Moscow, Russian Federation September 21, 2007


Download 4.8 Kb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet20/43
Sana29.11.2017
Hajmi4.8 Kb.
1   ...   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   ...   43

The RAO UES Group. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
635.8
651.9
665.4
695.0
Thermal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
520.6
521.4
540.8
569.1
Hydro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
115.2
130.5
124.6
125.9
Source: RAO UES
According to RAO UES, the total electricity output in Russia was 995.6 bln kW/h, as compared to
953.1 bln kW/h in 2005, representing an increase of 4.5%. Of this total, thermal power plants accounted
for 664.1 bln kW/h, which represented an increase of 5.5% as compared to 2005, hydro power plants for
175.0 bln kW/h, which represented a decline of 0.3% as compared to 2005, and nuclear power plants for
156.5 bln kW/h, which represented an increase of 4.7% as compared to 2005.
In 2006, the RAO UES Group’s electricity output was 695.0 bln kW/h, which was 29.6 bln kW/h more than
in 2005, representing an increase of 4.5% as compared to 2005. The RAO UES Group’s electricity output
in 2006 comprised: 332 bln kW/h of electricity generated by the OGKs, representing 47.8% of the total
electricity output of the RAO UES Group in 2006; 277 bln kW/h of electricity generated by the TGKs,
representing 39.8% of the total electricity output of the RAO UES Group in 2006; and 86 bln kW/h of
electricity generated by other sources, representing 12.3% of the total electricity output of the RAO UES
Group in 2006.
Heat Output
Generators of heat in Russia include the thermal power plants owned by OGKs, TGKs and other
generating companies, fossil-fired boilers and electric boilers. The boilers are owned by the RAO UES
Group, private companies and municipalities. See ‘‘— Current Market Structure — Power Generation
Companies’’.
The table below illustrates the growth of heat output between 2003 and 2006.
Heat output, mln Gcal
2003
2004
2005
2006
Russia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1,446.6
1,441.9
1,432.0
1,466.6
RAO UES Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
468.8
465.8
465.2
477.8
Source: RAO UES
In 2006, Russia’s total heat output was 1,466.6 mln Gcal, which was 23.0 mln Gcal more than in 2005,
representing an increase of 1.6% as compared to 2005. In 2006, the RAO UES Group’s total heat output
was 477.8 mln Gcal, which was 12.6 mln Gcal more than in 2005, representing an increase of 2.7% as
compared to 2005.
Electricity and Heat Consumption
The economic recovery following the 1998 financial crisis in Russia also contributed to an increase in the
total electricity consumption. Russia’s GDP has grown at a compounded annual growth rate of 5.3%
between 1998 and 2006, reaching RUB 26.8 trillion in 2006. The following tables provide information on
the RAO UES Group’s major consumers of electricity and heat in 2006.
138

Consumer Group
Electricity consumption
(2006)
bln kW/h
%
of Total
Industrial and equivalent consumers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
322.5
53.1%
Other electricity suppliers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
104.9
17.3%
Non-industrial consumers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
62.9
10.4%
Households. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
57.4
9.5%
Electrified transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
36.6
6.0%
Agribusiness consumers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13.3
2.2%
Cities/towns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.4
1.5%
Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
607.0
100%
Consumer Group
Heat consumption
(2006)
mln Gcal
%
of Total
Industrial and equivalent consumers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
221.8
51.1%
Domestic consumers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
32.8
7.6%
State budgetary entities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
34.2
7.9%
Home owners associations, building-construction
cooperatives, domestic cooperatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
29.6
6.8%
Population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19.1
4.4%
Other consumers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
24.4
5.6%
Other power companies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
72.0
16.6%
Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
433.9
100%
Source: RAO UES.
Electricity demand is subject to considerable fluctuations: It can vary significantly depending on weather
conditions (especially between different seasons), and also varies significantly during the course of the
day. The chart below demonstrates typical daily consumption curves in January and June:
0
 
20
 
40
 
60
 
80
 
100
 
120
 
140
 
160
 
12 AM
 
2 AM
 
4 AM
 
6 AM
 
8 AM
 
10 AM
 
12 PM
 
1 PM
 
3 PM
 
5 PM
 
7 PM
 
10 PM
 
GW
 
Consumption
 
As at January 31, 2007
 
As at June 30, 2007
 
Generation
Source: System Operator.
139

Generation Facilities
Despite the increases in the consumption of electricity and heat in the post-Soviet era, there have only
been limited investments in generation facilities and transmission and distribution infrastructure during
this period, with only a small number of primarily state-funded projects completed to offset the capacity
decline. Over 57% of existing Russian generation capacity is currently over 27 years old and, together with
other components of the power sector in Russia, is in need of investments to maintain supply stability and
cope with growing demand. The winter of 2005-2006 saw the peak capacity demand almost reach its
historical maximum, with black-outs occurring in Moscow, St. Petersburg, and the Tyumen Region, and
it is estimated that regional deficits are soon expected.
The table below indicates the percentage of Russia’s total electricity capacity provided by Russia’s
generation facilities, grouped according to date of commission:
Commissioning year
Share of total
Russian electricity
capacity
before 1950 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.4%
1951 – 1960 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.7%
1961 – 1970 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
23.8%
1971 – 1980 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
31.8%
1981 – 1990 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
25.4%
1991 – 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5%
after 2001. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.4%
Source: RAO UES.
In 2006, RAO UES developed a five-year investment program for the RAO UES Group, which envisaged
that 23,000 MW of installed electric capacity would be commissioned in 2006-2010. Recently, this
investment program was significantly enhanced and as a result envisaged the commissioning of 40,900
MW of installed electric capacity between 2006 and 2010 at a cost of approximately USD 120 bln.
However, in May 2007, the Russian government decided that this program was not sufficiently supported
by forecasts of future gas supplies by Gazprom and available financing sources. It is currently expected
that a revised investment program will be prepared by the end of 2007.
Electricity Sector Reform
Main goals
The main goals of the Russian electricity sector reforms include the following:
• the creation of a unified wholesale electricity and capacity market in the European part of Russia, the
Urals and Siberia (excluding certain isolated energy systems located in these regions and energy
systems not included in the pricing zones of the Russian Federation);
• the creation of a competitive electricity trading market involving long- and mid-term regulated
contracts, a day-ahead market, and a balancing market;
• the creation of a competitive capacity trading market involving long- and mid-term bilateral contracts,
purchase and sale of capacity in auctions for annual supply and for long-term supply (for several years
ahead);
• the creation of a competitive ancillary services market, involving the competitive selection of service
providers and the purchase of services necessary to ensure the quality of power supply in the Unified
National Energy System of Russia by the System Operator of the wholesale market; and
• introduction of the ability of retail end-users to select an electricity supplier.
Power Sector Restructuring
The Russian electricity market is currently in the process of restructuring as mandated by Russian Law.
During this restructuring process, the overall structure of the electricity industry is expected to be
140

completely transformed. It is currently anticipated that the competitive segment of the electricity market
will be gradually expanded, and consequently there will be a reduction in the percentage of output subject
to regulated tariffs. It is envisaged that the sector reform will result in the development of a fully
liberalized market for electricity generation, supply and related services by 2011, in which prices will be
established on the basis of supply and demand (other than supply to households). The reforms do not
currently contemplate the creation of a free market for electricity transmission, distribution or dispatch
activities, nor do they contemplate the liberalization of the heat sector.
The restructuring of the RAO UES Group has led to the creation of separate companies carrying out
specific lines of businesses: electricity generation (most of which also produces heat), transmission,
distribution, supply of electricity to customers, and repair and servicing. These separate companies have
been or will be merged with other companies with the same business profile, with the resulting merged
companies providing the relevant specific services for a number of regions of the Russian Federation.
Generation, supply, repair and service companies are expected to engage in competition with each other.
At the same time, the reforms envision retention of state control over the electricity transmission and
distribution networks.
A major step in this ongoing restructuring is the reorganization of the previously existing vertically
integrated power companies (the ‘‘Energos’’) into new companies. The Energos were former subsidiaries
of RAO UES, the state-owned power monopoly within the Russian Federation. In the course of the
restructuring, the power plants of the Energos have been consolidated into OGKs and TGKs, high voltage
trunk grid companies have been transferred to the control of the FSK and will be consolidated into the
FSK and the functions and assets of regional dispatch administrations have been transferred to the System
Operator. In addition, medium and low voltage distribution grids are managed by and will be consolidated
into MRSKs. See ‘‘— Current Market Structure’’ and ‘‘The Spin-Offs — Goals and Objectives of the
Reform’’.
Reform of the Wholesale Electricity Market
In 2006, the Russian government adopted a resolution on new wholesale electricity market rules (the New
Wholesale Market Rules), setting forth guidelines for the interaction of wholesale and retail market
participants during the transition period of the restructuring. The Government also adopted in 2006 a
resolution governing the interaction among electricity retail, grid and generation companies, and between
these companies and electricity consumers. This latter resolution introduced among other things the
concept of the ‘‘guaranteeing suppliers’’, which are obliged to enter into a contract with any retail
end-consumer at the request of any such consumer located in the territory of that ‘‘guaranteeing
supplier’’. The ‘‘guaranteeing suppliers’’ are selected in open tender for three years from among existing
electricity supply companies in the market.
These resolutions also contemplate a gradual reduction in the volume of electricity sold under agreements
(Regulated Contracts) concluded by participants in the wholesale electricity market at prices (‘‘tariffs’’)
determined by the FST.
Implementing this provision, in April 2007, the Russian government approved the following schedule for
the gradual reduction in the volume of electricity sold under Regulated Contracts by participants in the
electric power wholesale market:
• from January 1, 2007 — 90–95% of planned 2007 electricity output of each producer or consumption of
each consumer must be sold under Regulated Contracts with the remaining electricity sold (bought) at
unregulated prices;
• from July 1, 2007 — 85–90% of the above output (consumption) must be sold (bought) under Regulated
Contracts;
• from January 1, 2008 — 80–85% of the above output (consumption);
• from July 1, 2008 — 70–75%;
• from January 1, 2009 — 65–70%;
• from July 1, 2009 — 45–50%;
141

• from January 1, 2010 — 35–40%;
• from July 1, 2010 — 15–20%;
• from January 1, 2011 — all electricity is to be sold (bought) at unregulated prices (other than supply
to households).
Attracting Private Investors and Capital
One of the principal goals of the power sector reform is to attract private investments so as to fund large
investment programs in the power industry. In June 2006, the Russian government announced that it had
decided to permit capital raisings by thermal generation companies, including by way of public offerings
or private placements.
As of March 31, 2007, 16 generation companies were either preparing for or developing plans for share
offerings. The first generating company that completed a share offering was OGK-5. Pursuant to this
offering, 14% of OGK-5 shares were sold for approximately USD 460 mln and RAO UES’ shareholding
in OGK-5 decreased from 87.5% to 75.03%. In 2007, the USD 3.1 bln strategic sale of 38% of the OGK-3
shares, to a company in the Norilsk Group, resulted in the reduction of the RAO UES stake to a
non-controlling 37.1%. In addition, a 93.5% shareholding in two stand-alone power plants in the Kuzbass
region were sold at an auction to companies affiliated to the Evraz Group and Mechel for USD 485 mln.
In the same year (2007), a 29% shareholding in Mosenergo was sold to Gazprom for USD 2.2 bln, giving
the Gazprom group control over Mosenergo, while Integrated Energy Systems purchased a 26.5%
shareholding in TGK-5 for USD 448 mln. In June 2007, RAO UES sold a blocking stake of 30% in OGK-5
in open auction for USD 1.5 bln to Enel Investment Holding B.V. Enel Investment Holding B.V.
subsequently obtained permission from the FAS to acquire the remaining 70% of OGK-5 and, according
to public statements, intends to make a tender offer to acquire those remaining shares from the existing
OGK-5 shareholders.
Current Market Structure
RAO UES
The RAO UES Group is the largest power company in the Russian Federation. See ‘‘RAO UES’’.
Power Generation Companies
The electricity generation sector is currently principally comprised of thermal power plants (fossil-fuel-
powered plants, including natural gas, coal and fuel oil-fired plants, producing either electricity or both
electricity and heat), in particular six fossil-fueled OGKs and fourteen TGKs; approximately 102 hydro
power plants, approximately half of which will be consolidated into one HydroOGK; and ten nuclear
power plants owned and operated by Rosenergoatom.
The thermal power plants of the OGKs and the TGKs represented 4-5% and 70-75%, respectively, of the
Russian heat output in 2006, with the remaining heat being supplied by a large number of fossil fuel-fired
and electric boilers. These boilers are operated by either the RAO UES Group or by private generators,
including certain industrial groups, that produce heat for their own consumption.
The Wholesale Generating Companies (OGKs)
The large federal power plants generating primarily electricity, which were formerly owned by RAO UES
or the Energos, were merged into wholesale generating companies, or OGKs, which are the largest
generators in the wholesale electricity market. The reorganization of the power sector contemplated the
creation of seven OGKs, six of them operating thermal power plants and one, the HydroOGK, operating
hydroelectric power plants. Each OGK controls several power plants throughout Russia, each of which
primarily specializes in electricity generation. The OGKs primarily compete with each other and TGKs
on the wholesale electricity market and they depend on the services of the FSK, the System Operator and
the Trade System Administrator. See ‘‘— Current Market Structure— Service Providers in the Electricity
Market’’.
142

The OGKs have been formed according to the following principles:
• formation on a large scale — each OGK has an installed electric capacity of 8.5 to 9.5 GW in the case
of the fossil-fueled OGKs and 23.7 GW in the case of the HydroOGK;
• substantially equal initial specifications in terms of installed electric capacity, value of assets and
average equipment wear;
• minimization of possibilities for monopoly abuse in the wholesale electricity market; and
• consolidation based on the type of power generation facilities, thermal or hydro.
The formation of the OGKs, which was approved by the RAO UES’ Board of Directors on
September 29, 2003, was effected in two stages. In the first stage, the OGKs were established as
wholly-owned subsidiaries of RAO UES and their share capital was paid for by the contribution of
RAO UES assets, mainly in the form of power plants or shares in RAO UES subsidiaries that operate
power plants. In the second stage, RAO UES contributed to the OGKs shares in the companies operating
power plants that were spun-off from the Energos. These operating companies were then merged into the
OGKs.
By March 31, 2007, the final corporate structure of all six fossil-fueled OGKs had been completed, and
their shares had been admitted to trading on the RTS Stock Exchange or MICEX. The final restructuring
of HydroOGK is expected to be completed through the merger of its 22 subsidiaries into HydroOGK in
2008.
The following table sets forth key information regarding each of the OGKs:
OGKs
Electricity
capacity, 2006,
(MW)
Heat capacity,
2006 (Gcal/h)
Fuel Mix
Electricity
output, 2006,
(million kW/h)
Heat output,
2006
(thousand Gcal)
OGK-1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9,531
2,877
Gas
47,246
1,480
OGK-2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8,695
1,814
Gas/Coal
48,084
2,647
OGK-3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8,497
1,615
Gas/Coal
30,614
1,656
OGK-4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8,630
2,179
Gas/Coal
51,030
2,481
OGK-5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8,672
2,392
Gas/Coal
41,441
7,013
OGK-6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9,052
2,704
Gas/Coal
32,904
4,513
HydroOGK . . . . . . . . . . . . .
23,143
n/a
Hydro
79,654
n/a
Source: RAO UES,OGKs.
The Territorial Generation Companies (TGKs)
The majority of the remaining power plants that were owned by RAO UES or the Energos, which are
mainly smaller regional power plants, have been consolidated into territorial generation companies or
TGKs. Under the reforms, the TGKs have been formed according to the following principles:
• amalgamation of financially secure power plants on a territorial basis into inter-regional companies; and
• minimization of possibilities for monopoly abuse in the wholesale electricity market.
On April 23, 2004, RAO UES’ Board of Directors approved the establishment of the 14 TGKs. In a
resolution of RAO UES’ Board of Directors dated February 3, 2006 the details of the TGKs’ corporate
structure were finalized.
The formation of the TGKs involves the integration of the generation assets of regional energy companies
covering neighboring regions. The initial reform plan contemplated that TGKs were to be established as
wholly-owned subsidiaries of RAO UES and would be composed of merged regional generation
companies (‘‘RGKs’’), which were spun-off from the Energos. This plan, however, has not be strictly
followed in at least two circumstances. First, TGK-1 and Volzhskaya TGK (TGK-7) have been established
by several RGKs directly. Second, Mosenergo (TGK-3) and Kuzbassenergo (TGK-12) were the successor
entities to the Mosenergo and Kuzbassenergo Energos following the spin-off of non-generation assets
from these companies.
143

By March 31, 2007, the formation of all 14 TGKs had been approved. By June 30, 2007, the formation of
eleven TGKs had been completed, and it is intended that by the end of 2007 the formation of all of the
remaining TGKs will have been completed. The shares of all TGKs, except for TGK-4, Volzhskaya TGK,
TGK-11 and Eniseyskaya TGK, have been listed on RTS or MICEX. See ‘‘— Electricity Sector Reform’’.
The 14 TGKs are comprised primarily of combined regional power plants that generate both electricity
and heat, also known as co-generation plants. Since the TGKs own heat grid infrastructure, as well as
electricity and heat generation facilities, they are currently both wholesale electricity market participants
and the largest players in their respective retail heat markets.
The following table sets forth key information regarding each of the TGKs:
Download 4.8 Kb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   ...   43




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling