Medieval and early modern periods 1206


Download 5.23 Mb.

bet45/62
Sana12.02.2017
Hajmi5.23 Mb.
1   ...   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   ...   62

326 | 

P a g e


 

 



 

City College Hyderabad 

 

Nizam's Guaranteed State Railway 



 

Hyderabadi rupee 



 

State Bank of Hyderabad 



 

Nizamia observatory 



 

Osmania University 



 

Government Polytechnic College, Masab Tank 



Palaces of Hyderabad State era  

 



Asman Garh Palace 

 



Basheer Bagh Palace 

 



Bella Vista, Hyderabad 

 



Chowmahalla Palace 

 



Errum Manzil 

 



Falaknuma Palace 

 



Hill Fort Palace 

 



Jubilee Hall 

 



King Kothi Palace 

 



Malwala palace 

 



Purani Haveli 

 



Vikhar Manzil 

 



Khilwat Palace 

 



Chowmohalla Palace 

 

Nawab of Bengal 



Etymology 

The  exact  origin  of  the  word    and 

বঙ্গ

  Bongo  (Bengal)  is  unknown,  though  the 



word is believed to be derived from the Dravidian-speaking tribe called Bang that settled 

in  the  area  around  the  year  1000  BC.  It  could  also  be  derived  from  the  word  Vanga, 

which  was  a  kingdom  in  the  Bengal  region  during  the  times  of  Mahabharata  as 

mentioned in Sanskrit literature.  



History 

Remnants  of  Copper  Age  settlements  in  the  Bengal  region  date  back  4,300 

years.  After  the  arrival  of  Indo-Aryans,  the  kingdoms  of  Anga,  Bongo,  and  Magadha 

were formed by the 10th century BC, located in the Bihar and Bengal regions. Magadha 

was  one  of  the  four  main  kingdoms  of  India  at  the  time  of  Buddha  and  consisted  of 

several Janapadas. One of the earliest foreign references to Bengal is the mention of a 

land  named  Gangaridai  by  the  Greeks  around  100  BC,  located  in  an  area  in  Bengal. 


 

327 | 

P a g e


 

 

From the 3rd to the 6th centuries AD, the kingdom of Magadha served as the seat of the 



Gupta Empire.

  

Two kingdoms 



 Vanga or Samatata and Gauda 

 are mentioned in some texts 



to have appeared after the end of Gupta Empire, although details of their ruling time are 

uncertain. The first  recorded independent  king of Bengal was  Shashanka who reigned 

in the early 7th century. After a period of anarchy, the native Buddhist Pala Empire ruled 

the  region  for  four  hundred  years,  and  expanded  across  a  large  part  of  South  Asia 

during  the  reigns  of  Dharmapala  and  Devapala.  Bengal  was  invaded  by  a  Hindu 

Emperor  Rajendra Chola  I of  the  Chola dynasty for a short period in  the 11th century. 

The Pala dynasty was followed by the reign of the Hindu Sena dynasty. Islam started to 

appear in Bengal during the late 11th century, in the form of Sufism. Beginning in 1202 

a  military  commander  from  the  Delhi  Sultanate,  Bakhtiar  Khilji,  overran  Bihar  and 

Bengal as far east as Rangpur, Bogra, and the Brahmaputra River. Although he failed to 

bring  Bengal  under  his  control,  the  expedition  managed  to  defeat  Lakshman  Sen  and 

his two sons, who moved to Bikramapur (present-day Munshiganj District), from where 

they ruled over a smaller area until the late 13th century.  

From  the  13th  century  onward,  several  Islamic  dynasties  ruled  parts  of  Bengal, 

often known collectively as the Sultanate of Bengal. Some rulers such as the land-lords-

Baro-Bhuyans,  the  Deva  Kingdom,  and  Raja  Ganesha  ruled  parts  of  the  region 

intermittently.  Bengal  came  once  more  under  the  direct  control  of  Delhi  when  the 

Mughals conquered it in 1576. It became a Mughal subah and was ruled by subahdars 

(governors).  Akbar  exercised  progressive  rule  and  oversaw  a  period  of  prosperity 

(through  trade  and  development)  in  Bengal  and  northern  India.  There  were  several 

independent Hindu states established in Bengal during the  Mughal period like those of 

Maharaja Pratap Aditya of Jessore and Raja Sitaram Ray of Burdwan.[citation needed] 

Factory in Hugli-Chuchura, Dutch Bengal. Hendrik van Schuylenburgh, 1665 

Bengal's  trade  and  wealth  impressed  the  Mughals  so  much  that  emperor 

Aurangzeb called the region the Paradise of the Nations. Afghans under Sher Shah Suri 

and  his  descendants  ruled  Bengal  from  1540  to  1560.  Hindu  king  Hem  Chandra 

Vikramaditya  (Hemu)  defeated  and  killed  Bengal  ruler  Muhammed  Shah  in  1556  and 

appointed  Shahbaaz  Khan  as  his  governor.  Administration  by  governors  appointed  by 

the  court  of  the  Mughal  Empire  court  (1575

1717)  gave  way  to  four  decades  of  semi-



independence  under  the  Nawabs  of  Murshidabad,  who  respected  the  nominal 

sovereignty of the Mughals in Delhi. The Nawabs granted permission to the French East 

India  Company  to  establish  a  trading  post  at  Chandernagore  in  1673,  and  the  British 

East India Company at Calcutta in 1690.  

Around  the  early  1700s,  the  Maratha  Empire  led  expeditions  in  Bengal.  The 

leader of the expedition was Maratha Maharaja Raghuji of Nagpur. Raghoji was able to 

annexe  Odisha  and  parts  of  Bengal  permanently  as  he  successfully  exploited  the 

chaotic conditions prevailing in the region after the death of their Governor Murshid Quli 

Khan  in  1727.  Portuguese  traders  arrived  late  in  the  fifteenth  century,  once  Vasco  da 


 

328 | 

P a g e


 

 

Gama  reached  India  by  sea  in  1498.  European  influence  grew  until  the  British  East 



India Company gained taxation rights in Bengal subah, or province, following the Battle 

of Plassey in 1757, when Siraj ud-Daulah, the last independent nawab, was defeated by 

the  British.  The  Bengal  Presidency  was  established  by  1766,  eventually  including  all 

British  territories  north  of  the  Central  Provinces  (now  Madhya  Pradesh),  from  the 

mouths  of  the  Ganges  and  the  Brahmaputra  to  the  Himalayas  and  the  Punjab.  The 

Bengal  famine  of  1770  claimed  millions  of  lives.  Calcutta  was  named  the  capital  of 

British India in 1772. The Bengal Renaissance and Brahmo Samaj socio-cultural reform 

movements  had  great  impact  on  the  cultural  and  economic  life  of  Bengal.  The  failed 

Indian rebellion of 1857 started near Calcutta and resulted in transfer of authority to the 

British  Crown,  administered  by  the  Viceroy  of  India.  Between  1905  and  1911,  an 

abortive attempt was made to divide the province of Bengal into two zones.  

Bengal has played a major role in the Indian independence movement, in which 

revolutionary  groups  were  dominant.  Armed  attempts  to  overthrow  the  British  Raj 

reached a climax when Subhas Chandra Bose led the Indian National Army against the 

British.  Bengal  was  also  central  in  the  rising  political  awareness  of  the  Muslim 

population

the  Muslim  League  was  established  in  Dhaka  in  1906.  In  spite  of  a  last-



ditch effort to form a United Bengal, when India  gained independence in 1947, Bengal 

was  partitioned  along  religious  lines.  The  western  part  went  to  India  (and  was  named 

West  Bengal)  while  the  eastern  part  joined  Pakistan  as  a  province  called  East  Bengal 

(later renamed East Pakistan, giving rise to Bangladesh in 1971). The circumstances of 

partition were bloody, with widespread religious riots in Bengal.  

In East Pakistan, starting from the Bengali Language Movement of 1952, political 

dissent  against  West  Pakistani  domination  grew  steadily.  The  Awami  League,  led  by 

Sheikh  Mujibur  Rahman,  emerged  as  the  political  voice  of  the  Bengali-speaking 

population of East Pakistan by the 1960s. In 1971, the crisis deepened when Rahman 

was arrested and a sustained military assault was launched on East Pakistan.[38] Most 

of the Awami League leaders fled and set up a government-in-exile in West Bengal. The 

guerrilla Mukti Bahini and Bengali regulars eventually received support from the  Indian 

Armed  Forces  in  December  1971,  resulting  in  a  decisive  victory  over  Pakistan  on  16 

December  in  the  Bangladesh  Liberation  War  or  Indo-Pakistani  War  of  1971.  The 

independent nation of Bangladesh was established. However, the nation of Bangladesh

since its creation, suffered from continuous political instability and prolonged martial and 

autocratic rules. 

West Bengal, the western part of Bengal, became a state in India. In the 1960s 

and  1970s,  severe  power  shortages,  strikes  and  a  violent  Marxist-Naxalite  movement 

damaged much of the state's infrastructure, leading to a period of economic stagnation. 

The Bangladesh Liberation War of 1971 resulted in the influx of millions of refugees to 

West  Bengal,  causing  significant  strains  on  its  infrastructure.  West  Bengal  politics 

underwent  a  major  change  when  the  Left  Front  won  the  1977  assembly  election, 

defeating  the  incumbent  Indian  National  Congress.  The  Left  Front,  led  by  Communist 

Party of India (Marxist) (CPI(M)) governed the state for over three decades. 


 

329 | 

P a g e


 

 

Geography 

Most of the Bengal region is in the low-lying Ganges

Brahmaputra River Delta or 



Ganges  Delta.  The  Ganges  Delta  arises  from  the  confluence  of  the  rivers  Ganges, 

Brahmaputra,  and  Meghna  rivers  and  their  respective  tributaries.  The  total  area  of 

Bengal  is  232,752   km2

West  Bengal  is  88,752 km2  (34,267 sq mi)  and  Bangladesh 



147,570 km2 (56,977 sq mi). 

Most parts of Bangladesh are within 10 metres (33 feet) above the sea level, and 

it is believed that about 10% of the land would be flooded if the sea level were to rise by 

1  metre  (3.3  feet).  Because  of  this  low  elevation,  much  of  this  region  is  exceptionally 

vulnerable to seasonal flooding due to monsoons. The highest point in Bangladesh is in 

Mowdok  range  at  1,052  metres  (3,451  feet)  in  the  Chittagong  Hill  Tracts  to  the 

southeast of the country. A major part of the coastline comprises a  marshy jungle, the 

Sundarbans,  the  largest  mangrove  forest  in  the  world  and  home  to  diverse  flora  and 

fauna, including the royal Bengal tiger. In 1997, this region was declared endangered.  

West Bengal is on the eastern bottleneck of India, stretching from the Himalayas 

in the north to the Bay of Bengal in the south. The state has a total area of 88,752 km2 

(34,267 sq mi). The Darjeeling Himalayan hill region in the northern extreme of the state 

belongs to the eastern Himalaya. This region contains Sandakfu (3,636 m (11,929 ft))

the  highest  peak  of  the  state.  The  narrow  Terai  region  separates  this  region  from  the 



plains,  which  in  turn  transitions  into  the  Ganges  delta  towards  the  south.  The  Rarh 

region  intervenes  between  the  Ganges  delta  in  the  east  and  the  western  plateau  and 

high  lands.  A  small  coastal  region  is  on  the  extreme  south,  while  the  Sundarbans 

mangrove forests form a remarkable geographical landmark at the Ganges delta. 

At least nine districts in West Bengal and 42 districts in Bangladesh have arsenic 

levels in  groundwater above the World Health Organization maximum permissible  limit 

of 50 µg/L (micro gram per litre) or 50 parts per billion and the untreated water is unfit 

for  human  consumption.  The  water  causes  arsenicosis,  skin  cancer  and  various  other 

complications in the body. Arsenic is four times as poisonous as mercury. 

Major cities 

The following are the largest cities in Bengal (in terms of population): 

List of major cities in Bengal 

Rank  City 

Country 

Population 

Area (in km2) 

Dhaka



 

Bangladesh

 

14,543,124 



1463.6 [47] 

Kolkata



 

India


 

14,112,536[48]  1886.67 

Chittagong



 

Bangladesh

 

4,079,862 



168.07[49] 

Comilla



 

Bangladesh

 

346,238 


153[50] 

Gazipur



 

Bangladesh

 

1,820,374 



49.32[50] 

Narayanganj



 

Bangladesh

 

1,636,441 



759.57[50] 

Khulna



 

Bangladesh

 

1,490,835 



80.01 

 

330 | 

P a g e


 

 



Rajshahi

 

Bangladesh



 

842,701 


96.68 

Rangpur



 

Bangladesh

 

650,000 


204[50] 

10 


Sylhet

 

Bangladesh



 

2,675,346 

26.50 [50] 

11 


Barisal

 

Bangladesh



 

272,169 


45 [50] 

12 


Asansol

 

India



 

1,243,414 

340.13[48] 

13 


Siliguri

 

India



 

705,579 


640.0[48] 

14 


Durgapur

 

India



 

580,990 


154.0[48] 

 

History before the Nawabs' rule  

Mughal Empire 

The Mughal Empire emerged as a powerful Empire in northern India. Babur, who 

was  related  to  two  legendary  warriors  -  Timur  and  Genghis  Khan,  invaded  north  India 

and  defeated  Ibrahim  Lodi  of  the  Lodi  dynasty.  Babur  thus  became  the  first  Mughal 

emperor. He  was succeeded by his son,  Humayun. At  the same time,  Sher Shah Suri 

(alias  Farid  Khan)  of  the  Suri  dynasty  rose  to  prominence  and  established  himself  as 

the  ruler  of  the  present  day  Bihar  by  defeating  Ghiyashuddin  Shah.  But  he  lost  to 

capture  the  kingdom  because  of  sudden  expedition  of  Humayun.  In  1539,  Sher  Khan 

faced Humayun in the battle of Chausa. He forced Humayun out of India. Assuming the 

title  Sher  Shah,  he  ascended  the  throne  of  Delhi.  He  also  captured  Agra  and 

established  control  from  Bengal  in  the  east  until  the  Indus  river  in  the  west.  After  his 

death he was succeeded by his son,  Islam Shah Suri. But in 1544 the Suris were torn 

apart  by  internal  conflicts.  Humayun  took  this  advantage  and  captured  Lahore  and 

Delhi, but he died in 1556 AD. He was succeeded by  Akbar, who defeated Daud Khan 

Karrani of Bengal's Karrani Dynasty (or, Karnani Dynasty). After this, the administration 

of  the  entire  region  of  Bengal  passed  into  the  hands  of  governors  appointed  by  the 

Mughal emperors, who ruled Bengal till 1716 AD.  

There were several posts under the Mughal administrative system during Akbar's 

reign.  Diwani  was  a  system  of  provincial  revenue  administration  under  the  Mughals. 

Nizamat  (civil  administration)  and  Diwani  (revenue  administration)  were  the  two  main 

branches of the provincial administration under the Mughals.[5] A Subahdar (provincial 

viceroy  or  governor),  also  called  a  Nizam  was  in-charge  of  the  Nizamat.  There  was  a 

chain of subordinate officials under the Nizams on the executive side and under Diwans 

on the revenue and judicial side.  



Emergence of the Nawab Nizam of Bengal  

Murshid Quli Khan arrived as the Diwan of Bengal in 1717 AD. Before his arrival, 

there  were  four  Diwans.  And,  after  his  arrival,  Azim-ush-Shan  held  the  Nizam's  office. 

Azim got into conflict with Murshid Quli Khan over imperial financial control. Considering 

the complaint of Khan, the then Mughal emperor,  Aurangzeb ordered Azim to move to 

Bihar.[8] Upon his departure the two posts united in one and Murshid Quli Khan became 



 

331 | 

P a g e


 

 

the first Nizam cum Diwan of Bengal. Murshid Khan was appointed the "Nawab Nizam 



of  Bengal"  and  he  emerged  as  the  ruler  of  Bengal  under  the  Mughals.  Murshidabad 

remained  the  capital  of  the  Nawabs  of  Bengal  until  their  rule.  The  Nawab  Siraj  ud-

Daulah, was betrayed in the  Battle of Plassey by Mir Jaffer. He lost to the British East 

India  Company,  who  took  installed  Mir  Jaffer  on  the  Masnad  (throne),  as  a  "puppet 

ruler" and established itself to a political power in Bengal. 

In 1765, Robert Clive, of the British East India Company, became the first British 

Governor of Bengal. He secured in perpetuity for the Company the Diwani (revenue and 

civil justice) of the then Bengal subah from the then Mughal Emperor, Shah Alam II and 

thus the system of Dual Government  was established and the  Bengal Presidency was 

formed.  In 1772 the Dual Government system was abolished and Bengal was brought 

under  direct  control  of  the  British.  In  1793,  when  the  Nizamat  (military  power  and 

criminal  justice)  of  the  Nawab  was  also  taken  away  from  them,  they  remained  as  the 

mere pensioners of the British East India Company. After the Revolt of 1857, Company 

rule in India ended and the British Crown took over the territories which were under the 

direct rule of the British East India Company in 1858, which marked the beginning of the 

British  Raj.  These  territories,  including  the  territory  of  the  Nawab  Nazims  came  under 

the  direct  rule  of  the British  Crown  and  British  Raj  was  established  in  India.  Thus,  the 

Nawab Nizams remained just the titular heads of their territory, which was now ruled by 

the British Crown, and they had no political or any other kind of control over the territory. 

The last Nawab of Bengal, Mansoor Ali Khan abdicated on 1 November 1880 in favour 

of his eldest son.  

History during the Nawabs' rule  

Dynasties 

From  1717  until  1880,  three  successive  Islamic  dynasties 

  Nasiri,  Afshar  and 



Najafi 

 ruled what was then known as Bengal.  



The  first  dynasty,  the  Nasiri,  ruled  from  1717  until  1740.  The  founder  of  the 

Nasiri,  Murshid  Quli  Khan,  was  born  a  poor  Deccani  Odia  Brahmin  before  being  sold 

into  slavery  and  bought  by  one  Haji  Shafi  Isfahani,  a  Persian  merchant  from  Isfahan 

who converted him to Islam. He entered the service of Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb and 

rose through the ranks before becoming the Nawab Nizam of Bengal in 1717, a post he 

held until his death in 1727. He in turn was succeeded by his son-in-law, Shuja-ud-Din 

Muhammad  Khan.  After  Shuja-ud-Din's  death  in  1739  he  was  succeeded  by  his  son, 

Sarfaraz Khan, who held the rank, until he was killed in the Battle of Giria in 1741, and 

was succeeded by Alivardi Khan, former ruler of Patna, of the Afshar Dynasty in 1740.  

The  second  dynasty,  the  Afshar,  ruled  from  1740  to  1757.  Siraj  ud-Daulah 

(Alivardi Khan's grandson), the last Afshar Nawab was killed in the Battle of Plassey in 

1757. They were succeeded by the third and final dynasty to rule the whole Bengal, the 

Najafi.  


 

332 | 

P a g e


 

 

Under the Mughals 

Bengal  subah  was  one  of  the  wealthiest  parts  of  the  Mughal  empire.  As  the 

Mughal  empire  began  to  decline,  the  Nawabs  grew  in  power,  although  nominally  sub-

ordinate to the Mughal emperor. They wielded great power in their own right and finally 

became independent rulers of the Bengal region, for all practical purposes, by the early 

1700s.  

Maratha expeditions 

Marathas undertook six expeditions in Bengal from 1741

1748. Maratha general, 



Raghunath  Rao  was  able  to  annex  Orissa  to  his  kingdom  and  the  larger  confederacy 

permanently  as  he  successfully  exploited  the  chaotic  conditions  prevailing  in  Bengal, 

Bihar and Orissa after the death of Murshid Quli Khan in 1727. Constantly harassed by 

the  Bhonsles,  Orissa,  Bengal  and  parts  of  Bihar  were  economically  ruined.  Alivardi 

Khan made peace with Raghunathrao in 1751 ceding in perpetuity Orrisa up to the river 

Suvarnarekha, and agreeing to pay 12 lacs annually in lieu of the Chauth of Bengal and 

Bihar.  

The  treaty  included  20  lacs  as  Chauth  for  Bengal  (includes  both  West  Bengal 

and  Bangladesh)  and  12  lacs  for  Bihar(including  Jharkhand).  After  this,  Maratha 

promised never to cross the boundary of the Nawab of Bengal's territory.  

Thus, Baji Rao is hailed as the greatest Maratha chief after Shivaji because of his 

success  in  subjecting  Muslim  rulers  of  east  India  in  states  such  as  Bengal,  Bihar  and 

Orissa to the Maratha rule.  

Nawabs of Bengal under British rule and their decline 

The  breakup  of  the  centralized  Mughal  empire  by  1750,  led  to  the  creation  of 

numerous  semi-independent  kingdoms  (all  provinces  of  the  former  Mughal  empire). 

Each  of  them  were  in  conflict  with  their  neighbor.  These  kingdoms  brought  weapons 

from  British-French  East  India  company's  to  fuel  their  wars.  Bengal  was  one  such 

kingdom.  British  and  French  supported  the  princes  whoever  ensured  their  trading 

interest.  Jafar  was  one  such  puppet  who  came  to  power  with  support  of  British  East 

India  company  after  Nawab  Siraj  ud-Daulah  was  defeated  by  the  British  forces  of  Sir 

Robert Clive in the Battle of Plassey in 1757. Thereafter the Nawab of Bengal became a 

"puppet ruler" depending on military support from British East India company to secure 

their  throne.  Siraj-ud-Daulah  was  replaced by  Mir  Jaffer.  He  was  personally  led  to  the 

throne by Robert Clive, after triumph of the British in the battle.[19] He briefly tried to re-

assert  his  power  by  allying  with  the  Dutch,  but  this  plan  was  ended  by  the  Battle  of 

Chinsurah.  After  the  defeat  at  Battle  of  Buxar  and  grant  of  the  Diwani  (revenue 

collection) of Bengal by the then Mughal Emperor Shah Alam II, to the British East India 

Company  in  August  1765  and  the  appointment  of  Warren  Hastings  by  the  East  India 

Company  as  their  first  Governor  General  of  Bengal  in  1773,  the  Nawabs  authority 

became  restricted.  By  1773,  British  East  India  company  asserted  much  authority  and 



 


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   ...   62


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling