Medieval and early modern periods 1206


Download 5.23 Mb.

bet40/62
Sana12.02.2017
Hajmi5.23 Mb.
1   ...   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   43   ...   62

288 | 

P a g e


 

 

Other writings 

Cheluvambe,  a  queen  of  King  Krishnaraja  Wodeyar  I  (r.  1714

1732),  was  an 



accomplished Kannada writer. Her notable works include Varanandi Kalyana, written in 

the sangatya metre. The story narrates the wedding of Varanandi, the daughter of the 

Badshah  (Emperor)  of  Delhi,  and  the  god  Cheluvaraya  Swamy  of  Melkote.  In  the 

writing,  the  author  envisioned  Varanandi  to  be  a  reincarnation  of  Satyabhama,  the 

consort  of  the  Hindu  god  Krishna.  Her  other  compositions  include  Venkatachala 

Mahatmyam 

 a lullaby song written in choupadi (4-line verse) metre in devotion to the 



Hindu  god  Venkateshwara  residing  on  the  Vrishabha  hill,  songs  centred  on  Alamelu 

Mangamma,  the  consort  of  the  Hindu  god  Venkateshwara  of  Tirupati,  and  songs  in 

praise of the god Cheluvanarayana. Shalyada Krishnaraja, a poet and a member from 

the royal family was proficient writer in Kannada, Telugu and Sanskrit. His contributions 

to  Kannada  literature  include  devotional  songs,  vachana  poems,  compositions  in 

sangatya  metre  (Nija  Dipika  Ratna),  gadya  (Anubhava  Rasayana),  and  kirthane 

compositions  (Bhakti  Marga  Sarovara,  Gnana  Sarovara  and  Shalyada  Arasinavara 

Tikina Kirtane).  

Nanjaraja  was  the  most  noted  of  the  Shaiva  writers  in  the  court  of  King 

Krishnaraja  Wodeyar  II  (r.  1734

1766).  For  his  literary  taste,  he  earned  the  honorific 



"Nutana Bhojaraja", a comparison to the medieval  King Bhoja. A native of Kalale town 

near  Nanjangud,  Nanjaraja  came  from  an  influential  family  of  warriors,  statesman  and 

scholars. He was politically active and is known to have created a power centre, holding 

court in parallel to Krishnaraja II. He was proficient in multiple languages and authored 

more  than  twenty  writings  in  Kannada,  Sanskrit  and  Telugu.  Among  his  Kannada 

writings,  Kukudgiri  Mahatmya,  and  a  musical  composition  called  Aravattu  muvara 

trivadhi, an account of the life of 63 ancient devotees of the god Shiva, is well known.  

Other  well-known  Shaiva  writers  were  Chenniah,  who  wrote  in  the  sangatya 

metre  (Padmini  Parinaya,  1720),  Nuronda,  who  eulogised  his  patron  Krishnaraja  II  in 

Soundarya  Kavya  (c. 1740)  in  sangatya  metre,  and  Sankara  Kavi  (Chorabasava 

Charitre,  18th  century).  Linganna  Kavi  wrote  a  champu  historical  piece  called 

Keladinripavijayam  in  the 1763

1804  period accounting for the  chronology  and  history 



of  the  Keladi  dynasty.  The  work  also  gives  useful  information  about  contemporary 

kingdoms and states including the Nawabs of Savanur, the Marathas and the Mughals. 

Notable  Jain  writers  of  the  period  were  Payanna  (Ahimsacharitre),  Padmaraja 

(Pujyapada Charitre, 1792), Padmanabha (Ramachandra Charitre),  Surala  (Padmavati 

Charitre),  and  Jayendra  (Karnataka  Kuvalayananda).  Vaishnava  writers  who 

distinguished  themselves  were  Lakshmakavi  (Bharata  in  1728  and  Rukmangada 

Charite),  Venkatesha  (Halasya  Mahatmya,  in  champu  metre),  Konayya  (Krishnarjuna 

Sangara),  Timmamatya  (Ramabhyudaya  Kathakusumamanjari,  a  version  of  the  epic 

Ramayana),  Timmarya  of  Anekal  (Ananda  Ramayana,  1708),  Balavaidya  Cheluva 

(Lilavati,  and  an  encyclopedia  of  precious  stones  called  Ratnasastra),  and  Puttayia 

(Maisuru Arasugala Purvabhyudaya, c. 1713, an account of the history of the Kingdom 

of Mysore).  



 

289 | 

P a g e


 

 

19th century writings 



Age of prose and drama 

After the death of Tipu Sultan in the fourth Anglo-Mysore war (1799), the British 

took  control  of  the  kingdom.  They  however  restored  the  Wodeyars  in  the  smaller 

princely state of Mysore under the paramountcy of the British Raj. The British took direct 

control of the administration of the kingdom in 1831,  after which  Maharaja  Krishnaraja 

Wodeyar  III  devoted  all  his  time  to  developing  the  fine  arts,  earning  him  the  honorific 

"Abhinava  Bhoja"  (lit.  "Modern  Bhoja").  Krishnaraja  III  (1799

1868)  is  called  the 



"Morning  Star  of  the  Renaissance  in  Karnataka".  A  patron  of  the  fine  arts,  he  was  an 

accomplished writer, musician,  musicologist and composer. He  gave munificent  grants 

to scholars and was a prolific writer himself. Of the over forty writings attributed to him, a 

prose romance called Saugandhika Parinaya, in two versions (a sangatya composition 

and a play) is best known. In this writing, the author imaginatively narrates the story of 

the sage Durvasa who curses Devendra (the Hindu god Indra) to be born as Sucharitra, 

the son of King Sugandharaya of Ratnapuri. Devendra's wife Shachidevi takes birth as 

Sougandhika and marries Sucharitra. Apart from composing many devotional songs to 

his  deity,  the  Hindu  goddess  Chamundeshwari  (pen-name  "Chamundi"),  he  authored 

three noteworthy treatises: Sri Tatwanidhi and Swara Chudamani (on music) in Sanskrit 

language  and  Kannada  script,  and  Sara  Sangraha  Bharata  (on  dance  and  music), 

dealing with tala (rhythm) in the Kannada language.

  

Aliya  Lingaraja  Urs,  a native  of  Heggadadevanakote and  a  son-in-law  (Aliya)  of 



Maharaja  Krishnaraja  III  was  a  prolific  writer  with  over  fifty  works  spanning  various 

genres:  devotional  songs,  musical  compositions,  kavya  (classical  poems),  over  thirty 

Yakshagana  plays,  and  other  dramas.  The  author  used  multiple  pen-names  including, 

"lingaraja"  and  "linganripa".  For  his  contributions  to  the  fine  arts,  he  earned  the  title 

Ubhaya  Kavita  Visharada  (lit.  "Master  of  poetry  in  two  languages" 

  Kannada  and 



Sanskrit).  Among  his  best-known  Kannada  works  are  the  poem  Prabhavati  Parinaya 

and the two versions of the classical epic Girija Kalyana ("Marriage of the mountain born 

goddess"), in Yakshagana style and in sangatya metre. The writing gives an account of 

the  Girija,  the  daughter  of  Himavanta,  her  youthful  days  and  her  successful  penance 

which  resulted  in  her  marriage  to  the  Hindu  god  Shiva.  Yadava,  also  a  court-poet, 

penned two prose pieces, Kalavati Parinaya (1815) in the dandaka vritta (blank verse) 

metre  and  Vachana Kadambari,  a  prose  rendering  of  the  classical  Sanskrit  original  by 

poet Bana.  

The Jain poet Devachandra (1770

1841), a native of Kankagiri, was in the court 



of Krishnaraja III and authored three noted works: Pujyapada Charite, a poem on the life 

of  the  Jain  saint  Pujyapada  in  sangatya  metre;  Ramakathavatara,  the  poet's  Jain 

version  of  the  Hindu  epic  Ramayana  in  champu  metre;  and  Rajavalikathe  (1838),  a 

biographical  account  of  the  Mysore  royal  family,  some  earlier  poets,  and  stories  of 

religious  importance.  Another  Jain  writer  of  merit  was  Chandrasagaravarni,  author  of 

Kadambapurana and other works. Devalapurada Nanjunda of Nanjangud, a mere court 

attendant, rose to the level of a court poet for his scholarship in Kannada and Sanskrit. 


 

290 | 

P a g e


 

 

Among  his  many  compositions,  Sougandhika  Parinaya  in  sangatya  metre,  Samudra 



Mathana Kathe (a Yakshagana play), Sri Krishna Sarvabhoumara Charitre in sangatya 

metre, and Krishnendra Gite in choupadi metre are well-known. He earned the honorific 

Ubhaya  Bhasha  Kavi  ("Poet  of  two  languages").  Modern  Kannada  prose  saw  its 

nascent beginning in 1823 with Mudra Manjusha ("Seal Casket"). It is an elaboration of 

a play summarised in the Sanskrit original, Mudra Rakshasa by Vishakadatta, and was 

written by Kempu Narayana, a court poet of Maharaja Krishnaraja III.  



External influences 

Eager  to  spread  their  gospel  in  Kannada,  Christian  missionaries  took  to  the 

Kannada  language.  The  establishment  of  the  printing  press  and  English  language 

education  had  a  positive  effect  on  Kannada  prose.  Periodicals  and  newspapers  were 

published for  the first  time.  The first  Kannada  language  book  was printed  in  1817 and 

the first Bible in 1820. Grammar books and dictionaries, meant to help the missionaries 

in their effort in spreading Christianity, became available. Rev. W. Reeve compiled the 

earliest English-Kannada dictionary in 1824 followed by a Kannada-English dictionary in 

1832, though the best-known work is an 1894 publication by Rev. Ferdinand Kittel. Rev. 

William  Carrey  published  the  earliest  Kannada  grammar  in  1817.  The  influence  of 

English  literature  and  poetry  on  Kannada  was  evident  from  the  numerous  songs  of 

prayer  composed  by  the  missionaries.  British  officers  Lewis  Rice  and  John  Faithfull 

Fleet  deciphered  numerous  Kannada  inscriptions.  Rice  published  several  ancient 

classics and a brief history of Kannada literature while Fleet published folk ballads such 

as  Sangoli  Rayana  Dange  ("Sangoli  Raya's  Revolt").  The  first  Kannada  newspaper, 

Mangalura  Samachara ("Mangalore  News"), was published in Mangalore  in  1843. In a 

few years, printing presses opened in many locations, including at the Mysore palace in 

1840.  


A surge in the generation of prose narratives and dramatic literature, inspired by 

writings in English, Sanskrit, modern Marathi and modern Bengali languages culminated 

in original works in the succeeding decades. In the field of prose, translation of English 

classics  such  as  Yatrikana  Sanchara  (The  Pilgrim's  Progress  by  Bunyan,  1847)  and 

Robinson  Crusoe  (1857)  set  the  trend.  Translations  from  vernacular  languages  were 

popular too and included the Marathi classic Yamuna Prayatana (1869) and the Bengali 

work Durgesanandini (1885). In the genre of drama, inspiration came from translations 

of  Sanskrit  and  English  plays.  Shakuntala  and  Raghavendrarao  Nataka  (Othello)  by 

Churamuri  Sehagiri  Rao  (1869),  Pramilarjuniya  by  Srikantesa  Gowda  and 

Vasanthayamini  Swapnachamatkara  Nataka  by  K.  Vasudevachar  (Midsummer  Night's 

Dream),  Macbeth  by  Srikantesa  Gowda,  King  Lear  by  M.S.  Puttanna,  Ramavarma-

Lilavati (Romeo and Juliet) by C. Ananda Rao paved the way.  

Basavappa  Shastry  (1882),  a  native  of  Mysore  and  court  poet  of  Maharaja 

Krishnaraja  III  and  Maharaja  Chamaraja  Wodeyar  IX,  earned  the  honorific  Kannada 

Nataka  Pitamaha  (lit.  "Father  of  Kannada  stage")  for  his  contributions  to  drama.  His 

contribution  to  dramatic  literature  in  the  form  of  anthologies,  translations  and 

adaptations  from  English  and  Sanskrit,  learned  editions,  and  successful  integration  of 


 

291 | 

P a g e


 

 

musical  compositions  into  drama  is  well  accepted.  His  translations  from  English  to 



Kannada  include  Shurasena  Charite  ("Othello").  His  Sanskrit  to  Kannada  translations 

include, Kalidasa, Abhignyana Shakuntala, Vikramorvasheeya, Malavikagnimitra, Uttara 

Rama  Charite,  Chanda  Koushika  Nataka,  Malathi  Madhava  and  Ratnavali.  Other  well-

known  Kannada  writers  in  Chamaraja  IX's  court  were  S.G.  Narasimhacharya,  Dhondo 

Narasimha Mulabaglu, Santa Kavi and B. Ventakacharya.  

The  earliest  modern  novels  in  the  Kannada  language  are  the  Suryakantha  by 

Lakshman  Gadagkar  (1892)  and  the  Indrabayi  (1899)  by  Gulvadi  Venkata  Rao.  The 

later work is reformist and decried corruption and encouraged widow remarriages. Suri 

Venkataramana  Shastri's  modern  social  play  Iggappa  Heggadeya  Vivaha  Prahasana 

("Iggappa Heggade's farce of marriage", 1887) and Dhareswar's Kanya Vikraya (1887) 

carried a similar reformist outlook while Santa Kavi's Vatsalaharana (1885) drew upon 

mythological and folk themes.  



Developments up to the mid-20th century 

In  1881,  the  British  handed  back  administrative  powers  to  the  Wodeyar  family. 

Up to 1947, when the kingdom acceded to the Union of India, the incumbent Maharaja 

was  assisted  by  a  Diwan  (Prime  minister),  the  administrative  chief  of  Mysore.  These 

were  times  of  positive  social  and economic change,  the  independence movement  and 

modern nationalism, all of which had an impact on literature.  

Kannada  literature  saw  the  blossoming  of  the  Navodaya  (lit.  "New  beginning") 

style of writings in genres such as lyrical poems, drama, novels and short stories, with 

the  strong  influence  of  English  literature.  B.  M.  Srikantaiah's  English  Geetagalu 

("English songs", 1921) was the path-breaker in the genre of modern lyrical poetry. The 

earliest  stalwarts  in  the  field  of  modern  historical  drama  and  comedy  were  T.  P. 

Kailasam  and  A.N.  Swami  Venkatadri  Iyer  (also  called  "Samsa").  Kailasam  sought  to 

critique social developments by producing plays that questioned the utility of the modern 

education  system  in  Tollu  Gatti  (1918,  "The  Hollow  and  the  Solid")  and  the  dowry 

system in Tali Kattoke Cooline ("Wages for tying the Mangalsutra"). Samsa's ideal king, 

Narasaraja  Wodeyar,  is  the  protagonist  of  the  play  Vigada  Vikramarya  ("The  Wicked 

Vikramarya", 1925).  

Initial  development  in  the  genre  of  historical  novels,  in  the  form  of  translations 

and  original  works,  sought  to  re-kindle  the  nationalistic  feelings  of  Kannadigas. 

Venkatachar (Anandamatha) and Galaganath were among the first to write such novels. 

Galaganath's  Madhava  Karuna  Vilasa  (1923)  described  the  founding  of  the 

Vijayanagara  empire,  while  his  Kannadigara  Karmakatha  ("Kannadigas  Fateful  Tale") 

described the empire's decline. In 1917, Alur Venkata Rao wrote the famous Karnataka 

Ghata  Vaibhava,  a  summary  of  earlier  works  by  Fleet,  Rice,  Bhandarkar  and  Robert 

Sewell,  appealing  to  the  Kannadigas  to  remember  their  glorious  past,  their  ancient 

traditions and culture, their great rulers, saints and poets. Other well-known works were 

Kerur Vasudevachar's Yadu Maharaja describing the rise of the Wodeyar dynasty, and 

Vasudevaiah's Arya Kirti (1896). The tradition of novels started by Gulvadi Venkata Rao 



 

292 | 

P a g e


 

 

(1899)  reached  maturity  in  1915  with  M.S.  Puttanna's  Madidunno  Maharaya  ("Sir,  as 



you sow, so you reap"), a historical novel written in flowing prose and whose theme is 

set in the times of Maharaja Krishnaraja III. To Puttanna also goes the credit for writing 

the  earliest  modern  biography,  Kunigal  Ramashastriya  Charitre  ("The  story  of  Kunigal 

Ramashastri"). The genre of short story made its initial beginnings with Panje Mangesh 

Rao,  M.N.  Kamath and  Kerur  Vasudevachar,  but  it  was  Masti  Venkatesh  Iyengar  who 

stole  the  limelight  with  and  set  a  trend  for  others  to  follow  in  his  Kelavu  Sanne 

Kathegalu ("A few short stories", 1920) and Sanna Kathegalu ("Short stories", 1924).  

 

 

Music 

King Krishnaraja Wodeyar III (1794–1868)[edit] 

Mysore Musicians (1638-1947) 

Vaikunta Dasaru 

(1680) 


Veena Venkata Subbiah  1750 

Shunti Venkataramaniah  1780 

Mysore Sadashiva Rao 

1790 


Krishnaraja Wodeyar III 

1799 - 


1868 

Aliya Lingaraja Urs 

1823



1874 



Chikka 

Lakshminaranappa 

 

Pedda 


Lakshminaranappa 

 

Devalapurada Nanjunda   



Veena Shamanna 

1832 - 


1908 

Veena Padmanabiah 

1842 - 

1900 


Veena Sheshanna 

1852 - 


1926 

Mysore Karigiri Rao 

1853 - 

1927 


Sosale Ayya Shastry 

1854 - 


1934 

Veena Subbanna 

1861 - 

1939 


Mysore Vasudevachar

 

1865-



1961 

 

293 | 

P a g e


 

 

Bidaram Krishnappa 



1866 - 

1931 


T. Pattabhiramiah 

1863 


Jayarayacharya 

1846-


1906 

Giribhattara Tammayya 

1865 - 

1920 


Nanjangud Subba 

Shastry 


1834 - 

1906 


Chandrashekara 

Shastry 


 

Chinniah 

1902 

Veena Subramanya Iyer  1864 - 



1919 

Muthiah Bhagavatar

 

1877 - 


1945 

Veena Shivaramiah 

1886 - 

1946 


Veena Venkatagiriappa 

1887 - 


1952 

Srinivasa Iyengar 

1888 - 

1952 


Chikka Ramarao 

1891 - 


1945 

T. Chowdiah

 

1894 - 


1967 

Jayachamaraja 

Wodeyar

 

1919 - 



1974 

Dr.B. Devendrappa 

1899 - 

1986 


G. Narayana Iyengar 

1903 - 


1959 

T. Subramanya Iyer 

 

Anavatti Rama Rao 



1860 

Tiger Varadachariar 

1876 - 

1950 


Chennakeshaviah 

1895 - 


1986 

T. Krishna Iyengar 

1902 - 

1997 


S.N. Mariappa 

1914 - 


1986 

C. Ramchandra Rao 

1916 - 

1985 


R.N.Doreswamy 

1916 - 


2002 

 

294 | 

P a g e


 

 

Dr. V Doraiswamy 



Iyengar 

1920 - 


1997 

Vaidyalinga Bhagavatar 

1924 - 

1999 


This  period  heralded  the  beginning  of  British  control  over  the  administration  of 

Mysore  and  the  start  of  an  important  period  in  the  development  of  vocal  and 

instrumental Carnatic music in south India. King Krishnaraja Wodeyar III was a trained 

musician,  musicologist  and  composer  of  merit.  Being  a  devotee  of the  Hindu  goddess 

Chamundeshwari,  he  wrote  all  his  compositions  under  the  mudra  (pen  name) 

"'Chamundi'" or "'Chamundeshwari'". He composed many philosophically themed javali 

(light  lyric)  and  devotional  songs  in  the  Kannada  language  under  the  title  Anubhava 

pancharatna. Javali in Carnatic music have their roots in Mysore and are first mentioned 

in  the  king's  writings  as  javadi.  His  scholarship  in  Kannada  is  acclaimed  and  his 

compositions are seen as parallels to the vachana poems of the Virashaiva poets and to 

the devotional songs (pada) of the Haridasas of Karnataka. Mysore Sadashiva Rao was 

born in Greemspet in the Chittoor district of modern Andhra Pradesh to a Maharashtrian 

family. He came to Mysore between 1825 and 1835 and served as a court musician to 

the incumbent king for nearly fifty years. His compositions are said to have been in the 

hundreds, though only about one hundred, written in Sanskrit and Telugu under the pen 

name  "Sadashiva",  still  exist.  He  is  known  as  the  reviver  of  Carnatic  music  in  the 

Karnataka region.  

Veena Venkatasubbiah came from a  Mysorean family of famous veena artists ( 

or "vainika") of the time of King Haider Ali and belonged to the Badaganadu community. 

He  was  appointed  music  teacher  to  King  Krishnaraja  Wodeyar  III  by  his  minister  (or 

"Dewan") Purniah, who wanted to make Mysore the cultural centre of south India just as 

Vijayanagara  had  been  during  the  rule  of  the  Vijayanagara  Empire.  His  most  famous 

composition  is  the  Sapta  taleshwari  gite.  Some  historians  claim  the  work  was  a 

combined effort by the king and the musician.  The king's son-in-law, Aliya Lingraj Urs, 

was an authority and composer in both the Kannada and Sanskrit languages. A native 

of Heggadadevanakote (in modern Mysore district), he had several interests in the fine 

arts.  He  has  over  fifty  works  including  compositions,  dramas,  and  Yakshagana  to  his 

credit,  all  of  which  were  written  with  a  pen  name  beginning  with  "Linga",  such  as 

"Lingendra"  or  "Lingaraja".  His  most  famous  compositions  in  Kannada  are  titled 

"Chandravali  jogi  hadu",  "Pancha  vimshati  leele"  and  "Amba  kirtana",  and  in  Sanskrit, 

the "Shringara lahari". 

Shunti  Venkataramaniah  was  a  musician  from  Tiruvayyar  (modern  Tamil  Nadu) 

and  an  expert  at  playing  the  tambura.  He  was  introduced  to  the  king  by  the  court 

musician 

Veena 

Venkatasubbiah 



under 

unusual 


circumstances. 

When 


Venkataramaniah  first  met  Veena  Venkatasubbiah,  the  latter  asked  him  to  sing  a 

particular tune. Unable to sing it, Venkataramaniah walked away,  only to return a year 

later  having  mastered  the  tune.  While  singing  the  tune,  Venkataramaniah  went  into  a 

trance  and  the  court  musician  hurried  to  the  palace  and  requested  the  king  to  be 

audience  to  the  singer.  The  king  arrived  there  and  was  so  pleased  with 


 

295 | 

P a g e


 

 

Venkataramaniah's  voice  he  appointed  him  as  a  court  musician.  Venkataramaniah's 



most famous composition is the Lakshana gite.  

Chinniah was the eldest son of a family known as the "Tanjore quartet", a quartet 

of  brothers  who  were  singers  and  composers.  Before  his  arrival  in  Mysore,  Chinniah 

served at the court of the Tanjore kings Sarabhoji II and Shivaji II. He had learnt music 

from  Muthuswamy  Dikshitar.  At  the  court  of  the  king  of  Mysore,  Chinniah  created 

several compositions in praise of his patron king and the local deity Chamundeshwari. 

Famous  among  these  compositions  are  Ninnu  koriyunna,  Vanajalochana,  Nivanti, 

Chakkani na mohanaguni, Manavigai konarada and several javali.  

Veena  Chikka  Lakshminaranappa,  an  expert  vainika,  was  a  descendant  of 

Krishnappa, a Mysore court musician during the time of Bettada Chamaraja Wodeyar in 

the 16th century. Chikka Lakshminaranappa became the chief musician in the Prasanna 

Krishnaswamy temple located within the palace premises. His two sons Krishnappa and 

Seenappa,  who  were  later  patronised  by  the  kings  of  Mysore,  were  also  proficient 

players  of  the  veena  and  violin. Well  known  visiting  musicians  to  the  court  during  this 

time  included  Pallavi  Gopalayyar,  Veena  Kuppayyar,  Tiruvattiyur  Thyagayyar,  Veena 

Krishnayya and Suryapurada Ananda Dasaru.  



King Chamaraja Wodeyar IX (1868–1894)  

King  Chamaraja  Wodeyar  IX  was  also  a  patron  of  the  fine  arts  and  literature, 

having  been  tutored  by  his  own  court  musicians  Veena  Sheshanna  and  Veena 

Subbanna.  The  king  was  well  versed  in  the  violin  and  often  participated,  along  with 

other  musicians,  in  violin  performances  at  the  Krishna  temple  located  in  the  palace 

premises. He is known to have helped many budding artists, both by patronage of their 

talent  and  in  their  personal  difficulties.  He  sponsored  Mysore  Vasudevacharya  (who 

later  became  a  famous  musician)  to  train  at  Tiruvayyar  under  the  famous  Patnam 

Subramanya  Iyer.  He  also  formed  the  "Amateur  Drama  Club"  to  encourage  young 

artists.  However,  he  died  at  the  early  age  of  32  while  travelling  in  Kolkata.  Veena 

Shamanna was the son of Rama Bhagavatar, an immigrant from Tanjore who came to 

Mysore  during  a  famine,  seeking  royal  patronage.  His  birth  name  was  Venkata 

Subramanya. In 1876, Veena Shamanna was appointed court musician for his talent in 

both  vocal  and  instrumental  classical  music.  He  was  known  as  "Tala  Brahma"  for  his 

mastery of  the veena, violin, ghata and swarabhat.  A conservative artist, he played by 

the norms of theorical classical music and was a tutor to the royal family. In honour of 

his achievements, a street in Mysore city was named after him. His compositions were 

published by his son Veena Subramanya Iyer in a book called Sangeeta samayasara in 

1915.  

Veena  Padmanabiah,  a  native  of  Sriramapura  (also  known  as  Budihalu  in 



Chikkanayakanahalli taluk, Karnataka), was  trained in  classical vocal and veena in his 

early  days  by  a  disciple  of  Veena  Shamanna.  Later,  under  the  guidance  of  Veena 

Shamanna, Padmanabiah's expertise grew.  An incident  at  the king's palace during his 

youth made him popular and impressed the king. A well-known musician called Veena 



 


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   43   ...   62


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling