Medieval and early modern periods 1206


Download 5.23 Mb.

bet35/62
Sana12.02.2017
Hajmi5.23 Mb.
1   ...   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   ...   62

252 | 

P a g e


 

 

The third and final expedition of the Nizam of Hyderabad in 1742, resulted in the 



deposition  of  Murari  Rao  and  the  annexation  of  Tiruchirapalli.  As  a  result  of  this 

campaign,  Thanjavur  was  forced  to  become  a  vassal  of  Hyderabad  and  pay  annual 

tribute. 

The Seven Years' War 

During the Seven Years' War, Pratapsingh supported the English with arms and 

supplies. At Lawrences' behest, the great Thanjavur general Manoji took Coillady from 

the French and captured Chanda Sahib and beheaded him.  

However,  the  confederacy  broke  when  Nanja  Raja  realized  that  he  had  been 

deceived by Muhammad Ali who had promised to give him Tiruchirapalli as per an early 

arrangement. Pratapsingh supported his cause when the French under Dupleix tried to 

threaten him. Muhammad Ali and Murari Rao forged an alliance with the French. 

In  1758,  Lally  marched  to  Thanjavur  from  Karaikal  in  order  to  force  Thanjavur 

into  subjugation  but  was  repulsed  by  Manoji.  He  had  to  retreat  with  an  insignificant 

plunder at Nagore when an English fleet made its appearance off the coast at Karaikal. 

The  Thanjavur  troops  supported  by  a  small  English  contingent  harassed  the  French 

who  eventually  succumbed  to  starvation.  The  British  inflicted  a  crshing  defeat  on  the 

French in the siege of Puducherry in 1761. This dealt a death-blow to the French power 

in India. 

Loss of Independence 

From the onset, the Nawab of Carnatic Muhammad Ali wasn't in good terms with 

Pratapsingh  and  desired  to  annex  Thanjavur.  However,  for  the  sake  of  their  common 

interests,  Pratapsinha  maintained  an  uneasy  alliance  with  Muhammad  Ali.  Matters 

reached  a  boiling  point  after  the  Seven  Years'  War.  However,  their  common  ally,  the 

British East India, averted a crisis by stepping in to mediate a truce. The Raja agreed to 

pay  twenty  lakhs  as  arrears  and  an  annual  tribute  of  four  lakhs  to  the  Nawab  of 

Carnatic. In return, Coiladdy and Yelengadu were ceded to Thanjavur. Notwithstanding 

allegations  of  partiality  on  part  of  the  British,  this  treaty  practically  ended  Thanjavur's 

independence. 



Border disputes with Ramnad 

There were frequent border disputes with the state of Ramnad on the Aranthangi 

frontier.  Actively  supported  by  the  Tondaiman  of  Pudukkottai,  Manoji  once  led  a  large 

army into the territory of the Sethupathy of Ramnad and even captured Aranthangi. The 

Nawab  of  Carnatic  who  was  the  actual  overlord  to  whom  Thanjavur  paid  tribute, 

stepped in and stopped the Raja from pursuing further hostilities. 



Death 

 

253 | 

P a g e


 

 

Pratapsinha died on December 16, 1763 after reigning for 24 years. His third and 



fifth queens committed Sati. He was succeeded by his eldest son Thuljaji.  

Thuljaji 

Invasion of Ramnad and the Occupation of the Nawab of 

the Carnatic 

In  1771,  Thuljaji  invaded  the  dominion  of  the  Polygar  of  Ramnad  who  had 

wrested  Hanumantagudi  from  Thanjavur  during  the  reign  of  Pratapsingh.  The  Raja  of 

Ramnad  was  a  dependent  of  the  Nawab  of  Carnatic  and  this  act  of  aggression  by 

Thuljaji forced the Nawab to interfere. A humiliating treaty was forced upon the Raja and 

was  later  ratified  by  the  officials  of  the  British  East  India  Company.  Eighty  lakhs  of 

arrears had to be paid apart from a war indemnity of thirty-two lakhs. Thuljaji also ceded 

two Subhas of Thanjavur to the Nawab. Arni and Hanumantagudi were taken from the 

Raja's hands and Thanjavur was to have the same foreign policy as the kingdom of the 

Nawab.  


Humiliated  and  shaken  by  the  provisions  of  the  treaty,  Thuljaji  applied  to  the 

Peshwa  for  help.  A  large  army  commanded  by  Raghoba  was  dispatched  to  help 

Thuljaji.  But  court intrigues at  Satara forced him to turn back.  Thanjavur  was taken by 

the forces of the Nawab of Carnatic and Thuljaji was deposed. Thanjavur loathed under 

the rule of the Nawab for three years (from 1773 to 1776).  

Restoration 

In  1776,  the  Board  of  Directors  of  the  British  East  India  Company  ordered  the 

restoration  of  Thuljaji.[3]  However,  soon  after  his  restoration  a  treaty  was  forced  upon 

him  by  which  he  became  a  mere  vassal  of  the  British.  His  army  was  disbanded  and 

replaced with Company troops. He was to pay regular tribute to both the Nawab and the 

Company.  



The Second Mysore War 

The Second Mysore War broke out in 1780 between Hyder Ali and the Company. 

The very next  year, along with his son  Tipu Sultan he invaded Thanjavur. The Mysore 

army was in occupation of the kingdom for 6 months. The region was plundered and the 

people carried away. The missionary Schwartz records the abduction of 20,000 children 

from Thanjavur by Tipu Sultan in the year 1784 alone. The produce fell and a calamity 

ensued. Thanjavur did not recover from the impact of Tipu's invasion till the beginning of 

the 19th century.  



Literature 

 

254 | 

P a g e


 

 

Thuljaji  was  a  fine  writer  and  could  compose  in  Sanskrit  as  well  as  Telugu  and 



Marathi.  He  conferred  the  title  of  Andhra  Kalidasa  on  poet  Aluri  Kuppana.  Kuppana 

wrote  classics  such  as  Acharyavijayamu,Panchanada  Sthalapurana,Yakshaganas  of 

Ramayana  and  the  Bhagavata,  Parana  Bhagavatacharitra,Indumati  Parinaya  and 

Karmavipaka.  

Despite being a Hindu, Thuljaji was tolerant of other faiths and confided upon a 

Christian missionary called Schwartz. Thuljaji was also drawn deeply to Saivism.  



Death 

Thuljaji died in 1787 at age 49 leaving behind an impoverished state. Two of his 

queens  committed  Sati.  As  he  did  not  have  blood  offsprings  of  his  own,  he  adopted 

Serfoji from a parallel branch of the Bhonsle family. Serfoji II ascended the throne at the 

age of 10 with Thuljaji's brother Amarsingh as regent.  

 

 

 

Serfoji II 

Birth 

Serfoji was born on September 24, 1777 in the royal house of the Maratha king, 

Chattrapati  Shivaji.  Raja  Thulajah,  the  king  of  Thanjavur  adopted  him  as  his  son  on 

January 23, 1787 by duly performing all of the religious rites. The boy was entrusted to 

the care of Rev. Christian Freidrich Schwartz, a Danish missionary. 

Difficulties faced in early life 

But  Thulajah  died  soon  afterwards  and  his  half-brother  Amar  Singh  who  had 

earlier been appointed  regent to the boy-king usurped the throne in 1787. Amar Singh 

denied the young prince the benefits of basic education. 

At this juncture, Rev. Schwartz intervened to save the young prince and sent him 

to  Madras  where  he  was  educated  by  Rev.  Wilhelm  Gericke  of  the  Lutheran  Mission. 

Soon, he became proficient in Tamil, Telugu, Urdu, Sanskrit, French, German, Danish, 

Greek, Dutch and Latin. 



Restoration to the throne 

 

255 | 

P a g e


 

 

Meanwhile, the British interposed on his behalf and Serfoji ascended the throne 



of Thanjavur on June 29, 1798. In return for their assistance, Serfoji was forced to cede 

the  administration  of  the  Kingdom  to  the  British  and,  in  return,  was  granted  an  annual 

pension  of  100,000  star  pagodas  and  one-fifth  of  the  state's  land  revenue.  Serfoji's 

sovereignty was restricted to the Fort of Thanjavur and its surrounding areas. Therefore, 

Serfoji is remembered in history as the last sovereign ruler of Thanjavur. 

Reign and administration 

During Serfoji's reign which lasted from 1798 until his death in 1832, for the first 

time,  the  proceedings of  the Tanjore  durbar were  recorded  in  paper.  The  Delta  region 

was  divided  into  five  districts  each  under  a  Subedar.  Cultivable  lands  yielded  good 

profits and the judiciary system was highly efficient and praiseworthy. 

Serfoji  is  also  credited  with  having  built  a  lot  of  chathrams  or  rest  houses  for 

weary pilgrims. These pilgrims received free boarding and lodging and their needs were 

taken care of by the State. In all Serfoji built three important chathrams, including one at 

Orathanadu. 

 

 

Contribution to the Sarasvati Mahal Library 

The  Sarasvati  Mahal  Library  was  founded  as  a  Palace  Library  by  the  Nayak 

kings  of  Thanjavur  (1535

1675),  it  was  however  Serfoji  who  enriched  it  with  priceless 



works, maps, dictionaries, coins and artwork. 

The bibliophile that he was, he purchased around 4000 books from different parts 

of  the  world  and  enriched  his  library  with  his  enormous  book  collection.  Medical 

treatises, in the library collection contained his remarks alongside, in English. His library 

included  treatises  on  Vedanta,  grammar,  music,  dance  and  drama,  architecture, 

astronomy,  medicine,  training  of  elephants  and  horses,  etc.  Serfoji  set  up  the  first 

Devanagari printing press in South India, using stone letters. He sent many Pundits far 

and wide and collected huge number of books and manuscripts for this Library. All the 

books in the library carry his personal autograph in English. 

Apart from these, the Library contains a record of the day-to-day proceedings of 

the  Maratha  court  known  as  the  Modi  documents,  French-Maratha  correspondence  of 

the 18th century. 

The Encyclopædia Britannica in  its survey of the libraries of the world mentions 

this as "perhaps the most remarkable library in India". 



 

256 | 

P a g e


 

 

The Library is situated in the centre of Nayak palace and it was opened for public 



in 1918. There is also a small museum there for the visitors. 

Educational reforms 

Serfoji  founded  a  school  called  Navavidhya  Kalanidhi  Sala  where  languages, 

literature,  the  sciences  and  arts  and  crafts  were  taught  in  addition  to  the  Vedas  and 

shastras. Serfoji maintained close ties with the Danes at Tarangambadi and visited their 

schools  quite  often  and  appreciated  their  way  of  functioning.  Impressed,  he  tried  to 

implement European methods of teachings and education all over his Empire. He was a 

supporter  of  the  emancipation  of  Indian  women  and  revolutionized  education  by 

appointing women teachers. 

Serfojis  is  also  credited  with  installing  a  hand  press  with  Devanagari  type  in 

1805,  the first of  its kind in  South India.  He also  established a stone type press called 

"Nava Vidhya Kalanidhi Varnayanthra Sala". 

Civic amenities 

Serfoji  constructed  ten  water  tanks  and  a  number  of  wells  for  civic  use.  He 

implemented an underground drainage system for the whole of Thanjavur city. 

 

Medicine 

Serfoji established the  Dhanavantari Mahal, a research institution that produced 

herbal  (indigenous  medicine)  medicine  for  humans  and  animals.  The  institution  also 

treated  sick  people  and  maintained  case-sheets  which  have  become  famous  of  late. 

Here,  physicians  of  modern  medicine,  ayurveda,  unani  and  siddha  schools  have 

performed research upon drugs and herbs for medical cure and had produced eighteen 

volumes  of  research  material.  Serfoji  also  had  the  important  herbs  studied  and 

catalogued in the form of exquisite hand paintings. 

Based  on  the  medical  prescriptions  stored  at  the  Dhanvanthri  Mahal,  a  set  of 

poems were compiled detailing the procedures to cure various diseases. These poems 

were collected and published as a book, called Sarabhendra Vaidhya Muraigal. 

Ophthalmology 

In  September  2003,  during  a  meeting  between  Dr.  Badrinath  and  Babaji  Rajah 

Bhonsle,  the  current  Scion  of  the  royal  family  of  Thanjavur  and  sixth  in  line  from  King 

Serfoji  II,  the  existence  of  200-year-old  manuscripts  in  the  Saraswathi  Mahal  library, 

containing  records  of  the  ophthalmic  surgical  operations  believed  to  have  been 

performed  by  Prince  Serfoji  II,  came  to  light[2]  Serfoji  II  regularly  carried  a  surgical  kit 

with  him,  wherever  he  went  and  performed  even  cataract  surgeries.  Seforji's 


 

257 | 

P a g e


 

 

"operations" have been recorded in detail in English with detailed case histories of the 



patients he operated. These manuscripts form a part of the collection at the Saraswathi 

Mahal Library. 



Zoological garden 

Serfoji created the first Zoological Garden in Tamil Nadu in the Thanjavur palace 

premises. 

Shipping 

Serfoji  erected  a  shipyard  at  Manora,  around  fifty  kilometres  from  Thanjavur. 

Serfoji also established a meteorological station to facilitate trade. He had a gun factory, 

a naval library and a naval store with all kinds of navigational instruments. 

Serfoji was also  keenly  interested in  painting,  gardening,  coin-collecting,  martial 

arts and patromized chariot-racing, hunting and bull-fighting. 



Contribution to arts and music 

Serfoji was a patron of traditional Indian arts like dance and music. He authored 

famous  works  like  "Kumarasambhava  Champu",  "Mudrarakshaschaya"  and  "Devendra 

Kuruvanji"  and  introduced  western  musical  instruments  like  clarinet  and  violin  in 

Carnatic  Music.  Serfoji  is  also  credited  with  inaugurating  and  popularising  if  not 

inventing the unique Thanjavur style of painting. 



Construction and renovation activities 

The  five  storeyed  Sarjah  Mahadi  in  the  Thanjavur  palace  and  the  Manora  Fort 

Tower  at  Saluvanayakanpattinam  were  constructed  in  Serfoji's  reign.  He  installed 

lightning  rods  at  the  top  of  these  monuments  and  had  the  history  of  the  Bhonsle 

Dynasty  inscribed  on  the  south-western  wall  of  the  Brihadeeswara  Temple.  It  is 

considered  to  be  the  lengthiest  inscription  in  the  world.  Serfoji  also  renovated  and 

reconstructed  several  existing  temples  like  the  Brihadeeswara  Temple  apart  from 

building  new  ones.  He  was  also  an  ardent  philanthropist  and  a  member  of  the  Royal 

Asiatic Society. 

Pilgrimage to Kasi 

In  1820-21,  Serfoji  embarked  on  a  pilgrimage  to  Kasi  along  with  a  retinue  of 

3,000  disciples  and  camp-followers.  He  encamped  at  several  places  along  the  route, 

giving away alms to the needy and the poor and engaging himself in acts of charity. He 

was also involved in the renovation of several holy places. Memories of the pilgrimage 

have  survived  to  the  present  day  in  the  paintings  of  the  bathing  ghats  on  the  Ganges 

and the different holy sites commissioned by him. 


 

258 | 

P a g e


 

 

Religious tolerance 

Serfoji  was  open-minded  and  tolerant  of  other  faiths.  He  liberally  funded 

churches and schools run by Christian missionaries. He was also a patron of Thanjavur 

Bade Hussein Durgah. 

Death 

Serfoji II died on the 7 March 1832 after a reign of almost 40 years (His first reign 

was  from  1787  to  1793  and  his  second  reign  was  from  1798  to  1832).  His  death  was 

mourned  throughout  the  empire  and  his  funeral  procession  was  attended  by  over 

90,000 people. 

Legacy 

If we were to examine the history of pre-Victorian India, Serfoji's name often pops 

up  at  the  first  instance.  Here  was  a  great  savant  and  humanist,  a  man  who  was  far 

ahead of his times. During his time, Thanjavur was one of the most developed princely 

states in the Indian subcontinent. While many rajahs were engrossed in fighting and civil 

wars,  Serfoji  ushered  in  an  era  of  peace,  prosperity  and  scientific  development  and 

pioneered  new  administrative  and  educational  reforms.  His  vision  helped  Thanjavur 

forge ahead of other princely states and advance into a new age and emerge as a fitting 

competitor to European nations.  Above all,  he was an enlightened and educated soul; 

the  quintessential  Indian  maharajah  of  the  British  colonial  era  who  was  at  home  with 

both  Latin  as  well  as  Sanskrit  and  could  converse  and  compile  literary  works  in  both 

Tamil  as  well  as  English.  To  regard  his  age  as  a  "petty  Golden  Age"  of  Thanjavur 

wouldn't  be  an  exaggeration  or  over-statement.  Serfoji,  in  fact,  is  considered  by  many 

as the greatest king of Thanjavur since the times of Raja Raja Chola. 

At his funeral, a visiting missionary, Rev. Bishop Heber rightly observed: 

I  have  seen  many  crowned  heads,  but  not  one  whose  deportment  was  more 

princely. 

Trivia 

 



Serfoji was a scion of the Bhonsle family from which Chattrapathi Shivaji came. 

The Maratha kings were the descendants of Shivaji's half-brother, Venkoji. 

 

Serfoji II is mentioned as Sarabhoji in the Tamil records of the period. 



 

Serfoji  became  the  last  fully  independent  ruler  of  Tanjore  when,  in  1799,  the 



administration of the kingdom was wrested from him by the British immediately 

after his restoration to the throne leaving the Bhonsles in charge of the fort and 

the surrounding areas alone. Interestingly enough, his son Shivaji was the last 

Thanjavur  Marathi  ruler  to  wield  authority  of  any  sort.  The  princely  state  was 



 

259 | 

P a g e


 

 

extinguished  and  Tanjore  annexed  by  the  British  as  per  the  controversial 



Doctrine  of  Lapse  when  Shivaji  died  in  1855.  However,  Shivaji's  adopted  heir 

and his descendants have continued to live in the Tanjore palace and use the 

title "Chattrapathi" and "Bhonsle Raja of Thanjavur" right up to the present day. 

Shivaji II 

Raja  Shivaji ( fl.  17  March  1832 

  29  October  1855)  of  the  Bhonsle  dynasty  of 



Thanjavur in India, was the son of Raja Serfoji II and ruled the fortress of Thanjavur and 

its surroundings from 1832 to 1855. He was the last Raja of Thanjavur known to wield 

any authority. 

Raja Shivaji was the only surviving son of Serfoji II when the latter died in 1832. 

The missionary Heber describes the young Shivaji as a 'pale and sickly child'. However, 

his health seemed to have got better as he grew up for he is known for his physical and 

mental  attainments.  He  contributed  to  the  expansion  of  the  Saraswathi  Mahal  Library 

and  gave  many  useful  books.  One  Varahappaiyar  prepared  the  catalogue  for  all  the 

manuscripts in the library. 

 

 

'Arrest' of the Kanchi Mutt 

But  Shivaji  is  mostly  known  for  the  incident  related  to  the  'arrest'  of  the  Kanchi 

mutt.  The  earrings  (tatankas)  of  the  Goddess  Akhilandeswari  in  the  Jambukeshwarar 

Temple  was  replaced  with  new  ones  in  1843-44.  So,  the  Kanchi  mutt,  then  based  in 

Kumbakonam,  shifted  to  Trichy  with  all  the  retinue  in  order  to  conduct  a  Tatanka-

Pratishta  ceremony  for  consecration  of  the  earrings.  But  a  lawsuit  delayed  the 

ceremonies and the court case along with the rituals that followed incurred great debts 

on the part of the Mutt that they were unable to shift the Mutt back to Kumbakonam. At 

this juncture, the administrator-in-charge of  the ceremonies, a young  Brahmin,  went  to 

court of Shivaji and requested that the retinue should be allowed to stop at Thanjavur to 

receive donations from the people. But the Raja staunchly refused. 

However, as the  palanquin of the  Shankaracharya and his retinue were making 

their  way  to  Kumbakonam  they  were  stopped  on  the  banks  of  the  Cauvery  at 

Thiruvaiyaru by the sepoys of the Raja who surrounded them and respectfully escorted 

into the city of Thanjavur. At Thanjavur, they were accorded a royal reception by Shivaji 

and  the  citizens  of  Thanjavur.  It  was  later  said  that  the  Raja  had  had  a  dream  a  few 

nights before in which Lord Shiva had appeared and ordered him to render due honors 

to the Mutt. This incident is often referred to as the 'Arrest' of the Kanchi Mutt. 

Raja Shivaji died on 29 October 1855 after a reign of 22 years. 


 

260 | 

P a g e


 

 

On the death of Shivaji, due to the absence of a legitimate heir to the throne, the 



kingdom was annexed by the British East India Company as per the Doctrine of lapse. 

 

Literature 

The  Thanjavur  Maratha  Rajas  favoured  Sanskrit  and  Telugu  to  such  an  extent 

that  classical  Tamil  began  to  decline.  Most  of  the  plays  were  in  Sanskrit.  Venkoji,  the 

first  ruler  of  the Bhonsle  dynasty  composed a  'Dvipada'  Ramayana  in  Telugu.  His  son 

Shahuji was a great patron of learning and of literature. Most of the Thanjavur Maratha 

literature is from his period. Most of them were versions of the Ramayana or plays and 

short  stories  of  a  historical  nature.  Sanskrit  and  Telugu  were  the  languages  used  in 

most of these plays while there were some Tamil 'koothu' as well. Advaita Kirtana is one 

of the prominent works from this period. Later Thanjavur rulers like Serfoji II and Shivaji 

immersed themselves in learning and literary pursuits when they were dispossessed of 

their empire. Serfoji built the Saraswathi Mahal Library within the precincts of the palace 

to  house  his  enormous  book  and  manuscript  collection.  Apart  from  Indian  languages, 

Serfoji II was proficient in English, French, Dutch, Greek and Latin as well. 



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   ...   62


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling