Copyright 2007


Download 2.95 Mb.

bet13/38
Sana12.11.2017
Hajmi2.95 Mb.
1   ...   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   ...   38

112 Buehler, Arthur. Sufi Heirs o f the Prophet.  The Indian Naqshbadiyya and the Rise o f the Mediating Sufi 

Shayk. Columbia:  University o f South Caroline Press,  1998.p. XVII.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



141

Upon  adoption  of  Islam,  funerals  and  memorial  feasts  among  the  nomadic  Kyrgyz 

required the participation of a mullah or imam to carry out certain religious rites. Mullahs 

earned  most  of their  living  by  offering  their  religious  service  at  funerals  and  memorial 

feasts as well as by practicing healing through Quranic recitations  and making protective 

charms,  tumar.  In  other  words,  the  people  spoiled  their  mullahs  with  gifts  and  animals 

and  they  became  used  to  receiving  payment  in  different  forms.  We  find  the  following 

lines  from  the  above-mentioned  Memorial  Feast  for  Kokotoy  Khan  when  Bokmurun 

offers his father’s ash:

Moldolor diiniiyo boliishup,

Oshondo da talaship

113


Mushtaship juriip olushiip.

The mullahs divide the treasure  [gifts]

And even then they fight;

They fight so much they kill each other.

According to recent studies on  Sufism  among the  Kyrgyz,  there were two groups 

of Sufis called  “ak taki'yaluular”  and  “kara taki'yaluular,114  “those  with a white cap”  and 

“those  with  a black cap.”  It  is  said  that  these  two  groups  of Sufis  fought  against  each 

other  and  created  religious  confusion  among  the  nomadic  Kyrgyz.  It  is  said  that  the 

Kyrgyz belonged to the white-capped ones.115

113 Manas.  Kirgiz elinin baatirdik eposu (Manas. The Heroic Epic  of the Kyrgyz People), Version by 

Sagi'nbay Orozbakov, Vol. 3, Moskva: Nauka,  1990, p. 48.

114 Notes from Asan Saipov’s lecture about the adoption o f Islam by the  Kyrgyz. Institute of Islam,

Bishkek,  2003.

115  Until now many  Kyrgyz elderly men  wear a takiya,  not white but black or dark green or blue under their 

tebetei,  fur  hat  or kalpak  hat  made  from  white  felt.  I  remember  my  great  grandfather  always  wearing  his 

black  takiya  when  he  prayed.  If  a  person  does  not  drink  any  alcoholic  beverage,  they  say  Sopu  bolup 

kaldingbi,  “Since  when  have  you  become  a  Sufi?”  Or  Kojodoy  koldop  “venerating  someone  like  a khoja.” 

Or Moldo bolup kaliptir “He became a mullah,” i.e.,  very quiet and well behaved.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



142

There are many popular proverbs and sayings about the Muslim clergy among the 

Central  Asians.  Some  of  these  proverbs  are  quite  clear  in  meaning,  but  some  of  them 

require an explanation of their social context. These sayings  attest to the fact that Muslim 

clergy  generally  had  a  negative  reputation  among  the  people.  The  saying,  Moldonun 

aitkani'n kil,  Mgariin ki'lba,  “Do what a mullah says, don’t do what he does,” implies that 

mullah tells people to  do  good things, but he  himself does bad  or  inappropriate things 

which  are  against  Shari’a.  Another  popular  Central  Asian  saying  goes  Olongdiiu jerde 

ogiiz  semiz,  oliik  kop jerde  moldo  semiz,  “An  ox  gets  fat  where  there  is  much  grass,  a 

mullah  gets  fat where there  is  much  death.”  In  other words,  a mullah receives payments 

in  different  forms  at  each  funeral  where  he  recites  the  janaza  prayer  for  the  dead. 



Ishengen  kojong  suuga  aksa,  aldi-aldingdan  tal  karma,  “If  your  most  trusted  khoja  is 

carried away by a river, then you should all grab onto a willow tree.” This means that one 

should not rely on a khoja all the time, but rely on oneself.

The  presence  of  many  Sufi  religious  terms  demonstrate  that  Islam  came  to  the 

nomadic  Kazakhs  and  Kyrgyz  through  Sufi  dervishes  from  sedentary regions  of Central 

Asia. They transmitted basic religious knowledge and wisdom of the Prophet Muhammad 

in  oral  form  mostly  through  poetry.  Since  oral  poetry  was  highly  valued  among  the 

nomadic  Kazakhs  and  Kyrgyz,  their  poets  incorporated  new  Sufi/Persian  poetic  genre 



san’at-nasihat (
terme.116
 The 

development  of the  nasihat poetry  is  said  to  be  related  with  the  “Quranic  principle  that 

supports  the moral  autonomy of the individual”  who can  give  “sincere  advice  (nasihah),

116 The term comes from the Turkic verb ter-  “to select; to pick; to collect.” Oral poets improvised poetic 

lines consisting o f 7-8  syllables.  In their terme poetry, poets selected short, clear,  and wise  words to sing 

about life, time,  nature, good and bad, young and old,  women and men, child, etc.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



143

which entitles  everyone  to  advise  and to  alert  a fellow  citizen,  including the  head of the 

state  and  his  officials.”117  This  group  of  poets  wrote  and  composed  wisdom  poetry, 

kazaldar  (influenced  by  Persian  ghazals)  filled  with  many  Islamic  and  Sufi  religious 

ideas  and  values.118  The  literary  development  of this  poetic  genre,  which  became  very 

popular  during  the  spread  of Islam  and  Sufism  in  Central  Asia  in  the  18-19th  century, 

remains  largely  unexplored  by  scholars.  Most  of  the  recent  publications  of  Kyrgyz 

scholars  on  this  genre  contain  mostly collections  of sanat-nasiyat poetry  or  kazals  with 

very  little  comparative  analysis.  Soviet  scholars  named  this  group  of  poets  zamanachi 



aki'ndar,  because  they  wrote  and  sang  about  changing  times,  mainly  referring  to  the 

Russian  colonial  rule  in  the  18th  and  19th  centuries.  They  composed  philosophical  and 

religious  songs  about  life  in  this  and  the  other  worlds  and  gave  reasons  for  natural 

disasters  such  as  earthquakes  and  floods.  These  poets  and  their  kazal  poetry  prove  that 

they were  also  influenced by the  19th century Muslim reformist movements,  which were 

taking place in other parts of the Muslim world.119

There  are  many  pious  Muslim  figures  and  Sufi  saints  whom  the  Central  Asians 

hold  sacred.  An  important  religious  figure  in  Islam  is  a  man  named  al-Khidr,  whose 

image  became  popular  among  the  Central  Asian  Muslim  nomads.  The  Kyrgyz  have  a

117  Kamali, Mohammad Hashim,  “The Interplay of Revelation  and Reason in the Shariah.” In:  Oxford 

History o f Islam. Edited by John, L. Esposito.  Oxford University Press,  1999. p.  148.

1,8 Moldo Ki'lich (1866-1917). Kazaldar.  Compiled by Omor Sooronov, Frunze (Bishkek):  “Adabiyat,” 

1991.

Kaligul (1785-1855).  Kazaldar.  Ed.  by K.  Jusupov and compiled by  Sh.  Umotaliev,  K. Edilbayev,  and T. 

Abdilov, Bishkek:  Ala-Too journal,  1992.

Artstanbek (1828-1878). Poems.  Bishkek:  Kyrgyz entsiklopediyasi',  1994.

Kyrgyz el Trchilari(Kyrgyz People’s Poets).  Compiled by Batma Kebekova, Bishkek,  1994.

119 During the Soviet period, these poets were condemned as being “bourgeois-nationalists” or “Muslic 

fanatics”  who prevented people from progressing towards socialism or communism.  During the early  years 

o f Soviet nation building, pupils of these poets had to change the content of this traditional poetry filled 

with Islamic religious and Sufi ideas, and they  were ordered to compose songs about Lenin,  Stalin, and the 

“Great October Revolution” and ridicule their old teachers, in particular the Sufis and mullahs.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



144

saying or wish, Jolung shi'dir bolsun, joldoshung Kidir bolsunl  which means  “May your

road be  smooth  and  your companion  be  Kidirl”  This  is  said  for  those  who  set  out  on  a

long  journey.  According  to  Cornell,  even  though  in  Islam  Muhammad  is  the  final

Prophet, it was believed that “divine inspiration could remain accessible to believers even

after Muhammad’s  death.”120 In Islam that divine inspiration is  symbolized by the figure

of  al-Khidr  (The  Green  One),  who  is  described  as  “an  unnamed  servant  of  God  and

companion of the Prophet Musa (Moses).”121  We also find the strong presence of Sufism,

and  saints  like  al-Khidr in  the  Kyrgyz  epic Manas.  In  one of the  main  versions  sung by

the  well-known  singer  Sayakbay  Karalaev  (1894-1971),  the  singer  describes  Manas’

ancestors, and associates their greatness and merit with Sufi holy men.

His forefathers were all khans,

Blessed by Kidir from the beginning,

His ancestors were all khans,

Blessed by Kidir from the beginning.

In places where they had stayed overnight

Sacred shrines were built, for

God had blessed them from the beginning.

In the places where they had passed by 

A city with a bazaar was established, for 

God had blessed them from the beginning.

They had exchanged greetings with twenty Sufi masters,

Learned writing from a caliph,

And they thus were called great “sahibs.”122

Many  Russian  travelers  and  ethnographers,  including  the  native  Kazakh 

ethnographer  Chokan  Valikahanov,  who  collected  ethnographic  materials  from  the 

nomadic Kazakhs and Kyrgyz,  all pointed out the fact that Islam did not play a significant 

role in their everyday lives. People were aware of some rules of Islamic Shari’a, but they



120 Kamali, Mohammad Hashim, p.  66.

121  Op.cit.

122 Manas,  Kirgiz elinin  baatirdik eposu.  Version by Sayakbay  Karalaev, Vol.  1, Bishkek:  Ki'rgi'zstan,  1995,

p. 22.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



145

most  often  did  not  observe  them.  Although  they  considered  themselves  Muslim  by  the 

18th  and  19th centuries,  their religious  or spiritual practices  and rituals  often  had  nothing 

to do with Islam.  However, Privratsky is  very  skeptical  of Valikhanov’s treatment of his 

Kazakh  people’s  religion  as  “survivals  of  shamanism”  or  “nature  religion.”123  As 

Privratsky  notes,  Yalikhanov  was  trained  in  the  Russian  academy  and  thus  very  much 

influenced by Enlightenment ideas of the  19th century and coming from this background, 

Yalikhanov  purposeflly  ignored  the  Islamic  elements  of  Kazakh  culture  and  chose  to 

speak only about pre-Islamic religious beliefs and practices.

Similarly,  native  post-Soviet  scholarship  tends  to  undermine  the  significance  of 

Islam  in  Kyrgyz  history  and  culture.  As  Devin  DeWeese  notes,  because  of  many  pre- 

Islamic/”shamanic” religious beliefs and practices,  many of which still persist among the 

contemporary  Central  Asian  Turkic  Muslims,  Central  Asian  scholars  and  elite  have 

“ignored or dismissed or underestimated the Islamic component of their ‘national’  culture 

in  an  effort  to  highlight  the  specifically  ‘Turkic’  or,  for  example  Qi'rghiz  [Kyrgyz], 

component  of the  civilization  of which  they  are  the  current  bearers.”124  In  Chapter  6,  I 

will  discuss  the  issue  of  why  most  native  scholars  and  intellectuals  ignore  or 

underestimate the Islamic component of their Kyrgyz or Turkic national heritage.

In Muslim Turkestan:  Kazakh Religion and Collective Memory,  Bruce Privratsky 

examines  the  degree  of  Kazakh  “Muslimness”  by  offering  detailed  analyses  of  the 

Kazakh  version  of  Islamic/Sufi  religious  values  in  the  city  of Turkistan.  Many  Central

123 Privratsky, G. Bruce. Muslim  Turkestan:  Kazakh Religion and Collective Memory. Richmond,  Surrey: 

Curzon,  2001, pp.  17-18.

124 Ibid., p. 21.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



146

Asians  consider  Turkistan  a  “Second  Mecca,”125  because  the  well-known  13th  century 

Sufi  saint,  Qoja  Ahmad  Yasawi,  was  bom  and  buried  there.  Privratsky  did  extensive 

fieldwork research primarily among the Turkestani khojas, but he  applies his  findings  to 

all  Kazakhs.  He  uses  his  theory  of  “collective  memory”  and  asserts  that  almost  all 

religious  beliefs,  values,  customs,  and  practices,  which  have  been  claimed  before  as 

native  Kazakh  (or  shamanic)  in  fact  come  from  Islam  or  Sufism.  Privratsky  concludes: 

“Kazakh religion  is  a collective memory in two  ways.  First,  it commemorates the Kazak 

ancestors  as  a Muslim people.  Secondly,  it  depends  on the  social  memory of family  and 

friendship networks eating together.”126 However, he  goes too far in his attempt to prove 

that  all  current  religious  behaviors  and beliefs  of Kazakhs  are  rooted  in  Islamic  or  Sufi 

traditions and practices. For example, he suggests that the “cultural origin” of the popular 

Kazakh (and Kyrgyz)  term of endearment “Aynalayin  (Kazak)/aylanayin (Kyrgyz),”  i.e., 

“I will turn  around  you  (in  an act of self-sacrifice),”  which is used mostly by the elderly 

towards the  young, is related with “the self giving devotion to the saint and his memory” 

and with the Sufi practice of dzikr where the dervishes whirl in remembrance of God.127

It needs to be added that aylanayin is the most endearing term used in Kazakh and 

Kyrgyz  languages,  but  there  are  many  other  similar terms  that  are  used interchangeably 

with  it.  These  terms  also  describe  different  physical  movements  of  a  person.  As 

Privratsky notes correctly, the term aylanayin “invokes the memory of a healing rite” of a

1 9 8

shaman in Inner Asia. 



In this practice where a shaman circled (aylan-)  around the yurt 

in  which  a  sick person  or child  was  placed.  Other popular  Kyrgyz  terms  of endearment



125 Ibid., p.  3.

126 Ibid, p.  149.

127 Ibid., p.32.

128


Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.

147

that are similar to aylanayin  are kagilayin  (kak- to shake off;  kagil- to shake oneself)  and 



sogulayin  (sok-  to  hit;  sogul-  to  hit  oneself  against  something  [the  ground]).  Sufi 

dervishes  do  not  perform  such  movements,  but  a  shaman  does.  Privratsky  concentrates 

his analysis mostly on Islamic elements of Kazakh religious practices, but ignores the un- 

Islamic  or  native  elements,  for  example  in  the  healing  rites.  He  is  right  that  the  rite  of 



dem salu (“putting” the breath into the body of the sick person) by a mullah is a common

170


practice  among the  Kazakhs  and Kyrgyz. 

However,  he  does not describe  fully the rite 

of joyuu  (from joy- to eliminate  [bad spirits]), which is done  when  a bad spirit enters the 

body.  Kyrgyz  and  Kazakhs  say  kirne  kirdi,  which  Privratsky  translates  as  “inserts.”130 



Joyuu is  very common  among the  Kazakhs  and  Kyrgyz  and is usually done by a bakshi', 

healer  who  uses  kiil  (ash)  as  main  ingredient  in  cleansing  the  spirit  of  the  sick. 

Professional  or powerful healers usually begin yawning constantly when they are around 

a person or child who is not feeling well.131

What  makes  Central/Inner  Asian  Islam  distinct  from  other Muslim communities 

in the world is this  “ancestral complex”  which persisted  and  still persists  “most  strongly

1XJ

after  the  adoption  of  Islam.” 

Often,  ordinary  Kyrgyz  do  not  and  cannot  distinguish 

which of their religious  activities are Islamic  and which are non-Islamic.  This is because



129 Ibid., p.  195.

130 Ibid., p.  205.

131  When I  was growing up in the mountains,  we did not have a healer,  so my  grandmother would eliminate 

the bad  spirits from  my body  whenever I felt sick.  Like  a baksh'i,  she  would take a cup  of ash, cover it with 

a piece  o f cloth  and  begin  her  healing  by  moving  her  hand  in  which  she  held  the  cup  o f ash  in  a  circular 

motion  above  my  head,  then  she  would  move  to  my  shoulders,  back,  chest,  arms  and  legs  and  saying: 

Merlin  kolum  ernes  Umay  enenin  kolu.  Chik!  Chik!  Chik!  It-mishiktarga  bar,  uuru-kaskilerge  bar,  jaman 

orustarga  bar! Menin  balamda  emneng  bar?!  “These  are  not  my  hands  but Umay131  the  Mother.  Get  out! 

Get  out!  Get out!  Go  to  the cats  and  dogs,  go  to  the  thieves  and  hooligans,  and  to the  evil  Russians!  What 

are  you  doing  in  my  child’s  body?!”  I  think  this  kind  o f  healing  has  a  psychological  effect  on  the  sick 

person. I would feel better after my grandmother’s healing.

132 Ibid., p. 41.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



148

Islamic ideas became conceptualized and deeply integrated into the local religious values

and rituals.  Kyrgyz strongly believe it is their sacred duty as Kyrgyz to recite or dedicate

the  Quran  to  honor  their  deceased  ancestor(s).  In  other  words,  the  ancestral  spirits

became “Islamized.” DeWeese questionis the validity of a one directional way of viewing

the “Islamization” of Central Asian nomads.

We  must  acknowledge  first  off  that  the  process  signified  by  the 

unfortunate  inelegant term  “Islamization”  is  in  reality  a  dual  process  that 

necessarily  works  in  two  different  directions:  on  the  one  hand  the 

introduction  of Islamic  patterns  into Inner Asia involves  the  “imposition” 

of  Islamic  norms  in  a  new  setting,  an  alien  environment;  on  the  other 

hand,  the  nativization  of Islamic patterns  involves  their incorporation  and 

assimilation into indigenous modes of thought and action.133

Central  Asian  Muslims  recite  Quranic  prayers  in  Arabic  (often  without  knowing 

what  they  really  mean),  and  dedicate  these  holy  verses  to  the  spirit  of  their  deceased 

parent(s),  sibling(s),  relatives,  and  ancestors  in  general.  At  the  end  of  a  Quranic 

recitation, the Kyrgyz say: Atam Kdchumkuldun/(dtkdn-kertkenderdin) arbagina/soobuna 

bag'ishtadim,  “I  dedicate  [this  prayer  and  food]  to  the  spirit  or  good  merit  of my  father 

Kochiimkul  (or  to  all  those  [people]  who  have  passed  away/departed  from this  world.”) 

It is important to point out that when we say “ancestor veneration” it does not only imply 

one particular ancestor, but also close and distant deceased family members.

People  believe  in  the  ancestral  spirit’s  strong  power  to  bring  misfortune  to  an 

individual,  family  or  community  if  the  ancestors  are  not  remembered,  respected,  and 

offered  the  proper memorial  feasts  (beyshembilik,  kirqi, j'ildik,  ash  discussed  in  Chapter 

5)  and  rituals  accompanied  by  a  recitation  from  the  Quran.  One  of  the  common



133 Ibid., p. 51.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



149

traditional  curses  among  the  Kyrgyz  is  Arbak  ursun!/Arbak  urgur!,m   “May  the 

deceased’s spirit hit (curse) him/her/you!” Another saying is Kuday urgan ongolot,  arbak 

urgan ongolboit,  “One who is cursed by God will recover (i.e.,  will  have another chance 

in life), but one  who  is cursed by a (an  ancestral)  spirit will  never recover (his bad deed 

will  not  be  forgiven),”  demonstrating  that  nomadic  Kyrgyz  believed  in  the  spiritual 

power of the  ancestors  or deceased  family  member.  Therefore,  most  Kyrgyz  do  not  feel 

guilty  if  they  do  not  pray  five  times  a  day  or  do  not  fast  during  the  holy  month  of 

Ramadan.  But  they  fear  God,  (Arabic Allah,  or Persian  Quday)  and  the  ata-babalardin 



arbag'i  (ancestral  spirit)  and  feel  compelled  to  carry  out  periodic  offerings  of  various 

forms by sacrificing animals paying homage to their arbak(s). Thus, ancestral spirits have 

an  equal,  not  lesser,  power  than  God.  DeWeese  confirms  this  idea  in  his  following 

statement:

A  natural  and  vital  focus  of such  religious  life,  designed  to  maintain  and 

promote  life  and  well-being,  falls  naturally  upon  the  Ancestors,  who  are 

the key to the community’s health and well-being as protectors not only of 

the family’s  stock and lineage, but of its economic foundations as w e ll ..   .

More  important,  the  ancestral  spirits,  are  a  central  focus  of  the  most 

common  and  most  sacred  religious  practice  among  Inner  Asian  peoples; 

for  the  vast  majority  of  individuals  and  communities,  religious  life  lies 

primarily not  in  recourse  to  a  shaman  or  “worship”  of some  deity,  but in 

the periodic offerings to the ancestral spirits in the various forms, intended 

to preserve the health and continuity of the family and community.135

The majority of Kazakhs  and Kyrgyz  (and even  some  Uzbeks, who are  said be to

more  devout  Muslims)  do  not  know  the  basic  five  pillars  of Islam.  People  utter Persian

and Arabic words  for God i.e.,  Quday or Allah.  They recite surahs  and prayers from the



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   ...   38


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling