Medieval and early modern periods 1206


Download 5.23 Mb.

bet10/62
Sana12.02.2017
Hajmi5.23 Mb.
1   ...   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   ...   62

67 | 

P a g e


 

 

historians  consider  the  story  highly  implausible  and  suspect  Hosayni  of  inventing  both 



the text and its origin story.  

 

European views 

Timur  arguably  had  a  significant  impact  on  the  Renaissance  culture  and  early 

modern  Europe.  His  achievements  both  fascinated  and  horrified  Europeans  from  the 

fifteenth century to the early nineteenth century. 

European views of Timur were mixed throughout the fifteenth century, with some 

European  countries  calling  him  an  ally  and  others  seeing  him  as  a  threat  to  Europe 

because of his rapid expansion and brutality.  

When  Timur  captured  the  Ottoman  Sultan  Bayezid  at  Ankara,  he  was  often 

praised and seen as a trusted ally by European rulers such as Charles VI of France and 

Henry IV of England because they believed he was saving Christianity from the Turkish 

Empire  in  the  Middle  East.  Those  two  kings  also  praised  him  because  his  victory  at 

Ankara allowed Christian merchants to remain in the Middle East and allowed for their 

safe return home to both France and England. Timur was also praised because it was 

believed  that  he  helped  restore  the  right  of  passage  for  Christian  pilgrims  to  the  Holy 

Land.  

Other  Europeans  viewed Timur  as a  barbaric  enemy  who  presented  a  threat  to 



both  European  culture  and  the  religion  of  Christianity.  His  rise  to  power  moved  many 

leaders,  such  as  Henry  III  of  Castile,  to  send  embassies  to  Samarkand  to  scout  out 

Timur,  learn  about  his  people,  make  alliances  with  him,  and  try  to  convince  him  to 

convert to Christianity in order to avoid war. 

In  the  introduction  to  a  1723  translation  of  Yazdi's  Zafarnama,  the  translator 

wrote:  


[M.  Petis  de  la  Croix]  tells  us,  that  there  are  calumnies  and  impostures,  which 

have  been  published  by  authors  of  romances,  and  Turkish  writers  who  were  his 

enemies, and envious at his glory: among whom is Ahmed Bin Arabschah

…As Timur

-

Bec  had  conquered  the  Turks  and  Arabians  of  Syria,  and  had  even  taken  the  Sultan 



Bajazet prisoner, it is no wonder that he has been misrepresented by the historians of 

those nations, who, in despite of truth, and against the dignity of history, have fallen into 

great excesses on this subject. 

Exhumation 

Timur's body was exhumed from his tomb in 1941 and his remains examined by 

the Soviet anthropologist Mikhail M. Gerasimov, Lev V. Oshanin and V. Ia. Zezenkova. 

It  was  determined  that  Timur  was  a  tall  and  broad-chested  man  with  strong  cheek 



 

68 | 

P a g e


 

 

bones.  At  5 feet  8 inches  (1.73  meters),  Timur  was  tall  for  his  era.  The  examinations 



confirmed that Timur was lame and had a withered right arm due to his injuries. His right 

thighbone had knitted together with his kneecap, and the configuration of the knee joint 

suggests  that  he  had  kept  his  leg  bent  at  all  time  and  therefore  would  have  had  a 

pronounced  limp.  Gerasimov  reconstructed  the  likeness  of  Timur  from  his  skull  and 

found  that  Timur's  facial  characteristics  displayed  Mongoloid  features  with  some 

Caucasoid  admixture.  Oshanin  also  concluded  that  Timur's  cranium  showed 

predominately  the  characteristics  of  a  South  Siberian  Mongoloid  type.[74]  Timur  is 

therefore  considered  to  have  been  close  to  the  Mongoloid  race  with  some  Caucasoid 

admixture. 

It is alleged that Timur's tomb was inscribed with the words, "When I rise from the 

dead, the world shall tremble." It is also said that when Gerasimov exhumed the body, 

an additional inscription inside the casket was found, which read, "Who ever opens my 

tomb,  shall  unleash  an  invader  more  terrible  than  I."  In  any  case,  the  same  day 

Gerasimov  began  the  exhumation,  Adolf  Hitler  launched  Operation  Barbarossa,  the 

largest military invasion of all time, upon the Soviet Union. Timur was re-buried with full 

Islamic ritual in November 1942 just before the Soviet victory at the Battle of Stalingrad.  



In the arts 

 



Tamburlaine  the  Great,  Parts  I  and  II  (English,  1563

1594):  play  by 



Christopher Marlowe 

 



Tamerlane (1701): play by Nicholas Rowe (English) 

 



Tamerlano  (1724):  opera  by  George  Frideric  Handel,  in  Italian,  based  on 

the 1675 play Tamerlan ou la mort de Bajazet by Jacques Pradon. 

 

Bajazet (1735): opera by Antonio Vivaldi, portrays the capture of Bayezid I 



by Timur 

 



Il gran Tamerlano (1772): opera by 

Josef Mysliveček

 that also portrays the 

capture of Bayezid I by Timur 

 

Tamerlane:  first  published  poem  of  Edgar  Allan  Poe  (American,  1809



1849). 


 

Timur  is  the  deposed,  blind  former  King  of  Tartary  and  father  of  the 



protagonist  Calaf  in  the  opera  Turandot  (1924)  by  Giacomo  Puccini, 

libretto by Giuseppe Adami and Renato Simoni. 

 

Timour appears in the story Lord of Samarkand by Robert E. Howard. 



 

Tamerlan: novel by Colombian writer Enrique Serrano in Spanish[78] 



 

Tamburlaine:  Shadow  of  God:  a  BBC  Radio  3  play  by  John  Fletcher, 



broadcast  2008,  is  a  fictitious  account  of  an  encounter  between 

Tamburlaine, Ibn Khaldun, and Hafez. 

 

Tamerlane (1928): historical novel by Harold Lamb. 



Consorts 

Timur married six times and had many concubines: 



 

69 | 

P a g e


 

 

1.  Turmish Agha, daughter of Amir Jaku Barlas



2.  Aljaz  Turkhan  Agha  (m.  1357/58),  daughter  of  Amir  Mashlah  and 

granddaughter of Amir Kurgen; 

3.  Saray Mulk Khanum (m.  1367), widow of Emir Husain  Khan,  daughter of 

Khazan Khan; 

4.  Dilshad  Agha  (m.  1374),  daughter  of  Shams  ed-Din  and  his  wife  Bujan 

Agha; 


5.  Touman Agha  (m.  1377),  daughter of  Emir Musa  and  his  wife Arzu  Mulk 

Agha; 


6.  Chulpan Mulk Agha, daughter of Haji Bey of Jetah

7.  Tukal Khanum (m. 1395), daughter of Mongol Khan Khizr Khawaja Aglen; 

8.  Tolun Agha, concubine and mother of Umar Shaikh Mirza I

9.  Mengli Agha, concubine and mother of Miran Shah ibn Timur; 

10. Toghay  Turkhan  Agha,  concubine  and  mother  of  Shahrukh  Mirza  ibn 

Timur. 


Descendants of Timur 

Sons of Timur 

 



Jahangir Mirza ibn Timur - with Turmish Agha; 

 



Umar Shaikh Mirza I - with Tolun Agha; 

 



Miran Shah ibn Timur - with Mengli Agha; 

 



Shahrukh Mirza ibn Timur - with Toghay Turkhan Agha; 

 



Khalil Sultan ibn Timur - with Saray Mulk Khanum. 

Daughters of Timur 

 



Akia  Beghi,  married  to  Mohammad  Bey,  son  of  Amir  Musa  -  mother 

unknown; 

 

unknown, married to Solyman Mirza - mother unknown; 



 

unknown, married to Cumaleza Mirza - mother unknown; 



 

Sultan Bakht Begum, married firstly Mohammed Mireke, married secondly, 



1389/90, Soliman Shah- with Aljaz Turkhan Agha. 

Sons of Jahangir 

 



Pir Muhammad bin Jahangir Mirza 

Sons of Umar Shaikh Mirza I 

 



Pir Muhammad ibn Umar Shaikh Mirza I 

 



Iskandar ibn Umar Shaikh Mirza I 

 



Rustam ibn Umar Shaikh Mirza I 

 



Bayqarah ibn Umar Shaikh Mirza I  

o

 



Mansur ibn Bayqarah  

 



Husayn ibn Mansur bin Bayqarah  

 

70 | 

P a g e


 

 



 

Badi' al-Zaman  

 

Muhammed Mu'min 



 

Muzaffar Hussein 



 

Ibrahim Hussein 



Sons of Miran Shah 

 



Khalil Sultan ibn Miran Shah 

 



Abu Bakr ibn Miran Shah 

 



Muhammad ibn Miran Shah  

o

 



Abu Sa'id Mirza  

 



Umar Shaikh Mirza II  

 



Zahir-ud-din Muhammad Babur  

 



the Mughals 

 



Jahangir Mirza II 

Sons of Shahrukh Mirza 

 



Mirza Muhammad Taraghay 

 better known as Ulugh Beg  



o

 

Abdul-Latif 



 

Ghiyath-al-Din Baysonqor  



o

 

Ala-ud-Daulah Mirza ibn Baysonqor  



 

Ibrahim Mirza 



o

 

Sultan Muhammad ibn Baysonqor  



 

Yadigar Muhammad 



o

 

Mirza Abul-Qasim Babur ibn Baysonqor 



 

Sultan Ibrahim Mirza  



o

 

Abdullah Mirza 



 

Mirza Soyurghatmïsh Khan 



 

Mirza Mohammed Juki 



 

Babur 

Name 

Ẓahīr


-ud-

Dīn


  is  Arabic  for  "Defender  of  the  Faith"  of  Islam  and  Muhammad 

honors its prophet. 

The difficulty of pronouncing the name for his Central Asian Turco-Mongol army 

may  have  been  responsible  for  the  greater  popularity  of  his  nickname  Babur,  also 

variously spelled Baber, Babar, and Bābor. The name is generally taken in reference to 

the  Persian  babr,  meaning  "tiger".  The  word  repeatedly  appears  in  Ferdowsi's 

Shahnameh and was borrowed into the Turkic languages of Central Asia. Timur's name 

had  undergone  a  similar  evolution,  with  the  Sanskrit  cimara  ("iron")  becoming 

pronounced first *čimr and then a Turkicized timür, owing to the need to provide vocalic 


 

71 | 

P a g e


 

 

support between the m and r in Turkic languages. The choice of vowel would nominally 



be restricted to one of the four front vowels (e, i, ö, ü per the Ottoman vowel harmony 

rule), hence babr 

→ babür, although the rule is routinely violated for words of Persian or 

Arabic  derivation.  Thackston  argues  for  an  alternate  derivation  from  the  PIE  word 

"beaver

", pointing to similarities between the pronunciation Bābor and the 



Russian bobr 

(бобр, "beaver").

 

Babur  bore  the  royal  titles  Badshah  and  al-



ṣultānu  'l

-

ʿazam  wa  'l



-

ḫāqān  al

-

mukkarram pādshāh



-

e ġāzī. 


 

Background 

Babur's memoirs form the main source for details of his life. They are known as 

the  Baburnama  and  were  written  in  Chaghatai  Turkic,  his  mother-tongue,  though, 

according  to  Dale,  "his  Turki  prose  is  highly  Persianized  in  its  sentence  structure, 

morphology or word formation and vocabulary." Baburnama was translated into Persian 

during the rule of Babur's grandson Akbar.  

Babur  was  born  on  14  February [O.S.  ] 1483  in  the  city  of  Andijan,  Andijan 

Province,  Fergana  Valley,  contemporary  Uzbekistan.  He  was  the  eldest  son  of  Umar 

Sheikh Mirza,[13] ruler of the Fergana Valley, the son of 

Abū Saʿīd Mirza

 (and grandson 

of  Miran  Shah,  who  was  himself  son  of  Timur)  and  his  wife  Qutlugh  Nigar  Khanum, 

daughter  of  Yunus  Khan,  the  ruler  of  Moghulistan  (and  great-great  grandson  of 

Tughlugh  Timur,  the  son  of  Esen  Buqa  I,  who  was  the  great-great-great  grandson  of 

Chaghatai Khan, the second born son of Genghis Khan).  

Babur  hailed  from  the  Barlas  tribe,  which  was  of  Mongol  origin  and  had 

embraced Turkic and Persian culture.  He  converted to Islam and resided in  Turkestan 

and Khorasan. Aside from the Chaghatai language, Babur was equally fluent in Persian, 

the lingua franca of the Timurid elite.  

Hence Babur, though nominally a Mongol (or Moghul in Persian language), drew 

much  of  his  support  from  the  local  Turkic  and  Iranian  people  of  Central  Asia,  and  his 

army was diverse in its ethnic makeup. It included Persians (known to Babur as "Sarts" 

and "Tajiks"), ethnic Afghans, Arabs, as well as Barlas and Chaghatayid Turko-Mongols 

from Central Asia.  



Rule in Central Asia  

As ruler of Fergana 

In 1494, at eleven years old, Babur became the ruler of Fergana, in present-day 

Uzbekistan,  after  Umar  Sheikh  Mirza  died  "while  tending  pigeons  in  an  ill-constructed 

dovecote  that  toppled  into  the  ravine  below  the  palace".  During  this  time,  two  of  his 

uncles from the neighbouring kingdoms, who were hostile to his father, and a group of 

nobles  who  wanted  his  younger  brother  Jahangir  to  be  the  ruler,  threatened  his 


 

72 | 

P a g e


 

 

succession  to  the  throne.  His  uncles  were  relentless  in  their  attempts  to  dislodge  him 



from  this  position  as  well  as  from  many  of  his  other  territorial  possessions  to  come. 

Babur  was  able  to  secure  his  throne  mainly  because  of  help  from  his  maternal 

grandmother, Aisan Daulat Begum, although there was also some luck involved.  

Most  territories  around  his  kingdom  were  ruled  by  his  relatives,  who  were 

descendants  of  either  Timur  or  Genghis  Khan,  and  were  constantly  in  conflict.  At  that 

time, rival princes were fighting over the city of Samarkand to the west, which was ruled 

by  his  paternal  cousin.  Babur  had  a  great  ambition  to  capture  it  and  in  1497,  he 

besieged Samarkand for seven months before eventually gaining control over it. He was 

fifteen years old and for him, this campaign was a huge achievement. Babur was able to 

hold  it  despite  desertions  in  his  army  but  later  fell  seriously  ill.  Meanwhile,  a  rebellion 

amongst  nobles  who  favoured  his  brother,  back  home  approximately  350  kilometres 

(220 mi)  away  robbed  him  of  Fergana.  As  he  was  marching  to  recover  it,  he  lost  the 

Samarkand to a rival prince, leaving him with neither Fergana nor Samarkand. He had 

held  Samarkand  for  100  days  and  he  considered  this  defeat  as  his  biggest  loss, 

obsessing over it even later in his life after his conquests in India.  

In 1501, he laid siege on Samarkand once more, but was soon defeated by his 

most  formidable  rival,  Muhammad  Shaybani,  khan  of  the  Uzbeks.  Samarkand,  his 

lifelong  obsession,  was  lost  again.  He  tried  to  reclaim  Fergana  but  lost  it  too  and 

escaping with a small band of followers, he wandered to the mountains of central Asia 

and took refuge with hill tribes. Thus, during the ten years since becoming the ruler of 

Fergana, Babur suffered many short-lived victories and was without shelter and in exile, 

aided  by  friends  and  peasants.  He  finally  stayed  in  Tashkent,  which  was  ruled  by  his 

maternal uncle. Babur wrote, "During my stay in Tashkent, I endured much poverty and 

humiliation. No country, or hope of one!" For three years Babur concentrated on building 

up a strong army, recruiting widely amongst the Tajiks of  Badakhshan in particular. By 

1502, Babur had resigned all hopes of recovering Fergana, he was left with nothing and 

was forced to try his luck someplace else.  

 

 

At Kabul 

Kabul was ruled by Ulugh Begh Mirza of the  Arghun Dynasty,  who died leaving 

only an infant as heir. The city was then claimed by Mukin Begh, who was considered to 

be  a  usurper  and  was  opposed  by  the  local  populace.  In  1504,  by  using  the  whole 

situation[clarification needed] to his own advantage, Babur was able to cross the snowy 

Hindu  Kush  mountains  and  capture  Kabul;  the  remaining  Arghunids  were  forced  to 

retreat  to  Kandahar.  With  this  move,  he  gained  a  new  kingdom,  re-established  his 

fortunes  and  would  remain  its  ruler  until  1526.  In  1505,  because  of  the  low  revenue 

generated by his new mountain kingdom, Babur began his first expedition to India; in his 

memoirs, he wrote, "My desire for Hindustan had been constant. It was in the month of 



 

73 | 

P a g e


 

 

Shaban, the Sun being in Aquarius, that we rode out  of Kabul for Hindustan". It was a 



brief raid across the Khyber Pass.  

In the same year, Babur united with  Sultan Husayn Mirza Bayqarah of  Herat,  a 

fellow Timurid and distant  relative,  against their common enemy,  the Uzbek Shaybani. 

However,  this  venture  did  not  take  place  because  Husayn  Mirza  died  in  1506  and  his 

two sons were reluctant to go to war. Babur instead stayed at Herat after being invited 

by the two Mirza brothers. It was then the cultural capital of the eastern Muslim world. 

Though  he  was  disgusted  by  the  vices  and  luxuries  of  the  city,  he  marvelled  at  the 

intellectual  abundance  there,  which  he  stated  was  "filled  with  learned  and  matched 

men".  He  became  acquainted  with  the  work  of  the  Chagatai  poet  Mir  Ali  Shir  Nava'i, 

who encouraged the use of Chagatai as a literary language. Nava'i's proficiency with the 

language, which he is credited with founding, may have influenced Babur in his decision 

to  use  it  for  his  memoirs.  He  spent  two  months  there  before  being  forced  to  leave 

because of diminishing resources; it later was overrun by Shaybani and the Mirzas fled.  

Babur  became  the  only  reigning  ruler  of  the  Timurid  dynasty  after  the  loss  of 

Herat,  and  many  princes  sought  refuge  from  him  at  Kabul  because  of  Shaybani's 

invasion  in  the  west.[26]  He  thus  assumed  the  title  of  Padshah  (emperor)  among  the 

Timurids

though  this  tile  was  insignificant  since  most  of  his  ancestral  lands  were 



taken,  Kabul itself was in  danger and Shaybani continued to be a threat. He prevailed 

during  a  potential  rebellion  in  Kabul,  but  two  years  later  a  revolt  among  some  of  his 

leading  generals  drove  him  out  of  Kabul.  Escaping  with  very  few  companions,  Babur 

soon  returned  to  the  city,  capturing  Kabul  again  and  regaining  the  allegiance  of  the 

rebels. Meanwhile, Shaybani was defeated and killed by  Ismail I, Shah of Shia Safavid 

Persia, in 1510.  

Babur  and  the  remaining  Timurids  used  this  opportunity  to  reconquer  their 

ancestral  territories.  Over  the  following  few  years,  Babur  and  Shah  Ismail  formed  a 

partnership  in  an  attempt  to  take  over  parts  of  Central  Asia.  In  return  for  Ismail's 

assistance,  Babur  permitted  the  Safavids  to  act  as  a  suzerain  over  him  and  his 

followers. Thus, in 1513, after leaving his brother Nasir Mirza to rule Kabul, he managed 

to  get  Samarkand  for  the  third  time  and  Bokhara  but  lost  both  again  to  the  Uzbeks. 

Shah Ismail reunited Babur with his sister 

Khānzāda


, who had been imprisoned by and 

forced  to  marry  the  recently  deceased  Shaybani.[31]  He  returned  to  Kabul  after  three 

years in 1514. The following 11 years of his rule mainly involved dealing with relatively 

insignificant  rebellions  from  Afghan  tribes,  his  nobles  and  relatives,  in  addition  to 

conducting raids across the eastern mountains. Babur began to modernise and train his 

army despite it being, for him, relatively peaceful times.  



Foreign relations 

Babur  began  relations  with  the  Safavids  when  he  met  Ali  Mirza  Safavi  at 

Samarqand;  their  good  relations  lasted  even  after  Babur  was  approached  by  the 

Ottomans.  The  Safavids  army  led  by  Najm-e  Sani  massacred  civilians  in  Central  Asia 

and  then  sought  the  assistance  of  Babur,  who  advised  the  Safavids  to  withdraw.  The 


 

74 | 

P a g e


 

 

Safavids, however, refused and were defeated during the  Battle of  Ghazdewan by the 



warlord Ubaydullah Khan.  

Babur's early relations with theOttomans were poor because the Ottoman Sultan 

Selim I provided his rival Ubaydullah Khan with powerful  matchlocks and cannons.[34] 

In  1507,  when  ordered  to  accept  Selim  I  as  his  rightful  suzerain  Babur  refused,  and 

gathered Qizilbash servicemen in order to counter the forces of Ubaydullah Khan during 

the Battle of Ghazdewan. In 1513, Selim I reconciled with Babur (fearing that he would 

join  the  Safavids),  dispatched  Ustad  Ali  Quli  the  artilleryman  and  Mustafa  Rumi,  the 

matchlock  marksman,  and  many  other  Ottoman  Turks,  in  order  to  assist  Babur  in  his 

conquests;  this  particular  assistance  proved to  be  the  basis  of future  Mughal-Ottoman 

relations.[35] From them, he also adopted the tactic of using matchlocks and cannons in 

field (rather than only in sieges), which would give him an important advantage in India.  

Formation of the Mughal Empire  

Babur still wanted to escape from the Uzbeks, and finally chose India as a refuge 

instead of Badakhshan, which was to the north of Kabul. He wrote, "In the presence of 

such power and potency, we had to think of some place for ourselves and, at this crisis 

and  in  the  crack  of  time  there  was,  put  a  wider  space  between  us  and  the  strong 

foeman."  After  his  third  loss  of  Samarkand,  Babur  gave  full  attention  on  conquest  of 

India, launching a campaign, he reached Chenab, now in Pakistan, in 1519. Until 1524, 

his  aim  was  to  only  expand  his  rule  to  Punjab,  mainly  to  fulfil  his  ancestor  Timur's 

legacy, since it used to be part of his empire. At the time parts of north India was under 

the  rule  of  Ibrahim  Lodi  of  the  Lodi  dynasty,  but  the  empire  was  crumbling  and  there 

were  many  defectors.  He  received  invitations  from  Daulat  Khan  Lodi,  Governor  of 

Punjab and Ala-ud-Din,  uncle  of Ibrahim.  He  sent  an ambassador to Ibrahim,  claiming 

himself  the  rightful  heir  to  the  throne  of  the  country,  however  the  ambassador  was 

detained at Lahore and released months later.  

Babur  started for  Lahore,  Punjab,  in  1524  but  found  that  Daulat  Khan  Lodi  had 

been driven out by forces sent by Ibrahim Lodi. When Babur arrived at Lahore, the Lodi 

army marched out and his army was routed. In response, Babur burned Lahore for two 

days,  then  marched  to  Dipalpur,  placing  Alam  Khan,  another  rebel  uncle  of  Lodi's,  as 

governor.  Alam  Khan  was  quickly  overthrown  and  fled  to  Kabul.  In  response,  Babur 

supplied Alam Khan with troops who later joined up with Daulat Khan Lodi and together 

with about 30,000 troops, they besieged Ibrahim Lodi at Delhi. He easily defeated and 

drove  off  Alam's  army  and  Babur  realized  Lodi  would  not  allow  him  to  occupy  the 

Punjab.  

Battle of Khanwa 

Background 

The Rajput ruler Rana Sanga had sent an embassy to Babur at Kabul, offering to 

join in Babur's attack on Sultan Ibrahim Lodi of Delhi. Sanga had offered to attack Agra 


 



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   ...   62


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling