Medieval and early modern periods 1206


Download 5.23 Mb.

bet24/62
Sana12.02.2017
Hajmi5.23 Mb.
1   ...   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   ...   62

169 | 

P a g e


 

 

The temple was rebuilt by Mahipala Deva, the Chudasama king of Saurashtra in 



1308  and  the  Linga  was  installed  by  his  son  Khengar  sometime  between  1326  and 

1351.  In  1395,  the  temple  was  destroyed  for  the  third  time  by  Zafar  Khan,  the  last 

governor of Gujarat under the  Delhi Sultanate. In 1451, it was desecrated by  Mahmud 

Begada, the Sultan of Gujarat.  

In  1546,  the  Portuguese,  based  in  Goa,  attacked  ports  and  towns  in  Gujarat 

including Somnath and destroyed several temples and mosques.  

By 1665, the temple, one of many, was once again ordered destroyed by Mughal 

emperor  Aurangzeb.  In  1702,  he  ordered  that  if  Hindus  had  revived  worship  there,  it 

should be demolished completely.  

Later the temple was rebuilt to its same glory adjacent to the ruined one. Later on 

a  joint  effort  of  Peshwa  of  Pune,  Raja  Bhonsle  of  Nagpur,  Chhatrapati  Bhonsle  of 

Kolhapur,  Queen  Ahilyabai  Holkar  of  Indore  &  Shrimant  Patilbuwa  Shinde  of  Gwalior 

rebuilt the temple in 1783 at a site adjacent to the ruined temple.  

'Proclamation of the Gates' Incident during the British raj  

In  1782-83  AD,  Maratha  king  Mahadaji  Shinde,  victoriously  brought  the  Three 

Silver Gates from Lahore after defeating Muhammad Shah of Lahore. After refusal from 

Pundits of Guzrath and the then ruler Gaekwad to put them back on Somnath temple, 

these silver gates were placed in the temples of Ujjain. Today they can be seen in two 

temples of India, Mahakaleshwar Jyotirlinga and Gopal Mandir of Ujjain.  

In 1842,  Edward Law,  1st  Earl of  Ellenborough issued his famous Proclamation 

of the Gates,  in  which  he ordered the British army in  Afghanistan to return via  Ghazni 

and bring  back  to  India  the  sandalwood  gates from the tomb  of  Mahmud  of Ghazni  in 

Ghazni,  Afghanistan.  These  were  believed  to  have  been  taken  by  Mahmud  from 

Somnath.  There  was  a  debate  in  the  House  of  Commons  in  London  in  1843  on  the 

question of the gates of the Somanatha temple. After much crossfire between the British 

Government and the opposition, the gates were uprooted and brought back in triumph. 

But  on  arrival,  they  were  found  to  be  replicas  of  the  original.  They  were  placed  in  a 

store-room in the Agra Fort where they still lie to the present day. 

In  the  19th  century  novel  The  Moonstone  by  Wilkie  Collins,  the  diamond  of  the 

title is presumed to have been stolen from the temple at Somnath and, according to the 

historian Romila Thapar, reflects the interest aroused in Britain by the gates.  



Reconstruction of the Somnath Temple  

Before independence, Prabhas Patan was part of the princely state of Junagadh, 

whose ruler had acceded to Pakistan in 1947. After India refused to accept his decision, 

the state was made a part of India and Deputy Prime Minister Patel came to Junagadh 



 

170 | 

P a g e


 

 

on 12 November 1947 to direct the stabilization  of the state by the Indian Army and at 



the same time ordered the reconstruction of the Somanath temple.  

When Patel, K. M. Munshi and other leaders of the Congress went to  Mahatma 

Gandhi  with  their  proposal  to  reconstruct  the  Somnath  temple,  Gandhi  blessed  the 

move,  but  suggested  that  the  funds  for  the  construction  should  be  collected  from  the 

public  and  the  temple  should  not  be  funded  by  the  state.  He  expressed  that  he  was 

proud to associate himself to the project of renovation of the temple[34] However, soon 

both  Gandhi  and  Sardar  Patel  died  and  the  task  of  reconstruction  of  the  temple 

continued under Munshi, who was the Minister for Food and Civil Supplies in the Nehru 

Government.  

The ruins were pulled down in October 1950 and the mosque present at that site 

was shifted few kilometres away. In May 1951, Dr. Rajendra Prasad, the first President 

of the Republic of India, invited by K M Munshi, performed the installation ceremony for 

the temple. The President said  in his address,  "It is my view that the reconstruction of 

the Somnath Temple will be complete on that  day when not only a magnificent edifice 

will  arise  on  this  foundation,  but  the  mansion  of  India's  prosperity  will  be  really  that 

prosperity  of  which  the  ancient  temple  of  Somnath  was  a  symbol.".  He  added  "The 

Somnath  temple  signifies  that  the  power  of  reconstruction  is  always  greater  than  the 

power of destruction" 



Architecture of the present temple  

The  present  temple  is  built  in  the  Chalukya  style  of  temple  architecture  or 

"Kailash  Mahameru  Prasad"  style  and  reflects  the  skill  of  the  Sompura  Salats,  one  of 

Gujarat's  master  masons.  The  temple's 

śikhara

,  or  main  spire,  is  15  metres  in  height, 



and it has an 8.2-metre tall flag pole at the top.  

The  temple  is  situated  at  such  a  place  that  there  is  no  land  in  a  straight  line 

between Somnath seashore until Antarctica, such an inscription in Sanskrit is found on 

the Bāṇastambha  erected on the sea

-

protection wall. The Bāṇ



astambha mentions that 

it stands at a point on the Indian landmass that is the first point on land in the north to 

the South Pole at that particular longitude.  

Railway Station 

Somnath railway station is also considered the attraction for tourists, because of 

its unique temple-based design. This station ends the railway tracks. 

 

 



 

 

171 | 

P a g e


 

 

Ghazwa-e-Hind 



Ghazwa-e-Hind or the final battle of India is an  Islamic term mentioned in some 

hadiths predicting a final and last battle in India and as a result, a conquest of the whole 

Indian  sub-continent  by  Muslim  warriors.  The  term  has  recently  become  a  subject  of 

vast criticism in media for being used by the extremist Taliban organization Al-Qaeda to 

justify their terrorising activities in the subcontinent.  

Regional powers 

For two and a half centuries from the mid 13th, the politics in the Northern India 

was  dominated  by  the Delhi  Sultanate and  in  the  Southern  India  by  the Vijayanagar 

Empire which originated as a political heir of the erstwhile Hoysala Empire and Pandyan 

Empire. However,  there  were  other  regional  powers  present  as  well.  In  the  North, 

the Rajputs were  a  dominant  force  in  the  Western  and  Central  India.  Their  power 

reached  to  the  zenith  under Rana  Sanga during  whose  time  Rajput  armies  were 

constantly  victorious  against  the  Sultanate  army. In  the  South,  the Bahmani 

Sultanate was  the  chief  rival  of  the  Vijaynagara  and  gave  Vijayanagara  tough  days 

many  a  times. In  the  early  16th  centuryKrishnadevaraya of  the Vijayanagara 

Empire defeated the last remnant of Bahmani Sultanate power after which the Bahmani 

Sultanate collapsed. It was established either by a Brahman convert or patronized by a 

Brahman  and  form  that  source  it  got  the  name Bahmani. In  the  early  16th  century,  it 

collapsed  and  got  split  into  five  small Deccan  sultanates. In  the  East,  the Gajapati 

Kingdom remained  a  strong  regional  power  to  reckon  with, so  was  the Ahom 

Kingdom in the North-east for six centuries.  

Mughal Empire 

In  1526, Babur,  a Timurid descendant  of Timur and Genghis  Khan from Fergana 

Valley (modern  day  Uzbekistan),  swept  across  theKhyber  Pass and  established 

the Mughal Empire, which at its zenith covered modern day Afghanistan, Pakistan, India 

and Bangladesh. However, his son Humayun was defeated by the Afghan warrior Sher 

Shah  Suri in  the  year  1540,  and  Humayun  was  forced  to  retreat  to Kabul.  After  Sher 

Shah's death, his son Islam Shah Suri and the Hindu emperor Hemu Vikramaditya, who 

had 


won 

22 


battles 

against 


Afghan 

rebels 


and 

forces 


of 

Akbar, 


from Punjab to Bengal and  had  established  a  secular  rule  in  North  India  from Delhi till 

1556  after  winning Battle  of  Delhi. Akbar's  forces  defeated  and  killed  Hemu  in 

the Second Battle of Panipat on 6 November 1556. 

Akbar's son, Jahangir more or less followed father's policy. The Mughal dynasty 

ruled most of the Indian subcontinent by 1600. The reign of Shah Jahan was the golden 

age of Mughal architecture.  He  erected several large monuments, the most  famous of 

which is the Taj Mahal at Agra, as well as the Moti Masjid, Agra, the Red Fort, the Jama 

Masjid,  Delhi,  and  the  Lahore  Fort.  The  Mughal  Empire  reached  the  zenith  of  its 



 

172 | 

P a g e


 

 

territorial expanse during the reign of Aurangzeb and also started its terminal decline in 



his  reign  due  to  Maratha  military  resurgence  under Shivaji.  Historian Sir.  J.N. 

Sarkar wrote, "All seemed to have been gained by Aurangzeb now, but in reality all was 

lost." The same was echoed by Vincent Smith: "The Deccan proved to be the graveyard 

not only of Aurangzeb's body but also of his empire". 

The empire went into decline thereafter. The Mughals suffered several blows due 

to  invasions  from Marathas and Afghans.  During  the  decline  of  the  Mughal  Empire, 

several smaller states rose to fill the power  vacuum and themselves were contributing 

factors  to  the  decline.  In  1737,  the  Maratha  general Bajirao of  the Maratha 

Empire invaded and plundered Delhi. Under the general Amir Khan Umrao Al Udat, the 

Mughal  Emperor  sent  8,000  troops  to  drive  away  the  5,000  Maratha  cavalry  soldiers. 

Baji Rao, however, easily routed the novice Mughal general and the rest of the imperial 

Mughal army fled. In 1737, in the final defeat of Mughal Empire, the commander-in-chief 

of  the  Mughal  Army,  Nizam-ul-mulk,  was  routed  at  Bhopal  by  the  Maratha  army.  This 

essentially brought an end to the Mughal Empire. In 1739, Nader Shah, emperor of Iran, 

defeated the Mughal army at the Battle of Karnal. After this victory, Nader captured and 

sacked 


Delhi, 

carrying 

away 

many 


treasures, 

including 

the Peacock 

Throne. The Mughal  dynasty was  reduced  to  puppet  rulers  by  1757.  The  remnants  of 

the  Mughal  dynasty  were  finally  defeated  during  the Indian  Rebellion  of  1857,  also 

called  the  1857  War  of  Independence,  and  the  remains  of  the  empire  were  formally 

taken  over  by  the British while  the Government  of  India  Act  1858 let  the British 

Crown assume direct control of India in the form of the new British Raj. 

The  Mughals  were  perhaps  the  richest  single  dynasty  to  have  ever  existed. 

During  the  Mughal  era,  the  dominant  political  forces  consisted  of  the  Mughal  Empire 

and  its  tributaries  and,  later  on,  the  rising  successor  states 

  including  the Maratha 



Empire 

 which fought an increasingly weak Mughal dynasty. The Mughals, while often 



employing brutal tactics to subjugate their empire, had a policy of integration with Indian 

culture, which is what  made them successful where the short-lived Sultanates of Delhi 

had  failed.  This  period  marked  vast  social  change  in  the  subcontinent  as  the  Hindu 

majority  were  ruled  over  by  the  Mughal  emperors,  most  of  whom  showed  religious 

tolerance, liberally patronising Hindu culture. The famous emperor Akbar, who was the 

grandson of Babar, tried to establish a good relationship with the Hindus. However, later 

emperors such as Aurangazeb tried to establish complete Muslim dominance, and as a 

result  several  historical  temples  were  destroyed  during  this  period  and  taxes  imposed 

on  non-Muslims.  Akbar  declared  "Amari"  or  non-killing  of  animals  in  the  holy  days  of 

Jainism.  He  rolled  back  the jizya tax  for  non-Muslims.  The  Mughal  emperors  married 

local royalty, allied themselves with local maharajas, and attempted to fuse their Turko-

Persian  culture  with  ancient  Indian  styles,  creating  a  unique Indo-Saracenic 

architecture.  It  was  the  erosion  of  this  tradition  coupled  with  increased  brutality  and 

centralization  that  played  a  large  part  in  the  dynasty's  downfall  after Aurangzeb,  who 

unlike  previous  emperors,  imposed  relatively  non-pluralistic  policies  on  the  general 

population, which often inflamed the majority Hindu population. 



 

 

173 | 

P a g e


 

 

Etymology 

Contemporaries referred to the empire founded by Babur as the Timurid empire, 

which reflected the heritage of his dynasty, and was the term preferred by the Mughals 

themselves. Another name was  Hindustan, which  was documented in the  Ain-i-Akbari, 

and which has been described as the closest to an official name for the empire. In the 

west, the term "Mughal" was used for the emperor, and by extension, the empire as a 

whole.  The  use  of  Mughal  derived  from  the  Arabic  and  Persian  corruption  of  Mongol, 

and  it  emphasized  the  Mongol  origins  of  the  Timurid  dynasty,  gained  currency  during 

the 19th century,  but  remains disputed by  Indologists.  Similar terms had been used to 

refer  to  the  empire,  including  "Mogul"  and  "Moghul".  Nevertheless,  Babur's  ancestors 

were  sharply  distinguished  from  the  classical  Mongols  insofar  as  they  were  oriented 

towards Persian rather than Turco-Mongol culture.  

History 

The  Mughal  Empire  was  founded  by  Babur,  a  Central  Asian  ruler  who  was 

descended from the Turco-Mongol conqueror Timur (the founder of the Timurid Empire) 

on  his  father's  side  and  from  Chagatai,  the  second  son  of  the  Mongol  ruler  Genghis 

Khan,  on his mother's side.  Ousted from his ancestral domains in  Central Asia, Babur 

turned to India to satisfy his ambitions. He established himself in Kabul and then pushed 

steadily southward into India from Afghanistan through the Khyber Pass. Babur's forces 

occupied much of northern India after his victory at Panipat in 1526. The preoccupation 

with  wars  and  military  campaigns,  however,  did  not  allow  the  new  emperor  to 

consolidate  the  gains  he  had  made  in  India.  The  instability  of  the  empire  became 

evident under his son, Humayun, who was driven out of India and into Persia by rebels. 

Humayun's exile in Persia established diplomatic ties between the  Safavid and Mughal 

Courts,  and  led  to  increasing  Persian  cultural  influence  in  the  Mughal  Empire.  The 

restoration  of  Mughal  rule  began  after  Humayun's  triumphant  return  from  Persia  in 

1555,  but  he  died  from  a  fatal  accident  shortly  afterwards.  Humayun's  son,  Akbar, 

succeeded  to  the  throne  under  a  regent,  Bairam  Khan,  who  helped  consolidate  the 

Mughal Empire in India.  

Through  warfare  and  diplomacy,  Akbar  was  able  to  extend  the  empire  in  all 

directions  and  controlled  almost  the  entire  Indian  subcontinent  north  of  the  Godavari 

river.  He  created  a  new  class  of  nobility  loyal  to  him  from  the  military  aristocracy  of 

India's  social  groups,  implemented  a  modern  government,  and  supported  cultural 

developments.  At  the  same  time,  Akbar  intensified  trade  with  European  trading 

companies.  India  developed  a  strong  and  stable  economy,  leading  to  commercial 

expansion  and  economic  development.  Akbar  allowed  free  expression  of  religion,  and 

attempted to resolve socio-political and cultural differences in his empire by establishing 

a  new  religion,  Din-i-Ilahi,  with  strong  characteristics  of  a  ruler  cult.  He  left  his 

successors  an  internally  stable  state,  which  was  in  the  midst  of  its  golden  age,  but 

before long signs of political weakness would emerge. Akbar's son, Jahangir, ruled the 

empire at its peak, but he was addicted to opium, neglected the affairs of the state, and 

came under the influence of rival court cliques. During the reign of Jahangir's son, Shah 



 

174 | 

P a g e


 

 

Jahan,  the  culture  and  splendour  of  the  luxurious  Mughal  court  reached  its  zenith  as 



exemplified by the Taj Mahal. The maintenance of the court, at this time, began to cost 

more than the revenue.  

Shah Jahan's eldest  son,  the liberal  Dara Shikoh,  became regent in  1658,  as a 

result of his father's illness. However, a younger son, Aurangzeb, allied with the Islamic 

orthodoxy against his brother, who championed a syncretistic Hindu-Muslim culture, and 

ascended  to  the  throne.  Aurangzeb  defeated  Dara  in  1659  and  had  him  executed. 

Although  Shah  Jahan  fully  recovered  from  his  illness,  Aurangzeb  declared  him 

incompetent  to  rule  and  had  him  imprisoned.  During  Aurangzeb's  reign,  the  empire 

gained  political  strength  once  more,  but  his  religious  conservatism  and  intolerance 

undermined the stability of Mughal society. Aurangzeb expanded the empire to include 

almost the whole of South Asia, but at his death in 1707, many parts of the empire were 

in open revolt. Aurangzeb's son, Shah Alam, repealed the religious policies of his father

and  attempted  to  reform  the  administration.  However,  after  his  death  in  1712,  the 

Mughal  dynasty  sank  into  chaos  and  violent  feuds.  In  1719  alone,  four  emperors 

successively ascended the throne.  

During  the  reign  of  Muhammad  Shah,  the  empire  began  to  break  up,  and  vast 

tracts  of  central  India  passed  from  Mughal  to  Maratha  hands.  The  far-off  Indian 

campaign of Nadir Shah, who had priorly reestablished Iranian suzerainty over most of 

West  Asia,  the  Caucasus,  and  Central  Asia,  culminated  with  the  Sack  of  Delhi  and 

shattered the remnants of Mughal power and prestige. Many of the empire's elites now 

sought to control their own affairs, and broke away to form independent kingdoms. But, 

according to Sugata Bose and Ayesha Jalal, the Mughal Emperor, however, continued 

to  be  the  highest  manifestation  of  sovereignty.  Not  only  the  Muslim  gentry,  but  the 

Maratha,  Hindu,  and  Sikh  leaders  took  part  in  ceremonial  acknowledgements  of  the 

emperor as the sovereign of India.  

The  Mughal  Emperor  Shah  Alam  II  made  futile  attempts  to  reverse  the  Mughal 

decline, and ultimately had to seek the protection of outside powers i.e. from the Emir of 

Afghanistan, Ahmed Shah Abdali, which led to the Third Battle of Panipat between the 

Maratha  Empire  and  the  Afghans  led  by  Abdali  in  1761.  In  1771,  the  Marathas 

recaptured Delhi from Afghan control and in 1784 they officially became the protectors 

of  the  emperor  in  Delhi,  a  state  of  affairs  that  continued  further  until  after  the  Third 

Anglo-Maratha War. Thereafter, the British East India Company became the protectors 

of  the  Mughal  dynasty  in  Delhi.  The  British  East  India  company  took  control  of  the 

former  Mughal  province  of  Bengal-Bihar  in  1793  after  it  abolished  local  rule  (Nizamat) 

that  lasted  until  1858,  marking  the  beginning  of  British  colonial  era  over  the  Indian 

Subcontinent. By 1857 a considerable part of former Mughal India was under the East 

India's  company's  control.  After  a  crushing  defeat  in  the  war  of  1857

1858  which  he 



nominally  led,  the  last  Mughal,  Bahadur  Shah  Zafar,  was  deposed  by  the  British  East 

India  Company  and  exiled  in  1858.  Through  the  Government  of  India  Act  1858  the 

British  Crown  assumed  direct  control  of  East  India  company  held  territories  in  India  in 

the form of the new British Raj. In 1876 the British Queen Victoria assumed the title of 

Empress of India. 


 

175 | 

P a g e


 

 

 



Explanations for the decline  

Historians  have  offered  numerous  explanations  for  the  rapid  collapse  of  the 

Mughal  Empire  between  1707  and  1720,  after  a  century  of  growth  and  prosperity.  In 

fiscal  terms  the  throne  lost  the  revenues  needed  to  pay  its  chief  officers,  the  emirs 

(nobles)  and  their  entourages.  The  emperor  lost  authority,  as  the  widely  scattered 

imperial officers lost confidence in the central authorities, and made their own deals with 

local men of influence. The imperial army, bogged down in long, futile wars against the 

more aggressive Marathas, lost its fighting spirit. Finally came a series of violent political 

feuds  over  control  of  the  throne.  After  the  execution  of  emperor  Farrukhsiyar  in  1719, 

local Mughal successor states took power in region after region.  

Contemporary chroniclers bewailed the decay they witnessed, a theme picked up 

by  the  first  British  historians  who  wanted  to  underscore  the  need  for  a  British-led 

rejuvenation.  

Since  the  1970s  historians  have  taken  multiple  approaches  to  the  decline,  with 

little  consensus  on  which  factor  was  dominant.  The  psychological  interpretations 

emphasize  depravity  in  high  places,  excessive  luxury,  and  increasingly  narrow  views 

that left the rulers unprepared for an external challenge. A Marxist school (led by  Irfan 

Habib and based at Aligarh Muslim University) emphasizes excessive exploitation of the 

peasantry  by  the  rich,  which  stripped  away  the  will  and  the  means  to  support  the 

regime.  Karen  Leonard  has  focused  on  the  failure  of  the  regime  to  work  with  Hindu 

bankers, whose financial support was increasingly needed; the bankers then helped the 

Maratha  and  the  British.  In  a  religious  interpretation,  some  scholars  argue  that  the 

Hindu Rajputs  revolted against Muslim rule. Finally,  other scholars argue that  the very 

prosperity  of  the  Empire  inspired  the  provinces  to  achieve  a  high  degree  of 

independence, thus weakening the imperial court.  

List of Mughal emperors 

Main article: Mughal emperors 

Emperor 

Birth 


Reign 

Period 


Death 

Notes 


Babur

 

23 



February 

1483 


1526

1530 



30 

December 

1530 

Was a direct descendant of 



Genghis Khan through his 

mother and was descendant 

of Timur through his father. 

Founded the Mughal Empire 

after his victories at the First 

Battle of Panipat (1526), the 

Battle of Khanwa (1527), 

and the Battle of Ghagra 

(1529).  


 



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   ...   62


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling