Domaine le roc des anges, roussillon


Download 6.21 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet72/87
Sana21.11.2017
Hajmi6.21 Mb.
1   ...   68   69   70   71   72   73   74   75   ...   87

 

2015 


COUVE ~ Renski Rizling, Laski Rizling 

 



2013 

LASKI RIZLING 

 

2013 



RENSKI RIZLING 

 



2014  

DOLIUM WHITE ~ Muskat Ottonel 

 

2008 



SAUVIGNON - magnums 

 



 

 


 

 - 328 - 

 

 

HUNGARY 



 

 

 



HETSZOLO, TOKAJ – Organic 

The undisputed king of Hungarian vineyards, Mount Tokaj is located to the north of the country, 200 km east of Budapest. 

This legendary location produces exceptional wines, protected since 1772 by the first appellation of origin awarded in the 

entire world. 

 

The Royal Imperial Estate of Tokaj-Hétszolo owns beautiful land and cracking vines on the southern slopes of Mount Tokaj 

since 1502. No surprise, then, that it has attracted the attention of the greats of the wine world for over 5 centuries! 

  

The creation of the estate owes nothing to chance: the Garai family simply selected the best 7 parcels of the land in the region, 

hence the name - Hét Szolo means "7 parcels of vineyard" in Hungarian. Thence followed a series of prestigious owners, 

including Gaspar Karoli, translator of the Bible into Hungarian, Gabor Bethlen, prince of Transylvania and the Princes 

Rakoczi, a grand aristocratic family. The Habsburg royal family finally took possession of the vineyard and Tokaj-Hétszolo 

became an Imperial Estate in 1711. It was to remain the property of the Austro-Hungarian Crown for almost two centuries. 

Following a turbulent 20th Century, the Tokaj-Hétszolo Estate became one of the Michel Reybier vineyards in 2009, joining 

Cos d'Estournel, Saint-Estèphe Grand Cru classé, Château-Marbuzet and Goulée Médoc in their portfolio. 

The terroir is special. The volcanic rock here is covered by a particularly thick layer of loess, and the directly south-facing 

side of the hill benefits from optimum levels of sunshine. The parcels overlook the misty valley where the Rivers Tisza and 

Bodrog meet, and enjoy the perfect microclimate for botrytris cinerea, which produces the much-prized noble rot. 

Ecological responsibility is at the forefront of the winery’s objectives. There wasn’t any agriculture at Hétszőlő between the 

1950’s and 1990 - in fact throughout the era of massive agrochemical use of Soviet regime. When the vineyards were 

replanted in 1991 sustainability was put to the fore. To make organic culture more official, Hétszőlő began the conversion 

process for organic certification in 2009 with the label of Hungária Ökogarancia, an official organic certifier in Hungary. 

  

Today all the 55 hectares of vineyards of the estate are cultivated strictly in organic way. Minuscule amounts of copper and 

sulphur are employed. Instead of systemic chemicals they use more natural products like orange oil, baking powder and other 

substances. No artificial fertilizers, nor herbicides, are used and natural pest management is practised using predatory 

insects. Soil management is done by means of composting and diverse cover crop. Ecological islands have been established 

next to vine parcels to increase biodiversity. Allied to these changes is a move towards more natural wine making, using 

indigenous yeasts and spontaneous fermentation. 

The dry wine is 100% Furmint from the south-facing Nagyszőlő & Hétszőlő single vineyards on thick loess soil with more 

complex volcanic subsoil. Yields are around 35 hl/ha, and the wine is fermented and aged for five months in stainless tanks 

with weekly batonnage. The nose is quite reserved and a touch balsamic, but the palate is striking with lime, pear and green 

apple notes. Elegant acidity and minerality. The wine benefits from not being served too cold. 

 

Late Harvest is an important category nowadays for Tokaj. At Hétszőlő they use mostly use shrivelled berries with no botrytis, 

the aim being to keep the wine fresh and fruity and easy to drink. This version comprised Furmint 70% + Hárslevelű 30% 

from low-yielding vines (25hl/ha) and, like the dry wine, is fermented and matured in tank. On the nose we find citrus, 

elderflower, linden blossom and fresh tropical fruit notes. The same fruit comes through on the palate along with minerality 

and lovely balancing acidity.  

 

 

2016 


TOKAJI DRY FURMINT 

 



2015 

TOKAJI LATE HARVEST 

Sw 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 - 329 - 

 

 

NEW ZEALAND



 

 

 



What’s bred in the bone… 

 

 



“I  will  go  on  the  slightest  errand  now  to  the  Antipodes  that  you  can 

devise to send me on, said Benedick who ranked it as unpleasant a task 

as plucking out a hair from the Great Cham’s beard or exchanging a word 

with Beatrice. Our delightful errand in particular question was to seek 

out  evidence  of  life  in  the  currently  hibernating  New  Zealand  wine 

industry...” 

 

This is what I wrote a few years: it is no longer true. It is important to 



bear in mind that while New Zealand is still comparatively in its infancy 

as a wine producing country the wine industry is both dynamic and self-

questioning.  The  vines  are  still  very  young  and  the  resulting  wines, 

although they can exhibit an exhilarating freshness of fruit, rarely have 

the finesse and complexity associated with terroir. This is changing; low 

yields and marginal climates keep the wines honest. The choice of grape 

varieties is important: New Zealand has coasted on its ludicrously over-

inflated reputation for Sauvignon. To be taken seriously, however, you 

have to master the red grape varieties, and we now judge New Zealand 

especially  in  relation  to  other  countries  in  its  holy  quest  for  the  Pinot 

grail. 

 

Of all the regions in New Zealand Martinborough is producing the most 



world-class wines per producer at present, although quantities are small 

and  prices  are  scary.  Here  be  great  Pinot  Noir  and  good  Chardonnay. 

Hawkes  Bay  works  well  for  the  Cabernet  blends  and  the  surprisingly 

rarely  planted  Syrah.  Central  Otago  has  laid  claim  to  Pinot  Noir  and 

possibly  Riesling  and  Pinot  Gris.  Marlborough  (the  biggest  area  of 

production) is already renowned for the ubiquitous Sauvignon and other 

grape  varieties  are  showing  promise.  Waipara’s  (Canterbury)  superb 

Burgundian terroir make it ideal for world-class Pinot and Chardonnay. 

One criticism that might currently be levelled at New Zealand wines is 

their  tendency  towards  imbalance.  Quite  a  lot  of  Pinot  stew  is  still 

brewed:  alcoholic,  with  green  tannins  and  overextracted.  Chardonnay 

can be hot and heavy and taste of melted oak girders, Riesling will often 

resemble  fruit  loops  and,  on  a  bad  day,  the  Sauvignon  can  be  mean 

enough to give your nostrils a gooseberry enema. Much work to be done 

therefore,  but  no  doubting  the  potential  of  the  wines  and  the  overall 

standard is very high. 

 

 

Terrible  tragedy  in  the  South  Seas.  Three  million 



people trapped alive. 

 

Apocryphal Headline, New Zealand Listener 1979 



 

 

On  the  subject  of  sparkling  wine  Cloudy  Bay  have 



released the new deluxe brand “Thesaurus”, as they 

have  run  out  of  superlatives  to  promote  their  own 

products. 

 

Wine News Headlines 



 

 

 



We’ve  revamped  our  selection  from  New  Zealand 

with some biodynamic offerings. Sato is a new name 

in Central Otago. The 2009 vintage was their maiden 

voyage and a fine wine, and for their encore the 2010 

carries on the good work. We are also delighted to be 

working with Mike and Claudia Weersing at Pyramid 



Valley  in  northern  Canterbury  who  make  beautifully 

eloquent  Chardonnays,  Pinots  and  Rieslings  using 

little  or  no  sulphur.  These  are  exhilarating,  roller-

coaster  wines,  their  unpredictability  and  mutability 

part of their inherent charm. 

 

Framingham  continues  to  improve  in  leaps  and 



bounds.  Andrew  Hedley  is  surely  the  most  talented 

exponent  of  Riesling  in  New  Zealand,  making  the 

most ethereal (dare one say, Germanic) style at various 

levels of sweetness. His dry wines from old vines are 

also complex and remarkably ageworthy. Not that he 

is  one  trick  (or  ten  trick)  pony.  Excellent  Sauvignon 

with lees-contact and a touch of barrel work has more 

mouthfeel  and  complexity  than  the  run-of-the-mill 

Marlborough  Savvy,  textural  Pinot  Gris  has  warmth 

and  spice  in  abundance,  Pinot  Noir  is  well-knit  and 

fruit-driven  and  Montepulciano  has  sweet  ‘n’  spicy 

cherry fruit – great fun. 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 



From Science Today – 01/04/2012 – “High-Flying Sauvignon” 

 

It had to happen and so it did. In the wake of the hugely successful Cloudy Bay locator, Les Caves de Pyrène, a small company based in 



Guildford, has teamed up with top scientists and winery technicians to come up with a technological solution to keep tabs on their New 

Zealand brands in order to determine precisely where and when they were selling. Christened the “Pinot Pinpointer” they devised a 

system using the latest GPS smart technology wherein micro-chips could be implanted in the cork (or stelvin lining) before bottling; these 

chips contain complex digital information and emit a periodic signal which can be uploaded via satellite and downloaded instantly onto a 

web-site giving literally up-to-the-minute information regarding the sales history and whereabouts of every single bottle of that particular 

wine in the world. The transmission signal, incidentally, is only “active” until the cork is pulled. New phone technology means that you 

can now “Wap-Sauv” to locate and track down a bottle of your favourite Marlborough tipple and an inbuilt Sat-Sauv-Nav device will 

enable you to calculate the quickest route between two bottles. Initial teething problems have included certain difficulties tracking 

Riesling (the signals to the satellite are boosted by the alcoholic content of the wine) and the more ethereal nature of the grape variety has 

resulted in signal interference from Talk Radio stations and low flying aircraft. A spokesman for Les Caves de Pyrène commented: “The 

Pinot Pinpointer is the ultimate no-brainer for the wine trade”. 

 

 



 

 - 330 - 



NEW ZEALAND 

Continued… 



 

“If it would not look too much like showing off, I would tell the reader where New Zealand is.” ..... Mark Twain 189 



 

 

FELTON ROAD WINERY, Central Otago – Biodynamic  

Felton Road winery is located in Bannockburn, Central Otago, the most southerly wine-growing region in the world. 

Here, vineyards are nestled into small microclimates totally surrounded by high mountains, many of which are snow-

capped all year round. Though the location is on the edge of sustainable viticulture these microclimates consistently 

combine hot days, cool nights and long dry autumns: perfect for the creation of fine Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Riesling. 

The latitude of 45 degrees south is similar to the Willamette Valley in Oregon and some of the finest wine regions of 

France. 

  

Central Otago is New Zealand’s only wine region with a continental climate rather than a maritime one. This brings the 

risk of frosts but has the benefit of low rainfall and high sunshine hours. Of the five distinct microclimates so far identified 

in Central Otago, Bannockburn, with its gentle north facing slopes and deep loess soils seems well suited to the 

production of complex Pinot Noir. Viticulture makes extensive use of handwork and is heavily influenced by organic 

practice. The canopies use the Vertical Shoot Position trellis system with all pruning, positioning, shoot thinning, leaf 

plucking and fruit thinning performed carefully by hand. Cover crops are used to supply a natural biodiversity in the 

vineyard which aids vine balance as well as helping control disease and pests. The use of natural manure obtained from 

organic sources aids the “gentle touch” approach to the vines. Harvesting is by hand starting around the beginning of 

April and each block is harvested and vinified separately. A three level gravity-flow winery has been specifically created 

to make wine by hand in the gentlest way possible.  

 

When making Pinot Noir, fruit passes by gravity to fermenters to prevent pumping of must. Fruit is not crushed so it 

ferments as whole berries while the use of a percentage of whole bunches adds complexity and structure. Using wild 

yeasts for the fermentation is an important part of the natural wine making philosophy, with wines being rested outdoors 

in small fermenters for extended maceration with up to four punch downs per day, before being run by gravity to barrel. 

All the barrels are Burgundian coopered, 3-year air dried (typically 30% new oak each vintage) and selected for their 

slow extraction and subtlety of flavour. 

 

White wines are all hand harvested and whole bunch pressed. Chardonnay for barrel fermentation passes by gravity 

straight to the barrel from the press to await a wild yeast ferment. Again a natural malolactic follows in the spring. The 

Chardonnay barrels are also 100% French oak, low extraction, 3 year air dried. This Chardonnay is stirred by batonnage 

(stirring of the lees) regularly throughout its life.  

 

The Felton Rieslings and Chardonnays are whole bunch pressed then wild yeast fermented, with the wines being left on 

gross lees with stirring to develop complexity and mouthfeel

 

So much for the technical detail. The wines themselves are wonderful, brilliantly exhibiting the terroir, full of aromatic 

fruit and wild herbs, lacking the extraction and bitterness one associates with many New Zealand wines. Matthew Jukes 

describes the 2004 Felton Road Riesling as “just about the best Riesling I’ve ever had”. You’re off your trolley, son; it is 

wonderful, but is arguable whether it’s even the best Felton Road Riesling of the vintage. But then they are all bloody 

cracking wines (pardon my New Zealandish).  

 

 All wines are bottled under stelvin. 

  

2016 



FELTON ROAD “VIRTUAL” DRY RIESLING ~ limited availability 

 



2016 

FELTON ROAD “VIRTUAL” RIESLING ~ limited availability 

 

2016 



FELTON ROAD BLOCK 1 RIESLING – limited availability 

 



2016 

FELTON ROAD BANNOCKBURN PINOT NOIR  

 

2015 



FELTON ROAD CALVERT PINOT NOIR 

 



2016 

FELTON ROAD BLOCK 3 PINOT NOIR ~ limited availability 

 

2015 



FELTON ROAD BLOCK 5 PINOT NOIR ~ limited availability 

 



2016 

FELTON ROAD VIN GRIS 

Ro 

 

 



 

 


 

 - 331 - 



 

 

 



 

SATO ESTATE, YOSHIAKI & KYOKO SATO, Central Otago – Biodynamic 

Sato Wines was established by Yoshiaki & Kyoko Sato, as a small project in 2009. Based in New Zealand since 2006 they have 

also worked in traditional winegrowing countries in the last several years, having had experience working with natural 

winegrowers in France and learning from them forms the core of their winemaking style. 

Yoshiaki & Kyoko believe grape vines need to be grown in organic ways – preferably in biodynamic ways. They believe grapes 

should be simply transformed to wine, with minimum intervention by human hands, chemicals or additives in order to protect 

the natural microbiological balance in the vineyard and winemaking process, so that the real character of the terroir where the 

grape vines grow is truly and purely expressed in the wine. 

 

Sato Wines does not have its own vineyard. They purchase grapes from reliable local organic or biodynamic growers in Central 

Otago that they form long lasting relationships with. Sato produces a dry mineral Riesling and two tiers of Pinot Noir in which 

demand always outstrips supply. 

 

The Chardonnay is whole bunch pressed slowly with no settling (though the wine was racked), no additions, fermentation starts 

naturally in older barrels and the wine is kept on lees for 14 months. Bottled with around 15ppm SO2. This wine was actually 

made by Kyoko, Yoshi’s wife, under his watchful eye. Complex bouquet of toast, honeyed oatmeal, stone fruit and blanched nuts. 

Au natural kind of vibe, oxidative richness; close your eyes and you could be in Jura. Glorious to drink, but not in the usual 

framework of linear elegance expected from en vogue chardonnay producers; an almost almond milk texture but with a bolt of 

long, tight acidity lending a steely line through the texture of the wine. Precise stone fruit and citrus flavours – pristine, squeaky 

fruit from cool climate Otago an anchor. Absolutely refreshing and delicious. Complex. 

 

Entirely natural wine with just 10ppm of sulfur (about a tenth of most wines). The fruit is carefully selected and juice stays in 

contact with the skins for 3 months. The wine is allowed to slowly macerate in a pretty oxidative environment with very gentle 

pigeage for light extraction. This is an unusually aromatic wine showing cherry skin, spice, some menthol and rose petal notes. 

The palate has rich in texture and has some notable tannin grip. Savoury, oxidative notes contrast the vibrancy of the cherry 

skin fruit and floral components...almost as if a Pinot Gris rose had been aged in a fino sherry cask (if you can imagine that!) 

Complex and esoteric. 

 

Sourced from specific blocks of the organically certified "Pisa Terrace" Vineyard. Hand-picked and sorted Abel (DRC) and 115 

clone Pinot Noir. Wild ferment, open tops, hand / foot plunged. Nothing added or taken away, no fining / filtration just a tiny 

addition of sulfur at bottling after 18 months in French oak only 10% new. This Pinot shows fragrant purple flowers, lilac and 

orange blossom. Subtle spice characters, and delicate wild thyme. The palate is very fine and elegant, tannins and just a 

whisper with the vibrant acidity playing most of the structural role. Focused, elegant and honest

.

 



 

2014 


SATO CHARDONNAY 

 



2015 

SATO NORTHBURN WHITE 

Or 

 

2014 



SATO PINOT GRIS 

 



2014 

SATO PINOT GRIS L’ATYPIQUE ~ Pinot Gris, Riesling 

Or 

 

2014 



SATO RIESLING 

 



2015 

SATO PISA TERRACE PINOT NOIR 

 

2014 



SATO PINOT NOIR L’INSOLITE 

 



 

 


 

 - 332 - 

 

 

NEW ZEALAND 



Continued… 

 

 

 



 

PYRAMID VALLEY, MIKE AND CLAUDIA WEERSING, Canterbury – Biodynamic  

Mike and Claudia Weersing came to New Zealand in 1996, when Mike began making wine with Tim and Judy Finn at Neudorf 

Vineyards in Nelson. After a long and intensive search to find a site for their own vineyard, they purchased a farm in the 

Pyramid Valley, near Waikari in North Canterbury, in 2000. Claudia is a committed 332elabeling332sts and she guides the 

vineyard activities whilst Mike studied oenology and viticulture in Burgundy, beginning at the Lycee Viticole in Beaune, and 

continuing at the Universite de Bourgogne in Dijon. He has worked extensively in the vineyards and cellars of Europe, for 

producers such as Hubert de Montille, Domaine de la Pousse d’Or, and Nicolas Potel in Burgundy; Jean-Michel Deiss and 

Marc Kreydenweiss in Alsace; and Ernst Loosen in the Mosel and many, many others. 

The search for the “right” terroir has been rigorous- marginal climate, clay-limestone soils, scarp slopes, eastern to northern 

aspect, etc. – finding their way home has been a ranging, rich and fascinating migration.  

 

Mike and Claudia have developed four vineyards over the last twelve years, two of Pinot Noir, and two of Chardonnay. Their 

unusual shapes and differing sizes have been determined by describing, and then adhering to, discrete areas of homogenous 

soil and aspect. Each block is vinified and bottled separately, as an expression of its specific place. The vineyard names are 

derived from common names of predominant weed species in each block. As soil conditions change, the weed mix responds 

accordingly. They have managed these vineyards biodynamically from the very beginning, doing so by hand for the first two 

tractor-less years. 

This is a labour of love and of perfection: plant density is the highest in New Zealand, yields austere, and the vineyard 

environment – embracing soils and plants and animals and insects and above all, people – is lavished with care.  

 

“Wine to us is a genie, genius loci; our task is to coax it from its stone bottle. Wine’s magical capacity for evoking site, we 

consider an obligation, as much as a gift. Every gesture we make, in the vineyard and winery, is a summons to the spirit of 

place. Biodynamics, hand-based viticulture, natural winemaking – these are all means we’ve adopted better to record and to 

transmit, with the greatest possible fidelity, this spirit’s song

.” 


Field of Fire Chardonnay (the name derives from a weed called twitch) has a glorious

 

nose of baked peach, pate brisée, and 



yellow flowers – acacia and fennel blossom. Also a comfortable note of warm cornbread. Lush on entry, but quickly turns 

streamlined, from stony acidity and girdling phenolics: great volume and energy, condensing and accelerating on the palate. 

Lion’s Tooth Chardonnay has flavours of yellow peach, ground almonds, and lemon curd. Very fluid, very long. 

Emergent aromas of sliced pear, hot stone, hawthorn (blossom), and alyssum. 

Immediately dense and powerful, rich but stern; something nearly solid about this wine. An intense kind of inwardness, the 

wine folding in upon itself, condensing to an astonishing saline core. Enormous force and length, with alternating assertions 

of golden flavour – ripe pear, toast, flower honey, nuts – and chalk-hard structure. 

Riverbrook Riesling is a delight. Powerful bouquet of yellow fruits – 332elabelin, muskmelon, golden peach – and herb and 

weed flowers: chamomile, wild fennel, goldenrod. Also an unusual, but intriguing musky/dusty note, no doubt from the noble 

rot.  

Wonderfully rich and broad, mouthcoating and expansive, but with no troubling loss of detail or energy. Slippery and insistent 

at the same time. Long, complex, ripe yellow finish, with an attractive almond-kernel grip balancing the fruit sweetness. 

 

Calvert Pinot is from a schist and quartz sand vineyard managed by the Felton Road team in Bannockburn, Central Otago. 

“Whole cluster, warm ferment on the indigenous yeasts and long cuvaison. 14 months on lees in French barriques (25% new) 

before bottling without filtering or fining. Thyme branch, creosote, raspberry puree; a note of bruised blackberries in fresh 

cream. Reelingly floral: hedgerose, nasturtium, lavender. An intriguing muscat/orange zest component – musk this year in 

place of spice. Rich and broad, expansive, alluring and inviting without becoming profligate; very ripe, something almost 

essential, but nothing reduced or preserved; really saturates the palate and senses, in a lush but invigorating way.

 

It is delicate 

and finely wrought, with sinewy cherry and herb flavours and silky tannins that impart great elegance to the wine. While other 

New Zealand Pinot Noirs display Burgundy-like attributes, this one tastes positively Burgundian, in a relatively light bodied, 

Côte de Beaune sort of way.”

 

 

The “Earth Smoke” Pinot Noir gives a very pale ruby, slightly cloudy colour and a good intensity of funky, wild strawberry 

and soy aromas with nuances of dried herbs and cloves. The medium bodied palate is very elegant with exquisitely soft 

tannins, medium to high acid and a medium-long finish. Angel Flower is very fine with beautiful aromas of red berries, 

minerals and dust, very beguiling. Finesse and elegance abounds on the palate, yet there is a wonderful richness and fullness 

despite the elegance, harmoniously filling the mouth. 

 

2015 


FIELDS OF FIRE CHARDONNAY 

 



2015 

LION’S TOOTH CHARDONNAY 

 

2014 



ROSE RIESLING 

 



2015 

ANGEL FLOWER PINOT NOIR 

 

2015 



EARTH SMOKE PINOT NOIR 

 



2008 

ROSE LATE HARVEST RIESLING – ½ bottle 

Sw 

 

1   ...   68   69   70   71   72   73   74   75   ...   87




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling