a succession of extraordinary taut images and juddering juxtapositions, 

one of the most memorable of which is “…whose strenuous tongue/ Can burst Joy’s grape against his palate fine”. Keats suggests that the 

instant you resolve the pleasure (be it through gratification of desire or exploding a grape or tasting a wine) you destroy the pleasure, but 

that that let-down is an inevitable part of pleasure. Give rein to the senses, savour the moment exquisitely, suspend judgement and allow 

yourself to receive impressions; like the poem that has hidden itself in itself a wine doesn’t need to be yanked out of a dark hollow depth 

and exposed to flip judgement. In these moments the wine is more important than the taster. A portion of humility works wonders. 

 

This is not to say that appreciating wine is a solitary activity. Sharing a bottle of wine in good company with good food is the definition of 



happy sensuousness. Communicating pleasure takes it to another level. Wine writing has become an abstraction because it is unable to 

celebrate this sense of pleasure; editorial constraints mean that even accomplished writers are shackled and their columns effectively 

reduced to a succession of sound-nibbles and supermarket recommendations. Which brings me back to my initial point: to question 

whether there is there any room in wine writing for philosophical interrogation, for relaying aesthetic appreciation and sensual pleasure, 

or must every single word fit the purpose – in that the writing is designed specifically to sell “the business of wine” and is consequently 

destined forever merely to skim the surface of this fascinating subject. 



 

 - 154 - 



BORDEAUX

 

 To happy convents deep in vines Where slumber abbots purple as their wines Alexander Pope – The Dunciad 

 

WHAT’S UP MEDOC? (The price is – every day) 

 

Appreciation – the process whereby the value of wines of a certain 

reputation multiplies exponentially over a short period of time. As 

in  “I appreciate  that  this  bottle of  Pomerol  will  be  worth three 

times as much if I sell it five years hence”. 

 

-



 

The Alternative Wine Glossary 

 

A relatively small selection of Petits Châteaux at the moment, but 



we  are  scouring  the  region  for  goodies.  Are  we  that  bovvered? 

Maybe  not.  I  would  commend  to  your  attention  Château  La 

Claymore  (a  flavoursome  Lussac  Saint-Emilion  likely  to  be 

enjoyed  by  Scotsmen  looking  for  hand-to-hand  combat)  and  the 

Château  Penin,  a  consistently  fine  wine  punching  above  the 

modest  Bordeaux  Superieur  classification.  For  those  in  the 

Bordeaux  name  game  who  can’t  afford  the  top  dollar  top  dogs, 

democratic  second  wines  such  as  Lacoste-Borie  and  Sarget  de 

Gruaud-Larose provide an echoic flavour of the real thing. And for 

a Bordeaux that has shaken off the clunky shankles of Bordeaux 

we would unreservedly recommend Jacques Broustet’s Autrement 

de Lamery. It’s not AOC, it’s biodynamic, low yields, no sulphur 

– and tastes like a Burgundy. So not a Bordeaux. 

 

That’s the upside. Now let’s talk quality and squeaky pips and the 



mutest of fruit. Are not many growers in Bordeaux as smug as bugs 

in rugs? They certainly have green fingers; a character transmitted 

into the wines which embody the true flavour of LEAF-THROAT-

MULCH. Sure they talk the talk, but do they destalk the stalk? We 

taste endless samples, lean, mean, joyless wines with either dried-

out or soupy fruit, or over-extracted wines where frantic fiddling 

in  the  winery  is  trying  to  compensate  for  the  poor  fruit  quality. 

Until we find something good we will resist the lustre of Listrac, 

avoid  parting  with  our  hard-earned  moolah  for  Moulis  and  will 

never  rave  for  the  Graves  and  damn  it,  my  dear,  I  don’t  give  a 



franc.  

 

I give this peroration 84 Parker points 



Upfront,  fruity  language,  acidulous  facetiousness,  moderate 

offensiveness, lacking in structure, very sudden fin--

 



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   ...   87


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling