Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


 Memorandum From the Deputy Assistant Secretary of


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet81/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   77   78   79   80   81   82   83   84   ...   95

260. Memorandum From the Deputy Assistant Secretary of

Defense for International Economic Affairs (Frost) to the

Under Secretary of Defense for Policy (Komer)

1

Washington, February 12, 1980.



SUBJECT

DoD Involvement in International Energy Issues

REFERENCE

R. W. Komer Memorandum to SecDef/DepSecDef, 24 Dec 1979; (Secret/

Sensitive, Tab A)

In response to your memorandum,

2

we have developed a number



of specific follow-up actions. I recommend that you approve them and

indicate your priorities. Depending on your decision, we may have to

go for some temporary overstrength staff positions. My Office of Inter-

national Economic Affairs is greatly overburdened as it is. I contem-

plate as many as two staffers for energy issues plus one administrative

assistant serving the entire office.



Ellen L. Frost

3

Attachment

INTERNATIONAL ENERGY INITIATIVES

Summary:

1. Focus Attention on the National Security Impact of High Oil Prices



and Tight Oil Supplies.

It may cost the US less to develop alternative energy sources than it

would to undertake force build-ups. The former guarantees supply; the

latter is high risk and does not. In short, the former may be more

cost-effective.

We point out the need to highlight specific NATO stresses and the

vulnerability of key producer and consumer nations like Saudi Arabia

1

Source: Washington National Records Center, OASD/ISA Files: FRC 330–



82–0263, Box 1, ASD/ISA #2 Policy Files. Secret; Sensitive. Sent through the Assistant Sec-

retary of Defense for International Security Affairs, and a stamped notation indicates that

he saw it.

2

Attached at Tab A; printed as Document 253.



3

Frost signed “Ellen” above this typed signature.



365-608/428-S/80010

818 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

and Turkey. We suggest a program targeted on communicating the

gravity of these factors.

2. Examine the National Security Implication of Western and Eastern

European Dependence on Soviet and OPEC Energy Sources. Examine Means

to Assure Access to Crude and to Shift Supplies in the Event of Crisis.

We distinguish between crisis capacity and a willingness to pro-

duce given that excess capacity exists. We outline a range of potential

crisis possibilities involving Soviet, OPEC, OAPEC and other produc-

ers, and will develop a matrix of current dependencies and crisis op-

tions in and outside the IEA framework.

3. Focus Attention on Increasing the Use of Alternatives to Conventional

Petroleum in Military Applications within the US and Europe.

We strongly suggest speeding up the current US oil shale program.

If successful, this could fully meet US military needs by 1985; and fully

replace

the oil now supplied by either Algeria, Libya, or Indonesia. We

will investigate other fuel substitution possibilities with an eye toward

speed-up.

4. Focus DoD and Interagency Attention on the Question of Energy

Technology Transfer.

The US has no clearly defined energy technology transfer policy.

PRM 44, which was to develop the US-Soviet policy, was aborted.

4

En-



ergy technology, despite its specific importance, has been lost in overall

technology transfer questions. DoD is strongly supporting develop-

ment of a US policy which will discriminate between fuels and between

national targets.

5. Compare Alternative US, European, Japanese and other National Pro-

grams to Restrain Petroleum Demand and to Develop Alternative Energy

Sources.

Although this is being given NSC and IEA attention, we are not

satisfied with the pace. Nor are we convinced that US domestic plan-

ning cannot benefit from a closer look at other nations’ experience both

in demand restraint and alternative source development.

6. Review US and Soviet Coal Substitution Opportunities.

The US and Soviet Union each have coal reserves that even at

much higher utilization rates can serve for at least a hundred years.

Technological problems, but for environmental factors, are more con-

straining in the Soviet Union. We suggest a comparison of opportu-

nities in the two nations, to include technological cooperation, with the

purpose of accelerating the pace of transition to coal.

4

PRM 44, September 21, 1978, initiated a study of the “Export of Oil and Gas Pro-



duction Technology to U.S.S.R.” (Carter Library, National Security Council, Institutional

Files, Box 2, PRM 44)



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 819



Discussion:

1. Focus Attention on the National Security Impact of High Oil Prices



and Scarcity of Supply.

We will focus on national security arguments understandable to

the Congress and the public. These arguments will heighten awareness

of linkages between energy and national security. We will seek support

for new policy initiatives. We will emphasize the following points, each

of which is discussed below:

• New energy sources and conservation as alternatives to force

buildup and intervention;

• The impact of high energy prices and inflation on NATO bud-

gets and of energy scarcity on NATO resolve and preparedness;

• The especially vulnerable situations of key producer nations

(like Saudi Arabia) and consumer/NATO nations (like Turkey); and

• The need to direct a major effort to the problem of communicating

the national security gravity of the energy situation.

OPEC presently exports some 6.3 million b/d to the US, account-

ing for over 80% of our imports. This comes to about 2.2 billion barrels

per year. Assuming a $20 per barrel cost differential between OPEC oil

and oil that might be produced from shale, heavy oil deposits or coal, it

would cost about $44 billion annually to fully replace OPEC oil, using

these non-conventional sources. Incremental defense costs aimed at im-

proving the security of OPEC oil supplies may approach this amount in

a few years with no guarantee of assured supply. Further, $44 billion is

the upper bound on marginal substitute oil costs; the margin will nar-

row as OPEC prices rise. Some non-conventional sources even today

are considered no more costly than OPEC oil. Thus, an expenditure on al-

ternative petroleum sources could provide a much higher assurance of supply

than an equivalent or much higher expenditure on military forces.

We have


not yet made similar estimates for conservation alternatives but we feel

the potential is equally striking.

Inflation is running at some 10 percent in NATO Europe, about 30

percent of which is attributable to energy price increases. With contin-

ued dependence on OPEC, and on the Soviets, who account for 5–10%

of European oil and gas imports, we may expect further inflationary

pressures. NATO military budgets are suffering, making the 3% real

growth goal difficult if not impossible. Further, the Alliance is sorely

weakened with each direct approach to an OPEC producer by a NATO

member seeking a special deal for itself.

The particular vulnerability of key producer and consumer/

NATO nations deserves special attention. The Saudis would be vulner-

able to pressures from Iraq and South Yemen, not to mention internal

pressures directed at the Monarchy. Yet, the Saudi Arabian oil fields

are virtually unprotected. It has been said that the oil fields could liter-


365-608/428-S/80010

820 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

ally be taken over by an infantry battalion. We have to balance the op-

tion of intervening militarily, or at least indicating that we might,

which would be of questionable effectiveness in any imaginable cir-

cumstance, with that of seeking a greater degree of oil independence.

Turkey is a special circumstance. It occupies a unique and key po-

sition on the NATO flank. And it is facing political upheaval borne of

intense pressure from both the extreme right and extreme left. Both ex-

tremes, for different reasons, would like to see an army takeover. The

root of the problem is economic. NATO should help by mobilizing eco-

nomic assistance from its member nations. Furthermore, NATO mem-

bers could lend their support to priority IEA oil-sharing for Turkey. Ko-

rea and Brazil are also experiencing oil supply problems, and occupy

key regional positions.

The above are specific examples of the linkage between energy and

security. Unfortunately, although it would seem that this linkage can

hardly be doubted, many still pay it only lip service. The US has no



orchestrated

approach to sensitizing the country and the West to the

overriding strategic impact of the energy situation. Practically nothing

has been said in a language understandable to the Congress and ordi-

nary people who make up constituencies. The DoD should give

thought to an effort aimed at getting the right people involved in this



communications

job.


We will participate much more intensively in interagency fora dealing

with energy initiatives.

We are already participants in the NSC study as-

sessing international energy policy actions, are observing and will later

testify before Senator Jackson’s Energy and Natural Resources Com-

mittee on the geopolitics of energy, and participate in SCC and other

White House-directed deliberations on energy technology transfer. We

should integrate our international efforts with MRA&L’s participation

in the Sawhill Group working on domestic energy policy. We cannot

separate US domestic actions from international activity.

(Action: IEA primarily; assistance from USD (P)), LA, MRA&L and

other OSD offices as appropriate.)

2. Examine the National Security Implication of Western and Eastern



European Dependence on Soviet and OPEC Energy Sources. Examine, in

Event of Crisis, Means to Assure Greater Access to Crude from Selected Na-

tions and Possibilities for Shifting Supplies Outside the IEA Framework.

There are two “dependence” issues here: crisis production (will-



ingness

to meet a “surge” rate) and crisis capacity (ability to meet

“surge” rate). We will examine two cutback possibilities, Soviet and

OPEC. Soviet cutbacks may be forced by Soviet shortages or be foreign-

policy dictated. (The Soviets currently provide 5–10 percent of Western

European oil and gas with gas dependence expected to increase.) OPEC



365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 821

cutbacks may be OPEC-wide, OAPEC-wide, or selective. We will look

at:


• Possibilities for increasing OPEC production in the event of So-

viet cutbacks

• Possibilities in friendly OPEC nations in the event of selective

OPEC cutbacks

• Possibilities in non-OPEC nations (e.g., UK, Norway, Mexico) in

the event of Soviet, selective OPEC or OPEC-wide cutbacks

• The current pattern of oil and gas flow, and seek to develop a

matrix that might suggest alternatives

We have begun work in this area. We have outlined the nature of

Western European dependence on Soviet energy (oil and gas) and

begun to shape possible US policy responses. We are less clear on the

impact of Eastern European dependence; in particular, the impact of

substituting dependence on OPEC for dependence on the USSR. (The

Soviets currently furnish about 60% of Eastern European oil and 30% of

gas.) We should examine stepping up joint energy projects with the

East European moderates (Romania, Poland and Hungary).

As we examine political tradeoffs, we will examine the interrela-

tionship between the major energy sources (oil, gas, coal, possibly nu-

clear). Possibly, by urging a change in fuel, we may uncover an attrac-

tive variant relating to dependence on external sources; e.g., greater

European use of Dutch gas might conceivably reduce European de-

pendence on both OPEC and Soviet oil (and Soviet gas).

The following variables will be major inputs to this analysis:

• An assessment of OPEC moderates (perhaps Saudi Arabia, Ku-

wait, the UAE) willing to build up a capacity to substitute in the event

of Soviet export cutbacks. This would not involve Arab-Israeli issues.

This would constitute less than a 2% increase in current OPEC

production.

• An assessment of nations having unique vulnerability. Korea,

Iceland, Turkey, and possibly Brazil would be among these. Korea has

been threatened by an Iranian cutoff, Iceland is virtually dependent on

Soviet oil at this moment (might Canada substitute?), Turkey’s ap-

palling situation has already been described, and Brazil, which imports

85% of its oil, is dependent on Iraq for about half of that.

• An assessment of productive capacity in key non-OPEC nations.

Mexico is currently studying the possibility of moving up to 4 million

BD, and Britain and Norway conceivably might be induced, as NATO

members, to build crisis capacity.



In short, we will develop a matrix of current dependencies and potential

options.

(Action: IEA primarily; assistance from European and other Re-

gions as appropriate.)


365-608/428-S/80010

822 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

3. Focus Attention on Increasing the use of Alternatives to Conventional

Petroleum in Military Applications both in the US and Europe.

We will review the impact on NATO forces of petroleum scarcities

and high prices. We will emphasize substitution possibilities—to in-

clude coal in meeting facilities needs and non-conventional petroleum

in meeting transportation needs. Perhaps we and our NATO partners

should undertake accelerated programs to develop military fuels from

shale, heavy oil or coal.

We will examine boosting exports of US coal to Europe from the

current annual rate of 13 million short tons. The NSC and DOE are

looking at this possibility.

We will again ask the question, “Are we devoting enough DoD re-

search money to unconventional sources given that within 5 years we

may be desperately short of conventional fuels?” Past studies will be

noted. Perhaps the Navy has a much more powerful argument for

nuclear-powered ships now than it did just a few months ago.

We propose speeding-up the US program to develop oil shale pro-

duction to meet all US military needs for oil. The US has the clear-cut ca-

pability to meet fully its military needs for petroleum from oil shale.

The cur-


rent overall US goal is 400,000 BD of oil shale production by 1990; the

US military currently uses some 460,000 BD. Shale oil is now competi-

tive; it can be produced at $30–45 per barrel. The following actions

could result in the achievement of the US production goal as much as 5

years earlier.

• a guarantee by DoD to buy the oil. This is cost-free.

• a concerted effort to speed up the “permitting” process.

• procurement priority for production equipment (there is no tech-

nology problem).

• relaxing, or adding funds to meet, environmental considerations.

Some DOE representatives are optimistic that this speed-up can be

achieved with active DoD support. This is an ongoing program, need-

ing only priority. It has obvious implications for meeting European

needs and for replacing the most vulnerable segments of US oil im-

ports. The amount of oil is approximately that now supplied to the US by ei-

ther Libya, Algeria or Indonesia.

(Action: MRA&L and IEA)

4. Focus DoD and Interagency Attention on the Question of Energy

Technology Transfer.

The US has no clearly defined energy technology transfer policy.

Energy has never been singled out from technology in general, despite

its obvious special importance. PRM 44, which would have done this

for transfers to the USSR, was aborted.


365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 823

We need to establish a set of energy technology transfer policies

which discriminate effectively between fuels and between national

targets. We need to review possibilities for major collaborative ven-

tures with energy producers around the world, to include the Soviet

Union and China. Where appropriate, we should think about strength-

ening incentives to the private sector to facilitiate transfer. Compensa-

tion deals should be explored. We will review the role of domestic and

international financial institutions which may provide guaranteed fi-

nancial incentives.

Secretary Klutznick’s technology transfer review group is recom-

mending an urgent study of US-Soviet energy relationships. We

strongly support this recommendation. We will emphasize the gravity

of the global energy situation and work to ensure that the study does

not get bogged down in abstractions. We will point out that if the So-

viets, as predicted by the CIA, begin to import 15–20% of their oil by the

late 1980s, the result could be truly catastrophic. Even a significant re-

duction in current Soviet exports of 3 million BD could trigger a crisis.

(Action: Primarily IEA)

5. Compare Alternative US, European, Japanese and Other National Pro-

grams to Restrain Petroleum Demand and to Develop Alternative Sources of

Energy.

This is being given some consideration in a current NSC study ac-

tion, but DoD needs to play a more forceful role. The pace is very slow,

made more so by the need to coordinate with our IEA allies. The IEA is

considering further import reduction targets. The current US target (8.2

MBD) may be revised as this effort proceeds. We should review other

measures being taken, here and overseas, and those not being taken;

and examine voluntary and mandatory demand restraint measures

and efforts to develop substitutes for conventional petroleum.

The basic purpose will be to generate a series of specific near-term

proposals, to be floated via the NSC staff procedure, that draw from the

measures taken by the other nations ideas most appropriate to the US.

Korea, as one example, has developed a comprehensive program

aimed at reducing electric power dependence on oil. We do not expect

to uncover a dramatically new approach but we do hope to speed up

the current NSC action while culling from other nations’ experience

ideas of possible value in US domestic planning.

(Action: Primarily IEA, assistance from Regions.)

6. Review US and Soviet Coal Substitution Opportunities in General.

US and Soviet coal reserves are truly awesome. Even at much

higher utilization rates, both nations have the capability, using coal, to

reduce dramatically all liquid fuel consumption but for that in trans-

portation. US production constraints, with the single exception of


365-608/428-S/80010

824 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

having to meet environmental restrictions, are not nearly what they are

in the Soviet Union. The Soviets do not have the gasoline buffer we do;

in that sense their need to reduce non-transportation oil consumption is

more urgent. Technological cooperation with the Soviets will be inves-

tigated as part of the overall technology review.

We should review the arguments as to why coal usage cannot be

stepped up quickly and then urge the other Executive Departments to

take appropriate specific steps to accelerate the transition to coal. If

transition to coal or coal derivatives as our major energy source is inevi-

table, then the rising national security costs of relying upon oil clearly

mandate our accelerated transition.

(Action: IEA, DR&E and European Region.)



261. Telegram From the Department of State to the Embassies in

Nigeria and Saudi Arabia and the Liaison Office in Riyadh

1

Washington, February 15, 1980, 1407Z.



41711. Subject: Impact of Oil Price Increases. Ref: A) Lagos 1013

(Notal), B) 79 Riyadh 1986 (Notal), C) Lagos 1174.

2

1. Entire text Confidential.



2. In response to request Refs A and B, Department is pouching all

addressees copies of two CIA studies and a Department analysis of the

impact of oil price increases in 1980. Most of the text and all of the tables

in the CIA studies are unclassified; the Department’s analysis is admin-

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D800081–1236.



Confidential. Drafted by Todd; cleared by Raymond Hill (E) and in EB/ORF/FSE, EB/

PAS, AF/W, NEA/ARP, NEA/ECON, DOE/IA, and the Treasury Department; and ap-

proved by Calingaert. Repeated to Caracas, Quito, Jakarta, Algiers, Baghdad, Kuwait,

Abu Dhabi, Doha, Dhahran, and Libreville.

2

Telegram 1013 from Lagos, January 30, reads in part: “Embassy agrees that it is



both useful and important to engage FGN in meaningful dialogue on the price of oil. In

our view FGN will be principally motivated by short-term considerations of maximiza-

tion of revenue. Nevertheless, a strong and sophisticated argument which directly relates

Nigerian economy to the health of Western economies and the world price of oil might

make an impression over time.” (Ibid., D800052–0930) In telegram 1986 from Riyadh, De-

cember 13, 1979, the Liaison Office requested “specific data useful to a professional econ-

omist backing up conclusion of 0.8 percent decline in OECD GNP growth and 1 percent

increase in inflation attributable to 1979 oil price increases.” (Ibid., [no film number])

Telegram 1114 from Lagos, February 2, contains a quote from the newspaper New Nige-

rian

on the announcement of a crude oil price increase by the Nigerian National Petro-

leum Company. (Ibid., D800058–0360)


365-608/428-S/80010

January 1979–January 1981 825

istratively controlled and may be discussed privately with foreign gov-

ernment officials. We are also sending posts an unclassified paper de-

scribing methodological techniques used in preparing projections of

OECD energy demand and the economic impact of oil price increases.

3

3. Department wishes posts to be aware that, in the experience of



Department officers who have discussed oil price increases with offi-

cials of various oil producing nations, the use of detailed economic

analyses such as those described above has not been very productive.

Discussions often degenerate into debates over the econometric model

being used, premises and assumptions being employed, and disagree-

ments over data chosen for base-line cases. (Even within the U.S. Gov-

ernment, there is considerable disagreement between various agencies

and departments over these issues.) Furthermore, the use of various

hypothetical oil price increases lends itself to misinterpretations, and

can be misconstrued as evidence the USG was expecting such an in-

crease when we are arguing against an increase.

4. Economic analyses of the impact of oil price increases are based

upon weighted average oil prices; nothing in them examines the ques-

tion of differentials among different qualities of crude oil, a topic which

OPEC members themselves are notably unable to agree upon. When

supplies are perceived as adequate, such as during the slack oil market

conditions in 1974–78, these differentials would be determined by

net-backs to refiners. The premiums charged by producers of high

quality oil are theoretically limited by the ability of refiners to invest in

facilities to handle lower-priced, lower quality crudes. As Embassy

Lagos is aware, Nigeria and the North African producers were forced

into competitive price reductions, discounts, etc. during slack market

in 1978.

5. At the present time, Iran’s attempts to maintain a $6 per barrel

differential vis-a`-vis similar quality Persian Gulf crudes distort the

crude oil market and encourages the upward ratcheting of oil prices we

have seen thus far in 1980. These unstable conditions have created op-

portunities for producers in North Africa (and Mexico and the North

Sea) to increase prices, using the excuse of Persian Gulf price hikes.

In the long run, we expect the market will sustain some, but likely only

a small portion, of the widening of differentials for North African/

Nigerian crudes which occurred last year.

6. For Lagos: Ms. Schwartz (AF/W) will hand-carry documents de-

scribed paragraph 2 to Lagos February 20 and will be able to provide

additional background information.


Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   77   78   79   80   81   82   83   84   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling