Medieval and early modern periods 1206


Download 5.23 Mb.

bet8/62
Sana12.02.2017
Hajmi5.23 Mb.
1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   ...   62

52 | 

P a g e


 

 

family as captives. Maratha general Mahadaji was ―very much pleased with the revenge 



taken by his men‖ for Panipat. After punishing the Rohillas, the Mughal Emperor Shah 

Alam II was restored to the throne by the Marathas.  



Legacy 

Further information: Anglo-Maratha Wars 

The valor displayed by the Marathas was praised by Ahmad Shah Abdali himself, 

who paid a flowing tribute to his rivals in a letter to the then Jaipur ruler, Madhav Singh, 

he wrote : 

 



The  Marathas  fought  with  the  greatest  valour  which  was  beyond  the 

capacity  of  other  races.  These  dauntless  blood-shedders  didn't  fall  short  in 

fighting and doing glorious deeds. But ultimately we won with our superior tactics 

and with the grace of the Divine Lord.  

 

The Third Battle of Panipat saw an enormous number of deaths and injuries in a 



single day of battle. It was the last major battle between indigenous South Asian military 

powers until the creation of Pakistan in 1947. 

To  save  their  kingdom,  the  Mughals  once  again  changed  sides  and  welcomed 

the  Afghans  to  Delhi.  The  Mughals  remained  in  nominal  control  over  small  areas  of 

India,  but  were  never  a  force  again.  The  empire  officially  ended  in  1857  when  its  last 

emperor,  Bahadur  Shah  II,  was  accused  of  being  involved  in  the  Sepoy  Mutiny  and 

exiled. 

The  Marathas'  expansion  was  delayed  due  to  the  battle,  and  infighting  soon 

broke  out  within  the  empire.  They  recovered  their  position  under  the  next  Peshwa 

Madhavrao  I  and  by  1771  were  back  in  control  of  the  north,  finally  occupying  Delhi. 

However, after the death of Madhavrao, due to infighting and increasing pressure from 

the British, their claims to empire only officially ended in 1818 after three wars with the 

British. 

Meanwhile,  the  Sikhs

whose  rebellion  was  the  original  reason  Ahmad 



invaded

were  left  largely  untouched  by  the  battle.  They  soon  retook  Lahore.  When 



Ahmad Shah returned in March 1764 he was forced to break off his siege after only two 

weeks due to a rebellion in Afghanistan. He returned again in 1767, but was unable to 

win  any  decisive  battle.  With  his  own  troops  complaining  about  not  being  paid,  he 

eventually abandoned the district to the Sikhs, who remained in control until 1849 when 

it was annexed by the British Empire. 

The  Marathi  term  "Sankrant  Kosalali",  meaning  "Sankranti  has  befallen  us",  is 

said  to  have  originated  from  the  events  of  the  battle.  There  are  some  verbs  in  the 

Marathi language related to this loss as "Panipat zale". This verb is even today used in 



 

53 | 

P a g e


 

 

Marathi language. A common pun is "Aamchaa Vishwaas Panipataat gela". Just before 



death of brave Dattaji Shinde, when asked whether he would still fight, lionheart Dattaji 

replied "Bachenge to Aur Bhi Ladenge"  . Many historians, including British historians of 

the  time,  have  argued  that  had  it  not  been  for  the  weakening  of  Maratha  power  at 

Panipat, the British might never have gotten a strong foothold in India.[citation needed] 

The  battle  proved  the  inspiration  for  Rudyard  Kipling's  poem  "With  Scindia  to 

Delhi". 


"Our 

hands 


and 

scarfs 


were 

saffron-dyed 

for 

signal 


of 

despair, 

When 

we 


went 

forth 


to 

Paniput 


to 

battle 


with 

the 


~Mlech~ 

Ere we came back from Paniput and left a kingdom there." 



It  is,  however,  also  remembered  as  a  scene  of  valour  on  both  sides.  Santaji 

Wagh's corpse was found with over 40 mortal wounds. The bravery of Vishwas Rao, the 

Peshwa's  son,  and  Sadashiv  Bhau  was  acknowledged  even  by  the  Afghans.[44] 

Yashwantrao Pawar also fought with great courage, killing many Afghans. 

Afghan  military  prowess  was  to  inspire  hope  in  many  orthodox  Muslims  and 

Mughal royalists and fear in the British. 

The  present-day  Baloch  tribes  Bugtis  and  Marris  are  thought  to  be  the 

descendants of Maratha soldiers and civilians who were taken as prisoners of war[45] 



Accession of Babur and the Mughals  

After  Sultan  Ibrahim's  tragic  death  on  the  battle  field,  Babur  named  himself 

emperor over Sultan Ibrahim‘s territory, instead of placing Alam Khan (Ibrahim‘s uncle) 

on the throne. Sultan Ibrahim‘s death lead to the establishment of the 

Mughal Empire in 

India.  He  was  the  last  emperor  of  the  Lodi  Dynasty.  What  was  left  of  his  empire  was 

absorbed  into  the  new  Mughal  Empire.  Babur  continued  to  engage  in  more  military 

campaigns.  



Mahmud Lodi 

Ibrahim  Lodi's  brother ,  Mahmud Lodi  declared  himself  Sultan and  continued to 

resist  Mughal  forces.  He  provided  10,000  Pathan  soldiers  to  Rana  Sanga  in  battle  of 

Khanwa. After the defeat, Mahmud Lodi fled eastwards and again posed a challenge to 

Babur two years later at the Battle of Ghaghra.  

Destruction and desecration  

Delhi  Sultanate  marked  an  era  of  temple  destruction  and  desecration.  Richard 

Eaton[16]  has  tabulated  a  campaign  of  destruction  of  idols  and  temples  by  Sultans, 

intermixed with instances of years where the temples were protected from desecration. 

In many cases, the demolished remains, rocks and broken statue pieces were reused to 


 

54 | 

P a g e


 

 

build  mosques  and  other  buildings.  For  example,  the  Qutb  complex  in  Delhi  was  built 



from  stones  of  27  demolished  Hindu  and  Jain  temples  by  some  accounts,  and 

additionally  included  parts  from  Buddhist  temples  by  other  accounts.  Similarly,  the 

Muslim  mosque  in  Khanapur,  Maharashtra  was  built  from  the  looted  parts  and 

demolished remains of Hindu temples. Mohammad Bakhtiyar Khilji destroyed Buddhist 

and Hindu libraries and their manuscripts at Nalanda and Odantapuri Universities at the 

beginning of Delhi Sultanate.  

The first historical record of a campaign of temples destruction, and defacement 

of faces or heads of Hindu idols, are from 1193 through early 13th century in Rajasthan, 

Punjab,  Haryana  and  Uttar  Pradesh  under  the  command  of  Ghuri.  Under  Khalaji,  the 

campaign  of  temple  desecration  expanded  to  Bihar,  Madhya  Pradesh,  Gujarat  and 

Maharashtra,  and  continued  through  late  13th  century.[16]  The  campaign  extended  to 

Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka and Tamil Nadu under Malik Kafur and Ulugh Khan in 14th 

century,  and  by  Bahmani  in  15th  century.  Orissa  temples  were  destroyed  in  14th 

century under Tughlaq. 

Beyond  destruction  and  desecration,  the  Sultans  of  Delhi  Sultanate  in  some 

cases  had forbidden  reconstruction  of damaged  Hindu,  Jain  and Buddhist  temples, as 

well as prohibited repairs of old temples or construction of any new temples. In certain 

cases, the Sultanate would grant a permit for repairs and construction of temples if the 

patron  or  religious  community  paid  jizya  (fee,  tax).  For  example,  a  proposal  by  the 

Chinese  to  repair  Himalayan  Buddhist  temples  destroyed  by  Sultanate's  army  was 

refused,  on  the  grounds  that  such  temple  repairs  were  only  allowed  if  the  Chinese 

agreed  to  pay  jizya  tax  to  Sultanate's  treasury.  In  his  memoirs,  Firoz  Shah  Tughlaq 

describes  how  he  destroyed  temples  and  built  mosques  instead,  and  killed  those  who 

dared  build  new  temples.  Other  historical  records  from  wazirs,  amirs  and  the  court 

historians  of  various  Sultans  of  Delhi  Sultanate  describe  the  grandeur  of  idols  and 

temples  they  witnessed  in  their  campaigns  and  how  these  were  destroyed  and 

desecrated.  

Temple desecration during Delhi Sultanate period  

Sultan / Agent 

Dynasty  Years  Temple Sites Destroyed 

States 

Mohammad 



Ghuri, Aibek 

Mamluk  1193 

1290 

Ajmer, 


Samana, 

Kuhram, 


Delhi, 

Kol, 


Benaras 

Rajasthan, 

Punjab, 

Haryana, 

Uttar Pradesh 

Bakhtiyar, 

Iltumish,  Jalal  al-

Din, 


Ala 

al-Din, 


Malik Kafur 

Khilji 


1

290-


1320 

Nalanda, 

Odantapuri, 

Vikramashila, 

Bhilsa, 

Ujjain, 


Jhain, 

Vijapur, 

Devagiri, 

Somnath, 

Chidambaram, Madurai 

Bihar, 


Madhya  Pradesh, 

Rajasthan,  Gujarat, 

Maharashtra,  Tamil 

Nadu 


 

55 | 

P a g e


 

 

Ulugh  Khan, 



Firoz 

Tughluq, 

Nahar, 

Muzaffar 



Khan 

T

ughluq 



1

320-


1395 

Somnath, 

Warangal, 

Bodhan, 


Pillalamarri, 

Puri, 


Sainthali, 

Idar, 


Somnath[90] 

Gujarat, 

Andhra 

Pradesh, 



Orissa, Haryana 

Sikandar, 

Muzaffar 

Shah, 


Ahmad 

Shah, 


Mahmud 

Sayyid 


1400-

1442 


Paraspur, 

Bijbehara,  Tripuresvara, 

Idar, 

Diu, 


Manvi, 

Sidhpur, 

Delwara, 

Kumbhalmir 

Gujarat, 

Rajasthan 

Suhrab, 

Begdha,  Bahmani, 

Khalil 

Shah, 


Khawwas 

Khan, 


Sikandar 

Lodi, 


Ibrahim Lodi 

Lodi 


1457-

1518 


Mandalgarh, 

Malan, 


Dwarka, 

Kondapalle, 

Kanchi, 

Amod,  Nagarkot,  Utgir, 

Narwar, Gwalior 

Rajasthan, 

Gujarat,  Himachal 

Pradesh,  Madhya 

Pradesh 

 

 



The list of Sultans in the Delhi Sultanate  

Mamluk/Slave dynasty 

  Qutb-ud-din  Aibak  (1206



1210),  appointed  Naib  us  Sultanat  by 

Mu'izz  al-Din  Muhammad,  first  Muslim  Sultan  of  India,  ruled  with 

Delhi as capital 

  Aram Shah (1210



1211) 


  Shams  ud  din  Iltutmish  (1211

1236),  son-in-law  of  Qut-bud-din 



Aibak 

  Rukn ud din Firuz (1236), son of Iltutmish 



  Raziyyat-ud-din Sultana (1236

1240), daughter of Iltutmish 



  Muiz ud din Bahram (1240

1242), son of Iltutmish 



  Ala ud din Masud (1242

1246), son of Ruk-nud-din 



  Nasir ud din Mahmud (1246

1266), grandson of Iltutmish 



  Ghiyas  ud  din  Balban  (1266

1286),  ex-slave,  son-in-law  of  Sultan 



Nasir ud din Mahmud 

  Muiz ud din Qaiqabad (1286



1290), grandson of Balban and son of 

Nasiruddin Bughra Khan 


 

56 | 

P a g e


 

 

Khilji dynasty 

  Jalal ud din Firuz Khilji (1290



1296) 


  Alauddin Khilji (1296

1316) 


  Umar Khan Khilji (1316) 

  Qutb ud din Mubarak Shah (1316



1320) 


  Khusro Khan (1320) 



Tughluq dynasty 

  Ghiyath al-Din Tughluq (1320



1325)[91] 

  Muhammad bin Tughluq (1325



1351) 


  Mahmud Ibn Muhammad (March 1351) 

  Firuz Shah Tughluq (1351



1388) 


  Ghiyas-ud-Din Tughlaq II (1388

1389) 


  Abu Bakr Shah (1389

1390) 


  Nasir ud din Muhammad Shah III (1390

1393) 


  Sikander Shah I (March

April 1393) 



  Nasir-ud-Din  Mahmud  Shah  Tughluq  (Sultan  Mahmud  II)  at  Delhi 

(1393



1413),  son  of  Nasir  uddin  Muhammad,  controlled  the 



east[citation needed] from Delhi 

  Nasir-ud-din  Nusrat  Shah  Tughluq  (1394



1414),  grandson  of  Firuz 

Shah Tughluq, controlled the west[citation needed] from Firozabad 

  Sayyid dynasty[edit] 



  Khizr Khan (1414

1421) 


  Mubarak Shah (1421

1434) 


  Muhammad Shah (1434

1445) 


  Alam Shah (1445

1451) 


Lodi dynasty 

  Bahlul Lodi (1451



1489) 


  Sikandar Lodi (1489

1517) 


  Ibrahim  Lodi  (1517

1526),  defeated  by  Babur  in  the  First  Battle  of 



Panipat on April 21, 1526 

Timur

 

Early life 

Timur  was  born  in  Transoxiana  near  the  city  of  Kesh  (modern  Shahrisabz, 

Uzbekistan) some 80 kilometres (50 mi) south of Samarkand, part of what was then the 

Chagatai  Khanate.  His  father,  Taraqai,  was  a  minor  noble  of  the  Barlas,  who  were 

Mongols that had been Turkified.  


 

57 | 

P a g e


 

 

According  to  Gérard  Chaliand,  Timur  was  a  Muslim,  and  he  saw  himself  as 



Genghis  Khan's  heir.  Though  not  a  Borjigid  or  a  descendent  of  Genghis  Khan,  he 

clearly sought to invoke the legacy of Genghis Khan's conquests during his lifetime.  

His  name  Temur  means  "Iron"  in  old  Turkic  languages  (Uzbek  Temir,  Turkish 

Demir). Both Timur and Demir are popular male names in Turkey today.  

Later Timurid dynastic histories claim that he was born on April 8, 1336, but most 

sources from his lifetime give ages that are consistent with a birthdate in the late 1320s. 

Historian  Beatrice  Forbes  Manz  suspects  the  1336  date  was  designed  to  tie  Timur  to 

the  legacy  of  Abu  Sa'id  Bahadur  Khan,  the  last  ruler  of  the  Ilkhanate  descended  from 

Hulagu Khan, who died in that year.  

At  the age  of  eight  or  nine,  Timur  and  his  mother  and brothers  were  carried  as 

prisoners  to  Samarkand  by  an  invading  Mongol  army.  In  his  childhood,  Timur  and  a 

small band of followers Timur is regarded as a military  genius  and a tactician,  with an 

uncanny ability to work within a highly fluid political structure to win and maintain a loyal 

following  of  nomads  during  his  rule  in  Central  Asia.  He  was  also  considered 

extraordinarily  intelligent 

  not  only  intuitively  but  also  intellectually.  16  In  Samarkand 



and his many travels, Timur, under the guidance of distinguished scholars, was able to 

learn  the  Persian,  Mongolian,  and  Turkic  languages.  9  More  importantly,  Timur  was 

characterized  as  an  opportunist.  Taking  advantage  of  his  Turco-Mongolian  heritage, 

Timur frequently used either the Islamic religion or the law and traditions of the Mongol 

Empire to achieve his military goals or domestic political aims.  

Military leader 

About  1360  Timur  gained  prominence  as  a  military  leader  whose  troops  were 

mostly  Turkic  tribesmen  of  the  region.  He  took  part  in  campaigns  in  Transoxiana  with 

the  Khan  of  the  Chagatai  Khanate.  Allying  himself  both  in  cause  and  by  family 

connection  with  Kurgan,  the  dethroner  and  destroyer  of  Volga  Bulgaria,  he  invaded 

Khorasan[28]  at  the  head  of  a  thousand  horsemen.  This  was  the  second  military 

expedition  that  he  led,  and  its  success  led  to  further  operations,  among  them  the 

subjugation of Khwarezm and Urgench. 

Following  Kurgan's  murder,  disputes  arose  among  the  many  claimants  to 

sovereign  power.  Tughlugh  Timur  of  Kashgar,  another  descendant  of  Genghis  Khan, 

invaded,  interrupting  this  infighting.  Timur  was  sent  to  negotiate  with  the  invader  but 

joined  with  him  instead  and  was  rewarded  with  Transoxania.  At  about  this  time  his 

father died and Timur became chief of the Berlas as well.  Tughlugh then attempted to 

set his son over Transoxania, but Timur repelled this invasion with a smaller force.  



Rise to power 

It  was  in  this  period  that  Timur  reduced  the  Chagatai  khans  to  the  position  of 

figureheads while he ruled in their name. Also during this period, Timur and his brother-


 

58 | 

P a g e


 

 

in-law  Husayn,  who  were  at  first  fellow  fugitives  and  wanderers  in  joint  adventures, 



became  rivals  and  antagonists.  The  relationship  between  them  began  to  become 

strained  after  Husayn  abandoned  efforts  to  carry  out  Timur's  orders  to  finish  off  Ilya 

Khoja (former governor of Mawarannah) close to Tishnet. 40 

Timur  began  to  gain  a  following  of  people  in  Balkh,  consisting  of  merchants, 

fellow  tribesmen,  Muslim  clergy,  aristocracy  and  agricultural  workers,  because  of  his 

kindness in sharing his belongings with them. This contrasted Timur's behavior with that 

of  Husayn,  who  alienated  these  people,  took  many  possessions  from  them  via  his 

heavy tax laws and selfishly spent the tax money building elaborate structures. 41

2 At 


around 1370 Husayn surrendered to Timur and was later assassinated,  which  allowed 

Timur  to  be  formally  proclaimed  sovereign  at  Balkh.  He  married  Husayn's  wife  Saray 

Mulk Khanum, a descendant of Genghis Khan, allowing him to become imperial ruler of 

the Chaghatay tribe.  

One day Aksak Temür spoke thusly: 

"Khan Züdei (in China) rules over the city. We now number fifty to sixty men, so 

let  us  elect  a  leader."  So  they  drove  a  stake  into  the  ground  and  said:  "We  shall  run 

thither and he among us who is the first to reach the stake, may he become our leader". 

So  they  ran  and  Aksak  Timur,  as  he  was  lame,  lagged  behind,  but  before  the  others 

reached  the  stake  he  threw  his  cap  onto  it.  Those  who  arrived  first  said:  "We  are  the 

leaders." ["But,"] Aksak Timur said: "My head came in first, I am the leader." Meanwhile, 

an old man arrived and said:  "The leadership should belong to Aksak Timur; your feet 

have arrived but, before then, his head reached the goal." So they made Aksak Timur 

their prince.  



Legitimization of Timur' s rule 

Timur's  Turco-Mongolian  heritage  provided  opportunities  and  challenges  as  he 

sought  to  rule  the  Mongol  Empire  and  the  Muslim  world.  According  to  the  Mongol 

traditions, Timur could not claim the title of khan or rule the Mongol Empire because he 

was  not  a descendant of Genghis Khan. Therefore, Timur set  up a puppet  Chaghatay 

khan,  Suyurghatmish,  as  the  nominal  ruler  of  Balkh  as  he  pretended  to  act  as  a 

"protector of the member of a Chinggisid line, that of Genghis Khan's eldest son, Jochi". 

As a result, Timur never used the title of khan because the name khan could only 

be  used  by  those  who  come  from  the  same  lineage  as  Genghis  Khan  himself.  Timur 

instead used the title of amir meaning general, and acting in the name of the  Chagatai 

ruler of Transoxania.  

To  reinforce  his  position  in  the  Mongol  Empire,  Timur  managed  to  acquire  the 

royal title of son-in-law when he married a princess of Chinggisid descent. 

Likewise,  Timur  could  not  claim  the  supreme  title  of  the  Islamic  world,  caliph, 

because  the  "office  was  limited  to  the  Quraysh,  the  tribe  of  the  Prophet  Muhammad". 


 

59 | 

P a g e


 

 

Therefore, Timur reacted to the challenge by creating a myth and image of himself as a 



"supernatural  personal  power"  ordained  by  God.  Since  Timur  had  a  successful  career 

as a conqueror, it was easy to justify his rule as ordained and favored by God since no 

ordinary man could be a possessor of such good fortune that resistance would be seen 

as  opposing  the  will  of  God.  Moreover,  the  Islamic  notion  that  military  and  political 

success was the result  of Allah's favor had long been successfully exploited by earlier 

rulers.  Therefore,  Timur's  assertions  would  not  have  seemed  unbelievable  to  fellow 

Islamic people. 

Period of expansion 

Timur  spent  the  next  35  years  in  various  wars  and  expeditions.  He  not  only 

consolidated  his  rule  at  home  by  the  subjugation  of  his  foes,  but  sought  extension  of 

territory  by  encroachments  upon  the  lands  of  foreign  potentates.  His  conquests  to  the 

west and northwest led him to the lands near the Caspian Sea and to the banks of the 

Ural and the Volga. Conquests in the south and south-West encompassed almost every 

province in Persia, including Baghdad, Karbala and Northern Iraq. 

One  of  the  most  formidable  of  Timur's  opponents  was  another  Mongol  ruler,  a 

descendant  of  Genghis  Khan  named  Tokhtamysh.  After  having  been  a  refugee  in 

Timur's  court,  Tokhtamysh  became  ruler  both  of  the  eastern  Kipchak  and  the  Golden 

Horde.  After  his  accession,  he  quarreled  with  Timur  over  the  possession  of  Khwarizm 

and  Azerbaijan.  However,  Timur  still  supported  him  against  the  Russians  and  in  1382 

Tokhtamysh invaded the Muscovite dominion and burned Moscow.  

Conquest of Persia 

After  the  death  of  Abu  Sa'id,  ruler  of  the  Ilkhanate,  in  1335,  there was  a  power 

vacuum  in  Persia.  In  the  end  Persia  was  split  amongst  the  Muzaffarids,  Kartids, 

Eretnids,  Chobanids,  Injuids,  Jalayirids,  and  Sarbadars.  In  1383,  Timur  started  the 

military conquest of Persia, though he already over much of Persian Khorasan by 1381, 

after  Khwaja  Mas'ud,  of  the  Sarbadar  dynasty  surrendered.  Timur  began  his  lengthy 

Persian  campaign  with  Herat,  capital  of  the  Kartid  dynasty.  When  Herat  did  not 

surrender  to  him  he  reduced  the  city  to  rubble  and  massacred  most  of  its  citizens.  It 

remained in ruins until Shahrukh Mirza ordered it's reconstruction.[33] Timur then sent a 

General  to  capture  rebellious  Kandahar. With  the  capture  of  Herat  the  Kartid  kingdom 

surrendered  and  became  vassals  of  Timur,  but  would  later  be  annexed  in  1389  by 

Timur's son Miran Shah. He then headed west to capture the  Zagros Mountains; to do 

this  he  passed  through  Mazandaran.  During  his  travel  through  the  north  of  Persia,  he 

captured  the  then  town  of  Tehran,  who  surrendered  and  were  thus  treated  mercifully. 

He  then  held  siege  to  Soltaniyeh  in  1384.  But  Khorasan  revolted  one  year  later,  so 

Timur destroyed Isfizar and the prisoners were cemented into the walls alive. The next 

year the kingdom of Sistan, under the Mihrabanid dynasty, was ravaged, and its capital 

at  Zaranj  was  destroyed.  Timur  then  returned  to  his  capital  of  Samarkand  where  he 

began  planning  for  his  Georgian  campaign  and  Golden  Horde  invasion.  In  1386  he 

passed  through  Mazandaran  as  he  had  when  trying  to  capture  the  Zagros.  He  went 



 


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   ...   62


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling