Moscow, Russian Federation September 21, 2007


Download 4.8 Kb.

bet19/43
Sana29.11.2017
Hajmi4.8 Kb.
1   ...   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   ...   43

As at December 31,
Currency
Effective interest rate
Due
2006
2005
2004
(in millions of RUB)
Bonds issued by subsidiaries:
RAO HO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RUB
5%-10%
2005
3,000
FSK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RUB
7.2%-8.8%
2007 - 2010
30,000
19,000
5,000
Mosenergo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RUB
7.65%
2016
10,000

MOESK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RUB
8.00%
2011
6,000

OGK-5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RUB
8.00%
2011
5,000

HydroOGK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RUB
8.10%
2011
5,000

Lenenergo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RUB
10.00%
2007
3,000
3,000
3,000
OGK-3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RUB
7.00%
2010
3,000

Sverdlovenergo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RUB
10.5%-11.5%
2007
500
278
359
Altayenergo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RUB
18%
2005
600
Other bonds issued by subsidiaries . . . .

400
400
62,500
22,678
12,359
Long-term debts payable to:
EBRD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RUB
MosPrime + 2.15%
2013
5,000

EBRD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RUB
8.42%-9.32%
2016-2020
6,300

EBRD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
EUR
EURIBOR + 4.25%
2010

1,231
EBRD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
EUR
EURIBOR 6.858%
2006-2010
972
EBRD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
EUR
6%-7.53%
2012-2015
276
1,977
EBRD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
USD
MosPrime + 2.75%
2012
1,050
EBRD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
USD
MosPrime + 4%
2017
750

EBRD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
USD
MosPrime + 3. 15%
2017
1,250

EBRD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
USD
MosPrime + 2%
2017
1,750

EBRD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
USD
MosPrime + 2.5%
2018
900

EBRD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
USD
MosPrime + 3.5%
2012
1,500
EBRD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
USD
LIBOR + 3.5%
2007
432
906
EBRD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
USD
LIBOR + 4%
2009
267
647
EBRD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
USD
5%-7%
2007-2009
1,498
Alpha-Bank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RUB
10%-12%
2006-2008
6,863
298
Gazprombank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RUB
9.8%-10%
2007-2008
1,555
387
Sberbank. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RUB
10%-14.5%
2006-2011
6,085
4,182
2,802
Clovery PLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
USD
7.75%
2008
3,950

Municipal authority of Kamchatka
region . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
USD
LIBOR + 3%
2034
2,236
2,459
2,772
Nomos-Bank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RUB
10%-14%
2006-2008
1,197
440
24
Vneshtorgbank. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RUB
11%-15%
2006-2007
3,478
1,020
50
Bank Credit Suisse First Boston. . . . .
USD
RF30 + 2.5%
2010
731
1,119
Natexis bank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
USD
LIBOR + 2.5%
2008
395
432
Other Russian banks . . . . . . . . . . . .
RUB
10%-15%
2006-2011
12,315
4,751
Nordic Investment Bank . . . . . . . .
EUR
Euribor 6.904%
2012
1,041

MPS Russia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RUB
0%
2009
1,471
Kommertsbank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
USD
9%
2006
1,249
Other long-term debts . . . . . . . . . . .
7,074
3,720
3,223
67,367
21,592
15,066
Finance lease liability . . . . . . . . . . . .
2,997
4,617

Total non-current debt . . . . . . . . . . .
132,864
48,887
27,425
Less: current portion of non-current
debt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
(25,087)
(10,095)
(7,378)
Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
107,777
38,792
20,047
132

The table below shows a schedule of repayment dates of the RAO UES Group’s long-term borrowings
as at December 31, 2006, 2005 and 2004:
2006
2005
2004
(in millions of RUB)
Due for repayment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Between one and two years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
26,423
13,213
4,163
Between two and five years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
52,192
21,442
14,100
After five years. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
29,162
4,137
1,784
Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
107,777
38,792
20,047
133

SUMMARY OF CERTAIN DIFFERENCES BETWEEN U.S. GAAP AND IFRS
The financial information included in this Information Statement is, except where otherwise indicated,
prepared and presented in accordance with IFRS, which differ in certain material respects from
U.S. GAAP. The following is a summary of certain differences that exist between U.S. GAAP and IFRS
as at December 31, 2006, having regard to authoritative pronouncements the adoption of which was
mandatory as of that date. Other standards or pronouncements may have been issued whose adoption is
only mandatory after that date. In addition, the organizations that determine U.S. GAAP and IFRS have
projects on-going that could have a significant impact on future comparisons such as this.
This description is not intended to provide a comprehensive listing of all such differences specifically
related to the RAO UES Group, the Subsidiaries or the industries in which they operate.
The RAO UES Group is responsible for preparing the summary below. Neither the RAO UES Group
nor the Subsidiaries have prepared financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP or prepared a
reconciliation of their financial statements to U.S. GAAP and related footnote disclosure and have not
qualified such differences and, accordingly, neither the RAO UES Group nor the Subsidiaries can offer
any assurances that the summary is complete or the differences described below would, in fact, be the
accounting principles creating the greatest differences between financial statements of the RAO UES
Group or the Subsidiaries, as the case may be, prepared under U.S. GAAP and under IFRS. In addition,
neither the RAO UES Group nor the Subsidiaries can estimate the net effect that applying U.S. GAAP
would have on their respective results of operations or financial position, or any component thereof, in
any of the presentations of financial information in this Information Statement or elsewhere. However,
the effect of such differences may be material, and in particular, it may be that the total shareholders’
equity, and net profit prepared on the basis of U.S. GAAP would be materially different due to these
differences.
Shareholders should consult their own professional advisors for an understanding of the differences
between IFRS and U.S. GAAP, and how those differences might affect the financial information herein
and elsewhere.
U.S. GAAP is generally more restrictive and comprehensive than IFRS regarding recognition and
measurement of transactions, account classification and disclosure requirements. No attempt has been
made to identify all disclosure, presentation or classification differences that would affect the manner in
which transactions and events are presented in the financial statements or the notes thereto.
IFRS
U.S. GAAP
Depreciation of property, plant and equipment
The depreciable amount of an item of property,
plant and equipment must be allocated on a
systematic basis over its useful life, reflecting the
pattern in which the asset’s benefits are consumed
by the entity. Any changes in the depreciation
method used are treated as a change in accounting
estimate reflected in the depreciation charge for the
current and prospective periods.
Similar to IFRS, except that U.S. GAAP classifies
a change in the depreciation method as a change
in accounting policy. The cumulative effect of
the change is then reflected in the current year’s
statement of operations.
Impairment of assets
An entity must assess annually whether there are
any indications that an asset may be impaired. If
there is any such indication, the assets must be
tested for impairment. An impairment loss must be
recognized in the statement of operations when an
asset’s carrying amount exceeds its recoverable
amount.
Similar to IFRS except that for assets to be held
and used, impairment is first measured by
reference to undiscounted cash flows. If
impairment exists the entity must measure
impairment by comparing the asset’s carrying
value to its fair value. If there is no impairment
by reference to undiscounted cash flows, no
further action is required but the useful life of
the asset must be reconsidered.
134

IFRS
U.S. GAAP
The impairment loss is the difference between the
asset’s carrying amount and its recoverable amount.
The recoverable amount is the higher of the asset’s
fair value less costs to sell and its value in use.
Value in use is the future cash flows to be derived
from the particular asset, discounted to present
value using a pre-tax market determined rate that
reflects the current assessment of the time value of
money and the risks specific to the asset.
The impairment loss is based on the asset’s fair
value, being either market value (if an active
market for the asset exists) or the sum of
discounted future cash flows. The discount rate
reflects the risk specific to that asset.
An impairment loss recognized for an asset should
be reversed if there has been a change in the
estimates used to determine the asset’s recoverable
amount since the last impairment loss was
recognized, in which case, the carrying amount of
the asset should be increased to its recoverable
amount.
For assets to be disposed of, the loss recognized
is the excess of the asset’s carrying amount over
its fair value less cost to sell. Such assets are not
depreciated or amortized during the selling
period. Prohibits reversals of impairment losses
for assets to be held and used. Subsequent
revisions, both increases and decreases, to the
carrying amount of an asset to be disposed, must
be reported as adjustments to the carrying
amount of the asset but limited by the carrying
amount at the date the decision to dispose of the
asset is made.
Business combinations
Business
combinations
initiated
after
March 31, 2004, are acquisitions and accounted for
in accordance with one method — the purchase
method.
Before
March
31,
2004,
business
combinations accounted for as acquisitions were
the most common method of accounting for a
business combination, as the use of the uniting of
interests method was severely restricted.
All
business
combinations
initiated
after
June 30, 2001 are acquisitions and accounted for
in accordance with one method — the purchase
method.
Before
June
30,
2001,
business
combinations were accounted for using either
the purchase method or the pooling-of interests
method.
The date of acquisition is the date on which the
acquirer obtains control over the acquired entity.
The date of acquisition is the date on which
assets are received or securities are issued.
The purchase method records the assets and
liabilities of the acquired entity at fair value. The
cost of acquisition is the amount of cash or cash
equivalents (or fair value of non-monetary assets
exchanged).
Similar to IFRS.
Minority interest at acquisition stated at minority’s
share of the fair value of acquired identifiable
assets, liabilities and contingent liabilities.
Minority interests at acquisition stated at
minority’s share of pre-acquisition carrying value
of net assets.
The identification and measurement of acquiree’s
identifiable
assets,
liabilities
and
contingent
liabilities are reassessed. Any excess remaining
after reassessment is recognized in statement of
operations immediately.
Any excess after reassessment is used to reduce
proportionately the fair values assigned to non-
current assets (with certain exceptions). Any
remaining excess is recognized in the statement
of operations immediately as an extraordinary
gain.
135

IFRS
U.S. GAAP
Fair value determined on a provisional basis can be
adjusted against goodwill within 12 months of the
acquisition date. Subsequent adjustments are
recorded in income statement unless they are to
correct an error.
Similar to IFRS. Once fair value allocation is
finalized, no further changes are permitted except
for the resolution of know pre-acquisition
contingencies. The adjustments made during the
allocation period related to data for which
management was waiting to complete the
allocation are recorded against goodwill.
Inventories
Carried at the lower of cost or net realizable value
(being sale proceeds less all further costs to bring
the inventories to completion). Reversal is required
for a subsequent increase in value of inventory
previously written down.
Broadly consistent with IFRS, in that the lower
of cost and market value is used to value
inventories. Market value is defined as being
current replacement cost subject to an upper
limit of net realizable value and a lower limit of
net realizable value. Reversal of a provision for
inventory previously written down is prohibited.
LIFO method of determining inventory cost is
prohibited.
LIFO method of determining inventory cost is
permitted.
Taxation
Current and deferred taxes are measured based on
tax laws and rates that have been enacted or
‘‘substantively enacted’’ by the balance sheet date.
In some jurisdictions, announcements of tax rates
(and tax laws) by the government have the
substantive effect of actual enactment, which may
follow the announcement by a period of several
months. In these circumstances, tax assets and
liabilities are measured using the announced tax
rate (and tax laws).
Current and deferred taxes are measured using
enacted tax laws and rates. For federal tax
purposes in the United States, the enactment
date is the date that the president signs the tax
law. Enactment of a new tax law is viewed as a
discrete event of the period of enactment.
Restructured liabilities
Liabilities are remeasured (extinguished) and gain
or loss recognized when there is a significant
modification of terms.
Liabilities are remeasured and gain or loss
recognized in accordance with EITF 96-19,
‘‘Debtors Accounting for a Modification in
Exchange of Debt Instruments’’, which is more
restrictive than IFRS concerning what represents
a significant modification of terms.
Deferred tax assets
Deferred tax assets are recognized when it is
probable that future taxable profits will be available
against which the deferred tax asset can be utilized.
The carrying amount of the deferred tax asset is
reviewed at each balance sheet date and reduced if
appropriate.
Similar to IFRS but recognize all deferred tax
assets and provide a valuation allowance if is
more likely than not that some portion, or all, of
the deferred tax asset will not be realized. There
are
a
number
of
specific
differences
in
application.
Segment reporting
Report primary and secondary (business and
geographic) segments based on risks and returns.
Report based on internal reporting segments.
Operating segments are those business activities
for which discrete information is available, and
whose operating results are regularly reviewed
by the entity’s chief operating decision maker in
determining resource allocation and assessing
performance.
136

INDUSTRY OVERVIEW
Size
The power sector is one of Russia’s key industries, and was responsible for 11% of its gross domestic
product (‘‘GDP’’) in 2006. Russia’s power sector is among the largest in the world, ranking fourth in terms
of both installed electric capacity and electricity output, after the U.S., China and Japan, in 2006.
Country
Installed electric
capacity, GW (2006)
Country
Electricity output, bln
kW/h (2006)
1. USA
1
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1,050
1. USA
4
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4,254
2. China
2
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
508
2. China
4
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2,834
3. Japan
3
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
273
3. Japan
4
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1,150
4. Russia
1
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
221
4. Russia
4
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
993
5. Canada
3
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
123
5. India
4
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
727
6. India
2
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
115
6. Germany
4
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
636
7. France
3
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
112
7. Canada
4
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
584
8. Germany
2
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
110
8. France
4
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
571
9. Brazil
1
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
89
9. Brazil
4
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
419
10. U.K.
1
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
80
10. South Korea
4
. . . . . . . . . . .
416
Source: (1) The World Alliance for Decentralised Energy, (2) The Institute of Electrical Engineers of Japan, (3) The International
Atomic Energy Agency, (4) BP Statistical Review of World Energy June 2007.
Electricity Generation
The electricity generation industry of Russia consists primarily of:
• thermal power plants (fossil-fuel-powered plants, including natural gas, coal and fuel oil-fired plants,
producing either electricity or both electricity and heat). They include in particular the 14 TGKs and
six OGKs, in which most of Russia’s thermal generation capacity is currently consolidated;
• approximately 102 hydro power plants (water-powered plants producing electricity). Approximately
half of Russia’s hydro power plants are to be consolidated into a single holding company, the
HydroOGK; and
• approximately ten nuclear power plants (nuclear-powered plants producing electricity). All Russian
nuclear power plants are currently owned by the state and operated by Rosenergoatom.
See ‘‘—Current Market Structure — Power Generation Companies — Rosenergoatom’’.
In 2006, thermal power plants, hydro power plants and nuclear power plants accounted for approximately
66.7%, 17.6% and 15.7%, respectively, of Russia’s electricity generation according to RAO UES. The
installed electric capacity of thermal power plants, hydro power plants and nuclear power plants is
currently 150.4 thousand MW, 46.3 thousand MW and 23.3 thousand MW, respectively, which represented
68.4%, 21.0% and 10.6% of the capacity in Russia, according to Minpromenergo, the Ministry of Industry
and Energy of the Russian Federation.
In 2006, Russia’s total installed electric capacity was 221 thousand MW according to Minpromenergo. Of
this, the RAO UES Group accounted for 159.2 thousand MW or 72.1% according to RAO UES. In 2006,
the installed electric capacity of the RAO UES Group comprised: OGKs, which provided 74.8 thousand
MW, representing 47.0% of the RAO UES Group’s installed electric capacity; TGKs, which provided
54.3 thousand MW, representing 34.1% of the RAO UES Group’s installed electric capacity; and other
sources, which provided 30.1 thousand MW, representing 18.9% of the RAO UES Group’s installed
electric capacity.
Following the collapse of the Soviet Union, Russia experienced a decline in electricity output from
1,068.2 bln kW/h in 1991 to 827.2 bln kW/h in 1998, according to the BP Statistical Review of World
Energy (June 2007). Since 1998, electricity output in Russia has been growing at an average annual
137

growth rate of approximately 2.4% and the rate of increase accelerated to 4.5% in 2006 according to the
BP Statistical Review of World Energy (June 2007) and RAO UES. The table below illustrates this
growth between 2003 and 2006.
Electricity output (in bln kW/h)
2003
2004
2005
2006
Russia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
916.3
931.9
953.1
995.6
Thermal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
608.3
609.4
629.2
664.1
Hydro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
157.7
177.8
174.4
175.0
Nuclear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
150.3
144.7
149.5
156.5

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   ...   43


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling