Medieval and early modern periods 1206


Download 5.23 Mb.

bet43/62
Sana12.02.2017
Hajmi5.23 Mb.
1   ...   39   40   41   42   43   44   45   46   ...   62

310 | 

P a g e


 

 

with the British and French supporting competing factions. This resulted in  a period of 



internal  instability  as  two  Nizams  (Nasir  Jung  and  Muzaffar  Jung)  ruled  in  rapid 

succession, each being assassinated by a rival faction. The combined duration of their 

rule was just four years. The fourth Nizam, Mir Ali Salabat Jung, came to the throne on 

French instigation and his rule prevailed for 12 years. This period marked the height of 

French influence in the Nizam's dominions. 

Mir Ali Salabat Jung's successor was Nizam Ali Khan Asaf Jah II, who gained the 

territories  of  Aurangabad,  Bidar  and  Sholapur  in  various  battles  with  the  Marathas. 

Though  Asaf  Jah-II  ruled  for  over  50  years,  the  Nizam's  dominions  lost  considerable 

power  and  more  importantly,  land  to  both  the  British  and  the  French  due  to  infighting 

and  debts  owed  to  the  foreign  powers.  He  ceded  the  territory  of  Northern  Circars 

(present day Coastal Andhra region of the state of Andhra Pradesh) to the French as a 

gift  'for  perpetuity',  while  British,  French  and  Hyder  Ali  annexed  the  Carnatic  regions. 

The Nizam was criticized for failing to form an alliance with Hyder Ali of the Kingdom of 

Mysore,  a  move  which  could  have  countered  the  increasing  influence  of  the  British  in 

the Deccan. In this time, with the defeat of Napoleon Bonaparte at Waterloo, the British 

also  replaced  the  French  as  the  supreme  colonial  power  in  the  Indian  sub-continent. 

The British also fought a war with Mysore, which increased its clout in the Deccan and, 

by 1800, the Nizam's dominions came into a state of near-suzerainty under the British. 



 

During the British Raj 

By  1801,  the  Nizam's  dominion  assumed  the  shape  it  is  now  remembered  for: 

that  of  a  landlocked  princely  state  with  territories  in  central  Deccan,  bounded  on  all 

sides  by  British  India,  whereas  150  years  earlier  it  had  considerable  coastline  on  the 

Bay of Bengal. 

During  the  Mutiny  of  1857,  Salar  Jung  chose  to  side  with  the  British,  thereby 

earning the title of 'Faithful Ally' for Hyderabad. This action causes some regret among 

modern  patriots,  because  had  the  Nizam's  dominions  sided  with  the  rebel  forces,  the 

British would have been greatly weakened. Hyderabad was as important to the South of 

India as Delhi was to the North. However, this did not happen and Hyderabad was one 

of several independent kingdoms of India to side with the British. In 1857, when the rule 

of the East India Company came to an end and British India came under the direct rule 

of  the  Crown,  Hyderabad  continued  to  be  one  of  the  most  important  of  the  princely 

states. Twenty years later, Queen Victoria was proclaimed Empress of India. 

The  senior-most  (23-gun)  salute  state  during  the  period  of  British  India, 

Hyderabad was an 82,000 square mile (212,000 km²) region in the Deccan, ruled by the 

head of the Asif Jahi dynasty, who had the title of Nizam and on whom was bestowed 

the  style  of  "His  Exalted  Highness"  by  the  British.  Development  within  the  state  of 

Hyderabad  grew  as  Salar  Jung  and  the  Nizams  founded  schools,  colleges,  madrasas 

and  a  university  that  imparted  education  in  Urdu.  Inspired  by  the  elite  and  prestigious 



 

311 | 

P a g e


 

 

Indian  Civil  Service,  the  Nizam  founded  the  Hyderabad  Civil  Service.  The  pace  with 



which  the  last  Nizam,  Osman  Ali  Khan,  amassed  wealth  made  him  one  of  the  world's 

richest men in the 1930s. Carrying a gift, called Nazrana, in accordance with one's net 

worth while meeting the Nizam, was a de facto necessity. 

Industries in Hyderabad under the Nizams  

Various  major  industries  emerged  in  various  parts  of  the  State  of  Hyderabad 

before  its  incorporation  into  the  Union  of  India,  especially  during  the  first  half  of  the 

twentieth  century.  Hyderabad  city  had  a  separate  powerplant  for  electricity.  However, 

the  Nizams  focused  industrial  development  on  the  region  of  Sanathnagar,  housing  a 

number of industries there with transportation facilities by both road and rail.  

Company 

Year 


Karkhana Zinda Tilismat

 

1920 



Singareni Collieries

 

1921 



Vazir Sultan Tobacco Company,Charminar cigarette factory

 

1930 



Azam Jahi Mills Warangal

 

1934 



Nizam Sugar Factory

 

1937 



Allwyn Metal Works

 

1942 



Praga Tools

 

1943 



Deccan Airways Limited

 

1945 



Hyderabad Asbestos

 

1946 



Sirsilk

 

1946 



 

Banking 

The Imperial Bank of India opened a branch in Hyderabad in 1868, and a second 

branch in Secunderabad in 1906. Central Bank of India opened its branch in Hyderabad 

in 1918 and a second branch in Secunderabad in 1925. 

Until 1948, Gulbarga district, now part of Karnataka state, was part of Hyderabad 

state.  Saraswati  Bank,  established  in  Gulbarga  in  1918,  had  a  branch  in  Hyderabad. 

The Gulbarga Banking Company, established in 1930, however, did not. 

In 1935 Raja Pannalal Pitti founded the Mercantile Bank of Hyderabad. 

In  1942  the  Nizam  established  Hyderabad  State  Bank  to  conduct  treasury 

operations for the state government, and other banking.  In 1947 there was a proposal 

that Hyderabad State Bank would be allowed to establish a branch in Karachi, and that 

as  a  quid-pro-quo  Habib  Bank  would  be  allowed  to  establish  a  branch  in  Hyderabad. 

Partition and Operation Polo, the Indian invasion of Hyderabad that annexed Hyderabad 

to  India,  put  an  end  to  this  idea.  Then  in  1952-53,  Hyderabad  State  Bank  acquired 

Mercantile  Bank.  Next,  in  1956  State  Bank  of  India  took  over  Hyderabad  State  Bank, 


 

312 | 

P a g e


 

 

which  in  1959  became  State  Bank  of  Hyderabad,  a  subsidiary  bank  of  State  Bank  of 



India. 

After Indian Independence (1947



48)  

Background 

Hyderabad state was initially a Subah in the Deccan Plateau. Nizam-ul-Mulk Asaf 

Jah  was  appointed  Subahdar  in  1713  by  the  Mughals.  Hyderabad's  effective 

independence  is  dated  to  1724,  when  the  Nizam  won  a  military  victory  over  a  rival 

military appointee. In 1798, Hyderabad became the first Indian royal state to accede to 

British protection under the policy of Subsidiary Alliance instituted by Arthur Wellesley. 

The  State  of  Hyderabad  under  the  leadership  of  its  7th  Nizam,  Mir  Usman  Ali, 

was  the  largest  and  most  prosperous  of  all  the  princely  states  in  India.  With  annual 

revenues  of  over  Rs.  9  crore,  it  covered  82,698  square  miles  (214,190 km2)  of  fairly 

homogenous  territory  and  comprised  a  population  of  roughly  16.34  million  people  (as 

per the 1941 census) of which a majority (85%) was Hindu. The state had its own army, 

airline,  telecommunication  system,  railway  network,  postal  system,  currency  and  radio 

broadcasting  service.  Hyderabad  was  a  multi-lingual  state  consisting  of  peoples 

speaking  Telugu  (48.2%),  Marathi  (26.4%),  Kannada  (12.3%)  and  Urdu  (10.3%).  In 

spite  of  the  overwhelming  Hindu  majority,  Hindus  were  severely  under-represented  in 

government,  police  and  the  military.  Of  1765  officers  in  the  State  Army,  1268  were 

Muslims,  421  were  Hindus,  and  121  others  were  Christians,  Parsis  and  Sikhs.  Of  the 

officials  drawing  a  salary  between  Rs.600

1200  per  month,  59  were  Muslims,  5  were 



Hindus  and  38  were  of  other  religions.  The  Nizam  and  his  nobles,  who  were  mostly 

Muslims, owned 40% of the total land in the state  

When  the  British  finally  departed  from  the  Indian  subcontinent  in  1947,  they 

offered the various princely states in the sub-continent the option of acceding to either 

India or Pakistan, or staying on as an independent state. Several large states, including 

Hyderabad,  declined  to  join  either  India  or  Pakistan.  Hyderabad  had  been  part  of  the 

calculations of all-India political parties since the 1930s. The leaders of the new Union 

of India were wary of a Balkanization of India if Hyderabad was left independent.  

Hyderabad  state  had  been  steadily  becoming  more  theocratic  since  the 

beginning  of  the  20th  century.  In  1926,  Mahmud  Nawazkhan,  a  retired  Hyderabad 

official,  founded  the  Majlis-e-Ittehadul  Muslimeen  (also  known  as  Ittehad  or  MIM)  in 

1926. "Its objectives were to unite the Muslims in the State in support of Nizam and to 

reduce  the  Hindu  majority  by  large-scale  conversion  to  Islam".  The  MIM  became  a 

powerful  communal  organization,  with  the  principal  focus  to  marginalize  the  political 

aspirations of Hindus and moderate Muslims.  

Events preceding hostilities 


 

313 | 

P a g e


 

 

Political and diplomatic negotiations 

The  Nizam  of  Hyderabad  initially  approached  the  British  government  with  a 

request  to  take  on  the  status  of  an  independent  constitutional  monarchy  under  the 

British  Commonwealth  of  Nations.  This  request  was  however  rejected  by  the  last 

Governor-General of India, Lord Mountbatten of Burma.  

According  to  historian  and  author  A.  G.  Noorani,  Indian  Prime  Minister  Nehru's 

concern  was  to  defeat  Hyderabad's  secessionist  venture,  but  he  favoured  talks  and 

considered military option as a last resort. Sardar Patel of the Indian National Congress, 

however, took a hard line, and had no patience with talks. Noorani states, "Patel hated 

the Nizam personally, and ideologically opposed Hyderabad's composite culture."  

Accordingly,  the  Indian  government  offered  Hyderabad  a  'Standstill  Agreement' 

which  made  an  assurance  that  the  status  quo  would  be  maintained  and  no  military 

action  would  be  taken  for  one  year.  According  to  this  agreement  India  would  handle 

Hyderabad‘s  foreign  affairs,  but  Indian  Army  troops  stationed  in  Secunderabad  would 

be removed. Unlike in the case of other royal states, instead of an explicit guarantee of 

eventual  accession  to  India,  only  a  guarantee  stating  that  Hyderabad  would  not  join 

Pakistan was given. Negotiations were opened through K.M. Munshi

, India‘s envoy and 

agent general to Hyderabad, and the Nizam‘s envoys, 

Laik Ali and Sir Walter Monckton. 

Both  sides accused  the  other  of  violating  the  Standstill  Agreement. The  Indians 

accused  the  Hyderabad  government  of  importing  arms  from  Pakistan.  Hyderabad  had 

given  Rs.  200  million  to  Pakistan,  and  had  stationed  a  bomber  squadron  there. 

According to Taylor C. Sherman, "India claimed that the government of Hyderabad was 

edging  towards  independence  by  divesting  itself  of  its  Indian  securities,  banning  the 

Indian  currency,  halting  the  export  of  ground  nuts,  organising  illegal  gun-running  from 

Pakistan, and inviting new recruits to its army and to its irregular forces, the Razakars." 

The Hyderabadi envoys accused India of setting up armed barricades on all land routes 

and of attempting to economically isolate their nation.  

In the summer of 1948, Indian officials, especially Patel, signaled an intention to 

invade;  Britain  encouraged  India  to  resolve  the  issue  without  the  use  of  force,  but 

refused  Nizam's  requests  to  help.  In  June  1948,  Mountbatten  prepared  the  'Heads  of 

Agreement' deal which offered Hyderabad the status of an autonomous dominion nation 

under India. The deal called for the restriction of the regular Hyderabadi armed forces 

along with a disbanding of its voluntary forces. While it allowed the Nizam to continue as 

the executive head of the state, it called for a plebiscite along with general democratic 

elections to set up a constituent assembly. The Hyderabad government would continue 

to  administer  its  territory  as  before,  leaving  only  foreign  affairs  to  be  handled  by  the 

Indian government.  

Although the plan was approved and signed by the Indians, it was rejected by the 

Nizam  who demanded only complete independence or the status of a dominion under 

the British Commonwealth.  


 

314 | 

P a g e


 

 

The  Nizam  also  made  unsuccessful  attempts  to  seek  the  arbitration  of  the 



President  Harry  S.  Truman  of  the  United  States  of  America  and  intervention  of  the 

United Nations.  



Telangana Rebellion 

Communist involvement 

The  communists  were  as  surprised  as  everyone  else  to  see  their  efforts 

culminate  in  a  series  of  successful  attempts  at  organising  the  rebellion  and  the 

distribution  of  land.  With  the  Nizam  holding  on,  even  after  the  proclamation  of  Indian 

independence,  the  communists  stepped  up  their  campaign,  stating  that  the  flag  of  the 

Indian union was also the flag of the people of Hyderabad, much against the wishes of 

the ruling Asaf Jah dynasty.  

Events 

The revolt started in 1946 against the oppressive feudal lords and quickly spread 

to  the  Warangal  and  Bidar  districts  in  around  4000  villages.  Peasant  farmers  and 

labourers revolted against local  feudal landlords (jagirdars and deshmukhs), who were 

ruling the villages known as samsthans. These samsthans were ruled mostly by Reddys 

and Velama, known as doralu. 

They ruled over the communities in the village and managed the tax collections 

(revenues) and owned almost all the land in that area. The Nizam had little control over 

these regions except the capital, Hyderabad.  Chakali Ilamma, belonging to the  Rajaka 

caste,  had  revolted  against  'zamindar'  Ramachandra  Reddy,  during  the  struggle  when 

he tried to take her 4 acres of land. Her revolt inspired many to join the movement. 

The agitation led by communists was successful in taking over 3000 villages from 

the  feudal  lords  and  10,00,000  acres  of  agriculture  land  was  distributed  to  landless 

peasants.  Around  4000  peasants  lost  their  lives  in  the  struggle  fighting  feudal  private 

armies. 

It  later  became  a  fight  against  Nizam  Osman  Ali  Khan,  Asif  Jah  VII.  The  initial 

modest aims were to do away with the illegal and excessive exploitation meted out by 

these feudal lords in the name of bonded labour. The most strident demand was for the 

writing off of all debts of the peasants that were manipulated by the feudal lords. 

Nizam's resistance to join India 

With Hyderabad's administration failing after 1945, the Nizam succumbed to the 

pressure of the Muslim elite and started the Razzakar Movement. At the same, time the 

Nizam  was  resisting  the  Indian  government's  efforts  to  bring  the  Hyderabad  state  into 

the  Indian  Union.  The  government  sent  the  army  in  September  1948  to  annex  the 


 

315 | 

P a g e


 

 

Hyderabad  state  into  Indian  Union.  The  Communist  party  had  already  instigated  the 



peasants to use guerrilla tactics against the Razzakars and around 3000 villages (about 

41000 km2) had come under peasant rule. The landlords were either killed or driven out 

and  the  land  was  redistributed.  These  victorious  villages  established  communes 

reminiscent  of  Soviet  mirs  to  administer  their  region.  These  community  governments 

were  integrated  regionally  into  a  central  organization.  The  rebellion  was  led  by  the 

Communist Party of India under the banner of Andhra Mahasabha. 

Among  the  well-known  individuals  at  the  forefront  of  the  movement  were  Ravi 

Narayana  Reddy,  Maddikayala  Omkar,  Maddikayala  Lakshmi  Omkar,  Puchalapalli 

Sundarayya,  Pillaipalli  Papireddy,  Suddala  Hanmanthu,  Chandra  Rajeswara  Rao, 

Bommagani Dharma Bhiksham, Makhdoom Mohiuddin, Sulaiman Areeb, Hassan Nasir, 

Manthrala Adi Reddy, Bhimreddy Narasimha Reddy, Mallu Venkata Narasimha Reddy, 

Mallu Swarajyam, Lankala Raghava Reddy, Kukudal Jangareddy, Aruthla Ramchandra 

Reddy, Krishna Murthy, Aruthula Kamaladevi and Bikumalla Sathyam. 

The violent phase of the movement ended in 1951, when the last guerilla squads 

were subdued in the Telangana region.  

Annexation of Hyderabad State 

The rebellion and the subsequent  police action led to the capture of Hyderabad 

state  from  the  Nizam's  rule  on  17  September  1948  and  after  a  temporary  military 

administration  the  dominion  was  eventually  merged  into  the  Indian  Union.  In  the 

process tens of thousands of people lost their lives, the majority of them Muslims.[5] 

The Last Nizam Asaf Jah VII was made the Rajpramukh of the Hyderabad State 

from 26 January 1950 to 31 October 1956. The 1952 elections led to the victory of the 

Congress party in Hyderabad state. Burgula Ramakrishna Rao was first chief minister of 

the  Hyderabad  state  from  1952  to  1956.  In  1956,  Hyderabad  State  was  merged  with 

Andhra  state  to  form  Andhra  Pradesh  State.  It  was  again  separated  from  Andhra 

Pradesh into the Telangana State in 2014. 

Land reform 

The revolt ensured the victory of the Communist Party in Andhra Pradesh in the 

1952  elections.  Land  reforms  were  recognised  as  important  and  various  acts  were 

passed to implement them.  



In popular culture 

  Krishan Chander's famous  Hindi/Urdu novella Jab Khet  Jage was based on the 



Telangana Rebellion. 

  Dasaradhi  Rangacharya's  famous  trilogy  chillara  devullu,  Moduga  pulu, 



Janapadam written to depict before, on and after effects of Telangana Rebellion. 

 

316 | 

P a g e


 

 



  Filmmaker Gautam Ghose gained acclaim in 1979 when he made his first Telugu 

feature film Ma Bhoomi. 

  palletoori pillagaada was a famous song during the rebellion, written by Suddala 



Hanmanthu. 

Communal violence before the operation 

In the 1936

37 Indian elections, the Muslim League under Muhammad Ali Jinnah 



had sought  to harness Muslim aspirations,  and had won the adherence of  MIM leader 

Nawab Bahadur Yar Jung, who campaigned for an Islamic State centred on the Nizam 

as  the Sultan  dismissing  all  claims for  democracy.  The  Arya  Samaj,  a  Hindu  revivalist 

movement, had been demanding greater access to power for the Hindu majority since 

the late 1930s, and was curbed by the Nizam in 1938. The Hyderabad State Congress 

joined forces with the Arya Samaj as well as the Hindu Mahasabha in the State.  

Noorani regards the MIM under Nawab Bahadur Yar Jung as explicitly committed 

to  safeguarding  the  rights  of  religious  and  linguistic  minorities.  However,  this  changed 

with the ascent of Qasim Razvi after the Nawab's death in 1944.  

Even  as  India  and  Hyderabad  negotiated,  most  of  the  sub-continent  had  been 

thrown  into  chaos  as  a  result  of  communal  Hindu-Muslim  riots  pending  the  imminent 

partition of India. Fearing a Hindu civil uprising in his own kingdom, the Nizam allowed 

Razvi to set up a voluntary militia of Muslims called the 'Razakars'. The Razakars 

 who 



numbered  up  to  200,000  at  the  height  of  the  conflict 

  swore  to  uphold  Islamic 



domination in Hyderabad and the Deccan plateau in the face of growing public opinion 

amongst  the  majority  Hindu  population  favouring  the  accession  of  Hyderabad  into  the 

Indian Union. 

According  to  an  account  by  Mohammed  Hyder,  a  civil  servant  in  Osmanabad 

district, a variety of armed militant groups, including Razakars and Deendars and ethnic 

militias of Pathans and Arabs claimed to be defending the Islamic faith and made claims 

on  the  land.  "From  the  beginning  of  1948  the  Razakars  had  extended  their  activities 

from  Hyderabad  city  into  the  towns  and  rural  areas,  murdering  Hindus,  abducting 

women,  pillaging  houses  and  fields,  and  looting  non-Muslim  property  in  a  widespread 

reign  of  terror."  "Some  women  became  victims  of  rape  and  kidnapping  by  Razakars. 

Thousands  went  to  jail  and  braved  the  cruelties  perpetuated  by  the  oppressive 

administration.  Due  to  the  activities  of  the  Razakars,  thousands  of  Hindus  had  to  flee 

from the state and take shelter in various camps‖. An official count by the Go

vernment 

is hard to come by. This led to terrorizing of the Hindu community, some of whom went 

across  the  border  into  independent  India  and  organized  raids  into  Nizam's  territory, 

which  further  escalated  the  violence.  Many  of  these  raiders  were  controlled  by  the 

Congress  leadership  in  India  and  had  links  with  extremist  religious  elements  in  the 

Hindutva fold. In all, more than 150 villages (of which 70 were in Indian territory outside 

Hyderabad State) were pushed into violence. 



 

317 | 

P a g e


 

 

Hyder  mediated  some  efforts  to  minimize  the  influence  of  the  Razakars.  Razvi, 



while  generally  receptive,  vetoed  the  option  of  disarming  them,  saying  that  with  the 

Hyderabad  state  army  ineffective,  the  Razakars  were  the  only  means  of  self-defence 

available. By the end of August 1948, a full blown invasion by India was imminent.  

Nehru was reluctant to invade, fearing a military response by Pakistan. India was 

unaware that Pakistan had no plans to use arms in Hyderabad, unlike Kashmir where it 

had admitted its troops  were present.  Time magazine pointed out that  if India  invaded 

Hyderabad,  the  Razakars  would  massacre  Hindus,  which  would  lead  to  retaliatory 

massacres of Muslims across India.  

 

Hyderabadi military preparations 

The  Nizam  was  in  a  weak  position  as  his  army  numbered  only  24,000  men,  of 

whom  only  some  6,000  were  fully  trained  and  equipped.  These  included  Arabs, 

Rohillas,  North  Indian  Muslims  and  Pathans.  The  State  Army  consisted  of  three 

armoured  regiments,  a  horse  cavalry  regiment,  11  infantry  battalions  and  artillery. 

These were supplemented by irregular units with horse cavalry, four infantry battalions 

(termed as the Saraf-e-khas, paigah, Arab and Refugee) and a garrison battalion. This 

army  was  commanded  by  Major  General  El  Edroos,  an  Arab.  per  cent  of  the 

Hyderabadi  army  was  composed  of  Muslims,  with  1,268  Muslims  in  a  total  of  1,765 

officers as of 1941.  

In  addition  to  these,  there  were  about  200,000  irregular  militia  called  the 

Razakars  under  the  command  of  civilian  leader  Kasim  Razvi.  A  quarter  of  these  were 

armed  with  modern  small  firearms,  while  the  rest  were  predominantly  armed  with 

muzzle-loaders and swords.  

It is reported that the Nizam received arms supplies from Pakistan and from the 

Portuguese  administration  based  in  Goa.  In  addition,  additional  arms  supplies  were 

received via airdrops from an Australian arms trader Sidney Cotton.  

          Skirmish at Kodar 

On 6 September an Indian police post near Chillakallu village came under heavy 

fire  from  Razakar  units.  The  Indian  Army  command  sent  a  squadron  of  The  Poona 

Horse led by Abhey Singh and a company of 2/5 Gurkha Rifles to investigate who were 

also  fired  upon  by  the  Razakars.  The  tanks  of  the  Poona  Horse  then  chased  the 

Razakars  to  Kodar,  in  Hyderabad  territory.  Here  they  were  opposed  by  the  armoured 

cars  of  1  Hyderabad  Lancers.  In  a  brief  action  the  Poona  Horse  destroyed  one 

armoured car and forced the surrender of the state garrison at Kodar. 



Indian military preparations 

 


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   39   40   41   42   43   44   45   46   ...   62


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling