Medieval and early modern periods 1206


Download 5.23 Mb.

bet25/62
Sana12.02.2017
Hajmi5.23 Mb.
1   ...   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   ...   62

176 | 

P a g e


 

 

Humayun



 

6 March 


1508 

1530


1540 


Jan 1556 

Reign interrupted by Sur 

Empire after the Battle of 

Kanauj (1540). Youth and 

inexperience at ascension 

led to his being regarded as 

a less effective ruler than 

usurper, Sher Shah Suri. 

Sher Shah Suri

 

1472 



1540

1545 



May 1545 

Deposed Humayun and led 

the Sur Empire. 

Islam Shah Suri

 

c. 1500 


1545

1554 



1554 

2nd and last ruler of the Sur 

Empire, claims of sons 

Sikandar and Adil Shah 

were eliminated by 

Humayun's restoration. 

Humayun

 

6 March 



1508 

1555


1556 


Jan 1556 

Restored rule was more 

unified and effective than 

initial reign of 1530

1540; 


left unified empire for his 

son, Akbar. 

Akbar

 

14 



November 

1542 


1556

1605 



27 

October 


1605 

He and Bairam Khan 

defeated Hemu during the 

Second Battle of Panipat 

and later won famous 

victories during the Siege of 

Chittorgarh and the Siege of 

Ranthambore; He greatly 

expanded the Empire and is 

regarded as the most 

illustrious ruler of the 

Mughal Empire as he set up 

the empire's various 

institutions; he married 

Mariam-uz-Zamani, a 

Rajput princess. One of his 

most famous construction 

marvels was the Lahore 

Fort. 

Jahangir


 

Oct 1569 

1605



1627 



1627 

Jahangir set the precedent 

for sons rebelling against 

their emperor fathers. 

Opened first relations with 

the British East India 

Company. Reportedly was 

an alcoholic, and his wife 

Empress Noor Jahan 

became the real power 



 

177 | 

P a g e


 

 

behind the throne and 



competently ruled in his 

place. 


Shah Jahan

 

5 January 



1592 

1627


1658 


1666 

Under him, Mughal art and 

architecture reached their 

zenith; constructed the Taj 

Mahal, Jama Masjid, Red 

Fort, Jahangir mausoleum, 

and Shalimar Gardens in 

Lahore. Deposed by his son 

Aurangzeb. 

Aurangzeb

 

21 


October 

1618 


1658

1707 



3 March 

1707 


He reinterpreted Islamic law 

and presented the Fatawa-

e-Alamgiri; he captured the 

diamond mines of the 

Sultanate of Golconda; he 

spent the major part of his 

last 27 years in the war with 

the Maratha rebels; at its 

zenith, his conquests 

expanded the empire to its 

greatest extent; the over-

stretched empire was 

controlled by Mansabdars, 

and faced challenges after 

his death. He is known to 

have transcribed copies of 

the Qur'an using his own 

styles of calligraphy. He 

died during a campaign 

against the ravaging 

Marathas in the Deccan. 

Bahadur Shah I

 

14 


October 

1643 


1707

1712 



Feb 1712 

First of the Mughal 

emperors to preside over an 

empire ravaged by 

uncontrollable revolts. After 

his reign, the empire went 

into steady decline due to 

the lack of leadership 

qualities among his 

immediate successors. 

Jahandar Shah

 

1664 



1712

1713 



Feb 1713 

Was an unpopular 

incompetent titular 

figurehead; 

Furrukhsiyar

 

1683 



1713

1719 



1719 

His reign marked the 

ascendancy of the 


 

178 | 

P a g e


 

 

manipulative Syed Brothers, 



execution of the rebellious 

Banda. In 1717 he granted 

a Firman to the English East 

India Company granting 

them duty-free trading rights 

in Bengal. The Firman was 

repudiated by the notable 

Murshid Quli Khan the 

Mughal appointed ruler of 

Bengal. 


Rafi Ul-Darjat

 

Unknown 



1719 

1719 


  

Rafi Ud-Daulat

 

Unknown 


1719 

1719 


  

Nikusiyar

 

Unknown 


1719 

1743 


  

Muhammad Ibrahim

 

Unknown 


1720 

1744 


  

Muhammad Shah

 

1702 


1719

1720, 



1720

1748 



1748 

Got rid of the Syed 

Brothers. Tried to counter 

the emergence of the 

Marathas but his empire 

disintegrated. Suffered the 

invasion of Nadir-Shah of 

Persia in 1739.  

Ahmad Shah Bahadur

 

1725 



1748

54 



1775 

 

Alamgir II



 

1699 


1754

1759 



1759 

He was murdered by the 

Vizier Imad-ul-Mulk and 

Maratha associate 

Sadashivrao Bhau. 

Shah Jahan III

 

Unknown 


In 

1759 


1772 

Was ordained to the 

imperial throne as a result of 

the intricacies in Delhi with 

the help of Imad-ul-Mulk. He 

was later deposed by 

Maratha Sardars.  

Shah Alam II

 

1728 


1759

1806 



1806 

He was proclaimed as 

Mughal Emperor by the 

Marathas. Later, he was 

again recognised as the 

Mughal Emperor by Ahmad 

Shah Durrani after the Third 

Battle of Panipat in 1761. 

1764 saw the defeat of the 

combined forces of Mughal 

Emperor, Nawab of Oudh & 

Nawab of Bengal and Bihar 

at the hand of East India 


 

179 | 

P a g e


 

 

Company at the Battle of 



Buxar. Following this defeat, 

Shah Alam II left Delhi for 

Allahabad, ending hostilities 

with the Treaty of Allahabad 

(1765). Shah Alam II was 

reinstated to the throne of 

Delhi in 1772 by Mahadaji 

Shinde under the protection 

of the Marathas.[49] He was 

a de jure emperor. During 

his reign in 1793 British 

East India company 

abolished Nizamat (Mughal 

suzerainty) and took control 

of the former Mughal 

province of Bengal marking 

the beginning of British 

reign in parts of Eastern 

India officially. 

Akbar Shah II

 

1760 


1806

1837 



1837 

He became a British 

pensioner after the defeat of 

the Marathas, who were the 

protector of the Mughal 

throne, in the Anglo-

Maratha wars . Under East 

India company's protection, 

his imperial name was 

removed from the official 

coinage after a brief dispute 

with the British East India 

Company; 

Bahadur Shah II

 

1775 


1837

1857 



1862 

The last Mughal emperor 

was deposed in 1858 by the 

British East India company 

and exiled to Burma 

following the War of 1857 

after the fall of Delhi to the 

company troops. His death 

marks the end of the 

Mughal dynasty. 



 

Influence on South Asia 

 

180 | 

P a g e


 

 

South Asian art and culture  

 

Taj  Mahal  Built  by  Mughal  emperor  Shah  Jahan  for  his  beloved  wife,  the  Taj 



Mahal is a world-renowned testament to Mughal architecture. 

A  major  Mughal  contribution  to  the  Indian  subcontinent  was  their  unique 

architecture.  Many  monuments  were  built  by  the  Muslim  emperors,  especially  Shah 

Jahan,  during  the  Mughal  era  including  the  UNESCO  World  Heritage  Site  Taj  Mahal, 

which  is  known  to  be  one  of  the  finer  examples  of  Mughal  architecture.  Other  World 

Heritage  Sites  include  Humayun's  Tomb,  Fatehpur  Sikri,  the  Red  Fort,  the  Agra  Fort, 

and the Lahore Fort 

The  palaces,  tombs,  and  forts  built  by  the  dynasty  stand  today  in  Agra, 

Aurangabad,  Delhi,  Dhaka,  Fatehpur  Sikri,  Jaipur,  Lahore,  Kabul,  Sheikhupura,  and 

many  other  cities  of  India,  Pakistan,  Afghanistan,  and  Bangladesh.[50]  With  few 

memories of Central Asia, Babur's descendants  absorbed traits and customs of South 

Asia, and became more or less naturalized. 

Mughal influence can be seen in cultural contributions such as:[citation needed] 

  Centralized,  imperialistic  government  which  brought  together  many  smaller 



kingdoms.  

  Persian art and culture amalgamated with Indian art and culture.  



  New trade routes to Arab and Turkic lands. 

  The development of Mughlai cuisine.  



  Mughal Architecture found its way into local Indian architecture, most conspicuously 

in the palaces built by Rajputs and Sikh rulers. 

  Landscape and Mughal gardening 



Although the land the Mughals once ruled has separated into what is now India, 

Pakistan,  Bangladesh,  and  Afghanistan,  their  influence  can  still  be  seen  widely  today. 

Tombs of the emperors are spread throughout India, Afghanistan,[55] and Pakistan. 

The  Mughal  artistic  tradition  was  eclectic,  borrowing  from  the  European 

Renaissance  as  well  as  from  Persian  and  Indian  sources.  Kumar  concludes,  "The 

Mughal  painters  borrowed  individual  motifs  and  certain  naturalistic  effects  from 

Renaissance  and  Mannerist  painting,  but  their  structuring  principle  was  derived  from 

Indian and Persian traditions."  



Urdu language 

Although  Persian  was  the  dominant  and  "official"  language  of  the  empire,  the 

language of the elite later evolved into a form known as  Urdu.  Highly Persianized and 

also influenced by Arabic and Turkic, the language was written in a type of Perso-Arabic 



 

181 | 

P a g e


 

 

script known as Nastaliq, and with literary conventions and specialised vocabulary being 



retained from Persian, Arabic and Turkic; the new dialect was eventually given its own 

name  of  Urdu.  Compared  with  Hindi,  the  Urdu  language  draws  more  vocabulary  from 

Persian and Arabic (via Persian) and (to a much lesser degree) from Turkic languages 

where  Hindi  draws  vocabulary  from  Sanskrit  more  heavily.  Modern  Hindi,  which  uses 

Sanskrit-based  vocabulary  along  with  Urdu  loan  words  from  Persian  and  Arabic,  is 

mutually intelligible with Urdu. Today, Urdu is the national language of Pakistan and one 

of the official languages in India. 

Mughal society 

The  Indian  economy  remained  as  prosperous  under  the  Mughals  as  it  was, 

because  of  the  creation  of  a  road  system  and  a  uniform  currency,  together  with  the 

unification  of  the  country.  Manufactured  goods  and  peasant-grown  cash  crops  were 

sold throughout the world. Key industries included shipbuilding (the Indian shipbuilding 

industry was as advanced as the European, and Indians sold ships to European firms), 

textiles, and steel. The Mughals maintained a small fleet, which merely carried pilgrims 

to Mecca, imported a few Arab horses in Surat. Debal in Sindh was mostly autonomous. 

The Mughals also maintained various river fleets of  Dhows,  which transported soldiers 

over rivers and fought rebels. Among its admirals were  Yahya Saleh, Munnawar Khan, 

and  Muhammad  Saleh  Kamboh.  The  Mughals  also  protected  the  Siddis  of  Janjira.  Its 

sailors were renowned and often voyaged to China and the East African Swahili Coast, 

together with some Mughal subjects carrying out private-sector trade. 

Cities  and  towns  boomed  under  the  Mughals;  however,  for  the  most  part,  they 

were military and political centres, not manufacturing or commerce centres. Only those 

guilds  which  produced  goods  for  the  bureaucracy  made  goods  in  the  towns;  most 

industry  was  based  in  rural  areas.  The  Mughals  also  built  Maktabs  in  every  province 

under  their  authority,  where  youth  were  taught  the  Quran and  Islamic  law  such  as  the 

Fatawa-e-Alamgiri in their indigenous languages. 

The Bengal region was especially prosperous from the time of its takeover by the 

Mughals in 1590 to the seizure of control by the British East India Company in 1757. In 

a  system  where  most  wealth  was  hoarded  by  the  elites,  wages  were  low  for  manual 

labour.  Slavery  was  limited  largely  to  household  servants.  However,  some  religious 

cults proudly asserted a high status for manual labour.  



Science and technology 

Astronomy 

While  there  appears  to  have  been  little  concern  for  theoretical  astronomy, 

Mughal  astronomers  continued  to  make  advances  in  observational  astronomy  and 

produced  nearly  a  hundred  Zij  treatises.  Humayun  built  a  personal  observatory  near 

Delhi. The instruments and observational techniques used at the Mughal observatories 


 

182 | 

P a g e


 

 

were mainly derived from the Islamic tradition. In particular, one of the most remarkable 



astronomical instruments invented in Mughal India is the seamless celestial globe. 

 

Alchemy 

Sake Dean Mahomed had learned much of Mughal Alchemy and understood the 

techniques used to produce various alkali and soaps to produce shampoo. He was also 

a  notable  writer  who  described  the  Mughal  Emperor  Shah  Alam  II  and  the  cities  of 

Allahabad  and  Delhi  in  rich  detail  and  also  made  note  of  the  glories  of  the  Mughal 

Empire. 


Sake  Dean  Mahomed  was  appointed  as  shampooing  surgeon  to  both  Kings 

George IV and William IV.  



Technology 

Fathullah  Shirazi  (c.  1582),  a  Persian  polymath  and  mechanical  engineer  who 

worked for Akbar, developed a volley gun.  

Akbar  was  the  first  to  initiate  and  use  metal  cylinder  rockets  known  as  bans 

particularly against War elephants, during the Battle of Sanbal.  

In  the  year  1657,  the  Mughal  Army  used  rockets  during  the  Siege  of  Bidar.[68] 

Prince  Aurangzeb's  forces  discharged  rockets  and  grenades  while  scaling  the  walls. 

Sidi Marjan was mortally wounded when a rocket struck his large gunpowder depot, and 

after twenty-seven days of hard fighting Bidar was captured by the victorious Mughals.  

Later,  the  Mysorean  rockets  were  upgraded  versions  of  Mughal  rockets  used 

during the Siege of Jinji by the progeny of the Nawab of Arcot. Hyder Ali's father Fatah 

Muhammad the constable at Budikote, commanded a corps consisting of 50 rocketmen 

(Cushoon)  for  the  Nawab  of  Arcot.  Hyder  Ali  realised  the  importance  of  rockets  and 

introduced advanced versions of metal cylinder rockets. These rockets turned fortunes 

in favour of the Sultanate of Mysore during the Second Anglo-Mysore War, particularly 

during the Battle of Pollilur. 

 

 

 



 

 

183 | 

P a g e


 

 

Maratha Empire (1674



1818)  


 

Nomenclature 

The  Maratha  Empire  is  also  referred  to  as  the  Maratha  Confederacy.  The 

historian  Barbara  Ramusack  says  that  the  former  is  a  designation  preferred  by  Indian 

nationalists, while the latter was that used by British historians. She notes 

Neither  term  is  fully  accurate  since  one  implies  a  substantial  degree  of 

centralisation and the other signifies some surrender of power to a central government 

and  a  longstanding  core  of  political  administrators.  Maratha  power  was  fragmented 

among several discreet fragments.  

Although, at present the word Maratha refers to a particular caste of warriors and 

peasants,  in  the  past  the  word  has  been  used  to  describe  Marathi  people,  including 

Marathas themselves.  

History 

The  empire  had  its  head  in  the  Chhatrapati  as  de  jure  but  the  de  facto 

governance was in the hands of the Peshwas after death of Shahu and with the death 

of  Madhavrao  -  I,  various  chiefs  played  the  role  of  the  de  facto  rulers  in  their  own 

regions. The details are as below. 

Shivaji and his descendants 

From Shivaji to Shahu, spanning almost over 108 years, from 1642( sacred oath 

of shivaji) to 1749(death of shahu), chhatrapatis laid the foundation of the empire. From 

initial  2000  cavalry  to  100000  foot  soldiers/cavalry  was  raised  with  a  sound 

administration.  They  defeated  adilshah  and  mughals  in  a  protracted  long  war  .  And 

made the ground for future expansion. A number of forts were newly constructed or own 

dotting  the  entire  west  coast.  Further  navy  was  hallmark  of  royal  period.  With  liberal 

attitude of this royal family, marathas rose as a single socio-political force consisting of 

all castes and creeds. Sanskrit and vedic learning regained its lost charm almost after a 

gap 0f 400 years . A number of Sanskrit works came into being . A briefline of this royal 

period is as below. 

Shivaji 

Early life 

Birth 


 

184 | 

P a g e


 

 

Shivaji  was  born  in  the  hill-fort of  Shivneri  near  the  city  of  Junnar. While  Jijabai 



was pregnant, she had prayed the local deity (devi) called "Shivai" for the good of her 

expected child. Shivaji was named after this local deity.  



 

 

Birth date 

The exact birthdate of Shivaji has been a matter of dispute among the historians. 

The Government of Maharashtra accepts the 3rd day of the dark half of Phalguna, 1551 

of Saka calendar (Friday, 19 February 1630) as the official birthdate of Shivaji. This date 

is  supported  by  several  other  historians  including  Dr.  Bal  Krishna.  A  horoscope  of 

Shivaji  found  in  the  possession  of  Pandit  Mithalal  Vyas  of  Jodhpur  also  supports  this 

birthdate.  According  to  Setu  Madhavrao  Pagdi,  Shivaji's  court  poet  Paramanand  has 

also mentioned Shivaji birth date as 19 February 1630.  

However,  some  other  historians  such  as  Jadunath  Sarkar  and  Rao  Bahadur 

Sardesai believed that Shivaji was born in 1627. The various suggested dates include: 

  the  second  day  of  the  light  half  of  Vaisakha  in  the  year  1549  of 



Saka calendar i.e. Thursday, 6 April 1627.  

  10 April 1627 



  May 1627 

Sarkar believed that there are no contemporary reliable records of Shivaji's exact 

birth date and boyhood, and the bakhars composed years after his birth contain several 

unreliable  anecdotes.  Dr.  Bal  Krishna  rejects  the  date  suggested  by  Sarkar,  criticizing 

him for over dependence on 91-Qalmi Bakhar (composed in 1760s) and Shivadigvijaya 

Bakhar (composed in 1818).  

Parents 

Shivaji's father Shahaji was the leader of a band of mercenaries that serviced the 

Deccan  Sultanates.  His  mother  was  Jijabai,  the  daughter  of  Lakhujirao  Jadhav  of 

Sindkhed. 

Shivaji  was  the  fifth  son  born  to  Jijabai,  three  of  whom  had  died  as  infants; 

Shivaji's elder brother Sambhaji (not to be confused with his son Sambhaji) was the only 

one to have survived. While Shivaji was accompanied mostly by his mother, Sambhaji 

lived with his father Shahaji at present day Bangalore. 

During  the  period  of  Shivaji's  birth,  the  power  in  Deccan  was  shared  by  three 

Sultanates 

  Bijapur,  Golkonda,  Ahmadnagar.  Most  of  the  then  Marathas  forces  had 



pledged  their  loyalties  to  one  of  these  Sultanates  and  were  engaged  in  a  continuous 

 

185 | 

P a g e


 

 

game  of  mutual  alliances  and  aggression.  Legend  has  it  that  Shivaji's  paternal 



grandfather Maloji Bhosale was insulted by Lakhujirao Jadhav, a sardar in Nizamshahi 

of  Ahmadnagar,  who  refused  to  give  his  daughter  Jijabai  in  marriage  to  Shahaji.  This 

inspired  Maloji  to  greater  conquests  to  obtain  a  higher  stature  and  an  important  role 

under Nizamshahi, something that eventually led him to achieving the title of mansabdar 

(military  commander  and  an  imperial  administrator).  Leveraging  this  new  found 

recognition and power, he was able to convince Lakhujirao Jadhav to give his daughter 

in marriage to his son Shahaji. 

Shahaji  following  in  the  footsteps  of  his  father,  began  service  with  the  young 

Nizamshah  of  Ahmednagar  and  together  with  Malik  Amber,  Nizam's  minister,  he  won 

back most of the districts for the Nizamshah from the Mughals who had gained it during 

their  attack  of  1600.  Thereafter,  Lakhujirao  Jadhav,  Shahaji's  father-in-law,  attacked 

Shahaji  at  the  Mahuli  fort  and  laid  a  siege.  Shahaji  was  accompanied  by  Jijabai,  who 

was four months pregnant. After seeing no relief coming from Nizam, Shahaji decided to 

vacate the fort and planned his escape. He sent Jijabai off to the safety of Shivneri fort, 

which  was  under  his  control.  It  was  here  at  Shivneri  that  Shivaji  was  born.  In  the 

meanwhile,  suspecting  his  disloyalty,  Lakhujirao  Jadhav  and  his  three  sons  were 

murdered by the Nizamshah in his court when they came to join his forces. Unsettled by 

this  incident,  Shahaji  Raje  decided  to  part  ways  with  the  Nizamshahi  Sultanate  and 

raise the banner of independence and establish an independent kingdom. 

After  this  episode  Ahmednagar  fell  to  the  Mughal  emperor  Shah  Jahan,  and 

shortly  thereafter  Shahaji  responded  by  attacking  the  Mughal  garrison  there  and 

regained control of this region again. In response the Mughals sent a much larger force 

in 1635 to recover the area back and forced Shahaji to retreat into Mahuli. The result of 

this was that  Adilshah of Bijapur agreed to pay tribute to the Mughals in  return for the 

authority  to  rule  this  region  in  1636.  Thereafter,  Shahaji  was  inducted  by  Adilshah  of 

Bijapur  and  was  offered  a  distant  jagir  (landholding)  at  present-day  Bangalore,  but  he 

was  allowed  to  keep  his  old  land  tenures  and  holdings  in  Pune.  Shahaji  thus  kept 

changing his loyalty among Nizamshah, Adilshah and the Mughals but always kept his 

jagir at Pune and his small force of men with him. 

Relation with parents 

All  historical  accounts  agree  that  Shivaji  was  extremely  devoted  to  his  mother 

Jijabai.  His father  Shahaji's  affection  and  wealth  were  directed more  towards  his  step-

brother Vyankoji.  

During  the  1630s,  Shahaji  was  involved  in  campaigns  against  the  Deccan 

Sultanates and the Mughals. In October 1636,  he had to cede Shivneri to the Mughals 

as per a peace treaty. He retained the control of his ancestral  jagir of Pune and Supa. 

This ancestral jagir was formerly held under Nizam Shah, but in 1636, Shahaji entered 

the  service  of  Adil  Shah  of  Bijapur.  According  to  Tarikh-i-Shivaji,  Shahaji  placed  this 

jagir  under  Dadoji  Konddeo,  who  had  shown  good  administrative  skills  as  the  kulkarni 

(land-steward) of Malthan. He asked Konddeo to bring Jijabai and Shivaji from Shivneri 


 



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   ...   62


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling