Medieval and early modern periods 1206


Download 5.23 Mb.

bet54/62
Sana12.02.2017
Hajmi5.23 Mb.
1   ...   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   57   ...   62

391 | 

P a g e


 

 

to escape from the Chamkaur and the Guru had to obey it, because at that point of time, 



and as proclaimed by the Guru on March 30, 1699 about his absorption into the Khalsa 

and  declaring  the  five-beloved  being  equal  to  him,  the  Guru  was  just  a  Singh  of  the 

Khalsa. 

 

Code of conduct 

The Khalsa needs to abide by the four restrictions set by Guru Gobind Singh and 

if a Sikh breaks one of these four restrictions they are excommunicated from the Khalsa 

Panth  and  must  go  'pesh'  (get  baptized  again).  Guru  Gobind  Singh  also  gave  the 

Khalsa 52 hukams or 52 specific additional guidelines while living in Nanded in 1708  

Prohibitions 

The four prohibitions or mandatory restrictions of the Khalsa are: 

1.  Not to disturb the natural growth of the hairs. 

2.  Eating Kutha meat, meat of an animal slaughtered in the Muslim halal or Jewish 

kosher way; 

3.  Cohabiting with a person other than one's spouse; 

4.  Using tobacco or hookah. 

Five Ks 

The five items (or Kakkars)  

Kachera,  Kara,  Kirpan,  Kanga  and  Kesh.  A  person  who  wears  all  these  Five 

Kakaars should be considered a Sikh.[2] 

1. 


Kesh: uncut hair 

2. 


Kangha: a wooden comb 

3. 


Kara: a metal bracelet 

4. 


Kachera: a specific style of cotton undergarments 

5. 


Kirpan: a strapped curved sword 

 

Kesh 



Significance 

 

392 | 

P a g e


 

 

Kesh is a symbol of devotion to God, reminding Sikhs that they should obey the 



will of God. At the Amrit Sanchar in 1699, Guru Gobind Singh explained the reason for 

this: 


My Sikh shall not use the razor. For him the use of razor or shaving the chin shall 

be as sinful as incest. For the Khalsa such a symbol is prescribed so that his Sikhs can 

be classified as pure 

So  important  is  Kesh  that  during  the  persecution  of  Sikhs  under  the  Mughal 

Empire,  followers  were  willing  to  face  death  rather  than  shave  or  cut  their  hair  to 

disguise themselves or appease the Khan.  



Modern trend 

In  modern  times  the  trend  of  short  hair  has  encroached  upon  this  tradition;  in 

some  parts  of  Punjab,  it  is  estimated  that  80%  of  youths  have  cut  their  hair.[citation 

needed]  Meanwhile,  it  is  estimated  that  half  of  India's  Sikh  men  have  abandoned  the 

turban  and  cut  their  hair.  Reasons  include  simple  convenience 

  avoiding  the  daily 



combing and tying - because their parents hair was also cut and their parents decided 

to get their hair cut as well 

 as well as social pressure from the mainstream culture to 



adjust their appearance to fit the norm.  

Harassment 

After the attacks of September 11, 2001, Sikhs in the West have been mistaken 

for  Muslims  and  subjected  to  hate  crimes.  Balbir  Singh  Sodhi,  a  Sikh  living  in  Mesa, 

Arizona, was shot to death on September 16, 2001 when he was mistaken for a Muslim.  

In  2007,  an  18-year-old  Pakistani,  Umair  Ahmed,  forcibly  cut  the  hair  of  a  15-

year-old Sikh boy Harpal Vacher in a US school. In 2008, he was convicted by the jury 

of "second-degree menacing as a hate crime, second-degree coercion as a hate crime, 

fourth-degree criminal possession of a weapon, and third-degree harassment."

  

In 2009, Resham Singh, a Punjabi student in Melbourne, Australia, was attacked 



by a group of teenagers who tried to remove his turban and cut his hair.  

In  2010,  Basant  Singh,  a  Sikh  youth  in  Penang,  Malaysia  woke  up  discovering 

his  hair  was  cut  by  50 cm  when  he  was  asleep  in  his  dormitory  while  serving  the 

Malaysian  National  Service  Training  Programme.  The  incident  traumatised  the  youth 

and is under probe ordered by the Defense Ministry.  

In  September  2012  a  member  of  reddit  uploaded  a  picture  of  Balpreet  Kaur,  a 

young  Sikh  woman,  mocking  her  facial  hair.  She  responded  in  a  calm  manner, 

explaining the reason behind her appearance and the original poster apologized. It then 

went viral.  


 

393 | 

P a g e


 

 

Kangha 



History 

The Sikhs were mandated by Guru Gobind Singh at the Baisakhi Amrit Sanchar 

in  1699 to wear a small comb called a Kanga at  all times.  Kanga must  be worn by all 

baptised  Sikhs  (Khalsa),  after  a  mandatory  religious  commandment  given  by  Guru 

Gobind Singh (the tenth Guru of Sikhism) in 1699. This was one of five articles of faith, 

collectively called Kakars that form the external visible symbols to clearly and outwardly 

display one's commitment and dedication to the order (Hukam) of the tenth master and 

become  a member of  Khalsa. The  Khalsa  is  the  "Saint-Soldier"  of  Guru  Gobind  Singh 

who stated: 

"He does not recognize anyone else except One Lord, not even the bestowal of 

charities, performance of merciful acts, austerities and restraint on pilgrim-stations; the 

perfect  light  of  the  Lord  illuminates  his  heart,  then  consider  him  as  the  immaculate 

Khalsa." (Guru Gobind Singh in the Dasam Granth page 1350) 

The  Kanga  is  an  article  that  allows  the  Sikh  to  care for his  or  her unshorn  long 

hair,  Kesh.  The  kanga  is  usually  tucked  behind  the  "Rishi  Knot"  and  tied  under  the 

turban. It is to be used twice daily to comb and keep the hair in a disentangled and tidy 

condition. It represents the importance of discipline and cleanliness to a Sikh way of life 

and  is  used  to  keep  the  hair  healthy,  clean,  shining  and  tangle-free.  The  Kanga  is 

tucked under the rishi knot to keep the rishi knot firm and in place. Guru Gobind Singh 

old name was Guru Gobind Rai before the khalsa was made 



Kara 

A kara, is a steel or iron (sarb loh) bracelet, worn by all initiated Sikhs. It is one of 

the five kakars or 5Ks 

 external articles of faith 



 that identify a Sikh as dedicated to 

their religious order. The kara was instituted by the tenth Sikh guru Gobind Singh at the 

Baisakhi Amrit Sanskar in 1699. Guru Gobind Singh Ji explained: 

He  does  not  recognize  anyone  else  except  me,  not  even  the  bestowal  of 

charities, performance of merciful acts, austerities and restraint on pilgrim-stations; the 

perfect  light  of  the  Lord  illuminates  his  heart,  then  consider  him  as  the  immaculate 

Khalsa. 


The  kara  is  to  constantly  remind  the Sikh  disciple  to  do  God's  work,  a  constant 

reminder of the Sikh's mission on this earth and that he or she must carry out righteous 

and true deeds and actions, keeping with the  advice given by the Guru. The Kara is a 

symbol of unbreakable attachment and commitment to God. It is in the shape of a circle 

which has no beginning and no end, like the eternal nature of God. It is also a symbol of 

the Sikh brotherhood. As the Sikhs' holy text the Guru Granth Sahib says "In the tenth 

month, you were made into a human being, O my merchant friend, and you were given 


 

394 | 

P a g e


 

 

your allotted time to perform good deeds." Similarly,  Bhagat  Kabir reminds the Sikh  to 



always  keep  one's  consciousness  with  God:  "With  your  hands  and  feet,  do  all  your 

work,  but  let  your  consciousness  remain  with  the  Immaculate  Lord."  The  kara  is  also 

worn by many ethnic Punjabis who may be Hindu, Muslim, or Christian; moreover, the 

use of the kara by non-Sikhs is encouraged as it represents the "totality of God."  

The basic kara is a simple  unadorned steel bracelet,  but  other forms exist.  The 

kara originated as a protective ring to guard the sword arm of the Khalsa warriors during 

battle when fighting armed with swords. 

It  was  also  historically  used  like  a  knuckle-duster  for  hand-to-hand  combat. 

Battlefield variations include kara with spikes or sharp edges. Sikh soldiers of the British 

Indian army would settle disputes by competing in a form of boxing known as loh-musti 

(lit. iron fist) with a kara on one hand. 

Kachera 

Kacchera  are specially designed short, shalwar-like loose undergarments with a 

tie-knot ("naala" = drawstring) worn by baptized Sikhs. It is one of the five Sikh articles 

of faith called the Five Ks , and was given as a "gift of love" by  Guru Gobind Singh at 

the  Baisakhi  Amrit  Sanskar  in  1699.  Kacchera  have  been  worn  by  baptized  Sikhs 

(Khalsa)  since  a mandatory  religious  commandment  given  by  Guru  Gobind  Singh,  the 

tenth  Guru  of  Sikhism,  in  1699.  Both  male  and  female  Sikhs  wear  similar 

undergarments.  This  is  one  of  five  articles  of  faith

collectively  called  "Kakkars"



that 


form  the  external,  visible  symbols  clearly  and  outwardly  displaying  one's  commitment 

and dedication to the order (Hukam) of the tenth master. 

The  Sikh  Code  of  Conduct  states  "For  a  Sikh,  there  is  no  restriction  or 

requirement as to dress except that he must wear Kachhehra and turban."[1] Kachera is 

a  drawer  type  fastened  by  a  fitted  string  round  the  waist,  very  often  worn  as  an 

underwear.  This  Kakkar  was  given  by  Gobind  Singh  to  remind  his  Sikhs  that  they 

should  control  their  sexual  desire,  Kaam  (lust).  The  kacchera  is  above-the-knee 

underwear  meant  to  give  a  feeling  of  dignity,  modesty,  and  honour  to  the  person  who 

wears it. The garment is usually made from white, lightweight-cotton material. It serves 

to cover the genitalia, as well as to remind the Sikh of the Guru's commandment to think 

of members of the opposite sex as he or she would think of immediate family and not as 

objects of lust. The kacchera is secured and tied with a "nara" (drawstring). This serves 

as another reminder that when one is untying the drawstring one is given  time to think 

about what one is about to do. 

The  kacchera  is  the  Guru's  gift  and  it  reminds  the  Sikhlibus  of  the  Guru's 

message  regarding  the  control  of  the  Five  Evils,  especially  lust.  Further,  this  garment 

allows  a  Sikh  soldier  to  operate  in  combat  freely  and  without  any  hindrance  or 

restriction[clarification  needed].  It  serves  its  purpose  efficiently  and  effectively  and  is 

easy  to  fabricate,  maintain,  wash,  and  carry  compared  to  other  conventional 

undergarments, such as the dhoti, etc. 



 

395 | 

P a g e


 

 

The Guru Granth Sahib states that sexual desire can be overcome: "Through the 



Kind  and  Compassionate  True  Guru,  I  have  met  the  Lord;  I  have  conquered  sexual 

desire,  anger  and  greed."  and  that  one  should  renounce  worldly  desire  and  seek  the 

sanctuary of the Lord.  

Kirpan 

History 

Sikhism was founded in the 15th century in present-day Punjab. At the time of its 

founding, this culturally rich region had been conquered by Muslim invaders from central 

Asia.  During  the  time  of  the  founder  of  the  Sikh  faith  and  its  first  guru,  Guru  Nanak, 

Sikhism flourished as a counter to both the prevalent Hindu and Muslim teachings. The 

Mughal  emperor  Akbar  was  relatively  tolerant  of  non-Islamic  religions  and  focused  on 

religious tolerance. His relationship with Nanak was cordial.  

The  relationship  between  the  Sikhs  and  Akbar's  successor  Jehangir  was  not 

friendly. Due to a large number of Muslim converts to Sikhism and references to Muslim 

and  Hindu  teachings  in  the  Guru  Granth  Sahib,  the  fifth  guru,  Guru  Arjan  Dev  was 

summoned and executed.  

This incident is seen as a turning point in Sikh history,[citation needed] leading to 

the  first  instance  of  militarization  of  Sikhs  under  Guru  Arjun's  successor  Guru 

Hargobind. Guru Hargobind trained in shashtravidya, a form of martial arts that became 

prevalent  among  the  Sikhs.  He  first  conceptualized  the  idea  of  the  kirpan  through  the 

notion of Sant Sipahi, or "saint soldiers". 

The  relationship  between  the  Sikhs  and  the  Mughals  further  deteriorated 

following  the  execution  of  the  ninth  Guru  Tegh  Bahadur  by  Aurengzeb,  who  showed 

high levels of intolerance to Sikhs, partially driven by his desire to impose Sharia. 

Experiencing another execution of their leader and facing increasing persecution, 

the Sikhs were forced to officially adopt militarization for self-protection by creating the 

Khalsa;  an  incident  that  also  formalized  various  aspects  of  the  Sikhs  faith.  The  tenth 

(and final) guru, Guru Gobind Singh formally included the kirpan as a mandatory article 

of faith for all baptised Sikhs, making it a duty for Sikhs to be able to defend themselves 

and others from oppression. 

Legality 

In recent times, there has been debate about allowing Sikhs to carry a kirpan that 

would  otherwise  be  an  unlawful  weapon,  with  some  countries  allowing  Sikhs  a 

dispensation. 



 

396 | 

P a g e


 

 

Other issues not strictly of legality arise such as whether or not to allow carrying 



of kirpans on commercial aircraft or into areas where security is enforced. 

 

 

Belgium 

On  12  October  2009  the  Antwerp  Court  declared  carrying  a  kirpan  a  religious 

symbol,  overturning  a 

  550  fine  from  a  lower  court  for  "carrying  a  freely  obtainable 



weapon without any legal reason". 

Canada 

In  most  public  places  in  Canada  a  kirpan  is  allowed,  although  there  have  been 

some  court  cases  involving  the  carrying  on  school  premises.  In  the  2006  Supreme 

Court of Canada decision of Multani v. Commission scolaire Marguerite-Bourgeoys the 

court  held  that  the  banning  of  the  kirpan  in  a  school  environment  offended  Canada's 

Charter  of  Rights  and  Freedoms,  nor  could  the  limitation  be  upheld  under  s.  1  of  the 

Charter, as per R. v. Oakes. The issue started when a 12-year-old schoolboy dropped a 

20 cm (8-inch) long kirpan in school. School staff and parents were very concerned, and 

the  student  was  required  to  attend  school  under  police  supervision  until  the  court 

decision[9]  was  reached.  A  student  is  allowed  to  have  a  kirpan  on  his  person  if  it  is 

sealed and secured.  

In September 2008, Montreal police announced that a 13-year-old student was to 

be  charged  after  he  allegedly  threatened  another  student  with  his  kirpan.  The  court 

found the teen not-guilty of assault with the kirpan but he was found guilty of threatening 

his schoolmates and granted an absolute discharge on 15 April 2009.  

On  February  9,  2011,  the  National  Assembly  of  Quebec  unanimously  voted  to 

ban  kirpan  from  the  provincial  parliament  buildings.  However,  despite  opposition  from 

the  Bloc  Québécois,  it  was  voted  that  the  kirpan  be  allowed  in  federal  parliamentary 

buildings.  

Denmark 

On 24 October 2006, the Eastern High Court of Denmark upheld the earlier ruling 

of  the  Copenhagen  City  Court  that  the  wearing  of  a  kirpan  by  a  Sikh  was  illegal, 

becoming  the  first  country  in  the  world  to  pass  such  a  ruling.  Ripudaman  Singh,  who 

now works as a scientist, was earlier convicted by the City Court of breaking the law by 

publicly  carrying  a  knife.  He  was  sentenced  to  a  3000  kroner  fine  or  six  days' 

imprisonment. Though the High Court quashed this sentence, it held that the carrying of 

a kirpan by a Sikh broke the law. The judge stated that "after all the information about 

the accused, the reason for the accused to possess a knife and the other circumstances 


 

397 | 

P a g e


 

 

of the case, such exceptional extenuating circumstances are found, that the punishment 



should be dropped, cf. Penal Code § 83, 2nd period." 

Danish law allows carrying of knives (longer than 6 centimeters and non-foldable) 

in  public  places  if  it  is  for  any  purpose  recognized  as  valid,  including  work-related, 

recreation,  etc. The High Court did  not  find religion to be a valid reason for carrying a 

knife. It stated that "for these reasons, as stated by the City Court, it is agreed that the 

circumstance  of  the  accused  carrying  the  knife  as  a  Sikh,  cannot  be  regarded  as  a 

similarly  recognisable  purpose,  included  in  the  decision  for  the  exceptions  in  weapon 

law  §  4,  par.  1,  1st  period,  second  part."  Conviction  number  for  the  case  above,  is  U 

2007.316 Ø in weekly justice.  

India 

Sikhism  originated  in  the  Indian  sub-continent  during  the  Mughal  era  and  a 

majority of the Sikh population lives in present-day India, where they form around 2% of 

its population. 

Article 25 of the Indian Constitution deems the carrying of a kirpan to be included 

in the profession of the Sikh religion, thus legalizing the carrying of a kirpan by Sikhs. 



Sweden 

Swedish law has a ban on "street weapons" in public places that includes knives 

unless used for recreation (for instance fishing) or profession (for instance a carpenter). 

Carrying some smaller knives, typically folding pocket knives, is allowed, so that smaller 

kirpans may be within the law.  

United Kingdom 

England and Wales 

As a bladed article, possession of a kirpan without valid reason in a public place 

would be illegal under section 139 of the Criminal Justice Act 1988. However, there is a 

specific  defence  for  a  person  to  prove  that  he  had  it  with  him  for  "religious  reasons". 

There  is  an  identical  defence  to  the  similar  offence  (section  139A)  which  relates  to 

school grounds. Notably, the official list of prohibited items on the London 2012 Summer 

Olympics venues, while prohibiting all kinds of weapons, explicitly allowed the kirpan.  

Scotland 

Similar  provisions  exist  in  Scots  law  with  section  49  of  the  Criminal  Law 

(Consolidation) (Scotland) Act 1995 making it an offence to possess a bladed or pointed 

article  in  a  public  place.  A  defence  exists  under  s.49(5)(b)  of  the  act  for  pointed  or 

bladed  articles  carried  for  religious  reasons.  Section  49A  of  the  same  act  creates  the 


 

398 | 

P a g e


 

 

offence  of  possessing  a  bladed  or  pointed  article  in  a  school  with  s.49A(4)(c)  again 



creating a defence when the article is carried for religious reasons. 

United States of America 

Several court cases in the US have addressed the legality of wearing a kirpan in 

public. Courts in New York and Ohio have ruled that banning the wearing of a kirpan is 

unconstitutional.  In  New  York  City,  a  compromise  was  reached  with  the  Board  of 

Education whereby the wearing of the knives was allowed so long as they were secured 

within  the  sheaths  with  adhesives  and  made  impossible  to  draw.  In  recent  years,  the 

Sikh practice of wearing a Kirpan has caused problems for security personnel at airports 

and  other  checkpoints;  security  personnel  may  confiscate  kirpans  if  they  feel  it  is 

necessary, but are advised to treat them with respect. Sikh leaders chose not to attend 

an  17  April  2008  interfaith  meeting  with  Pope  Benedict  XVI  at  the  Pope  John  Paul  II 

Cultural Center in Washington, DC, rather than remove the kirpan.  

 

These are for identification and representation of the ideals of Sikhism, such as 



honesty, equality, fidelity, meditating on God, and never bowing to tyranny,[20] and for 

helping/protecting the weak, and self-defense. 



Initiation 

History 

Khande di Pahul was initiated in the times of Guru Gobind Singh when the Guru 

established  the  Order  of  Khalsa  at  Anandpur  Sahib  on  the  day  of  Vaisakhi  in  1699. 

Guru Gobind Singh addressed the congregation from the entryway of a tent pitched on 

a  hill  (now  called  Kesgarh  Sahib).  He  drew  his  sword  and  asked  for  a  volunteer  who 

was willing to sacrifice his head. No one answered his first call, nor the second call, but 

on  the  third  invitation,  a  person  called  Daya  Ram  (later  known  as  Bhai  Daya  Singh) 

came forward and offered his head to the Guru. Guru Gobind Singh took the volunteer 

inside  the  tent,  and  emerged  shortly,  with  blood  dripping  from  his  sword.  He  then 

demanded another head. One more volunteer came forward, and entered the tent with 

him.  The  Guru  again  emerged  with  blood  on  his  sword.  This  happened  three  more 

times. Then the five volunteers came out of the tent unharmed. 

These  five  men  came  to  be  known  as  Panj  Piare  or  the  "Beloved  Five".  These 

five were initiated into the Khalsa by receiving Amrit. These five were Bhai Daya Singh, 

Bhai  Mukham  Singh,  Bhai  Sahib  Singh,  Bhai  Dharam  Singh  and  Bhai  Himmat  Singh. 

Sikh men were then given the name Singh meaning "lion" and the women received the 

last name Kaur meaning "princess" 

Khande  Di  Pahul  not  only  embodies  the  primary  objects  of  Sikh  faith  and  the 

promises connected therewith, but also is itself a promise to lead a pure and pious life 


 



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   57   ...   62


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling