International and Cultural Psychology For other titles published in this series, go to


Download 3.52 Kb.

bet23/31
Sana17.11.2017
Hajmi3.52 Kb.
1   ...   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   ...   31

Why to Work
As can be seen from the above, Canto 3 of the bhagavadgItA is clearly dedicated 
to the discussion of karma and is no surprise that it is labeled karmayoga by all 
commentators of the text as stated at the end of the Canto. To summarize, in the 
bhagavadgItA
kRSNa tells arjuna that his karma or work as a kSatriya was to fight 
and gives five compelling reasons why we all have to do our karma or work. The 
first argument, given in verse 3.4, deals with the philosophical issue of pursuit of 
mokSa
. Just as one cannot become a sannyAsi or monk by simply entering into the 
order of sannyAsa, one cannot rise beyond karma (i.e., become naiSkarmya) by 
not starting activities. The goal in life is, of course, mokSa or liberation from the 
cycle  of  birth  and  death,  and  for  that  one  has  to  become  naiSkarmya.  However, 
naiSkarmya
 is not about not doing activities. Therefore, even for mokSa, the ulti-
mate goal of human life, one must work.
The second argument, given in the first line of verse 3.5, pertains to the physical 
world  and  our  physical  body.  Human  body  is  endowed  with  five  jnAnendriyas 
(organs  of  knowledge  or  perception)  and  five  karmendriyas  (organs  of  action), 
which are coordinated by the manas
70
 and buddhi.
71
 The nature of these organs is 
67
 Verse 3.33: sadrizaM ceSTate svasyAH prakriterjnAnavAnapiprakritM yAnti bhUtani  nigrahaH 
kiMkariSyati
.
68
 Verse  3.34:  indriyasyendriyasyArthe  rAgadveSau  vyavasthitau;  tayorna  vazamAgacchettau 
hyasya paripanthinau
.
69
 Verse 3.35: zreyansvadharmo viguNaH pardgarmAtsvanuSThitAtsvadharme nidhanaM zreyaH 
paradharmo bhayAvahaH
.
70
 We discussed in chapter four that manas is an Indian concept that cannot be captured by mind, 
since it is the locus of cognition, affect, and behavior.
71 
We discussed in chapter four that buddhi is an Indian concept, which has an important role in 
the pursuit of self-realization that cannot be accurately captured by intellect.

158
8 karma: An Indian Theory of Work
such that human body is simply not capable of existing without doing something 
even for a moment, and therefore we must work. With our eyes, ears, nose, tongue, 
and skin, we constantly see, hear, smell, taste, or feel something. Therefore, given 
any moment, we are doing something. The popular American saying, “Don’t just 
stand there; do something” exhorts people to be busy with some action, whereas this 
verse states that it is not possible to do nothing. In fact, this verse goes further and 
states that even in standing the person is doing something (i.e., he or she is standing 
and observing the environment). Thus, the second argument is that since we cannot 
exist without doing something, we may as well perform our svadharma or work that 
is prescribed by the social and cultural norms. It should be noted that in the Indian 
worldview, svadharma is supposed to be naturally meaningful, and paradharma 
or others’ work is dangerous (bhayAvaha), and thus cannot be meaningful.
The third argument, given in the second line of verse 3.5, is that everybody, in fact 
every living being, is under compulsion of its basic nature to work. The fish swim in 
water. The birds fly in air. The plants grow on earth or under water (e.g., coral reef) 
depending on their nature. Animals act according to their nature; for example, there 
is a wide variation in their eating behavior: some are vegetarians whereas others are 
carnivorous,  and  still  others  are  omnivorous.  Similarly,  we  all  have  some  natural 
aptitude, which we acquire as we learn skills growing up in our family, society, and 
culture. Since our aptitude will invariably drive us into doing something that we are 
naturally good at (e.g., being an artist, an actor, a scientist, a manager, and so forth), 
we cannot get by without working, and therefore, we must work.
There  are  many  examples  in  the  Indian  scriptures  of  how  people  have  some 
natural aptitude. For example, parzurAm was a brahmin but a warrior by nature; 
rAma
 was a kSatriya but kind (or saumya or mRdu) by nature; ekalavya and arjuna 
were archers by aptitude; bhIm was a wrestler, good at mace (he was a gadAdhara), 
also an accomplished cook, and had a weakness for good food. Some of us like hot 
food, and others like mild food. Some of us like to work out, whereas others like to 
do yoga. Thus, there is much face validity to this argument that we are all driven by 
our natural aptitude to engage in some activities. This is similar to the Lutheran 
notion of vocation as a calling.
The fourth argument, given in the second line of verse 3.8, is about our social life. 
We are born and live in a society, and our life is like a journey, to use a metaphor, 
and  like  every  journey  this  journey  requires  certain  implements  and  has  certain 
conditions. The argument is that we simply cannot move forward on this journey 
without doing work. The society expects us to take responsibility of ourselves and 
our family, it expects us to be a productive member, it expects us to fulfill the roles 
assigned to us, and so forth. Thus, to complete this journey of life one must work.
The fifth argument, given in verse 3.6, is more philosophical and builds on the 
above arguments. It is argued that in view of the above four arguments, it is simply 
not possible not to work and that in the extreme situation one may force the jnAn 
and karma organs to stop functioning. However, it is argued that in such a situation 
one is likely to still keep dwelling on various activities and work, which is being 
hypocritical. Therefore, instead of being a hypocrite, one must work.

159
How to Work
How to Work
The bhagavadgItA goes on at length to suggest that the ideal way to perform our 
work is by offering the fruits of our endeavors to brahman. It goes on to define that 
yoga  is  mastery  of  one’s  work  (yogaH  karmasu  kauzalam),  somewhat  different 
from the yogic definition of yoga (yogazcittavRttinirodha, or yoga is the control 
of the wandering of the manas), and also to define yoga as equanimity or balance 
in  action  (samatvaM  yoga  ucyate).  These  are  insights  that  have  a  lot  of  face 
validity.
If we master what we do, it becomes less stressful, though the mastery process 
may be stressful. We all know that an expert craftsperson does not think about what 
he or she is doing and creates perfect products. An expert teacher intuitively knows 
what the students need and provides them the best learning experience. And simi-
larly a skilled manager knows what situation calls for what technique to be effec-
tive. Mastery of our skills does help us perform at our best and without stress. This 
is consistent with the cognitive psychology literature where skill acquisition pro-
ceeds  from  declarative  to  procedural  to  automaticity  (Anderson,  2000),  which  is 
also applicable to intercultural and other social skills (Bhawuk, 2001b). Mastery of 
the skill leads to the behavior to become habitual, which is effortless. This has also 
been referred to as the peak experience or flow in the Western psychological litera-
ture (Csikszentmihalyi, 1990).
Besides mastery of our skills, it is also important to maintain equanimity in 
our work and other aspects of life. Maintaining a balance in all kinds of duality – 
happiness and sorrow, success and failure, hot and cold, friend and foe, loss and 
gain, praise and insult, etc. – is necessary to be able to do our work perfectly. 
And these two mantras (yogaH karmasu kauzalam and samatvaM yoga ucyate
translate into niSkAma karma, or work done without pursuing the fruits of our 
efforts,  if  we  practice  them  regularly  and  cultivate  detachment  (abhyAsena  tu 
kaunteya vairAgyena ca gRhyate
, verse 6.35b). By taking our mind away from 
the fruits of our work, we are able to develop a mindset in which we leave every-
thing up to brahman – if we get the fruit we thank brahman; if we do not we 
thank brahman for brahman knows best what we need. Thus, we can be trans-
formed to have deep compassion and tolerance toward failure. “Failure? What is 
that?”  This  would  be  the  likely  response  of  a  person  in  such  a  mindset.  And 
clearly, such a mindset is averse to any stress. Thus, doing our work with equa-
nimity leads to a stress-free life.
We  do  not  have  to  “not  try”  to  achieve  organizational  or  personal  objectives. 
That is not what the bhagavadgItA is suggesting since clearly arjuna is being moti-
vated to engage in the battle. Instead, we are encouraged to work hard and to treat 
work  with  the  same  dedication  that  we  show  in  worshipping  the  devas  (svakar-
maNa tamabhyarcya
, verse 18.46b). At the same time, we are encouraged not to 
chase  the  fruits  of  our  effort  and  are  advised  to  offer  them  to  the  devas.  Thus, 
niSkAma karma
 becomes a path of spiritual self-development.

160
8 karma: An Indian Theory of Work
Implications for Global Psychology
The fabled message of niSkAma karma of the bhagavadgItA simply suggests that 
we should neither work with our mind on achieving the fruits of our actions, nor 
become attached to not doing this work or only doing that work. Thus, according 
to the bhagavadgItA – work is to be performed for its own sake, not for its out-
comes, and yet such a mindset should motivate one not to withdraw from action. 
Others have discovered this same principle in their own life across the oceans. For 
example, Dewitt Jones, a motivational speaker and a distinguished and celebrated 
photographer  of  the  National  Geographic  presents  the  same  idea  as  doing  work 
“for the love of it,” which is the title of his 30-min presentation available on DVD. 
To quote Dewitt Jones:
I remember back in college, I saw the poet Robert Frost speak. Another very passionate 
man. For two hours he just held the audience in the palm of his hands, igniting us, inspiring 
us with his visions. And then he read from a poem called Two Tramps in Mud Time. He 
read words I’ll never forget: ‘My object in living is to unite, my avocation and my vocation; 
As my two eyes make one in sight; Only when love and need are one, and the work is play 
for mortal stakes, is the deed ever really done, for Heaven and the future’s sake.’ My object 
in living is to unite my avocation and my vocation. My vocation: what I had to do, what 
they paid me to do. My avocation: what I couldn’t help but do; what I loved to do. As my 
two eyes make one in sight. At one level, Frost was saying loud and clear, do what you 
love! Follow your bliss; make your living doing those things that bring you joy. I don’t 
think there’s anybody who doesn’t want to do that. And yet for many of us, probably most 
of us, it just doesn’t turn out that way. But as I listened to Frost, I realized that he was 
showing me another way that I could unite my avocation and my vocation. I could do what 
I love. Or, I could love what I do. I could love what I do. I could just fall in love with the 
task at hand. I could do my job for the love of it.
What Dewitt Jones is proposing in his inspirational speech is not so different from 
niSkAma karma
 that the bhagavadgItA proposes, showing the possibility of a uni-
versal or etic in the construct of niSkAma karma or karmayoga.
Paul’s instructions to the Colossians in the New Testament is also to work for 
God – And whatever you do in word or deed, do all in the name of the Lord Jesus, 
giving thanks to God the Father through Him (Colossians, 3.17). And whatever you 
do, do it heartily, as to the Lord and not to men (Colossians, 3.23). Knowing that 
from the Lord you will receive the reward of the inheritance; for you serve the Lord 
Christ (Colossians, 3.24). This idea was transformed by Martin Luther who gave 
everyday  activity  spiritual  significance  by  coining  the  term  beruf  or  calling  and 
instructed people to perform their social roles (e.g., husband, wife, servant, master, 
or commoner) to the best of their ability as if that was their calling from God. Thus, 
the doctrine of niSkAma karma postulated in the bhagavadgItA is also supported in 
the Christian faith, and the convergence of these ideas should be taken as natural 
experiments occurring in different cultures confirming the same human insight if 
not  truth,  further  indicating  the  possibility  of  a  universal  or  an  etic  in  this 
construct.
Another aspect of niSkAma karma is that it shifts the focus from the character-
istics of the task to the attitude of the person, raising question about the universality 

161
Implications for Global Psychology
of  the  motivating  potential  of  task  characteristics  namely,  skill  variety,  task 
 significance, task identity, autonomy, and feedback (Hackman & Oldham, 1976). It 
is known that many saints of India performed the most mundane and menial tasks 
of  a  weaver  (Kabir  Das),  cobbler  (Rai  Das),  petty  storekeeper  (Nisargadatta 
Maharaj), and so forth, but their work never limited them to achieve their spiritual 
potential.  In  fact,  performing  such  tasks  could  be  used  as  a  test  to  ascertain  for 
oneself if one has given up his or her desire for performing tasks that reflect social 
status or power. It would be interesting to examine if spiritual advancement is nega-
tively correlated to what a person does for a living.
To take an extreme position, to be provocative, one could posit that a theory of 
meaningful work or social change is really futile if not meaningless, because social 
change can be chased ad nauseam without really obtaining the desired change. The 
failure of Marxism is one such example. True change could only come if we are the 
change that we desire to see in the society; we must change individually to bring 
about the change in the society. Following the wisdom of the bhagavadgItA, when 
one truly seeks the self or Atman, one works without the desire of the fruits of one’s 
effort, and the energy that goes in struggling with the hindrances gets channeled 
toward calming the manas and buddhi, and one starts to accept and burn the prA-
rabdha
 (or the circumstances that arise in our current life as the outcome of our own 
actions in the past lives). Following this process, we are able to effect change in the 
society because one self-realized person is one less random entity in the universe 
and the entropy of the universe decreases not infinitesimally but infinitely, albeit 
mystically rather than scientifically as physicist do their measurement.
In the Western literature, there is much talk about working smart, and it is often 
presented in opposition to working hard. Many books are available to help people 
to learn to work smart rather than hard (e.g., Taub & Tullier, 1998). Working hard 
can lead to stress and burnout, which working smart can avoid. The bhagavadgItA 
offers a different solution to the debate on working hard versus smart. It supports 
working hard, as hard as it takes to do a job, but it recommends that we do not covet 
or worry about the expected outcomes of the work. By doing so, work becomes 
pleasurable, and we would not get stressed out. Thus, by following the doctrine of 
niSkAma karma modern work stress can be avoided.
The bhagavadgItA presents an approach toward consuming the gifts of earth and 
our environment, which we have discovered to be fragile. It was noted (in verse 
3.12) that devas or nature would fulfill the desires of people who perform proper 
action  or  yajna,  and  one  should  not  consume  anything  without  offering  it  to  the 
devas
.  Thus,  whatever  is  consumed  becomes  prasAd  or  gift  of  the  devas.  But  a 
warning is issued that one should offer everything to the devas before consuming 
it; and what is consumed without offering it to the devas is tantamount to stealing. 
The message of the bhagavadgItA is for the humans to take responsibility of the 
environment  and  not  to  consume  excessively,  which  is  tantamount  to  stealing  or 
forcing from the environment what it cannot afford to give. This perspective has 
important  implications  for  ethical  behavior  toward  our  environment,  a  burning 
issue for humanity today.

wwwwwwwwwwwwwwww

163
D.P.S. Bhawuk, Spirituality and Indian Psychology, International and Cultural Psychology, 
DOI 10.1007/978-1-4419-8110-3_9, © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011
As ecology and history shape culture, any discussion of the roots and practice of 
a discipline like psychology needs to be couched in the historical context since 
the  present  emerges  from  the  interaction  between  the  past  and  the  zeitgeist 
(Bhawuk, 2003a, 2010; Liu, in press; Liu & Hilton, 2005; Triandis, 1994). It is 
important to do so as this would allow us to be objective about the role of colo-
nialism and the zeitgeist of dominant logical positivism in shaping the way we 
view ourselves, our profession, and the knowledge we create. It would be ostrich 
like to try to bury the pathological consequences of colonialism and its impact on 
who we are, what we study, and how (Bhawuk 2007a, b; 2008a; Smith, 1999). 
However, delving too much in the history of colonialism and its impact on knowl-
edge creation can also take away the freedom to break the fetters of intellectual 
colonization  and  soar  in  the  indigenous  space  of  insight  and  wisdom.  In  this 
chapter, an attempt is made not to ignore the history of colonization, but yet to 
look at the epistemology and ontology of Indian Psychology with an open eye on 
the Indian wisdom tradition, which is consistent with the advice of Yang (1997) 
that  includes  what  to  avoid  as  well  as  some  positive  guidelines  for  pursuing 
indigenous research.
Hwang (2004) cogently argued that for indigenous psychologies to emerge suc-
cessfully from the yoke of Western psychology, researchers will need to make break-
throughs in three areas. First, they will need to reflect philosophically and not follow 
the  Western  philosophical  positions  on  the  meaning  of  modernization.  Often  it  is 
assumed that the Big Bang of knowledge creation started with renaissance in the 
West in the fourteenth century. It is important to remember that China and India were 
the  first  world  economically  until  1760  and  produced  75%  of  the  world  GDP 
(Bhawuk, Munusamy, Bechtold, & Sakuda, 2007; Kennedy, 1988). What is consid-
ered  first  world  today  was  third  world  up  to  1760.  The  cultural  wealth  in  these 
countries has not been lost, and people in these countries only need to reorient them-
selves to their cultural paradigms, which is already happening. Second, researchers 
in these countries need to develop theoretical frameworks that capture their world-
view. Finally, they need to test their models “empirically” using methodology, which 
are suitable to answer questions that are relevant in their cultural space; empirically 
does not mean following the logical positivist worldview and methodology. In this 
Chapter 9
Epistemology and Ontology of Indian 
Psychology

164
9 Epistemology and Ontology of Indian Psychology
chapter,  an  attempt  is  made  to  address  all  three  criteria  presented  by  Hwang  by 
deriving the epistemology and ontology of Indian Psychology.
Epistemology or theory of knowledge is about nature, origin (or source), scope 
(or  limitations),  and  variety  of  knowledge,  i.e.,  what  knowledge  is,  how  it  is 
acquired, what its relationship to truth is (i.e., if the knowledge that we have is true, 
then we have knowledge; if not, it is no knowledge; so how do we know that we 
know the truth?), its relationship to belief (i.e., knowledge is true belief), and its 
relationship with justification (i.e., why and how do we know what we know, or how 
can we justify that we have the truth?) (Audi, 1998; Ayer, 1956; BonJour, 2002). 
On the other hand, ontology is about what the being is or the study of being. What 
is  existence?  Which  entities  are  fundamental?  What  characteristics  are  essential  
as  opposed  to  peripheral?  Ontology  answers  these  questions  (Quine,  1948). 
Epistemology of Indian Psychology will be developed by deriving answer to these 
questions from the scriptures, by examining what knowledge is in the Indian world-
view, and focusing on Indian Psychology as the study of that knowledge. Similarly, 
verses  from  the  scriptures will  be  examined to  address the  ontological  questions 
presented above. It should be noted that the meaning of episteme in ancient Greek 
was “knowledge,” whereas in modern Greek it means “science” (Foucault, 2002). 
In this chapter, episteme is taken to mean knowledge rather than science.
1
Indeed,  epistemology  and  ontology  can  be  dense  and  elaborate  topics,  often 
mind-boggling not only for young scholars but also for seasoned researchers. But 
it need not be so, at least not for Indian Psychology. The epistemology of Indian 
Psychology and philosophy merge with the general Indian worldview of knowledge, 
truth, and belief about making sense of the self and the world. An attempt is made 
here to derive the epistemological and ontological foundations of Indian Psychology 
from a verse in the vedas, and then they are corroborated by some verses in the 
bhagavadgItA.
 This is consistent with the recommendation of Chakrabarty (1994) 
to use “word as a source of knowledge (p. viii),” who lamented that “epistemically 
respectable scientific, historical, social and psychological information is constantly 
derived  from  intelligible  statements  made  by  others  (p.  20)”  yet  “knowing  from 
words has been largely neglected (p. vii).” Since the bhagavadgItA is a synthesis 
of all Indian ideas and wisdom (Radhakrishnan & Moore, 1957), if the ideas test 
out against this text, they could be considered reasonably sound. In what follows, 
the epistemology and ontology of Indian Psychology as derived from the classical 
texts  are  presented,  and  their  role  in  constructing  cultural  meaning  for  theory, 
method, and practice is discussed.
1
 These definitional questions about epistemology and ontology have emerged from reading about 
them and discussing with many colleagues over the years. In a personal communication with two 
Greek colleagues, Nick Sydonius and Harry Triandis, it became clear that the meaning of episteme 
has changed over the years. In modern Greek, it does mean “science” rather than “knowledge,” a 
clear departure from the time of Plato. However, there has not been such a shift in the meaning of 
ontology. It seems that the Western belief has shifted to accept only knowledge created by science 
as truth. This would be an important difference between Indian and Western cultures when we 
think about what knowledge is.

165
Deriving Epistemology and Ontology of Indian Psychology

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   ...   31


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling