Copyright 2007


Download 2.95 Mb.

bet6/38
Sana12.11.2017
Hajmi2.95 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   38

51

because I feel like crying when I listen to good  Kyrgyz traditional music  and  songs  such 

as Jengijok’s “Balam Jok.”

In  conclusion,  I want to  cite  a very  strong but valid statement made by the  well- 

known  senior  Kazakh  scholar,  Mi'rzatay  Joldasbekov.  I will  never  forget  this  statement, 

which  I  heard  through  another  Kazakh  scholar,  Ashirbek Muminov,  because  his  words 

touched  my  heart  deeply,  and  also  confirmed  to  me  my  personal  identity  as  Kyrgyz. 

According  to  Mi’rzatay  Joldasbekov:  “A  Kazakh  who  does  not  cry  when  hearing  a 

[traditional] Kazakh music/song is not a true  Kazakh.”  If I measure my identity based on 

Joldasbekov’s  statement,  then  I  am  a  “true  Kyrgyz,”  because  I  feel  like  crying  when  I 

listen to good Kyrgyz traditional music and songs such as Jengijok’s “Balam Jok.”

Thus,  my Kyrgyz  identity,  which is deeply engrained in  nomadic  culture,  affects 

what  I  write  and  how  I  write  about  the  Kyrgyz  culture.  Like  many  other  Kyrgyz  who 

grew  up in the  mountains,  I feel  strongly  about the legacy of this  centuries  old nomadic 

life because  I learned  many valuable  life  lessons  such  as  respect  for  nature  and  animals 

and respect for the elderly and one’s parents. Most importantly, the ecological, economic, 

and social demands of nomadic life prevented the strict gender division like in traditional 

sedentary  cultures. 

Even  though  the  Kyrgyz  nomadic  life  was  based  on  tribal  or 

patriarchal  society,  women  always  played  an  important  role  in  making  family  decisions 

and running the  household.  As  the  Kyrgyz  say  “Katin jakshi er jakshi,”  “Behind a  good 

husband  stands  a  wise  wife.”  Kyrgyz  believe  that  everything,  such  as  hospitality, 

children’s  upbringing,  and  husband’s  status  among  his  and  his  wife’s  kinsmen  depends 

on the character of the wife. Therefore, when a Kyrgyz man searches for a good wife, he 

should  also  consider  her  tribal  background.  They  say,  “Our  daughter  in-law  is  ‘tektiiu

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



52

jerdin  kiz'f,’”  i.e.,  “from  a  good  tribal  background”  or  “Tektiiu jerden  klz  al,”  “Marry  a 

girl from a good tribal background.” This gives  a great honor for the woman because  she 

represents  not just  herself,  but  her  entire  kinsmen/clan,  with  whom  she  had  a  long  and 

very  close  interaction.  No  one  wants  to  hear  a  curse  “Urugung  soolgur!”  “May  your 

entire clan/tribe dry up/perish!”

The wisdom of nomadic  culture is not just reflected in epic  songs  and poetry, but 

in  everyday life  relationships.  Like many  young  Kyrgyz,  I grew  up  hearing  many alki'sh 

or  bata,  blessings  of the  elderly  and  my  grandparents.  Western  scholars  like  Privratsky 

are  mistaken  to  assert  “Kazakh  has  no  other  vocabulary  for  hello  and  thank  you.”31  In 

Central Asian culture, the word “Thank you” is expressed in the form of a blessing by the 

elders.  The  term Rahmat  (Ar.  “mercy”)  which  is  widely  used  in  Central  Asia  is  a  loan 

word  from  Arabic.  I  rarely  heard  elderly  Kyrgyz  saying  Rahmat.  Every  time  when  a 

young boy or girl pours water onto the hands of the elderly or guests before the meal, he 

or  she  receives  wonderful  blessings  such  as  Kuday jalgas'm!  “May  God  bless  you!” 

Omiiriing uzun,  ortishiing jayik bolsun!  “May your life be long and your summer pasture 

be wide!” Kem bolbo!  “Don’t ever lack anything!” Baktiluu bol!  “May you be happy  [in 

marriage]!”  Chong jigit  bol!  “May  you  grow  up  to  be  a  big  and  strong  man!”  Tilegen 

tileginge jet!  “May  you  reach  your  goals!”  In  other  words,  as  another  Kyrgyz  saying 

states Bata [or alki'sh] menen er/el kogorot, jamgi'r menen jer kogorot,  ““Blessings make 

a man grow, rain makes the earth grow (become green).”

31  Privratksy, Bruce G. Muslim  Turkistan.  Kazakh Religion and Collective Memory.  Richmond,  Surrey: 

Curzon, 2001, pp. 97- 98.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



53

Chapter II: 

The Town of Kizi'1-Jar:  The Main Research Site 

Ethnic and Tribal Composition

The  town  of Ki'zi'l-Jar  was  my  main  research  site  where  I  gathered  most  of my 

ethnographic  material  for  my  work.  Therefore,  it  is  necessary  to  provide  background 

information about the ethnic and tribal compositions, geography, and the socio-economic 

history of the town.

Kizil-Jar’s  dominant  ethnic  group  is  Kyrgyz. 

Of  a  population  of  16,000, 

approximately 90%  are ethnic  Kyrgyz, the rest are ethnic Uzbeks  and Uighurs.  After the 

Soviet collapse,  by mid  1990’s most of the  “minority groups”  (they were  not  considered 

minorities during Soviet period) such as Russians, Koreans, and Tatars left Ki'zi'l-Jar.

Almost  all  the  Kyrgyz  people  living  in  the  town  belong  to  the  main  uruu,  tribe, 

called  Saruu,  which is  divided  into  many  uruks,  clans.  The  major clans  within  Saruu  in 

Kizil-Jar  are  Ogotur  (Hunter),  Besh  Kaman  (Five  Boars),  Ki'rkuul  (Forty  Sons),  Bark'i, 

Machak/Keldey, Bagi'sh (Moose), Chargana, Kiirkuroo, etc. Although most of the Kyrgyz 

of Ki'zi'l-Jar knew  about their clan and tribal name during the Soviet period, their interest 

in their tribal genealogy grew stronger after Kyrgyzstan became independent. Writing the 

genealogy  and  history  of  all  Kyrgyz  tribes  became  a  national  task.  In  the  countryside, 

aksakals,  white bearded men  and intellectuals  from respected tribal  groups began telling 

about  their  tribal  genealogy  and  history  and  publishing  small  booklets  about  them.  In 

1995,  when  I was  returning  to  the  University  of Washington  in  Seattle,  my  father  gave 

me  a  manuscript  of  our  own  clan  genealogy,  which  he  had  recorded  from  my  great 

grandfather and other elders from our uruk. My father asked me to type the manuscript on

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



54

the computer and to make many copies  in  a small booklet form.  I brought back with me 

over two  hundred  copies  of the  genealogy booklet  which,  my  father  then  distributed  to 

most  of the  members  of  our  uruk.  Our  relatives  were  all  eager  to  receive  a  copy  and 

happy to see the names  of their ancestors, their own and their children.  I should mention 

the  fact  that  the  genealogy  includes  only  males’  names,  because  the  nomadic  Kyrgyz 

were a patriarchal society.

Knowing  the  names  of  one’s  seven  forefathers  was  the  tradition  among  the 

nomadic Kyrgyz  and Kazakhs.  Since they did not have a well-established written history, 

their oral  history  was  their  sanjira,  which  comes  from  a  Persian  word  for  tree.  Sanjira 

was  usually  told by  elderly men  and  oral  poets  and  epic  singers  who  were  able  to  store 

hundreds of personal, tribal  and clan names  as well as historical events in their minds.  In 

the past,  when  two  Kyrgyz met, they immediately inquired about their father’s name and 

the name of their tribe or clan. Those who did not know their ancestors were called teksiz 

or  kul,  rootless  or  slave.  One  of the  reasons  for  knowing  one’s  tribal  genealogy  was  to 

avoid  marriage  within  one’s  own  clan  or  cousin  marriage.  Kyrgyz  and  Kazakhs  still 

follow  the  tradition  of  not  marrying  someone  of  the  same  tribe/clan  after  seven 

generations pass.

In  Kizil-Jar,  these  various  uruks  of  the  Saruu  tribe  live  side  by  side  with  each 

other.  Although,  originally,  when they were brought down from mountainous regions by 

the  Soviets,  they became settled in the  same street or neighborhood.  Most of my Ogotur 

relatives,  for  example,  live  in  the  small  village  Jilkool,  which  used  to  be  their  winter 

place.  The majority of the Besh Kaman uruk live  on the Mailuu-Say Street.  People from 

different  uruks  intermarry,  helping  at  and  participating  in  each  other’s  feasts,  funerals,

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.


55

and other special gatherings. However, when one of the members of a particular clan is in 

“trouble”,  e.g.,  in  big  financial  debt  or  cannot  afford  to  kill  a  horse  for  his  diseased 

parents, it is people of the same clan who offer help. (These issues will be discussed more

in detail in Chapter 4).

Table  1:  Statistical Information about Kizi'l-Jar32

Number of households

3016


Town hospital

1

Number of people



14703

Feldsher


2

Women


7481

Middle schools

5(6)

Men


7222

Kindergartens

1

Retired people



1312

Public bathhouses and saunas

3

Welfare receivers



590

Private bathhouses

55

Pre-School Children



1859

Water pipelines

26 km

School aged children



4190

Culture House

1

Eligible workers



7205

Libraries

1

WWII veterans



7

Communication Service

1

Participants of the Afghan War



19

Drugstores

3

Victims of the Chernobyl Tragedy



3

Bazaar


1

Complete Orphans

12

Milestones



9

Disabled people

218

Household service shops



2

Old people with no relatives

15

Short History of the Town

Ki'zi'l-Jar  was  and  still  is  one  of the  well  known  agriculturally  developed  former 



sovkhozes, state farms in Kyrgyzstan.33 The town lies in the western edge of the Ferghana 

Valley, which is considered to be “the heart of Central Asia.”34

Due to the  Soviet ethno-territorial  division of the Central  Asian region in the  1920’s, the 

Valley  still  remains  artificially  divided  between  the  three  Central  Asian  republics,



321 took this information in 2003 from the large information billboard hanging at the entrance o f the town’s 

main park. But the information shows earlier numbers.

33  I  gathered  material  on  the  history  o f my  hometown  from  the  town’s  (formerly  sovkhoz’s)  former  and 

current directors and as well as from local elderly and teachers.

34 Rashid,  Ahmed. Jihad.  The Rise o f Militant Islam in Central Asia. New Haven & London:  Yale 

University Press, 2002, p.  18.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



56

Uzbekistan,  Tajikistan,  and  Kyrgyzstan.  The  Ferghana  Valley  is  the  most  densely 

populated and fertile region of Central  Asia with ten million inhabitants, the main ethnic 

groups  being  the  Uzbeks,  Tajiks,  and  Kyrgyz.  The  Ferghana  Valley,  especially  its 

bazaars, was also the place for centuries old nomad-sedentary interaction between various 

Kyrgyz  nomadic  tribal  groups,  who  lived  and  raised  livestock  in  the  Tian-Shan 

Mountains,  and Uzbek-Tajik sedentary townsmen  and farmers who made the best use of 

the Valley’s fertile land by growing agricultural products.

Three  out  of  the  seven  provinces  of  Kyrgyzstan  are  located  in  the  Ferghana 

Valley.  They  are  Osh,  Jalal-Abad,  and  Batken,  all  sharing  quite  complex  Soviet-drawn 

boundaries  with  Uzbekistan  and  Tajikistan.  The  town  of Kizil-Jar  (also  known  as  Uch- 

Korgon) is part of the AksI rayon of the province of Jalal-Abad,  Kyrgyzstan. To the east, 

Kizil-Jar  borders  with  the  Namangan  Province  of  Uzbekistan.  The  major  river  Narin, 

which  originates  in  the  northwestern  part  of  Kyrgyzstan,  flows  by  the  east  side  of the 

town  serving  as  a  natural  as  well  as  an  official  boundary between  the  Kyrgyz  town  and 

Uzbekistan.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.


57

Topography and hydrography 

of the Ferghana Valley

KAZAKHSTAN

Tashkem


UZBEKISTAN

TASHKENT 

iSyrdarya

TALAS


CHU

Reserv&t

HO* *  

KYRGYZSTAN

^

 

<1

l e M - S *  

^

 



JAUL-ABAD 

^

NAMANGAN 



Na' T

9an


1 ? %

M aluu-Sau



\

\

  Jalal-Abad 



AN DIJAN 

* L


JtUigpr,

•Amftian 

■'

Cafi&

%

^ f 5 


^

-a 


FERGHANA ^

,  

g L   TabosNSf  ^  



S f X  

• K«*and


Gufisttn 

SOG D  


KaffaW(um  I  

Fesghana


SYRDARYA 

^   Khujami 

R ew rw *   , S ^ aiJ

r >  

^ M o o n t a i e a



\  

KYRGYZSTAN 

*

\  Tiiikes,aM Moun/ajnj



TAJIKISTAN 

^  ^ . ,

/tiMvs'Jj-', 



I

k

  J 

—.

Zeravshan MounW,n 

;  

.

150 



''CO in 

'-V^/


E levation 

in metres

MgSOmnBI

,.■ 


i'fisi-sA '  i 

a;  ■',<■:&■*  VM  i   ikt*A!•:..»»

Ii

t eeP«'n,,fc



H M c p .G R iP  ARpfC-Al  A PSII  2005-

Figure  11: Map of the Ferghana Valley;  Source: United Nations Environment Programme

(UNEP)

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



58

KAZAKHSTAN

ISHKEK*

*Kara- 

TokmokfTokmak) 

c ^ ^ a ta k o l

68,53 


Balykchy^-^ y^MGB

OoAv^-ni


UZBEKISTAN

d# e'!  Jalal-fead

(DlhaWAhiirt)

Osh

CH  NA


Kyzyl-Kyya

I'Kyz^-Kiydi



Sary-TasM

TAJIKISTAN

rn

 

too km

too fni 


op

Figure  12: Map of Kyrgyzstan; Source:  Perry-Castaneda Library Map Collection

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.


59

Before  I start talking  about my hometown  KMl-Jar, it is important to discuss the 

significance of this  southern region  of AksT and its  inhabitants.  Unlike the Kyrgyz living 

in the other southern provinces of Osh  and Batken,  which have  large Uzbek populations, 

the people  of Aks'i speak  “standard”  or  “literary”  Kyrgyz  with  a  slight  accent  similar to 

the Talas  dialect in northern Kyrgyzstan.  One of the major tribes of Kyrgyz called Saruu 

inhabits  the  region.  The  Aksi'  region  is  blessed  with  many  beautiful  mountain  pastures 

such  as  Kashka-Suu,  Cheer,  Chatkal,  Bozpu,  Ispi,  Kichak-Jol,  and  lakes  and  rivers  like 

Sari-Chelek,  Kashka-Suu  and  Itagar.  It  has  been  a home  for many talented  Kyrgyz  oral 

poets and komuchus, komuz players  such as Jengijok and Niyazaali.  Aksi partly owes its 

fame to the  famous  oral  poet Jengijok  (1860-1918)  who composed the  oral poems  titled 

“The  Sooru  (the  best  part)  of the  Earth  is  Aksi  Indeed!”  and  “Let  Me  Tell  About  My 

Land,  Aksi”  in  which  he  praises  the  Saruu  and  Kitay  tribes  and  the  beauty  of  the 

mountain pastures  they inhabit.  He  uses  a very poetic  and rhythmic  language,  following 

the  strict  initial  and  internal  alliteration,  characteristic  of  Kyrgyz  oral  poetry.  The 

following  excerpts  from  his  first poem  help  us  to picture  Aksi  and  also  tell  us  why this 

region is special:

Aksi is aBlessed Land, indeed!35

I have my Saruu and Kitay people [in Aksi],

I have precious words like yellow gold 

Which make me sing when I desire.

I have reason for concern,

Who can sing with such passion 

The song left from my heart

Let me tell you a bit about 

My Aksi, the Polar Star,



35 Jengijok.  Irlar.  (Jengijok.  Poems) Frunze:  “Kirgi'zstan”,  1982, pp.  38-52.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



If I haven’t forgotten.

What a wonderful place Baldi'rkan is!

So, Oto,  describe it all from head to toe. 

Its baytereks swing in the wind,

Its birds chirp and sing,

Its upper reaches are all cool pastures.

Springs flow from the mountains 

Pure and tasty like honey.

Its rivers flow swiftly in ravines 

Turning to a silvery color 

It tastes like honey to drink,

Your  heart gains strength.

The cuckoo birds fly around anxiously 

Unable to find their loved ones.

Brown bears lumber across the hillsides 

As if searching for something.

As soon as the sun gets hot 

The cubs swim in the water,

They threaten with their strength 

The animals less strong than they.

(He describes the trees and grass)

A traveler can scarcely find 

His way out of its forests.

He can’t find his way home;

Walnut trees block his path.

If a horse comes too weak to walk 

It’ll grow its mane in just seven days. 

Grapes, apples, and pears 

These fruits are found by the hundred. 

The best part of the Earth is Aksi, 

Whoever lives here feels content. 

Alma-Konush and Kiz-Korgon 

Have always been destined 

For my Kyrgyz with the white kalpak. 

Glaciers remain all year around,

Winters get very cold.

Its cliffs reflect the sun,

And are covered all over with ice.

As if a beautiful girl has embroidered,

As if a master had specially built them,



36 Oto was Jengijok’s real first name, but he became famous with the  nickname name Jengijok which 

means “one  without sleeves,”  i.e., the poet used to roll up his sleeves before playing his komuz.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



61

You might say he made them perfectly.

Its slopes are covered with birch and pine,

If you look closely,

You’ll see red apples and black cherries.

Snow leopards play chasing one another,

While eaglets preen in their aeries.

The caves resound 

Echoing the human voice.

Ashuu-Tor and Ak-Taylak 

Are the pearls of the Earth,

People disperse at the height of summer,

They make ayran and koumiss flow,

Sunny side is filled with blackberries

They pitch six hundred yurts 

For ash at which I sing,

They drive the mares to be milked 

On the hills and valleys of feather grass.

A person’s heart will open 

When the perfumed breeze 

Kisses your face.

The place called Oy-Alma is our pasture,

Where many people settle in summer time.

Come with the people who live there 

See it for yourself and be satisfied.

(Then  he  talks  about  how  young  women  play  all  kinds  of 

traditional  games  such  as  ak  cholmok,  which  is  played  under  the 

moon light and play in the swing)

Twin baby deer play on the cliff 

By butting each other with their antlers,

Its spring flowing down the hill 

Imitates the laughter of girls,

This is the land where

All kinds of animals live

These are the famous Saruu people

Who’ve inhabited this place for a long time 

37

37  It is  a  long,  but  very  beautiful  poem,  in  which  Jengijok cannot  not finish  describing  the  beauty,  mainly, 

all  kinds  o f wild  animals,  birds,  and  plants  found  in  the  mountains  o f Aksi'.  The  poem  should  be  read  in 

Kyrgyz in order to feel the beauty o f the region as well as the  Kyrgyz poetic language.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



62

As  we  learn  from  this  poem,  the  mountains  and  valleys  of  Aksi  were  the 

traditional  summer  and  winter  camps  of the  nomadic  Saruu  tribe,  who  are  believed  to 

have come to the region from northern Kyrgyzstan during the seventeenth and eighteenth 

centuries’  Kalmyk  invasion.  Even  though  the  contemporary  members  of this  tribe  have 

become  settled  between  1930s  and  1950s,  people  still  remember  their  ancestors’ 

traditional  homeland which they refer to  it  as  “ata konush,”  i.e.,  ancestral  camp.  During

'3 0


summer time, some uruks,  who live in their permanent houses in towns and villages, get 

together  and  go  to  their  ata  konush  where  they  organize  a  traditional  feast/party  called 



sherine.  They  spend  their  time  remembering  their  ancestors,  singing,  and  enjoying  the 

traditional foods made from sheep and the koumiss.

This mountainous region of Aksi is also a home for many mazars, Muslim saints’ 

tombs  such  as  Safed-Bulan,  Padisha-Ata,  Iman-Ata,  and  other  sacred  places  like 

Baybulak-Ata,  Shudiigbr-Ata  etc.,  which  bear  historical  and  contemporary  significance. 

The poet Jengijok also mentions these places in his poem. The existence of these mazars 

tells  us  a  lot  about  the  religious  and  cultural  identity  of the  Aksi  people  as  well  as  the 

long history of Islamization and Sufi influence in the region.  (This topic will be discussed 

in more details in Chapter 4).

The history of the establishment of the town of Kizil-Jar (formerly a sovkhoz) is 

directly  connected  with  the  Soviet  policy  of  sedentarization  and  collectivization  of 

Central  Asian  nomads  like  the  Kazakhs,  Kyrgyz,  and  Turkmens  in  the  early  1930’s. 

According  to  local  elders,  including  my  grandparents,  about  fifty  years  ago,  Kizil-Jar 

used to be a desert-like place where only wild thorny bushes grew and lizards and reptiles




Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   38


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling