Domaine le roc des anges, roussillon


Download 6.21 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet57/87
Sana21.11.2017
Hajmi6.21 Mb.
1   ...   53   54   55   56   57   58   59   60   ...   87

 

 

 


 

 - 260 - 



TOSCANA 

Continued… 

 

 

 



 

IL PARADISO DI MANFREDI, MONTALCINO, Toscana – Biodynamic  

Il Paradiso di Manfredi is a tiny estate of 2.5 ha in the heart of Montalcino. In the 50s Manfredi worked for the famous 

Biondi Santi estate. In 1958 he bought Il Paradiso di Manfredi where there were more olive trees than vines and indeed in 

that period in Montalcino the olive oil production was higher than the wine production. 

Initially they were harvesting around10000 kg of olives each year but at the beginning of the 60’s a big freeze destroyed 

all the olive trees and Manfredi decided to replant everything with vines. 

 

In 1982 Manfredi died, and Florio, Manfred’s son in law, decided to work on the estate full time. 

Florio had always been passionate about wine and helped Manfredi, but his main job hitherto had been as a maths 

teacher. 

 

Il Paradiso di Manfredi today is one of the best expressions of traditional Brunello di Montalcino. Viticulture and vineyard 

rhythm is effectively biodynamic. Pesticides and weedkillers are eschewed, the waxing and waning of the moon determines 

activity in the vineyard and the winery. They hand-pick the grapes (yields are around 42hl/ha) ,the wild ferment takes 

place in concrete vats (no temperature control… ) after which the wine spends 36/40 months in big casks of Slavonia oak 

(25/ /30 hl ). By law a Brunello di Montalcino may be ready for the market in January five years after the harvest … for 

Florio a Brunello is ready when… it is ready. Truly a Grolsch moment. For example, they are now releasing together 2002 

and 2000 vintages and bottling the prized 2001 vintage just for us, because we are the sort of impatient school kids who 

just can’t wait for a good thing. Florio also produces a Rosso di Montalcino from the same vineyard… the only difference 

between the two wines is the period that it spends in wood (usually ten to twelve months). 

 

The wines are everything you hope for great Sangiovese displaying wicked wild cherry fruit along with notes of herbs, 

leather, liquorice, pepper and spice and nascent prune, tar and tobacco aromas. It’s so savoury that the food you are 

thinking of cooks and present itself at the table. 

 

2015 


ROSSO DI MONTALCINO 

 



2010 

BRUNELLO DI MONTALCINO 

 

2008 



BRUNELLO DI MONTALCINO – magnum 

 



2007 

BRUNELLO DI MONTALCINO RISERVA 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

The Vine – ‘Cometh the full grape cluster on the vine. The rain falleth. Clusters thicken, purple they are as bruises, as 

thunder, yet each grape containeth within itself a measure of joy and dancing, the quick merry blood of the earth. 

 

The Grape Harvest - ‘Cometh at last the hour of full ripeness. Labourers toil all day, they cram the baskets, their arms are 

red. The master of the vineyard, he goeth about the streets in the last of the sun, bargaining as such as sit idle against the 

wall and them that throw dice in the dust. For the grape harvest must be ingathered. 

 

The Treading of the Grapes – ‘And he that presseth the hoarded grapes, look, his breast and his thighs are red, as though 

he had endured a terrible battle, himself scatheless. And still more and more grapes are brought to the press where he 

laboureth, this hero. 

 

Wine – ‘Now it standeth long, the vat, in a cellar under earth, as it were in a cold grave. Yet this is in no wise a station of 

death. Put thy ear against the vat, thou hearest a ceaseless murmur, a slow full suspiration. The juice is clothing itself in 

sound, in song, in psalmody. 

 

From A Treading of Grapes – George MacKay Brown 



 

 


 

 - 261 - 



TOSCANA 

Continued… 

 

Five qualities there are wine’s praise advancing; 

Strong, beautiful, fragrant, cool and dancing. 

 

Sir John Harington 



 

 

PIAN DELL’ORINO, CAROLINE POBITZER & JAN HENDRIK ERBACH, MONTALCINO, Toscana – 

Biodynamic  

This estate is adjacent to the Biondi Santi property and the area has a long history of being particularly suited for 

growing grapes for high quality wines. “Our love for Tuscany and passion for viticulture binds us particularly to this 

land, our vines and the resulting wines”. The wines come from four different vineyards that add up to a total area of six 

hectares.  

 

Right from the beginning Caroline and Jan studied the soil and the structure of each vineyard in order to fully understand 

its characteristics. Fossils, petrified shells and chalk sediment all testify to the earth’s

 

evolutions and recount marine 

flooding and periods of drought in the area. 

 

To preserve the special identity of their vineyards they assiduously follow organic practises. Farming is only organic if it 

respects and protects the complex correlations and the equilibrium of a habitat. From the start the goal is to create and 

sustain the maximum harmony possible between vineyard, climate, soil and mankind. They encapsulate their philosophy 

thus: “Energy has great importance in the organisation of our daily work. In particular the phases of the moon – which 

affect nature and the life of all creatures, regulate growth and reinforce quality – are an important point of reference on 

our decision making.

 

Our vines have never been treated with herbicides, chemical pesticides, insecticides or soluble 

mineral fertilisers. Their immune system is reinforced by special infusions that we make with nettles, equisetum and 

yarrow and biodynamic preparations. We use propolis to protect the vine from infections caused by fungi and bacteria. 

We plant many kinds of grasses, including aromatic varieties, in order to encourage biodiversity, maintain the contents of 

the humus and improve the soil structure. In our vineyards bees and butterflies have an infinite choice of beautiful 

flowers. 

 

“Our goal is to fully understand the diverse

 

characteristics of the vineyards that we cultivate. To this end we separate the 

grapes picked from each vineyard during the vinification in order to make separate wines. The work we do in the 

vineyards is an important way of getting to know the vines themselves at close hand. “Our shared mother is the land that 

nourishes us, and together we grow with what she offers” (Béla Hamvas).  

 

“We are very attached to the land on which our vineyards grow. The soil itself gives us strength and

 

inspires us to respect 

nature and the environment. The grapes are pruned between flowering and their changing colour, leaving no more than 

four

 

bunches per vine. Before the harvest, the grapes are controlled once again on the vine in order to eliminate any 

single grape that is mouldy due to meteorological conditions or imperfect in any way. This same control is repeated 

throughout the harvest.”  

 

Bravo, you may say and you would be correct. The mature and carefully selected grapes are picked by hand and taken to 

the cellar in crates that contain only twenty kilos each. The final selection takes place on a large table, before the grapes 

are placed in the de-stemmer and, at last, into the barrels for vinification. 

The fermentation at Pian dell’Orino is induced by naturally occurring yeasts from the grape skins. Spontaneous 

fermentation starts between one and three days from the harvest, depending on the vintage. No extra yeasts, no industrial 

enzymes or further additives are used. 

Brunello di Montalcino

 

is made from 100% Sangiovese Grosso. Before harvest, the

 

grapes are

 

individually checked on 

the vines and cluster thinning is done. During harvest, the grapes are checked once more on a large table before being 

destalked and placed in the fermentation bins. Then the grapes are left to macerate for a certain period, according to the 

vintage. Spontaneous fermentation starts and the temperature is automatically controlled so that it does not exceed 34°C. 

The must macerates for three to five weeks, depending on the vintage, in order to obtain greater concentration and 

structure in the young wine.

 

The wine is then transferred to wooden oak barrels of 25 hectolitres where the malolactic 

fermentation takes effect. After 2 – 3 years of maturing in the barrels, when the wine becomes stabilized and appears 

brilliant, it is bottled without filtration. The wine is left to mature in the bottle for at least one year before labelling and 

release. The Rosso di

 

Montalcino is made from pure Sangiovese. The grapes are selected in the same way as for the 

Brunello di Montalcino. The difference is found in the wine-making. Spontaneous fermentation starts after one or two 

days of maceration. The temperature is automatically controlled so that it does not exceed 30°C. The must macerates for 

two or three weeks, depending on the vintage, in order to obtain mainly fruity flavours and finesse. Once fermentation has 

concluded, the wine is transferred to barriques and small 500-litre barrels, where the malolactic fermentation takes place.

 

After maturing for one year in the barrels, the wine is bottled and kept in the cellar for another three months. 



 

2014 


ROSSO DI MONTALCINO 

 



2011 

BRUNELLO DI MONTALCINO 

 

2010 



BRUNELLO BASSOLINO DI SOPRA 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 - 262 - 

 

 

 



 

 

TOSCANA 

Continued… 

 

 



Assumptions like bigger is better; you can’t stop progress; no speed is too fast; globalization is good. Then we have to replace them with 

some different assumptions: small is beautiful; roots and traditions are worth preserving; variety is the spice of life; the only work worth 

doing is meaningful work; biodiversity is the necessary pre-condition for human survival. 

  

Robert Bateman 



 

 

 



MONTEVERTINE, MARTINO MANETTI, RADDA IN CHIANTI, Toscana  

Montevertine is a small Chianti estate of eleven hectares, first planted in 1967 by Sergio Manetti assisted by legendary 

oenologist Giulio Gambelli. 

 

By 1981 Manetti was finding the DOC Chianti too restrictive (producers were not allowed to use 100% Sangiovese and 

were required to blend in white grape varieties), so he decided instead to produce a premium Tuscan wine that he hoped 

would convey the terroir of his site, particularly with Sangiovese. Thus he withdrew from the Chianti Consorzio, and Le 

Pergole Torte Vino da Tavola was born. Today, his son Martino remains committed to developing Montevertine following 

his father’s recipe: 100% Sangiovese grapes, harvested late, fermented in cement tanks without temperature control, 

macerated on skins for 25 days, then matured in Slavonian oak for 18 months with a further six in French allier barriques. 

 

Eric Asimov, the wine critic for the New York Times, wrote the following about Montevertine and it’s a sentiment we share 

completely: “Sometimes I fall in love with a producer from the moment I first taste his wine. I know, I sound gullible. But 

really, if you can sense a purity, a commitment, and of course deliciousness and complexity, why hold back?” 

Le Pergole Torte is a profound soliloquy for Sangiovese. Named after the tiny 2-hectare vineyard from which it comes, Le 

Pergole Torte has one of the coolest microclimates in the region, giving the wine a shivering energy, a precision to balance 

the wine’s obvious power. Le Pergole Torte is only made in top vintages; it is always 100% Sangiovese. If there is truly 

tremendous clarity to the wine, an articulation of nuance – dark berry fruit, dried cherry notes, smoke, gravel – make no 

mistake, Le Pergole Torte is meant to age. 



But it’s worth going a bit more into the philosophy of the Manettis. Although Sangiovese has been Tuscany’s most famous 

variety for many centuries it hasn’t always been accorded due respect. Chianti especially has had a roller coaster-ride of a 

century, from the insipid, watery “pizza wines” of thirty years ago to a preponderance of rather un-Sangiovese-like wines

anonymous and forgettable all at the same time. Although there are many great producers honouring the region with their 

wines, there have simply been too many Chiantis, blended into oblivion with heavy doses of Cabernet (or Syrah or 

whatever) and then lavished with new oak in a misguided effort to polish Sangiovese’s true character. 

 

Le Pergole Torte is one of those rare wines that sparkles with incredible charm. It is authentic and one of the gems of 

Tuscany – a landscape that is not without its share of treasures. 

The complex fruit of slightly bitter red cherry dominates the wine in its youth. It is gentle, silky, and seductive with a hint of 

grainy tannins to flesh out its finish. But, it also has an ethereal bouquet of crushed red cherries and the wild scent of 

“sotto bosce”, the forest undergrowth with its hints of mushroom and truffle and dried pine needles. There is the masculine 

and the feminine, the yin and the yang, of great wine to be found in this rendition which, for all its uniqueness, refers 

constantly to the profound traditions of this fine estate that has fought to preserve Sangiovese as the supreme grape of 

Tuscany. 

 

The Montevertine has a plummy colour and a broad, ruby rim. The nose is soft and approachable, with blackberry and 

cherry fruit, though a fine, jammy ripeness. There is a sweet earthiness on the palate of a lovely mouth-filling wine, with a 

slightly bloody, baked plum pie quality and a fine juicy mid-palate. There are hints of chocolatey depth before fresh lemon 

acidity cuts through, with hints of spices and tobacco. 

 

Pian del Ciampolo is the baby of the stable and could pass for a Piedmontese wine in a certain light.

 

Light bodied as usual 



with great finesse. Really light plum, dried herbs, rose petals, balsam, extremely earthy/dusty and mineral-laden. Beautiful, 

lithe cherries and touch of herbs and earth. Good fruit finish with plenty of zing and spine. 

 

2015 


PIAN DEL CIAMPOLO 

 



2014 

MONTEVERTINE 

 

2014 



PERGOLE TORTE 

 



 

 


 

 - 263 - 



TOSCANA 

Continued… 



 

 

 



CANTINE VITTORIO INNOCENTI, MONTEFOLLONICO, Toscana  

The estate lies between Montepulciano and Montefollonico and consists of about 32 hectares of which 12 are specialised 

vineyards, situated between 330 and 350 metres above sea level on medium-textured clay soils of Pliocene origin. The cellar 

buildings, dating back to end of the 13

th

 century, are in the small, well-preserved medieval town of Montefollonico. 

 

The oldest document referring to the wine of Montepulciano dates back to 789: the cleric Arnipert offered the church of San 

Silvestro or San Salvatore in Lanciniano, on Mt. Amiata, a portion of land with vineyards on it inside the castle of Policiano. 

Later in his “Historical and geographical dictionary of Tuscany” Repetti mentioned a document dating back to 1350 in which 

the terms for trade and exportation of Montepulciano wine were established. Records show that since the early Middle Ages 

the vineyards of Mons Politianus have produced excellent wines. In the mid-16

th

 century Sante Lancerio, cellarman of Pope 

Paul III Farnese, praised Montepulciano “perfect in both winter and summer, aromatic, fleshy, never sour, nor brightly-

coloured, because it is a wine fit for Noblemen” – for the tables of noblemen, although the earliest labels read simply Rosso 

Scelto di Montepulciano. Moving on from the Middle Ages to the 17

th

 century, Francesco Redi, renowned doctor and naturalist 

but also a poet, thoroughly praised the wine in his dithyrambic ode “Bacchus in Tuscany” (1685) in which Bacchus and 

Ariadne extol the finest Tuscan wines. The poem ends: Montepulciano is the king of all wines! The wine continued to be 

praised throughout its history and in the 19

th

 century the success of some wineries in important mid-century competitions was 

balanced by the severe opinion of His British Majesty’s winemaker at the Vienna exhibition in 1873, when he complained that 

the single sample of Montepulciano present was “mediocre enough to raise a few doubts about Redi’s praise”. 

 

When Vino Nobile made its debut as a DOCG in 1983 commentators were equally appalled at the poor quality. Now it is a 

more nobile beast worthy of an occasional panegyric. Aged in oak for two years and made from Prugnolo (plummy) Gentile 

(the local name for Sangiovese), Canaiolo Nero and Mammolo grapes, the Innocenti version is ruby red in colour tending 

towards garnet with age. It is a dense, spicy wine with cinnamon, plums and tea flavours finishing dry and slightly tannic with 

a delicate scent of violets. This is a wine with plenty of stuffing – perfect with steak, preferably bistecca alla fiorentina, grilled 

with olive oil and salt.  

 

Made from Sangiovese and Canaiolo Toscano grapes with a medium period of maceration, the Chianti is a little (not so little) 

belter. With the wines from the Classico region topping ten quid it’s great to find a rustic uncompromising Sangiovese. 

Lovely meaty style of wine with flavours of spicy ripe cherries, roasted herbs, leather and liquorice. 

 Try this with ribollita, a bread-thickened bean and black cabbage soup or pot roast pigeon cooked with sage and spiced 

luganega sausage with stir-fried fennel or braised celery.  

 

The Rosso di Montepulciano has plummy warmth and the reassurance of a well-kept barnyard. Notes of saddle leather and 

wild rose assail the nose, the palate is sweet, soft and gently spicy, and the finish suggests beeswax on old wood. If you are a 

sanitary modernist you’ll run a mile, but if you enjoy a truffle up each nostril this will be your bag of earth.  

 

2013 


CHIANTI DEI COLLI SENESI 

 



2014 

ROSSO DI MONTEPULCIANO 

 

2011 



VINO NOBILE DI MONTEPULCIANO 

 



2010 

VINO NOBILE DI MONTEPULCIANO RISERVA 

 

 



 

AA SAN FERDINANDO, VAL DI CHIANA, Toscana – Organic 

San Ferdinando’s estate spreads over 60 hectares in the heart of Tuscany in the area of Val di Chiana noted for its tradition of 

oil and wine production. The Grifoni family, inspired by the passion and by the respect for this land, purchased the farm in 

1998. The vineyards, at an altitude of 300 metres above sea level, occupy a total area of nine hectares and are planted with 

local 

Ciliegiolo, Sangiovese, Pugnitello and Vermentino. Most of the vineyard activities, hoeing included, are rigorously done 

by hand, while tractors are used for topping and treatments that follow the principles of supervised pest control. All operations 

that are part of the productive cycle of the wine always occur under the supervision of the watchful eye of Simone, who takes 

care that the vineyard is treated like a garden, with great respect for the environment and for nature. Weedkillers and 

insecticides are completely banned with plants sown in the vineyard rows and, green manures are frequently used. 

Podere Gamba is the vineyard name, lying on medium-textured stony clay soils rich in potassium. The blend is Sangiovese and 

Pugnitello (85/15), the grapes harvested in mid October normally. Harvest is manual and grapes are sorted, before 

destemming and a light crushing. The two grapes are vinified separately in stainless steel tanks at a conga controlled 

temperature before being transferred into Allier oak barrels for eight months before being bottled. 

With its nose of forest fruit, cherry, liquorice and coffee this is a silky style of Chianti with soft tannins and good juice. 

Pugnitello, by the way, is named after an ancient Tuscan grape variety, the word referring to the form of the cluster, which 

resembles a small fist (pugno

).

 



 

2015 


CHIANTI PODERE GAMBA 

 



2016 

CILIEGIOLO 

 



Download 6.21 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   53   54   55   56   57   58   59   60   ...   87




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling