Gw issn 0001 0545 b 20004 f fieedmfa Indivicka/sf

bet1/39
Sana23.09.2017
Hajmi
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   39
16324

GW  ISSN  0001  -  0545
B  20004  F
fieedmfa Indivicka/sf
(left) Ukrainians and Afghans in Denmark protesting against Russian 
occupation of their countries.
(right)  Ukrainians  in  Great  Britain  demonstrating  against  genocide  and 
persecution of freedom fighters of their fatherland.
Verlagspostamt:  Miinchen  2 
January  -  February  1985
Vol.  XXXVI. No.

C O N T E N T S : 
Three  More  Victims  of  Russian  Terror  . 

6
B.  Ozerskyj
The  Situation  in  Ukraine  and  in  the  Empire 
8
Z. Karpyshyn (USA)
Developments  in  Europe  and the  USSR .  .  12
Dr. A. I lie (Croatia)
Croats  are  not  Y u g o s la v s ...............................16
V. Berko (Slovakia)
The  Political  Situation  in  Slovakia  . . .   19
Father Paul Marx
The Forgotten Holocaust in Afghanistan .  .  20
Ex-prisoner  on  Trial  for  Memoirs  . . .   21
Victims  of  Russian  T e r r o r ...............................22
Statement  of  the  European Freedom  Council  24 
Eric Brodin (USA)
‘1984’  for  Over  25  Years  in  Cuba  . . .   26
Slava Stetsko, M.A.
ABN  A c tiv itie s.............................................................28
News  and  V iew s.............................................................34
From  Behind  the  Iron  Curtain  . . . .   42
Book  R e v ie w s .............................................................46
Publisher  and  Owner  (Verleger  und  In­
haber):  American  Friends  of  the  Anti- 
Bolshevik  Bloc  of  Nations  (AF  ABN), 
136  Second  Avenue,  New  York,  N.  Y. 
10003,  USA.
Zweigstelle  Deutschland:  Zeppelinstr.  67, 
8000 München 80.
Editorial Staff: Board of Editors. 
Editor-in-Chief:  Mrs.  Slava  Stetsko,  M.A. 
8000 Munich 80, Zeppelinstr. 67/0 
West Germany.
Articles  signed  with  name  or  pseudonym 
do  not  necessarily  reflect  the  Editor’s  o- 
pinion, but that of the author. Manuscripts 
sent  in  unrequested  cannot be returned in 
case  of  non-publication  unless  postage  is 
enclosed.
It is not our practice 
to pay for contributed materials. 
Reproduction perm itted but only 
with  indication  of  source  (ABN-Corr.). 
Annual subscription:
18 Dollars in the USA, and the equivalent 
of  18  Dollars  in  all  other  countries. 
Remittances  to  Deutsche  Bank,  Munich, 
Filiale  Depositenkasse,  Neuhauser  Str.  6, 
Account, No. 30/261  35  (ABN).
Schriftleitung:  Redaktionskollegium. 
Verantw.  Redakteur  Frau  Slava  Stetzko. 
Zeppelinstraße  67/0.  8000  München  80, 
Telefon: 48 25 32.
Druck:  Druckgenossenschaft „Cicero“ e.G. 
Zeppelinstraße 67, 8000 München 80.

THE  PATH  TRODDEN  BY  SAINTS
Rev.  Werenfried  van  Straaten’s sermon  during a  requiem for  the  late Patriarch 
Josyf  Slipyj,  which  was  held  in  St.  Michael’s  Church  in  Munich  on  Sunday, 
October  21,  1984.
According  to  an  old  legend,  Andrew  the  apostle  blessed  the  hills  around 
Kyiv  and  prophesied victory  for Christianity  in  Ukraine.  We know  for certain 
that St.  Clement,  the  third  successor of  St.  Peter  was banished  by  the  Emperor 
Trajan  to  the  Crimea,  where  he  died  a  martyr  and  exercized  an  indelible  in­
fluence on  the  Church  in Ukraine.  500  years  later,  the  banished  Pope  Martin  I 
died  a  martyr’s  death  on  the  Ukrainian  coast for the unity  of  the  Church.
Martyrdom  for  Christian  unity  has  remained  the  glorious  characteristic  of 
the Ukrainian  Church.  It was  the  first Eastern  Church  to  renew the union with 
Rome  following  the  Great  Schism  with  the  Orient  and  it  has  repeatedly  sealed 
its  loyalty  to the Apostolic See with rivers  of blood and mountains of corpses.
This  witness  through  blood  reached  its  zenith  after the  Second  World  War, 
when  Stalin  and  the  Moscow  Patriarch  forcibly  integrated  the Ukrainians  unit­
ed with Rome into the Orthodox Church.  Countless faithful,  hundreds  of priests 
and  practically  every  bishop  lost  their  lives  through  this  unecumenical  use  of 
force,  which those responsible in the Moscow  Patriarchate still  regard  as having 
been a glorious page in the history of the Orthodox Church.
Archbishop  Josyf  Slipyj  survived  the  atrocities.  Not  through  compromise 
but  through  maintaining  unswerving  loyalty.  Even  when  he  was  offered  the 
Patriarchal  Seat  in  Moscow  with  the  proviso  that  he  renounce  the  union  with 
Rome  and  the  primacy of  the  Pope,  he  remained  faithful  and  continued  on  his 
way of the cross which was to last  18 years.
At the beginning of the Vatican  Council  his seat remained empty,  while the 
representatives of Patriarch Alexej,  who was in part responsible for the persecu­
tion, were present. There was a storm of protest.
Pope John X X III  intervened personally.  The unbending witness  to  his  faith 
was  set  free on  February  9th,  1963.  From  that day  onwards  he  ran  his  Church 
in  the  catacombs  and  in  exile  from  Rome up  until  September  7th  of  this  year 
when he died at the age of 92  in the shadow of St. Sophia’s  Cathedral which  he 
had  built.
When  the  then  Archbishop,  Metropolitan  of  Lviv  and  sole  survivor  of 
the Ukrainian bishops  (ten  of them had been murdered or had died early  in So­
viet  gaols)  was  freed  after  an  unjust,  inhuman  and  arbitrarily  prolonged  im­
prisonment of  18 years  and exiled to Rome,  he received me straight away.  From 
that  moment  onwards  I  was  his  admirer,  his  helper,  his  comrade-in-arms  and 
his  friend.
He  was  a  Prince  of  the  Church  with  an  iron  character.  His  shattered  and 
weakened  body  concealed  an  unbroken  spirit.  He  was  a  brilliant  theologian, 
a born scholar,  and amongst all the Uniates,  perhaps the most stubborn  and  able 
advocate  of  a  pure  Byzantine  Rite.  That made  him  a  link  with  the  Orthodox 
Church  and  the  predestined  leader  of  all  the  oriental  Churches  united  with 
Rome. But he was a wholehearted spiritual leader  also, who had left behind him
1

the  beneficial  traces  of  this  activity  as  a  priest  in  countless  camps  all  over  the 
Soviet  Union.  Each  time when  his  influence  became  known,  he  was  moved  to 
another  prison.  Thus  he  had  become  a  well-known  symbol  everywhere,  outside 
Western  Ukraine  too  and  throughout  the  Soviet  Union,  not  only  for  the 
dispersed  Catholics but  also  for  the  genuine  Orthodox  Church  which was  to  be 
found  less  among the prelates  of  the  Moscow  Patriarchate  and more  in  the  ca­
tacombs  and  concentration  camps of Siberia.  And because there  exists  alongside 
this  holy  Orthodox Church  an  unholy,  Soviet  dominated  Orthodox  Church, he 
finally  also  became  an  involuntary  obstacle  to  an  ecumenical  rapprochement 
with Moscow’s official Church because it will never be possible for Rome to buy 
peace with  the Russian Orthodox Church by betraying five million martyrs and 
faithful  belonging  to  the Ukrainian  Catholic  Church.
Cardinal Slipyj  worked  like a  giant  during  his  final  21  years  in  exile.  Sub­
sequent generations will come to honour what he achieved for his exiled Church 
in the free world.  I  personally can testify  to the way in which he begged,  urged 
and  requested  me  and  “Aid  to  the  Church  in  Need”  to  provide  every  con­
ceivable  and  possible  assistance  for  his  persecuted,  bleeding  and  struggling 
Church  in  his  homeland.  He  lived  and  died  for  this  Ukrainian  Church,  in  the 
East  and in  the  West.
To assure the continuation of this Church and only for that reason he accept­
ed the title of Patriarch in 1975 at the request of the Ukrainian synod of bishops 
and  in  expectation  of  legal  confirmation  by  the  Pope.  As  a  faithful son  of the 
Church who had to suffer more and longer than anybody  this century for  unity 
with  the Apostolic See,  he repeatedly  sought  this  formal  confirmation  in  letters 
and discussions  and finally with the utmost vigour in his spiritual testament.  He 
constantly  explained  to  the  ecclesiastical  diplomats  who  were  afraid  of  the 
atheist  reaction  that  in  the  Eastern  Church  neither  the  Popes  nor  the  world 
councils  had  ever  created  patriarchs  of  the  individual  branch  Churches.  He 
tirelessly  drew  attention  to  the fact  that  endowing  such  branch  Churches  with 
a  patriarchal  crown  was  always  the  fruit  of  mature  Christian  consciousness  in 
God’s  people.  Many  did  not understand  this point.  Even  the  dying  martyr  was 
not  granted  his  wish,  although  it  was  not  for  his  personal  glory  but  for  the 
existence  of his  Church  that  he  sought it.
May  what  he  wrote  in  his  spiritual  testament  about  this  central  problem 
remain  forever  in your  thoughts:
“The  Patriarchate  which  was  the  vision  of  your  faithful  souls  has  be­
come  a  living  reality for you and will remain  so  in  future.  In  a  short while  the 
Patriarch  for  whom  you  are  praying  will  depart  this  earthly  life.  The  visible 
symbol,  the personification of the Patriarchate in his person will no longer exist. 
But  in  your  consciousness  and  in  your  thoughts  a  living  and  real  Ukrainian 
Church  bearing a Patriarch’s crown will continue to  exist.  That  is  why it is  my 
last  wish  that  you  pray  as  before  for  the  Patriarch  of  Kyiv,  Halyc  and  all 
Rus,  even  if  you  have  no  name  to  include.  The  time  will  come  when  the  Al­
mighty will send our  Church a Patriarch and reveal  his name. We  already have 
our Patriarchate.”
As  we  add  our  “fiat”  at  the  passing  of  our  beloved  Patriarch  Josyf  Slipyj 
to-day,  let us hope that the precious Ukrainian wheat seed which fell  on Roman
2

soil  forty  days  ago  will  not  be  wasted  but  will  yield  fruit  in  abundance.  It  is 
written that “the soul of this just man is in God’s hands. He tried him and found 
him worthy.”
God sent him trials.  He  was  led  along a way of the cross,  the like of which 
hardly  any  Cardinal  before  him  had  to  follow.  He  did  so  with  exemplary 
loyalty, without hate towards  his persecutors,  but also without evading the  con­
sequences  in  instances  where  compromise  or  escape could  have made  life  easier. 
He  followed  the  Lord  faithfully.  Because  “where  Christ  was,  there  also  His 
servant should be”.
He suffered unspeakably while a witness to Christ as a prisoner in the Soviet 
Union,  just  as  the Lord  had prophesied:  “And  you  shall  be my witnesses  in  Je­
rusalem and  in  all Judea  and  Samaria  and  to  the end  of  the  earth”  (Acts  1,8). 
There were other names on the signposts along his path, not Jerusalem  or Judea, 
but  Lviv,  Kyiv,  Siberia,  Krasnojarsky  Kraj,  Jenisseijsk,  Polar  regions,  Mor­
dovia  ...  and  they  did  indeed  reach  “to  the  end  of  the  earth”.  He  had  to  be 
a witness for his silent Church, condemned to death, a man robbed of all physic­
al  and  mental  strength  and  who  had  realized  that  his  path  “to  the  end  of  the 
earth”  had been  a  death sentence  (cf.  spiritual  testament,  p.  6.).  “In  the eyes  of 
the  fools  he appeared  to  be dead.”
He suffered greatly from having his shining figure so systematically obscured 
by the half light of deceit and slander in  the interest of peaceful co-existence,  to 
the  extent  that  Christ’s  accusation,  “Jerusalem,  Jerusalem  you  murder  the 
prophets  and  stone  those  who  were  sent  to  you,”  could  also  apply  to  the  pre­
sent  day  Church.  “That  is  how  he  lost  his  life  in  this  world,  but  kept  it  for 
eternity.”
He suffered even  more under the cross which was perhaps the greatest in his 
life when  he  was  freed  but  his  Church  had  no  freedom.  This  happened  against 
his  will  as he expressly intimated  in writing from  solitary confinement in Kyiv. 
He was prevented from continuing to bear the heavy cross along with his Church, 
(cf.  spiritual testament p. 9.)  “God tried him and  found him worthy.”
He  suffered  terribly  in  Rome,  more  than  in  Siberia,  he  told  me,  when  he 
learnt how  much  his  persecuted priests  in  Ukraine  were  in  despair  on account 
of  the  Orthodox  synod  which  had  taken  place  in  Moscow  in  June  1971.  There 
the  Vatican  delegate  had  learnt  without  uttering  a  protest  of  the  triumphant 
nullification declaration of the centuries old union between Rome and the Unit­
ed Ukrainian Church.  “God tested him like gold in a melting pot,  God  accepted 
him like a  burnt offering.”
His bitter fate reminds us all that all our efforts to save the menaced Church 
would  remain  unfruitful,  if  we  did  not  possess  the  additional  stream  of  grace 
attributable  to  anonymous  prayer  and  to  the  silently  carried  crosses  of  hidden 
saints.  The  Church  draws  its  strength  from people  like these.  Looked  at  in  this 
light,  the Patriarch’s  fate  will  at some  stage  represent the victory  of  the blessed 
cross. That could be  the  only  reason why  God allowed  it  to  happen.
Christ’s  having  been  obedient  up  to  his  death  on  the  cross  cannot  be  com­
prehended  by  reason  alone.  We  have  to  submit  to  that  wisdom  which  reason 
regards  as being foolish.
Jesus  Christ  and  all  the  martyrs  who  shared  his  fate  have  preceded  your 
Patriarch  along  the  hard  path which  he  chose  freely.  It  is  the path  trodden by
3

saints down the ages.  They were deprived of their rights just like God’s own Son 
who assumed  the  role of  a  slave  and  remained  obedient up  to  His  death  on  the 
cross.  This  cross  of  obedience  is  the  basic  law  of  Christianity.  Despite  all  the 
praiseworthy  and  necessary  efforts  at  giving human  rights  more  weight  within 
the Church,  we should not be under any illusions  and never forget that we  must 
endeavor to be defenceless disciples of the One who died without rights and who 
seeks  to  continue  not  only  His  life  but  also  His  death  in  each  one  of  us.  For 
such  a  giant  in the  history  of  the  Church  as Josyf  Slipyj  to  submit  to  this  law 
is  a sign of true holiness  and  an example  for all  those who  walk  bent  under the 
heavy  and sometimes incomprehensible burden  of  obedience  to  the Church.
As  we  wait  in  hope  for  the  signs  and  miracles,  which  we  trust  God  may 
work through him very soon to save the Ukrainian Church, we can already  dare 
to  say,  “Corona  aurea  super caput eius!”  “Blessed  are  those who  are  persecuted 
for  righteousness’  sake,  for  theirs  is  the  kingdom  of  heaven.  Blessed  are  you 
when  men revile you  and  persecute  you  and  utter  all kinds  of evil  against  you 
falsely on my account. Rejoice and be glad, for your reward is great in heaven.” 
(Mt.  5,  10-12).
Therefore listen  to  your  Patriarch  with  respect  and  childlike  obedience.  He 
is  not  dead. His soul  is  in God’s  hands  and no  further suffering  can affect  him. 
The hour has come where he will be glorified with the Son of Man.  A voice was 
heard  from  the  heavens  saying,  “I have  glorified  and  will  continue  to glorify.” 
Your  Patriarch  shines  like  a  bright  light.  He  passes  judgement  on  the  pagans 
and rules  over the nations.
Yes indeed, listen  to him because he continues to preach in his testament, the 
magnificent and at the same time moving document which he has left behind as 
his final legacy. If this legacy is not repeatedly read, weighed up, taken to heart, 
acquiesced  to,  carried  out  and  lived  by  every  Ukrainian  family,  by  every 
Ukrainian  priest  and  by  every  Ukrainian  bishop,  then  I  fear  the  Ukrainian 
Church has  not been  worthy  of such  a  shepherd.  That  ought not  to  be  the  case. 
Therefore  you,  the  flock  of  Josyf  Slipyj,  listen  to  his  voice,  trust  in  his  inter­
cession,  carry  out his  legacy  and  above  all  preserve  your  Christian  family  life, 
your language and your beautiful liturgy.
Your liturgy!  I  experienced  it  as  never before  on  September  12th and  13th, 
when  I  took  part  deeply  moved  in  the  Parastas,  the  Liturgija  and  Panachyda 
for  your  Patriarch.  Under  the  golden  mosaic  of  the  Cathedral  which  he  him­
self had built like a hymn in stone at God’s feet, I felt as if I were in heaven. We 
were  not  alone.  The  many  saints  who  had  protected  the Patriarch  throughout 
his life glinted on the iconostasis, on the vaulted ceiling and on the walls. Clothed 
in  scarlet  cloaks  and  wearing  shining  mitres  with  a  touch  of  God’s  splendour 
about them,  metropolitans,  cardinals,  bishops,  archimandrites,  priests  and monks 
stood  around  the  mortal  remains  of  the  iron-hard  martyr  who  was  permitted 
to  outlive Stalin  and  his weak  servant  Alexej,  so as  to  build up  through  God’s 
power  everything  which  they  had  destroyed  in  the  service  of  Satan.
The  pain  felt  by  the  thousand-strong  congregation  finds  an  outlet  in  the 
sombre Alylujas and in  the heart-rending laments  of the cantors who  repeatedly 
break  out  into  the  Hospody  pomyluj  with  voices  full  of  tears.  The  wood  of 
shame which the deceased carried for so long for his  Church and his  nation and 
on which he  died  victorious is  revered  a  hundredfold everytime  when  the  cele­
4

brants  and  the  congregation  profess  their  belief  in  the  Blessed  Trinity  and  the 
victory of Jesus  Christ by making the threefold sign of the cross with  expansive 
gestures.  Incense  rises  up  over  the  martyred  body  as  a  belated  tribute  to  this 
man  deeply  stirred by  God  who  all  through  his  long life carried  with  him  and 
radiated  the  divine  grace  which  he  had  received  at  baptism  and  at ordination.
Occasionally the  tempo  and  the rythm  of  the  singing increase  and  the  pitch 
rises.  No  longer  is  it a  suppliant  beseeching,  it  has  become  a  crying  out  and  a 
demand  for  God’s  mercy.  No longer  is  it  intercession  for  the soul  of the  Patri­
arch,  but  rather  the  soul  of  an  oppressed  and  betrayed  people  despairingly 
seeking help.  It sounds like a last appeal to the pastoral care of the dead martyr, 
who  is  already  in  God’s  presence.  Protect  your  poor  nation,  give  our  priests 
holiness  and  strength,  awaken  in  our  bishops  the  willingness  to  preserve  your 
legacy  and  to  defend  it,  provide  the  diplomats  with  supernatural  vision,  and 
prevent  them  from  further  exchanging  truth  and  justice  for  an  illusory  gain. 
And  enlighten  your Slav  friend,  the  Pope  from  Poland,  so  that  he  may find  a 
way of  leading us  all  to  peace,  justice  and  freedom...
When the final Hospody pomyluj  has died away,  silence reigns in the golden 
cathedral.  Now  that  the  powerful  voice  of  the  Patriarch  is  forever  silent,  may 
God  grant  that  silence will  not  reign  in  the  One,  Holy,  Catholic  and Apostolic 
Church.  God  grant  that  sufficient  faithful  disciples  may  be  found  to  repeat 
continually the  teachings which  he,  just  like  Moses,  put  before  his  people as  far 
as the borders of the promised land. And let those teachings be stamped indelibly 
on  the hearts  of the Ukrainian people.
Then  the Almighty will hasten  the  day which his  faithful  servant  Josyf  Sli- 
pyj was not permitted to  see,  the  day  when  justice will  reign.  Then your  strong 
and  courageous  Patriarch  will  bless your  Ukrainian  nation  from  heaven,  just as 
once  upon  a  time  Andrew  the  Apostle  blessed  your  homeland  from  the  hills 
around Kyiv. Because the Lord says,  “I  myself  will  seek out my sheep  and  look 
after  them...  I  will  pick  you  out  of  all  races  and  collect you together  from  all 
countries  and  bring  you  back  to  your  homeland...  Then  you  will  live  in  the 
country I have given you and be my people and I will be your God.”
“In  you  I  embrace  in  the  charity  of  Christ  all  the  people  of  your  homeland, 
together  with  their  history,  culture,  and  the  heroism  with  which  they  have 
lived their faith...”
“Our  meeting  today,  taking  place  as  it  does  on  the  threshold  of  the  solemn 
celebration  of  the  Millennium  of  Christianity  in  Kyiv  and  the  entire  Ukraine, 
carries  our minds and  hearts back  through  the  centuries  of your glorious history 
of faith...  I came to know and appreciate  this precious heritage of the  Ukrainian 
people...”
(The Holy Father’s Message to the Ukrainian Community in Canada 
at Sts. Volodymyr and Olha Cathedral, September 16, 1984 in Winnipeg.)
5

Three  More  Victims 
of 
Russian 
Terror
It  has  been  noticeable  that  for  quite 
some time now the Russian authorities and 
the  KGB  have  been  tightening  the  screw 
in  Ukraine.  Their  recent  actions  in  the 
most  important  of  the  non-Russian  re­
publics  were  aimed  specifically  at  dealing 
a  death  blow  to  the  human  and  national 
rights movement in Ukraine.
As  a  result  of  this  crackdown  on  all 
dissent  and  opposition  three  prominent 
Ukrainian  political  prisoners,  Oleksa  TY- 
KHYJ,  Yurij  LYTVYN  and  Valerij 
MARCHENKO,  all  active  campaigners 
for  national  rights  in  Ukraine,  have  died 
since  the  spring  of  1984,  as  a  direct  re­
sult  of  ill-treatment  and  inadequate  me­
dical attention. Others have been forced to 
recant.
In addition four former members of the 
Organisation  of  Ukrainian  Nationalists 
(OUN) and the Ukrainian Insurgent Army 
(UPA),  which  fought  against  the  Nazis 
and  then  actively  opposed  the  reimposi­
tion  of  Soviet  Russian  rule,  Olexander 
PALYHA,  Mykhajlo  LEVYCKYJ,  Nil 
YAKOBCHUK  and  Vasyl  BODNAR, 
were  rounded  up  and  shot  as  “traitors” 
and  “war  criminals”,  as  was  reported  by 
Radio  Kyiv  on  2nd  October,  1984.  Ac­
cording  to  “Radianska  Volyn’”  (Soviet 
Volyn’)  their  trial  took  place  on  17th 
August,  1984.  A  report  in  "Radianska 
Ukraina”  (Soviet  Ukraine)  No.  221,  of 
27th  September,  1984,  states  that  another 
member  of  OUN  and  UPA,  FILONYK, 
was  also  put  on  trial  and  sentenced  to 
death  by  firing  squad.  Many  similar  in­
cidents have occurred in past years as well.
At  the  same  time  the  anti-nationalist 
and  anti-religious  propaganda  campaign 
in  Ukraine  has  also  been  greatly  stepped 
up.



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   39


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2019
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling