Copyright 2007


Download 2.95 Mb.

bet1/38
Sana12.11.2017
Hajmi2.95 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   38
19937

©Copyright 2007 

Elmira M.  Kuchumkulova

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.


Reproduced with  permission  of the copyright owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without permission.

Kyrgyz Nomadic Customs and the Impact of Re-Islamization after 

Independence

Elmira M. Kuchumkulova

A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of

Doctor of Philosophy

University of Washington 

2007


Program Authorized to Offer Degree:

Near and Middle Eastern Studies Group

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.


UMI  Number:  3252871

Copyright 2007  by 

Kuchumkulova,  Elmira  M.

All  rights  reserved.

INFORMATION  TO  USERS

The quality of this reproduction  is dependent upon the quality of the copy 

submitted.  Broken  or indistinct  print,  colored  or poor quality illustrations and 

photographs,  print bleed-through,  substandard  margins,  and  improper 

alignment can  adversely affect reproduction.

In the  unlikely event that the author did  not send  a  complete  manuscript 

and there are  missing  pages,  these will  be noted.  Also,  if unauthorized 

copyright material  had to  be removed,  a  note will  indicate the deletion.



®

UMI

UMI  Microform  3252871 

Copyright 2007  by ProQuest  Information  and  Learning  Company. 

All  rights  reserved.  This  microform  edition  is  protected  against 

unauthorized  copying  under Title  17,  United  States  Code.

ProQuest  Information  and  Learning  Company 

300  North Zeeb  Road 

P.O.  Box  1346 

Ann Arbor,  Ml  48106-1346

Reproduced with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited  without  permission.



University of Washington 

Graduate School

This is to certify that I have examined this copy o f a doctoral dissertation by

Elmira M. Kuchumkulova

and found that it is complete and satisfactory in all respects, 

and that any and all revisions required by the final 

examining committee have been made.

Chair of the Supervisory Committee:

Stevan Harrell

Reading Committee:

Stevan Harrell

£

Daniel Warngh

Ilse D.  Cirtautas

Date:


Selim Kuru

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



In presenting this dissertation in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the doctoral 

degree at the University of Washington, I agree that the Library shall make its copies freely 

available for inspection. I further agree that extensive copying of the dissertation is 

allowable only for scholarly purposes, consistent with “fair use” as prescribed in the U.S. 

Copyright Law. Requests for copying or reproducing of this dissertation may be referred to 

Proquest Information and Learning, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346,  1- 

800-521-06600 to whom the author has granted “the right to reproduce and sell (a) copies 

of the manuscript in microform and/or (b) printed copies of the manuscript made from 

microform.”

Signature.

Date.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



University of Washington 

Abstract

Kyrgyz Nomadic Customs and the Impact of 

Re-Islamization after Independence

Elmira M. Kuchumkulova

Chair of the Supervisory Committee:

Professor Stevan Harrell 

Department of Anthropology

This dissertation deals with three major issues:  Kyrgyz nomadic customs,  Islamic 

revival,  and the  emergence  of a new national  ideology,  Tengirchilik.  These three  factors 

have  current  significance  in  post-Soviet  Kyrgyz  society  and  in  the  development  of 

Kyrgyz national identity.  The  socio-cultural  legacy of nomadic life and the worldview of 

Tengirchilik, which are closely related to each other, conflict with fundamentalist Islamic 

ideas  and  practices,  which  come  from  outside.  In  the  past,  the  nomadic  Kazakhs  and 

Kyrgyz easily adopted Sufism, especially the veneration of Sufi saints, because its idea of 

“saint  worship”  was  similar  to  their  native  religious  concept  of “ancestor  cult.”  Today, 

unlike  Sufism,  which was tolerant of people’s  traditional  religious  beliefs  and practices, 

foreign  and  underground  Islamic  fundamentalist  groups  in  Kyrgyzstan,  such  as  Hizb-ut 



Tahrir al-Islamiyya (Party of Islamic Liberation),  are becoming intolerant towards many 

Kyrgyz  customs  and  religious  practices,  and  condemn  them  as  bid’ah,  idolatrous 

innovations.  In  Kyrgyzstan,  the  clash  between  “normative  Islam”  and  “local  Islam”  is 

most evident in traditional religious practices  and  customs,  such as  funerals.  Traditional 

funeral rituals among the Kyrgyz and Kazakhs form an institutionalized custom, which is 

deeply connected with the socio-economic necessities of nomadic life, and that they were 

able  to  survive  by  incorporating  some  Islamic  practices.  However,  the  core  native 

customs and rituals continue to play a significant role in Kazakh and Kyrgyz societies.  In 

response  to  the  competing  Islamic  and  Christian  religious  activities  in  their  countries, 

native  Kazakh  and  Kyrgyz  intellectuals  are  trying  to  revive  the  ancient,  but  living 

worldview of Tengirchilik, which comes from the Old Turkic word Tdngri (Sky/God). To 

replace  the  commonly  accepted  term  “shamanism,”  which  focuses  on  the  figure  of the

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.


shaman,  native  intellectuals  coined  a  new  term,  Tengirchilik,  by  systematizing  all  the 

native  religious  beliefs  and  practices  shared  by  Turkic  peoples.  The  advocates  of 



Tengirchilik  believe  that  this  ancient  worldview  offers  much  more  sophisticated  views 

about  life  and  the  world  than  other  world  religions  such  as  Islam  and  Christianity. 



Tengirchilik  might  find  universal  support  in  the  future,  especially  among  international 

environmental organizations, for it treats Nature as God and puts it above everything.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page


List of Figures.......................................................................................................................... iii

List of Tables........................................................................................................................... iv

Transliteration Guide................................................................................................................v

Introduction: Theory and Methodology...................................................................................1

Chapter I:  “Fieldwork” in The Native “Field” .......................................................................7

The Term “Fieldwork” .........................................................................................11

My Personal, Family, and Academic Backgrounds...........................................13

Ethnographic Research Experience in my Home Town Ki'zil-Jar................... 38

Chapter II: The Town o f Kizil-Jar:  The Main “Research Site” .......................................... 53

Ethnic and Tribal Composition........................................................................... 53

Short History of the Town...................................................................................55

The Uch-Korgon Bazaar and Bridge..................................................................68

Cotton Monoculture during the Soviet Period...................................................76

Schools.................................................................................................................. 83

Medical Care........................................................................................................ 84

Chapter III:  Dynamics of Identity Formation among the Kyrgyz and Uzbeks:

Legacies of Nomadic-Sedentary Differences...................................................87

Introduction........................................................................................................ 87

Nomadic-Sedentary Interaction in Eurasia...................................................... 89

The “Nomadic Factor” in Kyrgyz Identity....................................................... 93

Uzbeks in the Eyes of the Kyrgyz:................................................................... 99

a) The “Naive” Kyrgyz and the “Cunning” Uzbeks...........................107

b) Food and Hospitality among the Uzbeks and Kyrgyz................... 109

c) Kyrgyz Tribal Identity vs. Uzbek Regional Identity.......................117

d) Women in Kyrgyz and Uzbek Societies..........................................120

Conclusion.........................................................................................................124

Chapter IV:  Islamization and Re-Islamization of Central Asia........................................129

Sufism: Ancestor and Saint Veneration in Central Asian Culture.............. 140

Islam in the Soviet Period.............................................................................. 158

Re-Islamization in Post-Soviet Kyrgyzstan.................................................. 167

“Hizb-ut-Tahrir al-Islamiyya” (Islamic Liberation Party)...........................177

The Story of My Paternal Uncle Mirzakal (from a momun man

to a fanatic Muslim)........................................................................................ 184

i

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



Conclusion

189


Chapter V: Kyrgyz Funeral Rites: “Islamic In Form,  ‘Pagan’  In Content?” .................. 190

Introduction.......................................................................................................190



Kereez,  Words of Testament........................................................................... 198

Uguzuu and Kabar aytuu, (Telling/Breaking and Sending

the Bad News to Family Members, Kinsmen and Others)........................... 205

Funeral Protocol among the Kyrgyz............................................................... 214

Koshok/Joktoo, Ritual Lament........................................................................223

Significance of K oshok.................................................................................. 233

Deceased and the boz iiy, the yurt.................................................................. 243

Horse Sacrifice and Quranic Recitations....................................................... 249

Sacrifice Dilemma:  To Whom is the Animal  Sacrificed?.............................258

Significance of Ash,  Memorial F east............................................................ 263

The Concept of Generosity in Kyrgyz Nomadic

Society and in Their Heroic Epics.................................................................. 266



Sook koyuu, Burial............................................................................................283

Kyrgyz Cemeteries and Funerary Monuments.............................................. 289

Conclusion........................................................................................................ 290

Chapter VI:  Kyrgyz National Ideology:  Tengirchilik....................................................... 292

Introduction..................................................................................................... 292

National Ideology and Native Intellectuals...................................................295

The Ancient Turkic Worldview of Tengirchilik (Tengrianity)................... 301

Tengirchilik Explained by Choyun Omiiraliev............................................ 315

Tengirchilik Explained by Dastan Sar'igulov................................................323

How is Tengirchilik V iew ed?....................................................................... 337

Conclusion...................................................................................................... 342

Summary................................................................................................................................348

Glossary.................................................................................................................................359

Bibliography.......................................................................................................................... 366

Appendix:

A.  Proverbs and Sayings Used in the Dissertation...................................... 396

B.  Kyrgyz Traditional Koshok which My Mother Suusar Sang

When Her Father, Suyiinali Died in 2000.............................................. 401

C.  Tradition of Serving  12 Jiliks,  Parts of a Sheep to Guests

According to Their Age and Gender....................................................... 402

ii

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



LIST OF FIGURES1

Figure Number 

Page

1. 


My mother and 1 ,1976................................................................................................ 16

2. 


My paternal great grandparents Kochumkul and Rapia,

my mother Suusar and me,  1975............................................................................... 17

3. 

My paternal grandfather Kochkorbay and grandmother Kumu,  1996.................... 18



4. 

My grandmother (first from left), mother (middle), aunts, cousins, and me

(second from right), Ispi jayloo,  1977...................................................................... 19

5. 


My uncles and aunts playing koz tangmay (Blind Man’s Buff), Ispi,  1970s..........20

6. 


Kyrgyz herders in the Ispi jayloo,  1970s.................................................................. 21

7. 


Figure 7: My paternal uncles Mirza and Mi'rzakal, ispi,  1970s.............................. 22

8. 


A scene from a kirkim, shearing sheep’s wool, Ispi,  1970s..................................... 23

9. 


My father Mamatkerim playing komuz, Ispi',  1970s................................................ 24

10. 


My paternal grandfather Kochkorbay, great uncles Anarbay and Anarkul,

with their wives behind them.................................................................................... 25

11. 

Map of the Ferghana Valley;  Source: UNEP............................................................ 57



12. 

Map of Kyrgyzstan;  Source: Perry-Castaneda Library Map Collection.................58

13. 

My paternal uncle Oros skinning a sheep, Ispi, 2005.............................................112



14. 

My paternal uncle Kojomkul skinning a sheep, Ispi, 2003.................................... 112

15. 

My grandmother Kumu in her mourning clothes at my grandfather’s kirki,



fortieth day memorial feast, Ki'zil-Jar, 2003.......................................................... 219

16. 


My uncles at my grandfather’s kirki, fortieth day

memorial feast, Kizil-Jar, 2003............................................................................... 220

17. 

My female relatives at my grandfather’s kirki........................................................221



18. 

Ancient symbols representing a three dimensional relationship between

Sky, Man, and Earth;  Source:  Ch.  Omuraliev,  Tengirchilik, p. 26...................... 307

19. 


The Dao hieroglyphs;  Source: Ch. Omuraliev,  Tengirchilik, p.  58...................... 309

1 All the family pictures are the courtesy o f my father Mamatkerim Kochiimkulov and Elmira 

Kuchumkulova.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



LIST OF TABLES

Table Number 

Page

1. 


Statistical Information about Ki'zi'l-Jar......................................................................55

iv

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



TRANSLITERATION GUIDE

Kyrgyz Letters 



)K >

k

y y

0  e 


LI ti 

H   H 

H it 


III in 


H i

Transliteration

J j

U ii 


O o  

11 


I i  

Y y  


ng 

Sh sh 


Ch ch

Kyrgyz spelling 



)KaHJioo

T

yhayk

K

ok

Blcnw


B

h jihm

Bo3 


YH

M

hh



;

BnniKeK

Eyn

Transliteration 

Jayloo 

Tiindtik 



Kok 

Ispi 


Bilim 

Boz iiy 


Ming 

Bishkek 


Chiiy

v

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The  first person to whom I  should be  grateful is Professor Ilse Cirtautas, who, by 

establishing  an  exchange  program  between  the  University  of  Washington  and  the 

University of Humanities in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, made it possible for me to come to the 

United  States  to  study.  I  would  like  to  express  my  deep  appreciation  to  her  kind 

hospitality and help  during my  stay in  Seattle  and for her academic  guidance throughout 

my studies at the University of Washington.

I  am  equally  grateful  to  the  other  members  of  my  supervisory  Committee— 

professors  Daniel  Waugh  (History),  Stevan  Harrell  (Anthropology),  and  Selim  Kura 

(Near  Eastern  Languages  and  Civilization)—for  their  valuable  academic  guidance  and 

encouragement during the process of writing my dissertation.  I especially thank Professor 

Waugh  for  serving  as  the  chair  of  my  supervisory  committee  until  his  retirement  in 

summer 2006.1 very much appreciate all the genuine support and valuable advice he gave 

me to help me achieve my academic goals. In the same way, I am greatly indebted to Prof. 

Stevan Harrell,  who,  despite his very busy academic  schedule, happily agreed to  serve as 

the  Chair  of my  Ph.D.  Committee  in  place  of Professor  Waugh.  I  very  much  benefited 

from  his  rich  academic  expertise  and  personal  experience  in  the  field  of  Cultural 

Anthropology.  I am very thankful to Professor Jere Bacharach (Univ.  of Washington)  for 

strongly  encouraging  me  to  apply  for  the  Ph.D.  Program  after  I  received  my  MA  and 

supporting my academic goals.

I  am  also  most  grateful  to  my  two  Kyrgyz  professors  Sulayman  Kayi'pov 

(Folklore)  and  Kadirali  Konkobayev  (Turkology)  in  Bishkek  for  believing  in  me  and 

selecting  me  for  the  exchange  program  to  represent  Kyrgyz  culture  in  America.  These 

professors  very  much  inspired  their  young  Kyrgyz  students,  especially  girls  including 

myself,  to  achieve  in  academics  as  well  as  in  personal  life.  Sulayman  agay  played  an 

important role in developing my interest in Kyrgyz oral tradition.

My  dissertation  work  could  not  have  been  accomplished  without  the  continuous 

financial  support  that  I  received  from  the  Department  of Near  Eastern  Languages  and

vi

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



Civilization, the  Graduate  School of the University of Washington, and the Open Society 

Institute,  Soros  Foundation.  My  sincere  gratitude  goes to  Mrs.  Jean Rogers,  Coordinator 

of the Interdisciplinary Ph.D  Program in Near and Middle Eastern  Studies.  She was very 

helpful to  get me the necessary funding from the  Graduate  School  and graduate from the 

Program successfully.

I  wish  to  thank  all  my  relatives  and  townsmen  in  KIzi'1-Jar  for  sharing  their 

personal  views  and valuable  knowledge  openly with me  on Kyrgyz  nomadic  culture  and 

customs.  I  am  especially  grateful  to  my  paternal  grandparents  for  raising  me  in  the 

mountains  of southern  Kyrgyzstan  and  thus  instilling  in  me  the  wisdom  and  values  of 

Kyrgyz nomadic  life  and culture.  I also thank my parents and  siblings for their numerous 

letters  in which they  showed great moral  support especially during the  first two years  of 

my stay and study in America.

I  am  also  very  grateful  to  my  mother-in-law  and  sister-in-law  who  were  of 

tremendous help in taking care of my first son, Erbol, who was born during my fieldwork 

in  Kizil-Jar.  They treated  me  as  their  own  daughter  and  sister  and  I  appreciate  the  hard 

work, patience and unconditional love that they provided for Erbol.

I  want  to  thank  the  late  Kyrgyz  writer  and  poet  Esengul  Ibrayev  for  sharing  his 

rich personal memoirs and knowledge on Kyrgyz oral tradition and funeral customs.  May 

he rest in peace.

My husband and I are very grateful to  Sabirdin bayke in Kochkor and Erkin bayke 

in  the  Song-Kol jayloo  for  their  kind  and  generous  hospitality  that  they  showed  to  us 

during our visit.

Very  special  thanks  also  go  to  Dastan  Sarigulov  and  Choyun  Omuraliev  for 

sharing their unique ideas,  insights, and research findings on the ancient but living Turkic 

worldview of Tengirchilik and thus enriching my knowledge.

I  am  fortunate  to  have  a  good  friend  and  classmate  like  Kaliya  Kulalieva  in 

Bishkek  who  wrote  many  letters  of  moral  support  during  my  first  years  of  study  in 

Seattle.


vii

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



I  feel  lucky  to  have  American  students  and  friends  in  Seattle:  Andrea  Bufort, 

Stefan  Kamola,  Jonathan  North  Washington,  and  Shoshana  Billik  who  were  very 

generous with their time to proofread my dissertation chapters,  give  feedback,  and polish 

my  English.  I  want  to  single  out  my  student  Stefan  Kamola,  who  knows  Kyrgyz  very 

well,  for  helping  me  to  translate  all  the  pieces  of  Kyrgyz  oral  poetry,  proverbs,  and 

sayings in the dissertation into English.  Also,  I thank my Central Asian friends in Seattle: 

Jipar Diiyshembieva,  Dilbar Akhmedova, BakhTtjan Nurjanov,  and Nurgul Nurjanova for 

their long lasting friendship and moral support.

Finally, I am deeply indebted to my husband  Sovetali Aitkul uulu for standing by 

me  from  the  beginning  to  the  end  and  showing  tremendous  moral  support  and  love.  I 

cannot leave  out my two  lovely kuluns (“foals”—Kyrgyz term of endearment)  Erbol  and 

Baitur.  Even  though  it  was  very  difficult  to  finish  my  Ph.D.  with  two  small  children, 

looking back,  I have no  regrets  for they filled my heart with love  and great joy that gave 

me the energy to go forward.

viii

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



DEDICATION

Eyn  ducepm aifwmdbi MapuyM  noij amcm KoHKopdaudun otccma A6dbiK.epuM 

aKejuduH otcapKbm 3Jiecme  daebimmauMbiH.

I  dedicate  this dissertation to  the spirits o f  my late pa tern a l grandfather 

Kochkorbay and my patern al uncle Abdikerim.

ix

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.




Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   38


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling