Copyright 2007


Download 2.95 Mb.

bet9/38
Sana12.11.2017
Hajmi2.95 Mb.
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   ...   38

Chapter III: 

Dynamics of Identity Formation among the Kyrgyz and Uzbeks: 

Legacies of Nomadic-Sedentary Differences 

Introduction

Having  provided  the  above  information  about  the  ethnic  composition  and  the 

socio-economic history of the town of Kizil-Jar, we can now talk about the dynamics and 

processes  of  identity  formation  in  the  formerly  nomadic  Kyrgyz  and  sedentary  Uzbek 

societies,  who  are  the  main  ethnic  groups  living  the  Ferghana  Valley.  We  need  to  ask: 

What  role  did  historical  nomad  and  sedentary  interaction  play  in  creating  and  fostering 

ethnic boundaries between the two peoples? What were and  are  some of the main  socio­

cultural  and  psychological  factors  that  kept  and  still  keep  the  two  ethnic  groups  apart? 

Are  these  factors  indeed  a  side  effect  of  their  pre-Soviet  religious  and  socio-cultural 

values and traditions, which are in turn rooted in the two distinct lifestyles they led in the 

past? Or is this division the legacy of the seventy-year rule of the Soviet system, which is 

said  to  have  artificially  created  heterogeneous  nation  states  out  of  the  homogeneous 

region  called  Turkistan  by  granting  each  ethnic  group  a  separate  national  territory, 

identity,  literary  language/alphabet,  national  dress,  and  national  elite?  Or  could  this 

ethno-cultural  division  be  the  legacy  of  both  pre-Soviet,  historical  nomadic-sedentary 

interaction and the Soviet political  system? Even though the  Soviet indigenization policy 

played a major role in dividing ethnic groups, I argue that prior to Soviet territorialization 

and  indigenization,  an  “unofficial”  ethno-cultural  division  existed  on  a  local  or  popular 

level between the nomadic Kyrgyz (or tribal groups) and sedentary Uzbeks/Sarts.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



88

As  a  result  of  Soviet  nationality  policy  in  the  1920’s,  today  there  exist  clearly 

marked  nation  states  such  as  Kyrgyzstan,  Uzbekistan,  Kazakhstan,  etc.,  and  clearly 

demarcated ethno-national  groups, such as the Kyrgyz, Kazakhs, and Uzbeks.  In contrast 

to  simple-minded  interpretations  of  ethnicity  as  a  totally  modem  phenomenon,  in  fact 

there  have  been  cultural,  ecological,  and  political  boundaries  between  sedentary  and 

nomadic Turks for a long time; the modem process of ethno genesis has to be understood 

as  starting from a situation in which there were  already boundaries  and those boundaries 

were  further  strengthened  by  Soviet  indigenization  policy  which  granted  titular  ethnic 

groups  a separate  national  territory,  alphabet,  school  system,  and language by codifying 

the Turkic  dialects  into  separate  languages.  Despite the fact that various Turkic  speaking 

peoples of Central Asia share a common history, culture, and root language, people living 

in each independent republic today are very self-conscious about their national identity as 

Kyrgyz, Kazakhs, Uzbeks, Turkmens, and Tajiks.

Soviet  nationality  policy  played  a  key  role  in  hardening  the  national/ethnic 

identities  among  the  Turkic  peoples  of Central  Asia.  The  creation  of national  or  ethnic 

identity  is  a  result  of the  official  indigenization  policies  of larger  multi-ethnic  states  or 

empires  such  as  the  Soviet  Union  and  China.  Both  of  them  had  and  still  have  many 

minority ethnic  groups living in their territory.  It  is usually the  titular nation that tries to 

legitimize its power over the rest by presenting itself as  an “elder brother.” For example, 

together  with  many  other  minority  ethnic  groups  living  in  the  People’s  Republic  of 

China,  the  Inner  Mongols  have  been  the  subjects  of  the  Chinese  official  policy  of

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.


89

minzufication.  40  According  to  Almaz  Khan,  China  portrays  herself  as  a  modem  and 

highly civilized Han-Chinese nation.  Almaz Khan also maintains that national identity as 

a  Mongol  previously  was  not  that  important,  but  it  was  revived  after  the  Cultural 

Revolution of the  I960’s.  It is argued that political events during the Cultural Revolution 

resulted  in  the  emergence  of national  or ethnic  Inner Mongol  identity  vis-a-vis  the  Han- 

Chinese. 41



Nomadic-Sedentary Interaction in Eurasia

Historically,  the  region  of  Eurasia  was  the  homeland  of  various  Turkic  and

Mongol peoples and their states and empires.  Since the ancient times of nomad-sedentary 

interaction  in  Eurasia,  the  Turco-Mongol  nomads  have  played  a  vital  role  in  the  socio­

economic  and  political  history  of that  part  of the  world.  Eurasian  nomadic  empires  and 

peoples  have  not  lived  in  isolation,  but  have  interacted  with  the  sedentary  world  for 

thousands of years.  As  a result of their close interactions, they adopted or integrated into 

their  own  cultures  different  religious  beliefs  and  practices  of  sedentary  cultures  and 

religions  such  as  Buddhism,  Nestorian-Christianity,  Manicheism,  and  Islam.  Moreover, 

merchants and travelers from East and West traveled along the  Silk Road,  going through 

the  vast  territories  of  Eurasia  inhabited  by  the  Turco-Mongol  nomadic  peoples.  This 

resulted in  trade  and cultural  exchanges  the  between  sedentary  and nomadic  worlds.  By 

the  20th  century,  traditional  pastoral  nomadism  and  these  powerful  nomadic  empires  — 

which  existed  for  more  than  two  thousand  years  —  were  gone.  After  the  Soviet



40 Han Almaz X,. Split Identities: Making Minzu/Ethnic Subjects in Inner Mongolia,  P eople’s Republic o f 

China (Doctoral Dissertation).  University o f Washington,  1999.

41  Ibid., pp.  2-5.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



90

occupation of Central Asia, the nomadic Kazakhs  and Kyrgyz had no choice but to leave 

their jayloos  (pasturelands),  give  up  their  livestock,  become  settled,  and  integrate  into 

sedentary Russian/Soviet culture;  however, the historical, political, economic,  and socio­

cultural interactions between the two worlds left unique socio-cultural legacies among the 

Central Asian Turkic nomads, especially among the Kazakhs and the Kyrgyz.

Despite their different  socio-economic  organizations  and lifestyles,  sedentary and 

nomadic,  Uzbeks  and Kyrgyz  share  a common Turkic language, pre-Islamic  and Islamic 

religious beliefs  and practices,  and  sedentary/agricultural  life.  Historical  socio-economic 

lifestyle  divisions  between  the  nomadic  Kyrgyz  and  sedentary  Uzbeks  in  the  Ferghana 

Valley have vanished.  All rural Kyrgyz, except some herder families, live a sedentary life 

in  permanent brick  and  mud  houses  all  year round,  and  largely  practice  agriculture  like 

the  Uzbeks.  But  despite  their  common  linguistic,  historical,  and  cultural  heritage,  both 

ethnic  groups  demonstrate  strong  sentiments  of  separate  self  and  national  identity.  For 

various  reasons,  which  I  explore  in  my  research,  the  two  peoples  have  certain 

“prejudices” towards  each other’s  socio-cultural  values,  such that intermarriage between 

the two groups rarely takes place.  The  Kyrgyz  consider it almost  a disgrace  if a Kyrgyz 

girl  marries  an  Uzbek  man  and  many  Uzbeks  feel  the  same  about  a  Kyrgyz  man  or  an 

Uzbek girl.

The  8th century A.D.  Orkhon-Turkic  inscriptions written  on  stones  in  Old Turkic 

are  the  best  proof  for  the  above  argument.  Bilge  Qagan,  ruler  of  the  Turkic  Empire, 

which existed between  552-744 A.D in Inner Asia, erected  an eternal  stone honoring his 

brother  Kultegin  Qagan.  The  Kultegin  inscription,  which  reflects  the  style  of  an  oral 

traditional  epic,  is  full  of patriotic  feelings.  Bilge  Qagan  is  desperate  to  save  his  people

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.


91

and  empire  from  the  Chinese  with  whom  they  closely  interacted.  Since  the  text  of the 

inscription  is  too  long  to  cite  here,  I  will  select  only  those  passages  which  reflect  the 

“nationalistic”  sentiments  of Bilge  Qagan  towards  his  “Turk people.”  On  the  south  side 

of the  stone, he begins his words by addressing his brothers,  sons,  family, people, nobles 

and  military  commanders,  and  asks  them  to  listen  to  his  words  carefully.  Then  he  talks 

about  his  campaigns  against  other  people  and  places  by  naming  all  the  geographical 

names.  He  gives  messages  and  advice  to  his  Turk  people.  Among  all  the  places,  Bilge 



qagan  singles  out  the  Otiken  Mountain-Forest  from  where  he  ruled  his  Empire,  and  he 

warns  his  people  not  to  go  far  from  the  Otuken  Mountain-Forest,  lest  be  destroyed  by 

their enemies:

The  words  of the  Chinese  people  are  sweet  and  the  silk  of the  Chinese 

people  is  soft.  They attract remote peoples,  luring them with  sweet words 

and soft  silk.  When the Chinese  have  settled remote peoples  nearby,  they 

devise  schemes to create  discontent there.  Good wise men and good brave 

men are prevented from moving about freely.  If a man turns against them, 

they  show  no  mercy  towards  his  family,  his  people  nor  even  towards 

babies  in  the  cradle.  In  this  way,  enticed by the  sweet words  and  the  soft 

silk of the Chinese, many of you Turk people have perished 

42

This  message  of Bilge  Qagan  clearly  demonstrates  the  fact the  Turk people  had  already



developed  their  “national”  self-consciousness  in  the  8th  century  C.E.  Bilge  Qagan  has  a

clear idea about the mentality or character of the Chinese people, who were sedentary. He

definitely knew and his Turk people probably also knew about the territorial and cultural

boundaries that existed between the Turks and the Chinese.

On  the  east  side  of the  memorial  stone,  Bilge  Qagan  talks  about  his  ancestors,

Bumin Qagan and Istemi Qagan, who created the Turk Empire and codified its traditional



42 “The Kul Tigin Inscription,” translated by Oztopchu Kurutulush and Sherry Smith-Williams.  In: 

Anthology o f Turkish Literature. Edited by Kemal Silay.  Bloomington, Indiana: Turkish Studies and 

Ministry o f Culture o f Joint Series XV,  1996, p. 2.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



92

laws.  He  very  much  regrets  the  fact  that  after  the  death  of  his  ancestors,  many  Turk

nobles were deceived by the Chinese:

Their sons,  destined to be nobles, became  slaves  of the  Chinese,  and their 

daughters,  destined  to  become  ladies,  became  chattels  of  the  Chinese 

people. The Turk nobles gave up their Turk titles and, inclining toward the 

Chinese,  took  Chinese  titles,  became  subjects  of the  Chinese  qagan,  and 

gave him their service for fifty years.. . .  43

Thus all the Turk common folk said:  “We were a people with an enemy of 

our own;  where  is our enemy now?”  “For whom are we  conquering these 

lands?” they said.  “We were people with a qagan of our own;  where is our

qagan now?” “To what qagan are we giving our service?” they said.........

Then the Turk Heaven above  and the Turk Holy Earth and Water acted in 

this way:  So that the Turk people would not perish, so that the Turk people 

would be  united,  the  gods  on  high elevated  my  father  Ilterish  qagan  and 

my  mother  Ilbilge  qatun.  Thereupon  my  father  the  qagan  set  out  with

44

seventeen men........

“We  settled the Turk people  and  organized them in the  west  as  far as  the 

Kengu  Tarman.  At  that  time,  slaves  became  the  owners  of  slaves  and 

chattel became owners of chattels. That was how our empire was won and 

our tribal laws reestablished 

45

So that the name  and reputation of the people whom our father and uncle 



had  conquered  would  not  cease  to  exist,  and  for  the  sake  of  our  Turk 

people, I spent nights without sleeping and days without resting.. .   ,46

These eloquent words  of a Turk qagan  from the  8th century reflect strong  self-conscious

nationalistic feelings about the Turk people.  As mentioned earlier, it is quite possible that

the  Chinese  accepted  those  Turks  —  who,  as  Bilge  Qagan  mentions,  learned  Chinese

ideograms  —  into  their  community  without  feeling  that  they  were  nationally  distinct.

However, it is clear that the Turks felt strongly about who they were and how important it

was  for  them  to  keep  their  identity  separate  from  the  Chinese  people  for  the  above

reasons that Bilge Qagan mentions.

43

45

Ibid., p. 4.

' Op.cit. 

Ibid., p. 5.

’ Ibid., p.  6.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



93

“The Nomadic Factor” in Kyrgyz Identity

I believe that originally, the Kyrgyz—or the Eurasian nomads in general — did not 

call  themselves  “nomads,”  nor  describe  their  lifestyle  and  culture  as  being  “nomadic,” 

since  the  boz  iiy,  yurt,47  was  both  their  permanent  and  portable  dwelling,  whereas  the 

mountains  and  pastures  were  their  homeland.  They  have  the  word  “koch,”  which,  as  a 

verb means  to  “to move”  and  as  a noun means  “migration.”  However,  there is no  native 

Kyrgyz/Turkic  word for  “nomad.”  It  is  most  likely  that  it was  their sedentary  neighbors 

the  Persians,  Tajiks  and later Uzbeks  who  created  the  second noun,  “nomad” by  adding 

the  Persian  suffix  “man”  to  the  Kyrgyz  noun  “koch.”  So,  together  “kochman” 

(“kochmon”  in  Kyrgyz,  “koshpend'f”  in  Kazakh)  means  a  “nomad.”  I believe  that  once 

the Kyrgyz became fully sedentary,  they started to use the word kochmon,  meaning both 

nomad  and  nomadic  to  refer  to  their  traditional  culture  and  lifestyle.  Upon  adopting  a 

sedentary  life,  they  estranged  the  nomadic  life  from  themselves  and  started  to  look  at 

their past  history and life  style  from  a  sedentary point of view.  Russians used the native 

Turkic  word “koch”  and added the Russian  suffixes  “evnik”  and “voy” to make it into  a 

noun and adjective forms: “kochevnik” for nomad and “kochevoy” for nomadic.

Another  interesting  point  to  be  made  is  about  the  connection  between  modem 

Kyrgyz identity and their nomadic past. For instance, even though the majority of Kyrgyz 

living  in  the  countryside—including  my  hometown  of  Kizil-Jar—have  been  living  a 

sedentary life  for more than  a half-century,  they live  sedentary in form  (i.e.,  they live  in



47 Westerners, including Russians, use a misinformed term for the dwelling o f the Central Asian nomads. 

Yurt is a Turkic  word which means the homeland, as well as the trace of ground  where the “yurt” is 

erected.  Central Asian nomads—including Mongols,  Kazakhs,  Kyrgyz, Tuvans and Turkmens—all have 

different names for their yurt.  The Kyrgyz call it boz iiy (gray house), gray referring to the color o f the felt 

covering.  The Mongols call it a “ger” which closely relates to the Kyrgyz word “kerege” i.e.,  the 

collapsible  wooden frame of the yurt.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



94

permanent  houses  and  practice  agriculture),  but  nomadic  in  content  (they  practice  and 

cherish  nomadic  customs  and  values  in  their  family  and  social  relationships,  feasting, 

cooking,  and  eating).  Most  interestingly,  in  identifying  themselves  or  in  creating  their 

image  as  Kyrgyz,  the  neighboring  Uzbeks  and  their  sedentary  culture  used  to  play  and 

still do play an important role.  In other words, “ethnic identity has a great deal to do with 

the  way  peoples  adapt,  especially  to  their  socio-political  environment,  that  is,  to  other 

peoples.”48

We  know  from  historical  nomad-sedentary  interaction  in  Eurasia  that  nomads 

traditionally  looked  down  on  sedentary peoples  and  their cultures,  and  in  the  same  way 

sedentary  people  looked  down  on  nomadic  peoples.  The  popular  saying  among  the 

Kazakhs  and  Kyrgyz  “Ozbek  oz  agam,  sart  sadagam,”  “An  Uzbek  is  my  own 

brother/kinsman, but a Sart is just my pocket change” attests to the fact that the nomadic 

Kazakhs  and  Kyrgyz  made  a  distinction  between  Uzbeks,  who  were  nomads  originally, 

and  Sarts,  who were the  original  inhabitants  of Central  Asia and  they primarily engaged 

in farming and trading. Later, when all Uzbeks adopted sedentary life and Islamic culture, 

intermarried with the local Sart/Tajik population and engaged themselves in farming  and 

trading,  the  Kyrgyz  and  Kazakhs,  who  were  still  leading  their  nomadic  life,  began 

identifying  them  as  Sarts.  Today,  the  term  Sart  carries  derogatory  connotation  and  it  is 

very offensive to call Uzbeks Sart.



48 Lehman. F. K.  “Who Are the  Karen, and If So, Why?  Karen Ethnohistory and a Formal Theory o f 

Ethnicity,” In: Ethnic Adaptation and Identity:  The Karen on the Thai Frontier with Burma. Edited by 

Charles Keyes, Philadelphia:  Institute for the Study o f Human Issues,  1979, p. 215.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



95

In his book titled  The Perilous Frontier: Nomadic Empires and China,49 Thomas 

Barfield  writes  about  the  historical  interaction between  various  nomadic  Turkic/Mongol 

empires  and sedentary Chinese dynasties.  He  questions why the Turko-Mongol  nomadic 

peoples  interacted with the Chinese  agrarian  state  for more than two thousand  years  and 

yet did not become politically incorporated by it nor adopt its culture.50 Barfield discusses 

some  fundamental  issues  of  the  socio-political  relationship  between  various 

Turko/Mongol  nomadic  empires  of the  steppe  and  different  Chinese  imperial  dynasties, 

and identifies  some  of the  major causes underlying the  Chinese/nomadic  conflict,  which 

lasted  for  more  than  two  millennia.  Confucian  scholars  wrote  mainly  negative  things 

about the nomads, whom they viewed as uncivilized barbarians. The relationship between 

the  nomadic  states  and  the  sedentary  Chinese  dynasties  is  illuminated  by  a  Kyrgyz 

expression  which  can  be  used  to  describe  two  peoples  as  “Kaynasa  kani  koshulbas 

(el/dushman),”  “Even  if you  boil  it,  blood  (i.e.  of enemies/certain  people)  won’t  mix.” 

Although the saying does not apply directly to the nomadic peoples’  relationship with the 

Chinese,  it  gives  a  clear  depiction  of the  nature  of  the  relationship  between  these  two 

linguistically  and  culturally  distinct  peoples.  Barfield  also  states:  “These  horse-riding 

nomads not only rejected Chinese culture and ideology, worse, they obstinately refused to 

see any value in it except in terms of the material goods the Chinese could offer.”51

In Nationalism and Hybridity in Mongolia,52 Inner Mongol anthropologist Uradyn 

Bulag  examines the  identity  and  nationalism of contemporary Mongols.  He  is critical  of

49 Barfield, Thomas.  The Perilous Frontier: Nomadic Empires and China,  221 BC  to AD 1757.  Cambridge. 

Mass.:  B. Blackwell,  1989.

50 Ibid., p.  2.

51  Op.cit.

52 Bulag, Uradyn. Nationalism and Hybridity in Mongolia.  Oxford: Clarendon Press; New York: Oxford 

University Press,  1998.

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.



96

the  “nationalism”  of  Halh  [Khalka]  Mongols  living  in  Outer  Mongolia.  During  his 

research in Outer Mongolia in the  mid  1990’s, Bulag had  a negative experience with his 

“relatives,”  Halh  Mongols  who  did  not  treat  him  well  because  he  was  from  Inner 

Mongolia where  Chinese  influence  is  strong.  Although Bulag  spoke  Mongolian,  he  was 

not  considered  a  real  Mongol  by  the  Halh  Mongols,  for  he  spoke  Mongolian  with  a 

Chinese  accent  and  had  adopted  some  of the  Chinese  “mentality”  or  manners.  Also,  he 

doesn’t mention this, but he was there with a Chinese wife.  Inner Mongols were believed 

to  have  lost  their  gene  pool  because  they  mixed  with  Chinese.  Bulag  was  accused  of 

being  a  “half  breed”  Chinese  who  does  not  know  real  Mongol  culture.  Bulag  tries  to 

understand  this  quite  “arrogant”  nature  of Mongol  identity.  He  believes  it  is  based  on 

their  previous  nomadic  heritage  and  their  historical  interaction  with  sedentary  Chinese 

peasant culture. The stereotypical Mongol image of a Chinese merchant is a person riding 

on a small donkey carrying bags.  So,  the Mongols call the Chinese  “sly donkeys,” while 

the  Chinese  call  the  Mongols  “stupid  cows.”  Thus,  according  to  the  author,  the  two 

peoples’  views are deeply embedded in their modes of production, which played a major 

role  in  creating  their  separate  social  identities  as  nomadic  pastoralists  and  sedentary 

farmers.


The  author  also  tries  to  understand  the  distinct  features  of  two  societies  by 

analyzing their attitudes towards food.  Since nomadic Mongol’s diet was  and still is to  a 

certain  extent based on  animal  husbandry,  Mongols  value meat and diary products  more 

than vegetables.  Mongols  do not want to  eat  vegetables  grown by Chinese  farmers  who 

use human excreta as fertilizer.  In the Mongol view, human excreta is untouchable and its

Reproduced  with  permission  of the  copyright  owner.  Further reproduction  prohibited without  permission.




Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   ...   38


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling