International and Cultural Psychology For other titles published in this series, go to


Download 3.52 Kb.

bet27/31
Sana17.11.2017
Hajmi3.52 Kb.
1   ...   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31

Cultural Insight and Knowledge Creation
Bhawuk, (2008a, b) argued that knowledge creation starts with the effort to address 
human issues. Often, people use cultural insights to resolve issues or solve prob-
lems facing a community. Thus, knowledge creation is necessarily culture bound 
and that is why all knowledge is cultural. Through socialization, cultural knowledge 
is  transmitted  from  generation  to  generation.  In  Figure 
10.1
,  there  is  a  solid  box 
around human issues, cultural insight and wisdom, and problem solution with an 
emic approach encompassing this process. Early on, all issues are dealt with people who 
face them, i.e., problems are studied and solved by practitioners. Only with the growth 
of knowledge does the need to codify it grow, and with time research fields emerge. 
As societies and cultures develop complexity, people start placing issues into broad 
categories (e.g., social, political, economic, religious, business, scientific, techno-
logical, and so forth), which are further broken down into narrower categories. We 
can  see  cultural  differences  in  basic  biological  functions  (e.g.,  eating,  drinking, 
mating, and so forth) as well as in major life events like birth and death. Survival 
problems are resolved by culturally appropriate tools, which are often laden with 
generations of insights and wisdom.
The weight of the lines of this box schematically represents the strength of the 
culture. Cultures found in Egypt, China, India, Iraq, Greece, and other such coun-
tries have both celebrated the human spirit for years and survived thousands of years 
of human movement, interactions, and travail. Many of these cultures are ancient, 
and people in these cultures are very proud of their culture. The older the culture, the 
more  the  people  are  attached  to  their  way  of  life  and  approach  to  solve  human 
CULTURAL 
INSIGHTS & 
WISDOM
HUMAN 
ISSUES
PROBLEM SOLUTION WITH 
DISREGARD TO CULTURAL INSIGHT
CREATION:  PATH FOLLOWED BY 
COLONIZED CULTURES, AND BY WEAKER 
ECONOMIES IN THE FACE OF 
GLOBALIZATION 
Context-Free 
Universal 
Theories
(GCF-ETICS)
Universal 
Theories with 
Cultural 
Contexts
(LCM-ETICS)
ANECDOTES, QUALITATIVE 
OBSERVATIONS AND DATA
EXISTING WESTERN THEORIES
EXISTING CROSS-CULTURAL 
THEORIES
CROSS-CULTURAL DATA
EMIC
Theory 
Building 
Problem 
solution 
Model 
Testing 
Diffusion of Cultural Practices 
Problem Solution with an  emic approach 
WESTERN DATA 
Figure 10.1
 
Cultural insight and knowledge creation (adapted from Bhawuk, 2010)

188
10 Toward a New Paradigm of Psychology
problems, and thus they are also more rigid about change (Hasegawa, 1995). It could 
be argued that such inflexibility is akin to the attitude found among researchers in 
major laboratories – what is “Not Invented Here” is not worth looking at.
Early trade between various cultures did allow the flow of ideas, products, and 
practices  from  one  part  of  the  world  to  another.  Thus,  there  was  some  degree  of 
cultural diffusion represented by arrows around the box. However, the knowledge 
brokers were still primarily the idea leaders of a particular culture, usually the elders 
or people who held social power. This changed dramatically with colonization. The 
ideas, products, practices, and values of the colonizers came to be considered signifi-
cantly  superior  to  the  native  practices  and  values,  and,  of  course,  the  colonizers’ 
military power facilitated this process. In the twentieth century, most human issues 
were couched into a Western worldview, and all problems were solved with a disre-
gard to cultural insights. The failure of development projects in most parts of the 
world could be attributed to the export and forceful implementation of such counter-
cultural ideas (Bhawuk 2001a; Bhawuk, Mrazek, & Munusamy, 2009). This process 
is identified by the dashed arrow going from the block of existing Western theories 
and Western data to human issues, and the second dashed arrow going from human 
issues to problem solutions that discard cultural insights. This could be labeled the 
colonial path to knowledge creation, which was followed by colonized cultures in 
the past and in the present time by weaker economies in the face of globalization. 
This is also true for cross-cultural theories and data in that the problem solution fol-
lows the pseudoetic approach and still disregards the cultural insights.
First  colonization  and  now  globalization  is  leading  to  the  neglect  of  cultural 
knowledge and insights in research and knowledge creation. However, the growth 
in indigenous psychology, supported by cross-cultural psychology, has also led to 
the questioning of, and a severe criticism of, the colonial approach to knowledge 
creation. The model of knowledge creation presented in Figure 
10.1
 would help chan-
nel cultural knowledge and wisdom back into the knowledge creation process.
Research has been generally dominated by the Western rationalist worldview in 
which truth is pursued by quantifying and measuring variables of interest. However, 
a rationalist research paradigm can never resolve situations when two contradictory 
ideas seem to be simultaneously true, because in this paradigm only one solution 
can exist. Therefore, we need to go beyond the rationalist paradigm, and use not 
only multimethods within one paradigm, but also multiple paradigms – particularly 
those suggested by indigenous worldviews (Bhawuk, 2008a, b). This should help 
the study of human behavior in its cultural context and enable researchers to study 
issues that cannot be studied appropriately within the narrow confine of any one 
paradigm.  The  multiparadigmatic  approach  calls  for  the  nurturing  of  indigenous 
research  agenda.  However,  the  leadership  of  the  Western  world  in  research  and 
knowledge creation more often than not leads to starting with theoretical positions 
that are grounded in Western cultural mores. Thus, starting with a theoretical posi-
tion invariably leads to the pseudoetic approach in which theories are necessarily 
Western emics.
This can be avoided by starting with insights coming from folk wisdom or from 
classical texts in non-Western cultures. This process, starting with cultural insights 

189
Discovering or Mining Models from Scriptures
and examining other evidence (including anecdotes, qualitative observations, and 
data),  leads  to  the  development  of  emic-embedded  theories  and  models,  and  by 
synthesizing  such  models  with  existing  Western  and  cross-cultural  theories  and 
data, one should be able to develop context-free universal theories as well as uni-
versal  theories  with  cultural  contexts,  which  could  be  called  global  theories  for 
psychology, management, and other fields of human endeavor. Such an approach 
can expand the scope of research for Western and cross-cultural theories and in the 
long run will help in the search of general theories.
Building Models by Content Analysis of Scriptures
A content analysis of a religious or other such texts by using key words can lead to 
the  development  of  models  about  constructs  such  as  peace,  spirituality,  karma
dharma
, identity, and so forth. This method was illustrated in Chapter 7 where a 
model with multiple paths for peace was developed. Also, in Chapter 8, karma was 
analyzed  using  this  methodology.  Thus,  the  methodology  has  promise.  Future 
research  could  focus  on  other  constructs  like  manas,  buddhi,  ahaGkAra,  antaH-
karaNa
kSamA (or forgiveness), karuNa (or compassion), and so forth, which can 
easily be studied following this approach.
Discovering or Mining Models from Scriptures
Sometimes models exist in the scriptures that need to be discovered or mined and 
polished to fit with the relevant literature.
3
 For example, in Chapter 6, a process 
model of how desire and anger cause one’s downfall was derived from the second 
Canto of the bhagavadgItA (see Figure 6.1). The 62nd verse delineates this process 
by stating that when a person thinks (dhyAyataH) about objects (viSayAn), he or she 
3
 Both Vijayan and Anand do not think that “polishing” captures the spirit of what I am saying. 
Scriptures are known for offering their teaching in sutra (or aphorism) form where the beginning 
and  end  states  are  mentioned  and  the  details  of  the  process  omitted.  Often  a  commentator  or 
bhASyakAr
 explicates the process sometimes by bringing other constructs and, at other times, by 
giving examples. What is being done in the polished model is similar to what a bhASyakAr does. 
For example, I explain how goal setting, a well-established psychological construct in Western 
psychology,  mediates  desires  and  anger.  Anand  thinks  it  may  be  better  to  call  it  an  explicated 
model  [Chandrasekar,  Personal  Communication  (2009)].  Vijayan  Munusamy  [Personal 
Communication (2009)], on the other hand, noted that what is being done under the label of “pol-
ished to fit” is akin to what is referred to as “theoretical sensitivity” in grounded theory when a 
researcher uses his or her personal and temperamental bent as well as theoretical insights to create 
a theory that fits the data (Glaser & Strauss, 1967, pp. 46–47). I think both perspectives together 
capture the process of polishing the model extracted from the scripture as the researcher is being 
bhASyakAr and in being that brings his or her theoretical sensitivity to the process of polishing 
the extracted model.

190
10 Toward a New Paradigm of Psychology
develops an attachment (saGga) to it. Attachment leads to desire (kAma), and from 
nonfulfillment of desire anger (krodha) is manifested. The 63rd verse further devel-
ops this causal link by stating that anger leads to confusion (sammoha) or clouding 
of discretion about what is right or wrong, confusion to bewilderment (smRtivibh-
rama
), to loss of memory or what one has learned in the past (smRtibhramza), to 
destruction  of  buddhi  (i.e.,  intellect  or  wisdom),  to  the  downfall  of  the  person 
(praNazyati)  or  his  or  her  destruction  (see  the  block  diagram  in  the  top  part  of 
Figure 
10.2
4
).
This causal model is as it is present in the bhagavadgItA, and since it is quite 
often cited in spiritual circles (or satsangs), it is not a secret and could hardly even 
be called a discovery. However, since the model has only recently made its entrance 
in  psychological  journals  in  India  (Bhawuk,  1999)  and  internationally  (Bhawuk 
2008b), and since it is as yet to make an inroad in psychological textbooks, it is 
perhaps  not  an  exaggeration  to  say  that  the  model  has  finally  been  discovered  
by psychologists. What needs to be done is to further synthesize it with the extant 
psychological literature, which could be considered the polishing of the model. We 
need to be sensitive to the possibility of polishing what already exists in the scriptures, 
PERSON 
GOALS
ANGER
GREED
NO
YES
THOUGHT
DESIRE
Person 
Thought 
Attachment 
Desire 
Anger 
Sense Objects 
Verse 2.59 
5 Senses 
sammoha
or 
Confusion
smRtivibhram
or 
Bewilderment 
BuddhinAz
or Loss of  
Intellect 
praNazyati 
Downfall 
smRtibhraMza  
Loss of Memory 
RAW MODEL 
POLISHED MODEL 
Unhappiness 
ATTACHMENT
Figure 10.2
 
Discovering or mining models from scriptures: a causal model of desire, anger, and 
self-destruction (adapted from Bhawuk, 2010)
4
 There is some discussion in the literature about whether or not smRtivibhrama and smRtibhramZa 
are  two  concepts,  especially  since  Adi  zankara  did  not  interpret  them  as  two  concepts  in  his 
commentary on the bhagavadgItA. I take the position that they are two different concepts; smRtiv-
ibhrama
  originates  from  the  root  bhramati  meaning  wander,  whereas  smRtibhramZa  is  derived 
from the root bhras meaning destruction. Thus, smRtivibhrama means restlessness or unsteadiness 
of memory, or simply one is disarranged, bewildered, perplexed, or confused. On the other hand, 
smRtibhramZa
 means decline or decay of memory, or simply ruined memory.

191
Discovering or Mining Models from Scriptures
without being irreverent because no idea is ever perfect and all ideas need to be 
made  sense  of  in  the  context  of  the  contemporary  knowledge  base  for  people  to 
appreciate it. Thus, there should be no hesitation in attempting to polish such models. 
In what follows an attempt is made to polish this basic model from the bhagavadgItA 
in the light of current psychological knowledge.
It is not explicated in the verse that desires lead to setting goals, which can be 
financial,  academic,  personal  (health,  how  one  looks,  etc.),  and  so  forth.  Thus, 
desire is translated into behaviors, which are directed toward goals. Anger results 
when goals are not met. But when goals are met, desires are fulfilled; and in this 
case desires are unlikely to lead to anger. This truism is not stated in the verse. It 
seems reasonable that when goals are met, the person either moves on to some other 
goals or continues to pursue the behavior to obtain more of the same outcome or 
something higher or better. Therefore, greed
5
 is the likely consequence of fulfill-
ment of goals (Bhawuk, 1999). Both anger and greed are causes of unhappiness, 
and  thus  it  could  be  argued  that  we  have  discovered  a  model  of  unhappiness.  
A schematic presentation of this process is captured in Figure 
10.2
. The top part of 
the diagram is raw wisdom as presented in the bhagavadgItA, and the lower part of 
the  diagram  is  an  attempt  to  polish  the  model  to  synthesize  current  thinking  in 
psychology. One could stop here or take another step and reverse the process of 
unhappiness, which could lead to a model of happiness (see Figure 7.1).
Another example will help demonstrate this approach further. In verses 3.14 and 
3.15 of the bhagavadgItA, a model that shows causal connection between yajna and 
human existence is presented. People are born of food, food is born of rain, rain is born 
of yajna, and yajna is born of karma (verse 3.14
6
). karma is born of the vedas, the vedas 
are born of indestructible brahman (see Figure 
10.3
), and so the all pervading brahman 
is always present in yajna (verse 3.15
7
). In the Indian worldview, yajna, where offerings 
5
 A question can be raised if fulfillment of goals invariably leads to greed, which is negative. What 
about  ambition  to  excel  in  something  or  non-selfish  goals  like  desire  to  help  others?  It  is  my 
understanding that all desires invariably lead to greed, since enlightenment means flowing with 
the universe and serving people without having any desire for oneself. The moment there is self, 
there is desire and, therefore, greed. The selfless person has no desire. The enlightened person has 
no desire, not even to fight for the freedom of nation. One would think that the pastors and min-
isters of Christian churches are motivated by serving others, but research evidence shows that they 
have one of the highest rates of burnout among all professions (Chun, 2006; Grosch & Olsen, 
2000). Clearly, too much of social service can also lead to stress and burnout. Other examples can 
be found in the scriptures. For example, arjuna’s desire to be the best archer led him to complain 
to guru droNa, which culminated in ekalavya losing his thumb. The contest between karNa and 
arjuna
 was a result of both trying to be the best archer of their time. So, excellence and ambition 
inherently lead to competition and result in greed sooner or later.
6
 Verse 3.14: annAdbhavanti bhUtAni parjanyAdannasambhavaH; yajnAdbhavati parjanyo yaj-
naH karmasamudbhavaH
.
7
 Verse  3.15:  karma  brahmodbhavaM  viddhi  brahmAkSarsamudbhavam;  tasmAtsarvagataM 
brahma nityaM yajne pratiSThitam
.

192
10 Toward a New Paradigm of Psychology
are made to fire, is long viewed as the cause of rain
8
 and the growth of plants, vegetables, 
and food. For example, in the manusmRti, it is also stated that the offering properly 
make to fire is placed in sun; sun causes rain, rain causes grains, and from grains come 
people.
9
 The model can be reconstructed or polished as shown in the bottom panel of 
Figure 
10.3
brahman created the vedas, as the vedas are said to be apauruSeya (i.e., 
not written by a person), and karma and yajna come from the vedasbrahman is also 
present in yajna as stated in these verses. Though karma is said to precede yajnabrah-
man
 is said to be present in yajna and not karma. Therefore, it may be better to show 
reciprocal relationship between yajna and karma and brahman as the cause of yajna.
Again, the model as it is exists in the bhagavadgItA and is also supported in the 
manusmRti
. To relate the model to work and organizations is what makes the model 
vedas 
karma  yajna
Rain 
Food
People
RAW MODEL 
POLISHED MODE L
brahman
brahman
vedas
karma
yajna
Rain 
Food 
People 
Figure 10.3
 
Discovering or mining models from scriptures: brahman, work, yajna, and living 
beings (adapted from Bhawuk, 2010)
8
 A friend noted if this entire argument or model should find a place in the paper. He thought that 
while  what  kRSNa  said  must  have  made  perfect  sense  to  the  people  of  his  time,  concepts  like 
yajnAd bhavati parjanyaH
 are difficult for the modern mind to accept. I thought similarly, so I can 
relate to the argument. During my sabbatical in New Zealand in October 2002, I was studying the 
bhagavadgItA
, and one day I thought that yajna could not cause rain. And that same day, a visiting 
anthropologist happened to present about Native Americans’ practice of going in solitude to pray 
for  rain  and  doing  what  is  referred  to  as  rain  dance.  After  his  presentation,  I  asked  him  if  he 
believed the shamans predicted rain or made rain, and he responded that what he believed did not 
matter.  The  Native  Americans  believed  that  the  shamans  made  rain.  I  stopped  questioning  the 
connection between rain and yajna from that point on. More recently in October 2009, I was read-
ing the biography of Sri Ramana Maharshi (Osborne, 1970), and I came across a story that sup-
ports such mystical connection between yajna and rain. “The mystery of Arunachala Hill also has 
become more accessible. There were many formerly who felt nothing of its power, for whom it 
was just a hill of rock and earth and shrubs like any other. Mrs. Taleyarkhan, a devotee mentioned 
in  the  previous  chapter,  was  sitting  once  on  the  hill  with  a  guest  of  hers,  talking  about  Sri 
Bhagavan. She said: “Bhagavan is a walking God and all our prayers are answered. That is my 
experience. Bhagavan says this hill is God Himself. I cannot understand all that, but Bhagavan 
says so, so I believe it.” Her friend, a Muslim in whom the courtly Persian traditions of culture 
still  lingered,  replied,  “According  to  our  Persian  beliefs  I  would  take  it  as  a  sign  if  it  rained.” 
Almost immediately there was a shower and they came down the hill drenched to tell the story 
(Osborne, 1970, p. 192).” Thus, I am open to the correlation between prayer or yajna and rain.
9
 agnau  prAstAhutiH  samyagAdityamupatiZThate;  AdityAjjAyate  vRSTirvRSTerannaM  tataH 
prajAH
 (Manusmriti 3.76). The offering given properly to fire is placed in Sun; Sun causes rain, 
rain causes grains, and from grains come people.

193
Recognition of What Works in Indigenous Cultures
relevant to psychology. yajna is interpreted to include not only the ritual offering to 
fire but also all activities that keep the universe running, and in that sense it is inclu-
sive of all kinds of work done by all beings. Thus, work is glorified to be always 
permeated by God, and thus doing any work is of the highest order. However, if it is 
done with passion and attachment it is a sin, and if it is done without attachment, 
then it frees one of all bondage. Thus, work is couched in a spiritual worldview (see 
Chapter 8 for full discussion) and if done properly without pursuing their outcomes 
it becomes a path leading to mental purity, which in turn leads to self-realization.
By comparing the insights in the model with ideas found in other cultures, its 
generalizability can be at least theoretically examined. As noted in Chapter 8, the 
doctrine of niSkAma karma postulated in the bhagavadgItA is also supported in the 
Christian  faith,
10
  and  the  convergence  of  these  ideas  should  be  taken  as  natural 
experiments occurring in different cultures confirming the same human insight if 
not truth. These two examples demonstrate how the scriptures are like mines full of 
gems  of  psychological  models  that  can  be  easily  extracted  and  polished.  Much 
research has been done on aggression in the West, but the insight presented in the 
model  in  Figure 
10.2
  brings  one  face  to  face  with  the  source  of  aggression,  and 
therein lies the solution to anger. Similarly, much can be learned about the nature 
of work using the model in Figure 
10.3
. It is also clear that building models from 
indigenous  insights  allows  one  to  accommodate  the  Western  theory  and  models, 
and also contribute to the global psychology.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling