Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet85/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   81   82   83   84   85   86   87   88   ...   95

Muskie

4

In telegram 122313 to London, May 9, the Department informed the Embassy that



in response to a request by the British Ambassador for clarification on whether the U.S.

Government was opposed to BP and Shell purchasing Iranian oil at the old price of $32.50

per barrel, the British were asked to “hold the line.” (National Archives, RG 59, Central

Foreign Policy Files, D800229–0086) Telegram 122311 to Tokyo, May 9, described Dun-

can’s meeting with the Japanese Ambassador in which Duncan asked for “strong Japa-

nese support on national numerical oil import ceilings” and explained that “an Iranian oil

price effectively or nominally above $32.50 would be too high.” (Ibid., P890016–0460) Ac-

cording to a May 8 memorandum from Dodson to Tarnoff, the President directed that the

Department of State “inform the Japanese and the British (and others who may inquire)”

that the United States was “asking them not to purchase Iranian crude oil above an effec-

tive price of $32.50 per barrel.” (Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Brzezinski Ma-

terial, Country File, Box 31, Iran, 5/80)

5

Saudi Arabia announced a price increase of $2 per barrel on May 14. Yamani ex-



plained the decision to West on May 15. (Telegram 3116 from Jidda, May 15; National Ar-

chives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D800240–0506) On May 17, in telegram

129124 to posts in oil-producing countries, the Department described the Saudi increase

as a “catch-up” increase and a “step in the Saudi campaign to return to a normal align-

ment of OPEC oil prices.” The telegram instructed Chiefs of Mission to “seek prompt op-

portunity to express to appropriate host government officials USG concern that recent

Saudi price increase should not be taken as an occasion for increases by others.” (Ibid.,

D800242–0971)



365-608/428-S/80010

856 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



273. Memorandum From Secretary of Energy Duncan to President

Carter

1

Washington, May 23, 1980.



SUBJECT

International Energy Agency (IEA) Ministerial Meeting and Visit with French

Industry Minister Giraud, May 18–22, 1980, 1980

I returned last night from a five day trip to Europe during which I

attended a Ministerial Meeting of the International Energy Agency

(IEA),


2

held bilateral meetings with the energy ministers of the UK,

Germany, Italy, Canada and Japan and the Executive Director of the

IEA and visited several French nuclear facilities with French Industry

Minister Giraud.

IEA Meeting

Since the December 1979 IEA Ministerial Meeting,

3

we have main-



tained pressure on our allies to follow through on the commitments to

establish and adjust targets to reflect our short, medium and long-term

expectations for the world oil market.

The December Ministerial decision to establish annual national oil

import ceilings for 1980 was taken in recognition of our failure to deal

effectively with the market disruptions of 1979 and of the need to plan

our oil strategy in anticipation of lowered OPEC supplies. While the in-

itial U.S. proposal in December was directed primarily at establishing a

system that provided an allocation mechanism for use in those circum-

stances short of triggering the formal IEA emergency oil sharing mech-

anism, we have refined this system to serve both as a flexible planning

tool to achieve a smooth transition from our short-term (1981) to our

medium-term (1985) and long-term (1990) objectives and as a means to

deal with abrupt deterioration of the oil market. Our efforts initially

were strenously opposed by the British and the Germans, who sought

to postpone action and avoid commitments to reduced oil imports,

1

Source: Carter Library, Staff Office Files, Council on Economic Advisers File, Box



28, Energy Department 1. No classification marking. Copies were sent to Muskie and

Owen. Carter initialed the memorandum.

2

The Department of State’s summary of the May 21–22 Ministerial meeting is in



telegram 137327 to all OECD capitals, May 24. (National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign

Policy File, D800255–0512) The final text of the IEA Ministerial paper, “Measures To En-

sure That Structural Change Occurs,” redrafted after the May 8–9 Governing Board meet-

ing, is in telegram 15282 from Paris, May 12. (Ibid., D800235–0657) The final text of the

IEA Ministerial paper, “Draft Conclusions,” also redrafted after the May 8–9 Governing

Board meeting, is in telegram 15362 from Paris, May 13. (Ibid., D800236–1090)

3

See Document 251.



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 857

even though they agreed with our pessimistic outlook for future world

oil supplies.



A System of Yardsticks and Ceilings

Our principal accomplishment at this Ministerial meeting was to

establish a system for continuous IEA monitoring of national energy

performance. Here is how the system will work:

—The IEA Secretariat will prepare annual estimates of each coun-

try’s oil requirements, which will serve as yardsticks for IEA monitor-

ing of national progress in implementing needed measures to reduce

oil imports and consumption.

—If Ministers conclude that tight oil market conditions exist, they

will make a decision on the use of individual oil import ceilings, based

in part on these estimates—i.e., a decision to convert the yardsticks into

import ceilings. We felt that this decision should follow automatically

on the finding of a tight market; but the British and Germans were

intransigent.

—In fixing its annual yardsticks or ceilings, the IEA will take ac-

count not only of estimated oil availabilities for the coming year but

also of the need to undershoot substantially the previously agreed 1985

oil import targets. The Ministers noted that the IEA Secretariat esti-

mates this required reduction at 4 million b/d below the previously

agreed 1985 IEA group oil import objective of 26.2. The Secretariat will

thus use a 1985 target of 22 in making its annual country-by-country es-

timates and in its monitoring operations. This gives us most—but not

all—of what we wanted in this respect. The Germans and most others

wanted to avoid any mention of a figure for 1985, only after consider-

able debate did we get agreement to this formulation. This resulted in

the 4 million b/d demand reduction estimate being mentioned in the

communique´.

4

The IEA Secretariat reported to the Ministers its assessment of na-



tional policies. In the case of the U.S., it called for more action to in-

crease coal production and to accomplish projected nuclear progress; it

indicated that we should continue our progress toward decontrolling

oil prices. The Secretariat’s report is a balanced one; the comments on

other countries were pointed and, in some cases, critical.

I took the occasion to explain our recent progress on oil decontrol,

the Windfall Profits Tax, the Synthetic Fuels Corporation, the Energy

4

The communique´ of the meeting of the Governing Board at the Ministerial level is



printed in Scott, The History of the International Energy Agency, vol. III, pp. 368–376. The

portion of the paper, “Ministerial Actions on Short-term Energy Measures, May 21–22,

1980, on “Yardsticks and Ceilings, and Stock Policies,” which includes annexes on “A

System for Adjusting National Import Ceilings and Goals” and “Consultations on Stock

Policies,” is ibid., pp. 114–121.


365-608/428-S/80010

858 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

Mobilization Board, your recent oil displacement initiative, and the

Coal Export Task Force.

When the Ministers meet again this fall, they will continue this

monitoring of national performance and, based on the yardsticks re-

ferred to above, they will decide whether the 1981 oil market seems

likely to be tight enough to justify transforming the yardsticks into oil

import ceilings. On the basis of present trends, this does not seem

likely, but these conditions could change very quickly.

It was also agreed that IEA imports should be even lower in 1990.

This agreement, combined with the annual yardsticks, ensures a grad-

ual decline in IEA oil imports during this decade, from 23 million b/d

last year to 18–21 million b/d in 1990, depending on economic growth

rates.

Alternative energy sources

Ministers also agreed on actions to increase production of alterna-

tive energy sources, however this was not treated in great detail; we ex-

pect the Venice Summit will focus heavily on this area, while endorsing

the other IEA actions described above.

Consultations on Stock Policies

There was considerable discussion of recent price increases, in

what seems to be a soft market. This led to agreement that the Secre-

tariat should urgently propose guidelines regarding use of stocks for

consideration by the IEA Governing Board. If the Board approves these

guidelines, this could lead to coordinated efforts by national gov-

ernments to influence the use of stocks in such a way as to try to miti-

gate short-term price increases. The potential effectiveness of this ac-

tion is limited sharply by the fact that most oil stocks are in private

hands.


OPEC Dialogue

There was an unstructured discussion respecting the advisability

of a dialogue with OPEC which clearly showed that there is a lack of

consensus among the IEA countries on how best to proceed. As a result,

the communique´’s reference to dialogue restates the group’s will-

ingness to discuss with producers economic development issues flow-

ing from our policy decision. We also stated our desire to assist devel-

oping countries in exploiting their indigenous resources in partnership

with OPEC. This latter issue will receive fuller attention at the Summit.

Finally we reaffirmed our intention to be constructive participants in

UN global negotiations and to support the UN Conference on New and

Renewable Resources.

With these decisions, we have made some progress toward a solid

foundation for future IEA action and have begun the move from targe-



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 859

try to meaningful measures to reduce imports. Coupled with rigorous

monitoring, the yardsticks can serve as a catalyst for policy action and

help move us toward an orderly evolution of the world oil market.

They will also respond to the call by OPEC moderates for a system of

demand restraint by the industrialized countries. The standby ceiling

arrangement will add a new tool which may help manage sudden sup-

ply interruptions that do not reach the 7 percent threshold necessary

for triggering the formal emergency sharing system. This decision also

dovetails with the actions under development for the Venice Economic

Summit.


Key Bilateral Meetings

While my conversations with my counterparts covered a wide

range of issues, the most critical were:

Iranian Oil Prices. Both the British and the Japanese express con-

cern over Iranian demands of $35/b for cargoes delivered to UK and

Japanese companies against their April allotment, before such sales

were suspended on April 21. Although both governments agree that

the $35 price is unwarranted in current market conditions, they both

cited legal problems which made it difficult to prevent private com-

panies from paying the higher price, because their contracts, they said,

clearly gave the Iranians the right to set the price. Each government

sought our assurances that the other would “hold the line.” The Japa-

nese in particular hedged their commitment by indicating they could

only “suspend” payment of the $35 price temporarily. The British also

sought additional supply assurances from the U.S., raising especially

the desire of Shell and British Petroleum for greater access to Saudi oil

that now goes to ARAMCO. I reiterated our strong belief that both gov-

ernments should resist all Iranian price increases and simply took note

of the British interest in Saudi oil.

I believe that we will have to give way on the oil already shipped,

but we should do so only in exchange for firm commitments against

taking any additional oil at the high asking price.

Libya. The British also requested that the U.S. Government look

into the question of pressuring U.S. oil companies to resist the latest

round of Libyan price increases. UK Energy Secretary Howell observed

the Libyan price rises were increasing the pressure to raise North Sea

prices. I made no commitments, but agreed to consider his request.

SPR. I took the occasion of my meeting with our Summit part-

ners to advise them that we were thinking about placing Elk Hills oil

into the SPR to avoid an auction which could result in embarrassingly

high prices. Our allies are hesitent to endorse our desire to resume pur-

chases for the SPR and the general reaction during the IEA meeting to

my statement was non-committal.


365-608/428-S/80010

860 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



Discussions with French Minister Giraud

My discussions on energy with French Minister of Industry Gi-

raud were cordial, covering the full range of energy issues facing our

two countries. At his invitation I toured the French vitrification plant

for processing of high level fission waste at Marcoule and the Eurodif

enrichment plant at Tricastin. On nuclear topics, Giraud emphasized

his view that our non-proliferation objectives were driving potential

nuclear customers away from the U.S., thereby increasing the prolifera-

tion risk. I responded that this was only a problem if other nuclear sup-

pliers failed to act in concert with us in minimizing the risks of prolifer-

ation. On the IEA, he was generally supportive of our efforts to set

meaningful oil targets although he prefers that the targets be supported

by accelerated and stronger policy measures. On LNG, he confirmed

the French intention to hold firm at the current $3.00 per million Btu for

LNG in the face of Algerian demands for a doubling of the contract

price. I am optimistic that the consensus among the U.S., France and

Germany which we have carefully constructed over the past few weeks

will hold. Giraud expressed strong reservations however about our

desire to begin purchases for the SPR, noting that he thought this

action would have a severe impact on the international oil market. He

repeated the French desire to invest funds in U.S. facilities for export of

coal from the U.S.



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 861



274. Telegram From the Department of State to the Embassy in

Saudi Arabia

1

Washington, May 31, 1980, 1808Z.



143707. For Ambassador. Subject: Text of Letter to Prince Fahd.

1. (S) Entire text.

2. You should review the following letter from the President to

Crown Prince Fahd and get in touch with us immediately if you wish to

withhold it or change it in any way.

2

3. Begin text:



Your Royal Highness:

The events of recent months have reaffirmed the value of our re-

maining in close touch on matters of deep interest to both our coun-

tries. I have been gratified by the reports I have received from John

West on his conversation with you.

As the time nears for the Economic Summit Conference in Venice, I

am aware of just how critical the supply and price of oil are to the eco-

nomic well-being of the world. Saudi Arabia plays a vital role in deter-

mining whether we will be able to dampen inflation, adjust to a world

less dependent on oil, and still maintain satisfactory economic growth.

This is a grave responsibility. Under your leadership, Saudi Arabia has

carried out that responsibility in a farsighted, consistent, and states-

manlike way.

The counterpart to Saudi Arabia’s policies is effective oil conser-

vation in the industrial nations. The United States is doing—and will

continue to do—its share. The comprehensive energy policy I have

fought so hard to put in place is showing results. U.S. oil consumption

declined in 1979. That is unprecedented in a period of considerable eco-

1

Source: Carter Library, National Security Affairs, Brzezinski Material, Country



File, Box 68, Saudi Arabia, 5/80. Secret; Immediate; Nodis. Drafted in the White House.

2

West replied that he had two concerns about the letter: 1) “It commits the Presi-



dent’s prestige when such a commitment is likely either to be unnecessary or unproduc-

tive”; and 2) “We should distinguish between our concerns about price and about pro-

duction; the issues obviously are related, but they are not identical.” West concluded: “If

the decision is made to forward the President’s letter, I strongly urge that Secretary

Duncan discuss its content with Yamani in the context of U.S. support for the Saudi objec-

tive of price unification. This should serve to prevent Yamani’s feeling that we are in any

way circumventing or undercutting him.” (Telegram 3432 from Jidda, June 2; National

Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D870094–0893) On June 5, Dodson wrote to

Tarnoff that Carter reviewed West’s concerns, determined that the Ambassador should

deliver the letter, and agreed that Duncan should contact Yamani. (Carter Library, Na-

tional Security Affairs, Brzezinski Material, President’s Correspondence with Foreign

Leaders File, Box 17, Saudi Arabia: Crown Prince and First Deputy Prime Minister Fahd

ibn Abd al-Aziz Al Saud, 6–10/80)


365-608/428-S/80010

862 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

nomic growth. This decline, which included a marked drop in gasoline

consumption, is continuing in 1980. Furthermore, we have taken the

initiative in the International Energy Agency to encourage all industrial

countries to conserve oil. Only last week, at the urging of Secretary

Duncan, these countries agreed to develop measures for increasing

their energy efficiency and to improve substantially upon their oil con-

servation goals for 1985 and beyond.

3

The period immediately ahead, however, is of great concern to me.



Last year’s oil price increases will ultimately add more than six percent

to the level of world prices and will reduce world output by about five

percent. As the world economy struggles to adjust to these losses, a

new wave of oil price increases is taking effect—despite the sharp re-

duction in oil consumption. These increases will make it very difficult

to control inflation and rebuild the foundation for sound economic

growth. They pose a substantial threat to my personal effort to restore

economic stability in the United States, while avoiding a deep reces-

sion—a difficult task at all times, but especially in an election year. The

fact is that the resilience of the world economic system, which has so far

proven to be considerable, is being pushed to a dangerous point.

In addition, security considerations are involved. I know you share

my view of the importance of sustaining a strong U.S. and Western de-

fense capability to maintain a global deterrence to Soviet pressures and

aggression. I have made economically difficult decisions to increase

U.S. defense spending, and I am encouraging our allies to do the same,

but I am concerned that inflation, aggravated by rising international oil

prices, is eroding our ability to maintain defense budgets at a level ade-

quate to meet an increasing Soviet threat.

I was pleased to learn through John West that Saudi Arabia does

not believe that additional price increases at the OPEC meeting on June

9 would be justified in present circumstances. A decision at that meet-

ing to impose further price increases beyond those already in place

would rekindle inflationary expectations and increase recessionary

forces, developments you are helping to avoid by maintaining high

production and by advocating price restraint.

I want you to know what great importance I attach to your efforts.

I urge you to consider maintaining present production levels and prices

through the end of this year. It would be extremely helpful in the cur-

rent international situation if you could make such a decision public.

An announcement to this effect at this critical time would make a major

contribution to the health of the international economy and to public

confidence in world financial markets.

3

Reference is to the decisions taken at the IEA Ministerial meeting held May 21–22.



See Document 273.

365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 863

At the Venice Summit on June 22, I will emphasize that Saudi

Arabia’s price and production policies and its efforts to restore order

and predictability in the world oil market call for commensurate action

by the industrialized countries. I will seek effective measures to reduce

oil consumption and increase production of alternative fuels during

this decade of transition in the world energy system. Such medium-

term measures by the Summit countries should make it possible to pre-

serve orderly economic growth without requiring excessive production

by the oil-exporting nations.

The health of the world economy and the common security are in-

terests our two countries share to an extraordinary degree. I will wel-

come your views and advice on how we can continue to work together

to advance these interests.

4

With warmest regards,



Sincerely, Jimmy Carter.

His Royal Highness

Prince Fahd Ibn Abd Al-Aziz Al Saud

First Deputy Prime Minister of Saudi Arabia

Riyadh.

End text.


Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   81   82   83   84   85   86   87   88   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling